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Encyclopedia > Armigerous

An armiger is a person entitled to use a coat of arms. Such a person is said to be armigerous. A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


The term "armiger" is well-defined only within jurisdictions (such as England and Wales, Canada and Spain) where heraldry is regulated by the state or heraldic body (such as the College of Arms in England), since anyone may use any coat of arms in jurisdictions, such as the United States, which lack regulated heraldry. Heraldry is the science and art of designing, displaying, describing and recording coats-of-arms (also referred to as armorial bearings or simply as arms). Its origins lie in the need to distinguish participants in battles or jousts and to describe the various devices they carried or painted on their... The Colleges own coat of arms was granted in 1484. ...


A person can be so entitled either by descent from a person with a right to bear a coat of arms, or by virtue of a grant of arms to him or herself. A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


Armiger was also a Latin cognomen. The cognomen (name known by in English) was originally the third name of a Roman in the Roman naming convention. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Armiger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (132 words)
An armiger is a person entitled to use a coat of arms.
The term "armiger" is well-defined only within jurisdictions (such as England and Wales, Canada and Spain) where heraldry is regulated by the state or heraldic body (such as the College of Arms in England), since anyone may use any coat of arms in jurisdictions, such as the United States, which lack regulated heraldry.
A person can be so entitled either by descent from a person with a right to bear a coat of arms, or by virtue of a grant of arms to him or herself.
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