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Encyclopedia > Arnold Bennett
Arnold Bennett, British novelist
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Arnold Bennett, British novelist

Enoch Arnold Bennett (May 27, 1867-March 27, 1931) was a British novelist. Download high resolution version (1391x2270, 476 KB)Arnold Bennett - Project Gutenberg etext 13635 - http://www. ... Download high resolution version (1391x2270, 476 KB)Arnold Bennett - Project Gutenberg etext 13635 - http://www. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ...

Contents

Life

Bennett was born in a modest house in Hanley in the Potteries district of Staffordshire. Hanley is one of a conurbation of six towns which joined together at the beginning of the twentieth century as Stoke-on-Trent. Enoch Bennett, his father, qualified as a solicitor in 1876, and the family were able to move to a larger house between Hanley and Burslem. The younger Bennett was educated locally in Newcastle-under-Lyme. Map sources for Hanley at grid reference SJ8847 Disambiguation: Hanley may refer to Hanley, Canada. ... The Potteries or Stoke is a well-recognised name for the area in Staffordshire, England which includes the city of Stoke-on-Trent and its surrounding towns of Newcastle-under-Lyme and Kidsgrove. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The town of Burslem known as the Mother Town is one of those that make up the city of Stoke-on-Trent, in the ceremonial county of Staffordshire, in the Midlands of England. ... Newcastle-under-Lyme, known simply as castle to many local people, is a busy market town in Staffordshire, England, not to be confused with the larger city of Newcastle upon Tyne. ...


At age 21 Arnold, who worked as a rent collector, left his father's practice and went to London as a solicitor's clerk. He won a literary competition in Tit Bits magazine in 1889 and was encouraged to take up journalism full time. In 1894 he became assistant editor of the periodical Woman. He noticed that the material offered by a syndicate to the magazine was not very good, so he wrote a serial which was bought by the syndicate for 75 pounds. He then wrote another. This became The Grand Babylon Hotel. Just over four years later his first novel A Man from the North was published to critical acclaim and he became editor to the magazine. London (pronounced ) is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom. ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


From 1900 he devoted himself full time to writing, giving up the editorship and writing much serious criticism, and also theatre journalism, one of his special interests. He moved to Trinity Hall Farm, Hockliffe, Bedfordshire on the Watling Street which was the inspiration for his novel Teresa of Watling Street which came out in 1904. His father Enoch Bennett died there in 1902, and he is buried in Chalgrove churchyard. In 1902 Anna of the Five Towns, the first of a succession of stories which detailed life in the Potteries, appeared. 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1903 he moved to Paris, where other great artists from around the world had converged on Montmartre and Montparnasse. Bennett spent the next eight years writing novels and plays. In 1908 The Old Wives' Tale was published, and was an immediate success throughout the English-speaking world. After a visit to America in 1911 where he had been publicised and acclaimed as no other visiting writer since Dickens, he returned to England where the Old Wives' Tale was reappraised and hailed as a masterpiece. During the First World War, he became Director of Propaganda at the War Ministry. He refused a knighthood in 1918. In 1926 at the suggestion of Lord Beaverbrook, he began writing an influential weekly article on books for the Evening Standard newspaper. 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...   City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land area... Montmartre seen from the centre Georges Pompidou (1897), a painting by Camille Pissarro of the boulevard that led to Montmartre as seen from his hotel room. ... The Montparnasse Tower, which at 209m was the tallest building in Western Europe when it was built. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Dickens redirects here. ... Combatants Allied Powers: France Italy Russia Serbia United Kingdom United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul von Hindenburg Reinhard... An Australian anti-conscription propaganda poster from World War One Propaganda is a specific type of message presentation directly aimed at influencing the opinions or behaviour of people, rather than impartially providing information. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sir William Maxwell Max Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook (May 25, 1879 - June 9, 1964) was a Canadian–British business tycoon and politician. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is an English tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas. ...


He separated from his French wife in 1922 but fell in love with the actress Dorothy Cheston, with whom he remained until his death from typhoid in 1931. His ashes are buried in Burslem cemetery. Their daughter Virginia Eldin lived in France and was president of the Arnold Bennett Society. 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... The town of Burslem known as the Mother Town is one of those that make up the city of Stoke-on-Trent, in the ceremonial county of Staffordshire, in the Midlands of England. ...


Work

His most famous works are the Clayhanger trilogy and The Old Wives' Tale. These books draw on his experience of life in the Potteries, as did most of his best work. In his novels the Potteries are referred to as "the Five Towns"; Bennett felt that the name was more euphonious than "the Six Towns" so Fenton was omitted. The real towns and their Bennett counterparts are: The Clayhanger Family is a series of novels by Arnold Bennett, published between 1910 to 1918. ... The Old Wives Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1908. ...

The Six Towns of Stoke-on-Trent Bennett's Five Towns
Tunstall Turnhill
Burslem Bursley
Hanley Hanbridge
Stoke Knype
Fenton The 'forgotten town'
Longton Longshaw


Bennett believed that ordinary people had the potential to be the subject of interesting books. In this respect, an influence which Bennett himself acknowledged was the French writer Maupassant whose "Une Vie" inspired "The Old Wives'Tale". Tunstall is an area in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England. ... The town of Burslem known as the Mother Town is one of those that make up the city of Stoke-on-Trent, in the ceremonial county of Staffordshire, in the Midlands of England. ... Map sources for Hanley at grid reference SJ8847 Disambiguation: Hanley may refer to Hanley, Canada. ... The city of Stoke-on-Trent (also known as The Six Towns and The Potteries) is a city in The Midlands, United Kingdom. ... Fenton is one of the eponymous Six Towns of Stoke-on-Trent, situated in the south-east of the city. ... Longton, located in the United Kingdom, is one of the six towns that joined together to form Stoke-on-Trent in 1910. ... Guy de Maupassant. ...


As well as novels, Bennett produced plenty of fine non-fiction work. One of his most popular non-fiction works, which is still read to this day, is the self-help book "How to Live on 24 Hours a Day". Extracts from his published diaries are often quoted in the British press. Bennett also wrote for the stage and the screen.


His novel Buried Alive was made into the 1912 movie "The Great Adventure". Over the years, several of his other books have been made into films (for example The Card starring Alec Guinness) and television mini-series (such as "Anna of the Five Towns" and "Clayhanger"). 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Petula Clark and Alec Guinness in the 1952 film The Card originated as a novel by Arnold Bennett. ... Sir Alec Guinness, CH, CBE (April 2, 1914 – August 5, 2000) was an Oscar-winning English actor who became one of the most versatile and best-loved performers of his generation. ...


Criticism

Critically, Bennett has not always had an easy ride. His output was prodigious and, by his own admission, based on maximising his income rather than from creative necessity.


As Bennett put it:

"Am I to sit still and see other fellows pocketing two guineas apiece for stories which I can do better myself? Not me. If anyone imagines my sole aim is art for art’s sake, they are cruelly deceived."

Contemporary critics (Virginia Woolf in particular) perceived weaknesses in his work, which they partly attributed to this factor. This may have been unfair - did critics search for weakness on the assumption that writing for financial gain must give rise to it? Did they attribute a genuine weakness in Bennett's work to an unrelated factor? Or were they making an unbiased and valid point? It must also be recognised that Bennett represented the "old guard" in literary terms. His style was traditional rather than modern, which made him an obvious target for those challenging literary conventions.[1] [2] Virginia Woolf (née Stephen) (25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) is a British novellist who by reputation is regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. ...


His reputation, for much of the 20th Century, was tainted by this perception, and it was not until the 1990s that a more positive view of his work became widely accepted.


Works

Fiction

  • A Man from the North - 1898
  • The Grand Babylon Hotel - 1902
  • Anna of the Five Towns - 1902
  • The Gates of Wrath - 1903
  • A Great Man - 1904
  • Teresa of Watling Street - 1904
  • Sacred and Profane Love - 1905 (Originally published as The Book of Carlotta)
  • Tales of the Five Towns - 1905 (short story collection)
  • Whom God Hath joined - 1906
  • Hugo - 1906
  • The Grim Smile of the Five Towns - (short stories 1907)
  • Buried Alive - 1908
  • The Old Wives' Tale - 1908
  • The Card - 1910
  • Clayhanger - 1910
  • Helen with a High Hand - 1910 (Serial title: The Miser's Niece)
  • Hilda Lessways - 1911
  • Milestones - play written with E.Knoblock
  • The Matador of the Five Towns - (short stories 1912)
  • The Regent - 1913 (US Title: The Old Adam)
  • These Twain - 1916
  • The Pretty Lady - 1918
  • The Roll-Call - 1918
  • Mr Prohack - 1922
  • Riceyman Steps - 1923
  • The Clayhanger Family - 1925, the complete trilogy consisting of Clayhanger, Hilda Lessways, and These Twain
  • Lord Raingo - 1926
  • The Strange Vanguard - 1928
  • Imperial Palace - 1930
  • Venus Rising from the Sea - 1931

Non-fiction Anna of the Five Towns is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1902 and probably his best-known work. ... Detail Sacred and Profane Love (also called Venus and the Bride) is an oil painting by Titian, painted around 1514. ... Arnold Bennett, British novelist Enoch Arnold Bennett (May 27, 1867-March 27, 1931) was a British novelist. ... The Old Wives Tale is a novel by Arnold Bennett, first published in 1908. ... Petula Clark and Alec Guinness in the 1952 film The Card originated as a novel by Arnold Bennett. ... The Clayhanger Family is a series of novels by Arnold Bennett, published between 1910 to 1918. ... Helen with a High Hand is a short, comedic novel by Arnold Bennett, published in 1910. ... The Clayhanger Family is a series of novels by Arnold Bennett, published between 1910 to 1918. ... The Clayhanger Family is a series of novels by Arnold Bennett, published between 1910 to 1918. ... The Clayhanger Family is a series of novels by Arnold Bennett, published between 1910 to 1918. ... Riceyman Steps- Cover of 1991 Penguin edition Riceyman Steps is the title of a novel by British novelist Arnold Bennett, first published in 1923. ... The Clayhanger Family is a series of novels by Arnold Bennett, published between 1910 to 1918. ...


For further guidance consult Studies in the sources of Arnold Bennett's novels by Louis Tillier (Didier, Paris 1949), and Arnold Bennett and Stoke-on-Trent by E. J. D. Warrilow (Etruscan Publications, 1966). How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, written by Arnold Bennett, is part of a larger work entitled How to Live. ... Those United States, subtitled Impressions of a First Visit, is a book detailing Arnold Bennetts first journey (via a transatlantic steam ship) to the United States of America. ... Those United States, subtitled Impressions of a First Visit, is a book detailing Arnold Bennetts first journey (via a transatlantic steam ship) to the United States of America. ... The book How to Live is a compilation of four of Arnold Bennetts non-fiction works, namely: How to Live on 24 Hours a Day - 1910 The Human Machine - 1925 Mental Efficiency - 1911 Self and Self-Management - 1918 These books themselves were compilations of articles that he wrote as... How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, written by Arnold Bennett, is part of a larger work entitled How to Live. ...


Quote

"In front, on a little hill in the vast valley, was spread out the Indian-red architecture of Bursley - tall chimneys and rounded ovens, schools, the new scarlet market, the high spire of the evangelical church... ...the crimson chapels, and rows of little red houses with amber chimney pots, and the gold angel of the Town Hall topping the whole. The sedate reddish browns and reds of the composition all netted in flowing scarves of smoke, harmonised exquisitely with the chill blues of the chequered sky. Beauty was achieved, and none saw it".


Clayhanger (1910)


Notes

  1. ^ Seminar - "Mr Bennett and Mrs. Brown"
  2. ^ Essay on the debate between Woolf and Bennett including comments on poor modern reputation of Bennett

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Arnold Bennett - Son of Stoke-on-Trent (520 words)
Bennett's infancy was spent in genteel poverty, which gave way to prosperity as his father succeeded as a solicitor.
Although Arnold Bennett never returned to the Potteries to live he never forgot the debt which he owed to his birthplace for giving him a unique setting for so many of his novels, a setting which he enhanced with his penetrating description of people and places.
It is perhaps unfortunate that Bennett felt the "The Five Towns" sounded more euphonious then "The Six Towns", and thus relegated the town of Fenton almost to oblivion, but as a chronicler of The Potteries he assured for the district a permanent place in English literature.
Bennett, Arnold (443 words)
Arnold Bennett (1867-1931) was born at Hanley, Staffordshire, England.
Arnold was educated in the local schools and in his father's office, in preparation for a law decree.
The chief correspondents are Arnold Bennett, Edward Knoblock, and Max Meyerfeld.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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