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Encyclopedia > Arnor
Arnor
Part of the The Lord of the Rings
Sundering of the North
Arthedain  · Cardolan  · Rhudaur
Places
Annúminas  · Fornost  · Tharbad
Weathertop  · Bree  · The Shire
Minhiriath  · Tower of Amon Sûl
Important Kings
Elendil the Faithful  · Isildur
Eärendur  · Amlaith of Fornost
Argeleb I  · Arvedui
People
Dúnedain  · Middle Men  · Hobbits
Dunlendings
Miscellaneous
Malbeth the Seer  · Reunited Kingdom
Rangers of the North
Related topics
Gondor  · Rohan  · The Shire
Mordor  · Angmar  · Númenor

Reunited Kingdom Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... location of Arthedain in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arthedain was one of the three kingdoms of Middle-earth that resulted from the breakup of Arnor during the Third Age. ... Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... Rhudaur is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkien universe of Middle-earth. ... Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... Cardolan is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... This article is about the novel. ... location of Arthedain in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arthedain was one of the three kingdoms of Middle-earth that resulted from the breakup of Arnor during the Third Age. ... Cardolan is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Rhudaur is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkien universe of Middle-earth. ... In the legendarium of J. R. R. Tolkien, Annúminas (Sindarin: West Tower or Sunset Tower) is a city of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Fornost Erain (Sindarin Northern-fortress of the Kings from for(n) (north) + ost (fortress); Norbury of the Kings in Westron) was a city of Eriador in the north of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Tharbad was a city on the southern edge of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Weathertop (Sindarin Amon Sûl, Hill of Wind) is a significant hill in the Eriador region of Middle-earth, the southernmost and highest summit of the Weather Hills. ... Bree is a fictional village in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, east of the Shire and south of Fornost Erain. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... Location of Minhiriath in Middle-earth In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Minhiriath is a region of Middle-earth. ... The Tower of Amon Sûl in Peter Jacksons The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ... This is a list of kings of Arnor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Eärendur is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Amlaith is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Argeleb I is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Arvedui is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were a fictional race of Men descended from the Númenóreans that survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth, led by Elendil and his sons, Isildur and Anárion. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Middle Men was a term used by the Númenóreans for Men of Middle-earth who were related to the Edain, the ancestors of the Númenóreans themselves. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... Dunland is a fictional land from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth: the land of the Dunlendings. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikiquote. ... Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkien’s legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Rohan (disambiguation). ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... location of Angmar in Middle-earth marked in red Angmar (Sindarin: Iron-home) is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...

Other elements of The Lord of the Rings
House of Isildur  · House of Anárion
Gondor

In the fictional legendarium of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. The name probably means "Land of the King", from Sindarin Ara- (high, kingly) + (n)dor (land). In the liteary works of JRR Tolkien, the House of Isildur was the Royal House of Arnor and after the sundering of the North-Kingdom of Arthedain, Cardolan, and Rhudaur. ... In the literary works of JRR Tolkien the House of Anárion was the Royal House of Gondor, descended from Anárion, joint first King of Gondor with his elder brother Isildur who went north to Arnor. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Dúnedain (singular: Dúnadan) were a fictional race of Men descended from the Númenóreans that survived the fall of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth, led by Elendil and his sons, Isildur and Anárion. ... Eriador (the Lone Lands) is a large region in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


At its greatest, Arnor encompassed almost the whole region of Eriador between Bruinen, Gwathló and Lhûn, and the region which would later be known as the Shire. Arnor's population was composed by Dúnedain in western-central regions and mixed or indigenous (and reluctant as citizens) peoples. Its capital was Annúminas near the lake Nenuial. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the river Bruinen or Loudwater is a river which appears in The Hobbit as well as The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the river Gwathló or Greyflood is a river in middle Eriador. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the river Lhûn or Lune was a river of north-western Eriador. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... In the legendarium of J. R. R. Tolkien, Annúminas (Sindarin: West Tower or Sunset Tower) is a city of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Lake Evendim or Nenuial is a lake of Middle-earth. ...

Contents

History

Arnor was founded at the end of the Second Age (S.A. 3320) by Elendil, whose sons Isildur and Anarion founded Gondor at the same time. The history of the two kingdoms is intertwined; both kingdoms are known as the Realms of the Dúnedain in Exile. The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


Before the foundation of Arnor there was already a sizable Númenórean population living there, a result of the slow emigration of Númenóreans which had started under Tar-Meneldur and especially Tar-Aldarion. Before the arrival of the Dúnedain Arnor was home to Middle Men of Edain stock, and the early colonists soon interbred with the indigenous population. Arnor was originally favoured over the more southern regions (Gondor) because the Elves under Gil-galad lived near it across the river Lhûn. However, in later days after the Númenóreans fell under Sauron's shadow they settled more to the south in portcities like Pelargir and Umbar. This led to a situation where Elendil arrived in an area populated by people who, unlike his own Númenóreans, were mainly still friends with the Elves, and unlike Gondor to the south in Arnor much knowledge of the Elder Days was preserved. Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Tar-Meneldur (S.A. 543–942, reigned S.A. 740–883) is a fictional character in the legendarium by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Tar-Aldarion (700–1098 S.A., reigned 883–1075 S.A.) is a character from J.R.R Tolkiens fantasy-fictional prehistory of the world. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Middle Men was a term used by the Númenóreans for Men of Middle-earth who were related to the Edain, the ancestors of the Númenóreans themselves. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Edain were those Men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Ereinion Gil-galad was the son of Orodreth,[1] and his mother was a Sindarin Elf. ... This article is about a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings. ...


Arnor's second king Isildur (also King of Gondor) was killed in T.A. 2 by Orcs in the disastrous Battle of the Gladden Fields. His three eldest sons, among them Elendur that could have been the most magnificant ruler of the dúnedain exiles, were killed with him, but the fourth and youngest, Valandil, survived and became king of Arnor (T.A. 2 or 10?). In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... The Gladden Fields (Sindarin Loeg Ningloron) is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Valandil was a king of Arnor in Middle-earth, ruling from 2 T.A. to 249 T.A. He was the fourth son of Isildur; his elder brothers were killed by Orcs at the Gladden Fields along with their father. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ...


Because Valandil and his heirs did not claim the throne of Gondor the realms were split, but Arnor's ruler kept the title High King, whereas in the south the ruler was 'just' King.


Decline

With the victory of the War of the Last Alliance, Arnor's power reached its zenith. The King of Arnor held the overlordship of all the land between the Ered Luin and the River Poros on the southern borders of Ithilien, east to the eastern borders of Mordor. After the Disaster of the Gladden Fields, Arnor began its slow decline. In many ways, Arnor never truly recovered from this disastrous blow to its manpower: While the dawn of the Third Age heralded a new era of opportunity and expansion for Gondor, Arnor began it in a futile attempt to simply recover lost strength. The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Combatants Army of Arnor Unknown number of Orcs Commanders Isildur, (High-King of Arnor and Gondor) Elendur (Heir to the Throne) Uruks of Mordor Strength 200 Knights and Soldiers less than 20 archers Unknown Casualties Isildur Elendur Aratan Ciryon 217 men of Arnor Serious casualties The Disater of the Gladden...


Civil war and successor states

After the death of its tenth king, Eärendur, in T.A. 861, Arnor was shaken by civil war between the three sons of Eärendur. The eldest son, Amlaith, claimed Kingship over all Arnor but was reduced to only ruling the region of Arthedain as his kingdom, while the other sons founded the kingdoms of Cardolan and Rhudaur. The former capital, Annúminas, became depopulated and fell into ruin. Eärendur is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... Amlaith is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... location of Arthedain in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arthedain was one of the three kingdoms of Middle-earth that resulted from the breakup of Arnor during the Third Age. ... Cardolan is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Rhudaur is a fictional country from J. R. R. Tolkien universe of Middle-earth. ...


This marked the start of the decline of the Northern Dúnedain. The three kingdoms had frequent border skirmishes over boundary disputes, but the relationship of Arthedain and Cardolan remained relatively peaceful. However, Rhudaur was unfriendly towards the two other successor states, and took part in a bitter conflict with Cardolan over the tower of Amon Sûl and the palantír associated with the tower.


Around T.A. 1300, an evil power, the Witch-king, arose in the mountains of the North East, where he founded Angmar. It was later revealed he was the leader of the Nazgûl, who were dispersed after the first overthrow of Sauron in S.A. 3434 at the hands of the Last Alliance of Elves and Men, but survived nonetheless. For other uses, see The Third Age. ... The Witch-king Angmar is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, the chief of the Ringwraiths of Middle-earth. ... location of Angmar in Middle-earth marked in red Angmar (Sindarin: Iron-home) is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Combatants Mordor and allies Lindon, Gondor, Arnor and allies Commanders Sauron Gil-galad and Elendil Strength The Hosts of Mordor: Many Orc-hosts. ...


Fall

The last Kings of Rhudaur were not of Númenórean blood, but were descended of Men in service of Angmar. Under their rule the land became a vassal of Angmar, and thus enemies of Cardolan and Arthedain (the two remaining kingdoms). Angmar annexed and terminated the kingdom in T.A. 1409. By this time the Dúnedain were gone from the region, as well as most of the other inhabitants. Constant battle with Angmar began to wear down the forces of Arthedain, while Cardolan as a political entity came to an end shortly after 1409. Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ...


In theory Arthedain became Arnor with the end of Cardolan and Rhudaur, but the Kingdom was a poor reflection of the large and powerful realm of Arnor before 861. Arthedain was destroyed in 1974, culminating in the pyrrhic victory of the Battle of Fornost. A coalition of Elves, the forces of Gondor and the remainder of Arnor's armies destroyed Angmar and freed Fornost. The population of Arnor were mostly wiped out by the wars, but the Hobbits survived in the Shire, men survived in Bree and probably other villages, and the Dúnedain of Arnor created new homes in the Angle south of Rivendell, where some of them became known as the Rangers of the North. With the help of the Elves, those people remained hidden from the rest of Middle-earth, and became an isolated, wandering people. For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... Bree is a fictional village in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, east of the Shire and south of Fornost Erain. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkien’s legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ...


Reunited Kingdom

Aragorn II as King Elessar refounded the Kingdom of Arnor as part of the Reunited Kingdom, and again made Annúminas his capital city. After the fall of Sauron, Arnor was safe again for human population, and although it remained less populated than Gondor to the south in time Arnor became a more densely populated area again, even if it had dwindled in size due to the independence of the Shire. Promotional poster featuring Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn in New Line Cinemas motion pictures directed by Peter Jackson. ... Promotional poster featuring Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn in New Line Cinemas motion pictures directed by Peter Jackson. ... Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ...


See also

Middle-earth Portal

Image File history File links Arda. ... This is a list of kings of Arnor from the fictional universe of Middle-earth novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

External links

  • Complete Chronology of Arnor and Gondor


  Results from FactBites:
 
Arnor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (583 words)
In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth.
Arnor's second king Isildur (also King of Gondor) was killed in T.A. 2 by Orcs in the disastrous Battle of the Gladden Fields.
The people of Arnor were mostly wiped out by the wars, but the Hobbits survived in the Shire, men survived in Bree and probably other villages, and the Dúnedain of Arnor created new homes in the Angle south of Rivendell, where some of them became known as the Rangers of the North.
Kings of Arnor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (233 words)
The Kings of Arnor through Amandil claimed descent from the Lords of Andúnië, and from there to Silmariën and the Kings of Númenor.
After Eärendur the realm of Arnor was split between his three sons, founding the realms of Arthedain, Cardolan and Rhudaur: the elder line of Kings continued with the Kings of Arthedain.
Argeleb, 7th King of Arthedain, is thus referred to as the 17th of the Kings of Arnor, and Arvedui was the 25th and last King of the Northern Line.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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