FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Armour" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Armour
A suit of Gothic plate armour
A suit of Gothic plate armour

Armour or armor (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. Armour has been used throughout recorded history, beginning with hides, leather, and bone, before progressing to bronze, then steel during the Roman Era, to modern fabrics such as Kevlar, Dyneema and ceramics. Armour or armor is protective clothing for combat. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1276x2283, 233 KB) Work by Rama File links The following pages link to this file: Plate armour Sabaton ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1276x2283, 233 KB) Work by Rama File links The following pages link to this file: Plate armour Sabaton ... Spelling differences redirects here. ... “Fights” redirects here. ... Ancient history is from the period of time when writing and historical records first appear, roughly 5,500 years before the Common Era. ... Look up hide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Modern leather-working tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides and skins of animals, primarily cattlehide. ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... The Roman Era is a period in Western history, when ancient Rome was the center of power of the world around the Mediterranean Sea, where Latin was the lingua franca. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... Dyneema or Spectra is a synthetic fiber based on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene which is 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than Kevlar. ... Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικός (keramikos). ...


Armour was also commonly used to protect war animals, such as war horses and elephants. Armour for war horses was called barding. Armour has also been produced for hunting dogs that hunt dangerous game, such as boars. Since World War I, armoured fighting vehicles are protected by vehicle armour. Military animals are creatures that have been employed by humankind for use in warfare. ... War horses are horses specially trained for use in battle or individual combat (see also: Jousting). ... The elephants thick hide protects it from injury. ... A hoplite wearing a helmet, a breastplate and greaves (and nothing else). ... A hunting dog refers to any dog who assists humans in hunting, or whose breed was originally developed to do so. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... An armoured fighting vehicle (AFV) is a military vehicle, protected by armour and armed with weapons. ... Military vehicles are commonly armoured to withstand the impact of shrapnel, bullets or shells, protecting the soldiers inside from enemy fire. ...


In modern usage, Armour, or the armoured is also a heavily armoured military force or organisation, such as heavy infantry or heavy cavalry (as opposed to light infantry or cavalry). In modern armoured warfare, armoured units equipped with tanks serve the historic role of heavy cavalry, and belong to the armoured branch in a national army's organisation (sometimes, the armoured corps). Mechanised infantry has replaced heavy infantry. Armoured warfare in modern warfare is understood to be the use of armoured fighting vehicles as a central component of the methods of war. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... It has been suggested that Mechanized warfare be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Mechanized infantry are infantry troops that use armoured fighting vehicles for transport and as heavy weapons support in combat. ...

Contents

History

Greek Mycenaean 1400 BC armour.
Greek Mycenaean 1400 BC armour.
Japanese Samurai Odoshi armour.

Many factors have affected the development of armour throughout human history. Significant factors in the development of armour include the economic and technological necessities of armour production. For instance plate armour first appeared in Medieval Europe when water-powered trip hammers made the formation of plates faster and cheaper. Also modern militaries usually do not provide the best armour to their forces since doing so would be prohibitively costly. At times the development of armour has run parallel to the development of increasingly effective weaponry on the battlefield. With armourers seeking to create better protection without sacrificing mobility. Image File history File links Mycenaean_armour_1400BC.jpg‎ Mycenaean armour from Dentra I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Mycenaean_armour_1400BC.jpg‎ Mycenaean armour from Dentra I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Mycenaean may refer to: Mycenae, coming from or belonging to this ancient town in Peloponnese in Greece Mycenaean Greece, the Greek-speaking regions of the Aegean Sea as of the Late Bronze Age, named (somewhat anachronistically) after the Mycenae of the Trojan War epics Mycenaean language, an ancient form of... Download high resolution version (960x1280, 171 KB) Samurai Armor as seen at the British Museum in London. ... Download high resolution version (960x1280, 171 KB) Samurai Armor as seen at the British Museum in London. ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ...


In European history, well-known armour types include the lorica segmentata of the Roman legions, the mail hauberk of the early medieval age, and the full steel plate harness worn by later Medieval and Renaissance knights, and a few key components, (breast and back plates) by heavy cavalry in several European countries until the first year of World War I. (1914-15). This article discusses the history of the continent of Europe. ... A reenactor dressed as a Roman soldier in lorica segmentata The lōrīca segmentāta was a type of armour primarily used in the Roman Empire, but the Latin name was first used in the 16th century (the ancient form is unknown). ... See also Legion software and Legion forummer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hauberk, Museum of Bayeux. ... Gothic armour Plate armour is personal armour made from large metal plates, worn on the chest and sometimes the entire body. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ...


In November 2006 it was announced in Greece that the oldest armour that exists in Greece was restored and will be put on display soon. The armour dates from the Mycenaean Era around 1400 BC, some 200 years before the Trojan War.[citation needed] Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ...


In East Asian history laminated armour such as lamellar and brigandine were commonly used. In pre-Qin dynasty times, leather armour was made out of exotic animals such as rhinoceros. Chinese influence in Japan would result in the Japanese adopting Chinese styles, their famous 'samurai armour' being a result of this influence. Japanese Samurai Odoshi Armor. ... A brigandine, a form of body armour, is a cloth garment, generally canvas, lined with small oblong steel plates riveted to the fabric. ...


History of armour in post-Ancient Europe

Mail

Main article: Mail (armour)

Mail, sometimes called by the neologism "chainmail", is made of interlocking iron or steel rings, which may be riveted or welded shut or, solely in modern manufacture, simply closed with the ends abutting. It is believed to have been invented by the Celtic people in Eastern Europe about 500 BC.[citation needed] When these Celts moved West they took mail with them. Most cultures who used mail used the Celtic word Byrnne or a variant, suggesting the Celts as the originators.[citation needed] The Roman Army used mail for almost all of its history. After the collapse of the Roman Empire in 476 AD the infrastructure to make plate was largely lost in Europe, as a result mail was the best available armour during the ensuing Early Medieval period.[citation needed] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A neologism (Greek νεολογισμός [neologismos], from νέος [neos] new + λόγος [logos] word, speech, discourse + suffix -ισμός [-ismos] -ism) is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (coined) — often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... This article is about the European people. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ...


Transition to plate

Little by little, small additional plates or disks of steel were added to the mail to protect vulnerable areas. By the late 1200s, the knees were capped with steel, and two circular disks, called besagews were fitted to protect the underarms. A variety of methods for improving the protection provided by mail were used as armourers seemingly experimented. Hardened leather and splinted construction were used for arm and leg pieces. The coat of plates was developed, an armour made of large plates sewn inside a textile or leather coat. Armour displaying besagews (full image) Besagews are circular defences designed to protect the armpits, as part of a harness of plate armour. ... Splint armour, also referred to as splinted armour, is a form of armour primarily from Medieval Europe. ... A coat of plates (also known in the European Middle Ages as a pair of plates[1]) is a form of torso armour consisting of metal plates sewn or riveted to a cloth or leather backing. ...


Solid steel plate was then developed to protect the shins, feet, throat and upper chest, and soon (mid to late 1300s) these protective plates covered most of the mail. The next phase saw the plate cover almost all parts of the mail. Eventually a full mail hauberk was no longer worn as it had been made redundant. Mail continued to be used to protect those joints which could not be adequately protected by plate, such as the armpit, crook of the elbow and groin.


The small skull cap evolved into a bigger true helmet, the bascinet, as it was lengthened downward to protect the back of the neck and the sides of the head. Additionally, several new forms of fully enclosed helmets were introduced in the late 1300s to replace the great helm, such as the sallet and barbute. The bascinet was a Medieval European open-faced military helmet, typically fitted with an aventail and hinged visor. ... Early great helms had large flat tops that were susceptible to crushing mace blows. ... A late fifteenth century sallet. ... A barbute is a visorless war helmet of fifteenth century Italian design, often with distinctive T shaped or Y shaped opening for the eyes and mouth. ...


Plate armour, 1300 - 1620

King Philip II of Spain (r. 1556-1598) in a luxurious half-armour
King Philip II of Spain (r. 1556-1598) in a luxurious half-armour
Main article: plate armour

Probably the most recognised style of armour in the world, associated with the knights of Late Medieval Europe, but continuing later through the 16th and 17th Centuries in all European countries. Heavy cavalry was being used before plate armour became the norm. In the 14th century, horseman were using a small, mobile "hand cannon", which along with improved crossbows, and the first pistols, began to take a heavy toll on the mail clad, and partially plated knights and foot soldiers. Rather than dooming the use of body armour, the threat of small firearms intensified the use and further refinement of plate armour. There was a 150 year period in which better and more metallurgically advanced steel armour was being used, precisely because of the danger posed by the gun. Philip II by Titian from [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Philip II by Titian from [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the... Gothic armour Plate armour is personal armour made from large metal plates, worn on the chest and sometimes the entire body. ... For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... Hand gonnes from the Historisches Museum, Bern Hand gonne being fired from a stand, Belli Fortis, manuscript, by Konrad Kyeser, 1400 The gonne, hand gonne or hand cannon, as it was called, was the first handheld, portable firearm. ... This article is about the weapon. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ...


In the early years of pistol and muskets, firearms were relatively low in velocity. The full suits of armour, or breast plates actually stopped bullets fired from a modest distance. The front breast plates were, in fact, commonly shot as a test. The impact point would often be encircled with engraving to point it out. This was called the "proof". It was not uncommon for a man in armour, mounted on a horse, to ride up closer to the enemy, wheel in a tactical manoeuvre called a caracole, and discharge his hand-cannon or later, pistols, right into the faces of the adversary at close range. Cross-bow arrows, if still used, would seldom penetrate good plate, nor would any bullet unless fired from close range. In effect, rather than making plate armour obsolete, the use of firearms stimulated the development of plate armour into its later stages. Hence, guns and cavalry in plate armour were "threat and remedy" together on the battlefield for almost 400 years. For most of that period, it allowed horsemen to fight while being the targets of defending arquebuseers without being easily killed. Full suits of armour were actually worn by generals and princely commanders right up to the second decade of the 18th century. It was the only way they could be mounted and survey the overall battlefield with safety from distant musket fire.

16th century plate armour for men and horses (Metropolitan Museum)
16th century plate armour for men and horses (Metropolitan Museum)

The horse was afforded protection from lances and infantry weapons by steel plate barding. This gave the horse protection and enhanced the visual impression of a mounted knight. Late in the era, elaborate barding was used in parade armour. Download high resolution version (495x640, 113 KB)Medieval armors in Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Download high resolution version (495x640, 113 KB)Medieval armors in Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... This 15th century depiction of Charlemagne and Pope Adrian I shows a well-bred Medieval horse with arched neck, refined head and elegant gait. ... There is also the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), located in Manhattan. ... A hoplite wearing a helmet, a breastplate and greaves (and nothing else). ...


See components of medieval armour for a summary description and comparison of the various parts of a harness as plate armour developed over time. Following is a table that concisely identifies various pieces of medieval armour, mostly plate but some mail, arranged by the part of body that is protected and roughly by date. ...


Characteristics of armour

Since the 15th century, most parts of the human body had been fitted with specialised steel pieces, typically worn over linen or woollen underclothes and attached to the body via leather straps and buckles. Mail protected those areas that could not be fitted with plate; for example, the back of the knee. Well-known constituent parts of plate armour include the helm, gauntlets, gorget or 'neckguard', breastplate, and greaves worn on the lower legs. Physical Features of the Human Body The human body is the entire physical structure of a human organism. ... A person wearing a helmet. ... Pair of gauntlets, Germany, end of the 16th century Gauntlet is a name for several different styles of glove. ... Sir Philip Sidney wears a gorget for a portrait A gorget is a type of armor designed to protect the neck. ... This can also refer to a piece of riding equipment, see Breastplate (tack). ... A greave (from 12th century French greve shin, of uncertain origin) is a piece of armour that protects the leg. ...


Typically, full-body plate armour was custom-made for the individual. This was understandably a very time-consuming and expensive undertaking, costing as much as a family house or high-powered car in today's money. As such, it was almost exclusively the luxury of the noble and landed classes, with soldiers of lower standing generally wearing cheaper armour (if at all) typically limited to a helm and a breastplate. Armour often bore an insignia in the interior, that was only visible to the wearer upon removal. Full plate armour made the wearer virtually impervious to sword blows as well as providing some protection against arrows, bludgeons and even early musket shot. Although sword edges could not penetrate the relatively thin (as little as 2 mm) plate, they could cause serious concussive damage via the impact. Also, although arrows shot from bows could often pierce early plate at close range, later improvements in the steel forging techniques and armour design made even this line of attack increasingly difficult. By its apex, toughened steel plate was almost impregnable on the battlefield. Knights were instead increasingly felled by blunt weapons such as maces or war hammers that could send concussive force through the plate armour resulting in injuries such as broken bones, organ haemorrhage and/or head trauma. Another tactic was to attempt to strike though the gaps between the armour pieces, using daggers to attack the Knight's eyes or joints. A development of the club, a mace consists of a strong, heavy wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ... A reproduction of a spiked war hammer A war hammer is a late medieval weapon of war intended for close combat, the design of which resembles the hammer. ... Hemorrhage (alternate spelling is Haemorrhage) is the medical term meaning bleeding. ...


Contrary to common misconceptions, a well-made suit of medieval 'battle' armour (as opposed to the primarily ceremonial 'parade' and 'tournament' armour popular with kings and nobility of later years) hindered its wearer no more than the equipment carried by soldiers today. An armoured knight, trained for wearing it since his teens, could comfortably run, crawl, climb ladders, as well as mount and dismount his horse without recourse to a crane (a myth probably originating from an English music hall comedy of the 1830s, and popularised in Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court). A full suit of medieval plate is thought to have weighed little more than 60 lb (27 kg) on average, considerably lighter than the equipment often carried by the elite of today’s armies. (For example, SAS patrols have been known to carry equipment weighing well over 200 lb (91 kg) for many miles.) Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court is an 1889 novel by American humorist and writer Mark Twain. ... See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ...


Plate armour slowly discarded

World War I German Stahlhelm and prototype anti-shrapnel armour.
World War I German Stahlhelm and prototype anti-shrapnel armour.

Gradually starting in the mid 16th century, one plate element after another was discarded to save weight for foot soldiers, but breast and back plates continued to be used through the entire period of the 18th century through Napoleonic times in many (heavy) European cavalry units, all the way to the early 20th century. Muskets from about 1700 and later could pierce plate, so cavalry had to be far more mindful of the fire. At the start of World War I the French Cuirassiers, in the thousands, rode out to engage the German Cavalry who likewise used helmets and armour. By that period, the shiny armour plate was covered in dark paint and a canvas wrap covered their elaborate Napoleonic style helmets. Their armour was meant to protect only against sabres and light lances. The cavalry had to beware of high velocity rifles and machine guns like the foot soldiers, who at least had a trench to protect them. Machine gunners in that war also occasionally wore a crude type of heavy armour. Towards the end of WWI, armies on both sides were experimenting with plate armour as protection against shrapnel and ricocheting projectiles. Image File history File links MWP_Stahlhelm. ... Image File history File links MWP_Stahlhelm. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... German Stahlhelme from the Second World War Stahlhelm (plural, Stahlhelme) is German for steel helmet. The Imperial German Army began to replace the traditional leather Pickelhaube (spiked helmet) with the Stahlhelm during the First World War in 1916. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... French cuirassier armour, 1854 Cuirassiers were mounted cavalry soldiers equipped with armour and firearms, first appearing in late 15th-century Europe. ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... It has been suggested that Fragmentation (weaponry) be merged into this article or section. ...


Modern personal armour

Ballistic

Main article: Ballistic vest
A modern ballistic vest.
A modern ballistic vest.

Today, bullet proof vests made of ballistic cloth (e.g kevlar, dyneema, twaron, spectra etc.) and ceramic or metal plates are common among police forces, security staff, corrections officers and some branches of the military. For infantry applications, lighter protection (historically known as a flak jacket) is often used to protect soldiers from grenade fragments and indirect effects of bombardment, but usually not small arms fire. This is because assault rifles usually fire harder, higher-energy bullets than pistols, and the increased protection needed to stop these would be too cumbersome and heavy to use in combat. Man in a ballistic vest A ballistic vest or bullet-proof vest is an item of armor that absorbs the impact from gun-fired projectiles and explosive fragments fired at the torso. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Bodyarmor. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Bodyarmor. ... A bulletproof vest – also called body armour (U.S. body armor) – is an article of protective clothing that works as a form of armour to minimize injury from being hit by a fired bullet. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... Dyneema or Spectra is a synthetic fiber based on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene which is 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than Kevlar. ... Chemical structure of Kevlar. ... Spectra are conditions or values that vary over a continuum. ... For the band, see The Police. ... A security officer guards a construction site. ... A Correction officer is a person charged with the responsibility of the supervision of prisoners in a prison or jail. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I Infantry or footmen are very highly disciplined and trained soldiers who fight primarily with small arms(rifles), but are trained to use everything from their bare hands to missle systems in order to neutralize... A flak jacket is a form of protective clothing originally developed by the Wilkinson Sword company during World War II to help protect Royal Air Force (RAF) air personnel from the flying debris and shrapnel thrown by German anti-aircraft guns flak (Fliegerabwehrkanone), a type of exploding shell. ... This article is about a military rank. ... Grenade may refer to: The well-known hand grenade commonly used by soldiers. ... A bombardment is an attack by artillery fire directed against fortifications, troops or towns and buildings. ... Small arms captured in Fallujah, Iraq by the US Marine Corps in 2004 The term small arms generally describes any number of smaller infantry weapons, such as firearms that an individual soldier can carry. ... The AK-47 is the worlds most common assault rifle. ... Armor-piercing ammunition is used to penetrate hardened armored targets such as body armor, vehicle armor, concrete, tanks and other defenses, depending on the caliber of the firearms. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... “Fights” redirects here. ...


The US Army has adopted Interceptor body armor, however, which uses Enhanced Small Arms Protective Inserts (E-S.A.P.I) in the chest, sides and back of the armour. Each plate is rated to stop a range of ammunition including 3 hits from a 7.62×51 NATO AP round at a range of 10 m, though accounts in Iraq and Afghanistan tell of soldiers shot as much as seven times in the chest without penetration [citation needed]. Interceptor body armor in woodland camouflage with groin and neck protector. ... NATOs 7. ...


Non-ballistic

Riot police with body protection against blows
Riot police with body protection against blows

Despite advances in the protection offered by ballistic armour against projectiles, as the name implies, modern ballistic armour is much less impervious to stabbing weapons unless they are augmented with anti-knife/anti-stab armour (usually a form of Mail (armour))[citation needed]. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Riot police are usually equipped with armour against blows.
Riot control are the measures to control a riot or to break up an unwanted demonstration (usually of protestors). ... Marines practicing striking A strike is an attack with an inanimate object, such as a weapon, or with a part of the human body intended to cause an effect upon an opponent or to simply cause harm to an opponent. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Armours

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... China has a long history of armour and weapons development. ... The armour used traditionally in ancient times against swords in swordfighting, and as well in other battlefield encounters by Koreans or those fighting in Korea, or Korean fighting overseas. ... Mongolian armour, like its Chinese counterpart, has a long history. ... Dragon Skin is a type of body armor made by Pinnacle Armor. ... Portrait: Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in military dress uniform, with medals. ... US Army soldiers wearing the new Army Combat Uniform, Desert Camouflage Uniform, and a World War II-era uniform (L to R) Battledress is a general term for the military uniform worn into combat, as opposed to display dress and formal uniforms worn at parades and functions. ... Military history is composed of the events in the history of humanity that fall within the category of conflict. ... Military vehicles are commonly armoured to withstand the impact of shrapnel, bullets or shells, protecting the soldiers inside from enemy fire. ... RHA stands for Rolled Homogeneous Armour. ... A U.S. Army 5-ton cargo truck with improvised armor on the doors, rear gunners box, and an improved bumper. ... U.S. Army conceptual mock-up of an exoskeleton-equipped soldier. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Armour Meat: Hot Dog, Pepperoni, Meatball, Italian Meatball (185 words)
When American families think of Armour, thoughts of childhood and that catchy Armour hotdog jingle immediately come to mind.
Armour is proud to offer American families delicious meatballs and flavorful pepperoni.
Whether it’s a spaghetti dinner, pizza time or a family cookout, treat your family to Armour and experience the value of a good meal.
Under Armour - Under Armour Home at GoBros.com (372 words)
Under Armour is licensee of the National Hockey League, supplier of the U.S. Ski Team, USA Rugby, the National Lacrosse League, and Major League Lacrosse.
Under Armour apparel is worn by professional football, baseball, and soccer players as well as athletes in major collegiate and Olympic sports.
Under Armour® is the originator of performance apparel, a line of moisture wicking microfiber clothing that pulls perspiration away from the skin to keep athletes cool...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m