FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Army (Soviet Army)

The term Army, besides its generalized meaning (see "army") specifically denotes a major military formation in militaries of various countries, including the Soviet Union. During World War II ordinary armies consisted of a number of Rifle Corps. Following the Second World War, an Army was reorganised with four to five divisions, often equivalent to a corps in most militaries. There were large variations in structure and size. Army (From Latin armata (act of arming) via Old French armée) can, in some countries, refer to any armed force. ... Military science concerns itself with the study and of the diverse technical, psychological, and practical phenomena that encompass the events that make up warfare, especially armed combat. ... A corps (a word that immigrated from the French language, pronounced IPA: , but originating in the Latin corpus, corporis meaning body; plural same as singular) is either a large military unit or formation, an administrative grouping of troops within an army with a common function (such as artillery or signals...


During a war, an Army of Sovet military was typically subordinated to a Front. In peace times an Army is usually subordinated to a Military district. A Front was a major military organization in the Soviet Army, roughly equivalent to an army or army group in British or American miltary terminology. ... Military districts are territorial entities used for the purposes of military planning and strategizing. ...


Special titles given to Soviet armies included 'Red Banner', following the award of the Order of the Red Banner and 'Shock'. The famous image of the flag over the Reichstag was of forces from 3rd Shock Army. Armies which distinguished themselves in combat during the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945 often became Guards Armies (see Russian Guards). These included the 8th Guards Army. The Soviet government of Russia established the Order of the Battle Red Banner, better-known as the Order of the Red Banner (in Russian: Орден Крaсного Знамени Orden Krasnogo Znameni) on September 16, 1918 during the Russian Civil War. ... Combate Naval de Iquique - oil on canvas painting by Thomas Somerscales, XIX century Combat, or fighting, is purposeful violent conflict between one or more persons or organizations, often intended to establish dominance over the opposition. ... The Eastern Front1 was the theatre of combat between Nazi Germany and its allies against the Soviet Union during World War II. It was somewhat separate from the other theatres of the war, not only geographically, but also for its scale and ferocity. ... This article is about the year. ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Guards (Russian: гвардия) or Guards units (Russian: гвардейские части) were and are elite military units in Imperial Russia, Soviet Union and Russian Federation. ... The Soviet 8th Guards Army, under Vasily Chuikov, was part of Marshal Zhukovs 1st Belorussian Front during the end of the Second World War. ...


From the Soviet Air Force, Air Armies were attached to Fronts. They were made up of two to three Aviation Corps. One of the longest serving, still active today in the Moscow Military District, is the 16th Air Army. The Soviet Air Force, also known under the abbreviation VVS, transliterated from Russian: ВВС, Военно-воздушные силы (Voenno-Vozdushnye Sily), formed the official designation of the airforce of the Soviet Union. ... The Moscow Military District is a military district of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. ... The 16th Red Banner Air Army (16 воздушная Краснознаменная армия) is a formation of the Russian Air Force. ...


Thus the two main types of land forces army during the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945 were: The Eastern Front1 was the theatre of combat between Nazi Germany and its allies against the Soviet Union during World War II. It was somewhat separate from the other theatres of the war, not only geographically, but also for its scale and ferocity. ... This article is about the year. ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ...

Contents

Regular armies

Made up of three to five Rifle Divisions. Included

  • HQ, 1st Army - served with Soviet Far East Front
  • HQ, 2nd Army - served with Soviet Far East Front
  • HQ, 3rd Army - survived entire war and disbanded in August 1945[1]
  • Soviet Fourth Army.Started war as part of Soviet Western Front. HQ 4th Army on 23 July 1941 became HQ, Central Front.
  • HQ, 5th Army - HQ officially disbanded 25 September 1941
  • HQ, 6th Army - 10 August 1941 headquarters disbanded
  • HQ, 7th Army - 18 December 1944 headquarters redesignated HQ 9th Guards Army (Other information indicates that HQ 7 Army became HQ 62 Army, and 9 Guards Army was formed from HQ Separate Airborne Army in January 1945)[2]
  • HQ, 8th Army - survived entire war and disbanded in September 1945
  • HQ, 9th Army - Started the war in the Odessa Military District. HQ disbanded 29 October 1943
  • HQ, 10th Army - Started war as part of Soviet Western Front. Destroyed by German forces. HQ officially disbanded 5 July 1941
  • HQ, 11th Army - HQ disbanded 18 December 1943
  • HQ, 12th Army - HQ disbanded 10 August 1941
  • HQ, 13th Army - survived not only entire war, but also entire Cold War up to dissolution of USSR
  • HQ, 14th Army - 31 July 1945 HQ disbanded and personnel used to fill out HQ, Belomorsk Military District
  • HQ, 16th Army - HQ disbanded 8 August 1941
  • HQ 17th Army (17 OA) ended its existence 4 months after the end of the war with Japan.
  • HQ 18th Army (18 OA) became after the war a Mountain Army in the territory of the Carpathian Military District and North Bukovina, where it was disbanded in May 1946. Some of its elements were used to form HQ 8 Mechanised Army.
  • HQ, 19th Army - HQ disbanded 20 October 1941
  • HQ, 20th Army - HQ disbanded 20 October 1941
  • HQ, 21st Army - HQ awarded 'Guards' status and renumbered to HQ, 6th Guards Army on 16 April 1943
  • HQ, 22nd Army - HQ disbanded in August 1945 and personnel used to form HQ, Tavricheskii Military District
  • HQ, 23rd Army - survived not only entire war, but also entire Cold War up to dissolution of USSR
  • HQ, 24th Army - HQ disbanded 10 October 1941
  • HQ, 26th Army - HQ officially disbanded 25 September 1941
  • HQ, 27th Army - HQ redesignated HQ, 4th Shock Army on 25 December 1941
  • HQ, 29th Army - formed in June-July 1941, joined Western Front
  • HQ, 30th Army - formed on 13 July 1941, comprising 119th, 242nd, 243rd, 251st Rifle Divisions, 51st Tank Division, 43rd Corps Artillery Regiment, 533rd and 758th Anti-tank Regiments. Joined Western Front
  • HQ, 31st Army - formed by 10 July 1941, comprised of 244th, 246th, 247th, 249th Rifle Divisions initially (Glantz, Stumbling Colossus)
  • HQ, 32nd Army - formed in June-July 1941, joined Reserve Front
  • HQ, 35th Army - formed in June-July 1941, joined Far Eastern Front. Within Far Eastern Front comprised 35th, 66th, 78th Rifle Divisions and 109th Fortified Region
  • HQ, 36th Army - HQ formed between 22 June 1941 and August 1941 in the Transbaikal Military District[3]
  • HQ, 40th Army (First Formation) ended its existence already during July 1945. It was re-created during May 1979 to cover the boundary with unstable Afghanistan with three motor rifle divisions (the 5th Guards, 108th and 68th), and entered Afghanistan in December 1979 without the last division, but had the Russian 201st Motor Rifle Division added to its composition during January 1980. The Limited Contingent of Soviet Troops in Afghanistan was formed on its basis. After the withdrawal from Afghanistan in 1989 it was reduced to 59th Army Corps.
  • HQ, 42nd Army (42 OA) ended its existence in the summer of 1946 on the Baltic coast.
  • HQ, 43rd Army ended its existence in the summer of 1946.
  • HQ, 44th Army - formed between June-August 1941, Transcaucasus Military District
  • HQ, 45th Army - formed between June-August 1941, Transcaucasus Military District For almost the entire war it was situated in Iran and ended its existence in 1946 after return to the USSR.
  • HQ, 46th Army - formed between June-August 1941, Transcaucasus Military District Disbanded in Summer 1945.
  • HQ, 47th Army - formed between June and August 1941, Transcaucasus Military District It was stationed in Halle, Germany, until 1947, when it was disbanded.
  • HQ, 49th Army - headquarters returned at the end of the war from Germany to the Gor'kiy region, where it was reformed as the Gor'kiy Military District.
  • HQ, 51st Army - moved during June 1945 from the Baltic States to the Urals with almost all its forces. Headquarters moved without its troops to Sakhalin in 1953.
  • HQ, 53rd Army (53 OA) - after the crushing defeat of Japan was brought out to Siberia, where it was disbanded in 1947.
  • HQ, 57th Army (57 OA) - on the completion of the war was relocated from Austria to Romania, where it became part of the Southern Group of Forces. It was disbanded together with the Southern Group of Forces in 1947.
  • HQ, 61st Army (61 OA) - It arrived in the North Caucasus from Germany during June 1945 and became the headquarters of the Donskoy Military District.
  • HQ, 62nd Army - involved in Battle of StalingradActivated in October 1941 as the 7th Army, the Army was redesignated the 62nd Army at Stalingrad in July 1942. It was among the victors of Stalingrad and thus redesignated the 8th Guards Army.
  • HQ, 63rd Army - involved in Battle of Stalingrad
  • HQ, 64th Army - involved in Battle of Stalingrad
  • HQ, 65th Army - involved in Battle of Stalingrad
  • HQ, 66th Army - which became 5th Guards Army. Involved in Battle of Stalingrad.
  • 67th Army (67 OA) at the end of the war was guarding the coast of the Baltic States from Tallin to the south, and during August 1945 it was disbanded.
  • 69th Army (69 OA) was moved without troops from Germany to Transcaucasia in June 1945, where its HQ may have been reorganised as the HQ of the Baku District. [4]
  • 70th Army. One of the higher-numbered Armies was the 70th, formed from NKVD troops after an authorising decree was signed by Stalin on 14 October 1942.[5] On February 5, 1943 this army was designated as the 70th Army with Far-Eastern, Transbaikal, Siberian, Central-Asian, Ural and Stalingrad divisions renamed respectively: 102nd, 106th, 140th, 162nd, 175th and 181st Rifle divisions, a total of 69236 personnel. The 70th Army was instantly transferred to Konstantin Rokossovsky’s Soviet Central Front, which was preparing a local offensive, and suffered its first defeat. In June 1945 it arrived, possibly just an HQ without any troops, from Germany, in the South Urals, where it's HQ may have been reorganised as the South Urals Military District.

The Soviet First Army (also called First Red Banner Army) was a Soviet field army of World War II that served in the far east. ... The Soviet Far East Front was a front (Soviet army group) of World War II that operated in the Far East, hence its name. ... The Soviet Second Army (also called Second Red Banner Army) was a Soviet field army of World War II that served in the far east. ... The Soviet Far East Front was a front (Soviet army group) of World War II that operated in the Far East, hence its name. ... The Soviet Fourth Army was a Soviet field army of World War II that served on the Eastern Front. ... The Western Front was a military subdivision of the Soviet Army, one of the Soviet Army Fronts during the World War II. The term is not to be confused with the general notion of the front in Western direrection. Categories: Russia-related stubs | Soviet fronts ... The Central Front was a Front (military subdivision) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... The Western Front was a military subdivision of the Soviet Army, one of the Soviet Army Fronts during the World War II. The term is not to be confused with the general notion of the front in Western direrection. Categories: Russia-related stubs | Soviet fronts ... The Carpathian Military District was a military district of the Soviet Armed Forces from 1945 after the conclusion of the Second World War to 1990-91. ... Far East Front may refer to one of the following. ... The Russian 201st Motor Rifle Division was originally raised as the 201st Rifle Division in World War II to replace the previous 201st which had been reformed as a Guards Division. ... Transcaucasian Front or Transcaucasus Front (Russian: Закавказский Фронт) was a Front (military subdivision) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Transcaucasian Front or Transcaucasus Front (Russian: Закавказский Фронт) was a Front (military subdivision) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Transcaucasian Front or Transcaucasus Front (Russian: Закавказский Фронт) was a Front (military subdivision) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Transcaucasian Front or Transcaucasus Front (Russian: Закавказский Фронт) was a Front (military subdivision) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... The Southern Group of Forces was a Soviet Army formation formed twice following the Second World War, most notably around the time of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. ... Combatants Germany Italy Romania Hungary Soviet Union Commanders Friedrich Paulus Erich von Manstein Hermann Hoth Georgiy Zhukov Vasiliy Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilyevskiy Strength German Sixth Army German Fourth Panzer Army Romanian Third Army Romanian Fourth Army Hungarian Second Army Italian Eighth Army 500,000 Germans Unknown number Reinforcements Unknown number Axis... Stalingrad is the former name of two cities: Volgograd, Russia Karviná-Nové Město, near Ostrava, Czech Republic Other uses: The Battle of Stalingrad (a major turning-point of World War II and arguably the bloodiest battle in human history) Stalingrad (German film set during the above battle) Stalingrad... Combatants Germany Italy Romania Hungary Soviet Union Commanders Friedrich Paulus Erich von Manstein Hermann Hoth Georgiy Zhukov Vasiliy Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilyevskiy Strength German Sixth Army German Fourth Panzer Army Romanian Third Army Romanian Fourth Army Hungarian Second Army Italian Eighth Army 500,000 Germans Unknown number Reinforcements Unknown number Axis... Combatants Germany Italy Romania Hungary Soviet Union Commanders Friedrich Paulus Erich von Manstein Hermann Hoth Georgiy Zhukov Vasiliy Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilyevskiy Strength German Sixth Army German Fourth Panzer Army Romanian Third Army Romanian Fourth Army Hungarian Second Army Italian Eighth Army 500,000 Germans Unknown number Reinforcements Unknown number Axis... Combatants Germany Italy Romania Hungary Soviet Union Commanders Friedrich Paulus Erich von Manstein Hermann Hoth Georgiy Zhukov Vasiliy Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilyevskiy Strength German Sixth Army German Fourth Panzer Army Romanian Third Army Romanian Fourth Army Hungarian Second Army Italian Eighth Army 500,000 Germans Unknown number Reinforcements Unknown number Axis... Combatants Germany Italy Romania Hungary Soviet Union Commanders Friedrich Paulus Erich von Manstein Hermann Hoth Georgiy Zhukov Vasiliy Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilyevskiy Strength German Sixth Army German Fourth Panzer Army Romanian Third Army Romanian Fourth Army Hungarian Second Army Italian Eighth Army 500,000 Germans Unknown number Reinforcements Unknown number Axis... Marshal of the Soviet Union Konstantin Rokossovsky Konstantin Konstantinovich Rokossovsky (Russian: Константин Константинович Рокоссовский, Polish name Konstanty Rokossowski) (December 21, 1896 – August 3, 1968), Soviet military commander and Polish Defence Minister. ... The Central Front was a Front (military subdivision) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ...

Tank armies

Made up of three Tank Corps. Guards Tank Armies were made up of a number of Guards Tank Corps. A Tank Corps was a Soviet armoured formation used since before the beginning of World War II. // In Soviet Russia, the so called armored forces (броневые силы) preceded the Tank Corps. ...

(Soviet Tanks during WWII). The Soviet First Guards Tank Army was a Soviet armoured formation that fought as part of the Red Army on the Eastern Front during World War II. The army was commanded throughout most of the war by Mikhail Katukov. ... List of Second World War military vehicles by country, showing numbers produced in parentheses. ...


Order of battle

An example of Order of Battle for an army [1]:


17th Army:

  • 209th Rifle Division
  • 278th Rifle Division
  • 284th Rifle Division
  • 70th Separate Tank Battalion
  • 82d Separate Tank Battalion
  • 56th Tank Destroyer Artillery Brigade
  • 185th Gun Artillery Regiment
  • 413th Howitzer Artillery Regiment
  • 1910th Tank Destroyer Regiment
  • 178th Mortar Regiment
  • 39th Guards Mortar Regiment
  • 1916th Antiaircraft Artillery Regiment
  • 66th Separate Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion
  • 282d Separate Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion
  • 67th Mortar Brigade

Sources

  1. ^ Deiscvuyuschaya Armiya (Operational Army) 1941 -1945, 2005, cited by konev at http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=101869&, 17 June 2006
  2. ^ http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=61112
  3. ^ David M. Glantz, Stumbling Colossus: The Red Army on the Eve of World War, University Press of Kansas, 1998
  4. ^ Feskov et al, The Soviet Army during the Years of the Cold War 1945-91, Tomsk 2004
  5. ^ http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/archive/index.php/t-15298.html

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wikipedia search result (6156 words)
This organization became the army of the Soviet Union after the establishment of the USSR in 1922, and eventually grew to form the largest army in the world from the 1940s until the collapse of the Soviet Union in December 1991.
Soviet forces suffered heavy damage in the field as a result of poor levels of preparedness, which was primarily caused by a reluctant, half-hearted and ultimately belated decision by the Soviet Government and High Command to mobilize the army.
Soviet Army units which had liberated the countries of Eastern Europe from German rule remained in some of them to secure the régimes in what became satellite states of the Soviet Union and to deter and to fend off NATO forces.
Article about "Red Army" in the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004 (1293 words)
This organisation became the army of the Soviet Union from its establishment in 1922.
Soviet Army units which had liberated the countries of Eastern Europe from German rule remained there to secure Soviet influence in what became socialist satellite states of the Soviet Union.
In 1979, however, the Soviet Army itself was sent to intervene in a civil war raging in Afghanistan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m