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Encyclopedia > Arlington National Cemetery
Memorial Drive leads from the Lincoln Memorial, across the Potomac River, to the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery, the portico of Arlington House is visible at top.
Memorial Drive leads from the Lincoln Memorial, across the Potomac River, to the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery, the portico of Arlington House is visible at top.
Plan and roadways of Arlington National Cemetery.
Plan and roadways of Arlington National Cemetery.

Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia, is an American military cemetery established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna Custis Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. The cemetery is situated directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., near to the location of The Pentagon, and is served by the Arlington Cemetery station on the Blue Line of the Washington Metro system. Image File history File links Memorial_Drive_entering_Arlington_National_Cemetery,_from_above. ... Image File history File links Memorial_Drive_entering_Arlington_National_Cemetery,_from_above. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1020x1300, 535 KB) USGS topos covering the area around the Pentagon in Virginia, soon after the road network was built. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1020x1300, 535 KB) USGS topos covering the area around the Pentagon in Virginia, soon after the road network was built. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... Gettysburg National Cemetery, Pennsylvania Golden Gate National Cemetery, California Arlington National Cemetery, Virgnia National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Hawaii National Cemetery is a designation for nationally important cemeteries in the United States. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, is a Greek revival style mansion located in Arlington, Virginia, on bluffs overlooking the Potomac River, directly across from the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. During the American Civil War, the grounds of the mansion were selected as the site of Arlington... // This article is about the Confederate general. ... Mary Anna Randolph Custis Lee (October 1, 1808 – November 5, 1873) was the wife of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. ... Give Me Liberty Martha Dandridge Custis Washington (June 2, 1731 – May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States, and therefore is seen as the first First Lady of the United States (although that title was not coined until after her death; she... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... This article is about the U.S. military building. ... Arlington Cemetery is a Washington Metro station in Arlington, Virginia on the Blue Line. ... The Washington Metro, or simply Metro, is the rapid transit system of Washington, D.C., and neighboring suburban communities in Maryland and Virginia, both inside and outside the Capital Beltway. ...


More than 300,000 people are buried here on 624 acres. Veterans from all the nation's wars are interred in the cemetery, from the American Revolution through the military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Pre-Civil War dead were reinterred after 1900. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that...


Arlington National Cemetery and United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery are administered by the Department of the Army. The other National Cemeteries are administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs or by the National Park Service. United States Soldiers and Airmens Home National Cemetery, in Washington, D.C., is located at the military retirement home. ... Seal The Department of the Army is one of the three military departments in the United States Department of Defense. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for administering programs of veterans benefits for veterans, their families, and survivors. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...


Arlington House (Custis-Lee Mansion) and its grounds are administered by the National Park Service as a memorial to Robert E. Lee.

Contents

History

Traditionally, American military cemeteries developed from the duty of commanders on the frontier and in battle to care for their casualties. When the Civil War casualties overflowed hospitals and burial grounds near Washington, D.C., Quartermaster General Montgomery Meigs proposed in 1864 that 200 acres of the Robert E. Lee family property at Arlington be taken for a cemetery. "The grounds about the mansion", Meigs wrote, "are admirably adapted to such a use." Burials had in fact begun at Arlington before the ink was even blotted on Meigs's proposal. By war's end, 16,000 graves filled the spaces close to the house. Heir to the property Custis Lee sued the government claiming that he owned the land. After the Supreme Court ruled in Lee's favor, Congress paid him $150,000 for title to the land. Arlington is not the largest national cemetery, but is possibly the most well-known.[citations needed]


Burial criteria

Historical

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Today

The persons specified below are eligible for ground burial in Arlington National Cemetery.[1] The last period of active duty of former members of the Armed Forces must have ended honorably. Interment may be casketed or cremated remains.

  • Any active-duty member of the Armed Forces (except those members serving on active duty for training only).
  • Any veteran who is retired from active military service with the Armed Forces.
  • Any veteran who is retired from the Reserves is eligible upon reaching age 60 and drawing retired pay; and who served a period of active duty (other than for training).
  • Any former member of the Armed Forces separated honorably prior to October 1, 1949 for medical reasons and who was rated at 30% or greater disabled effective on the day of discharge.
  • Any former member of the Armed Forces who has been awarded one of the following decorations:
  • The President of the United States or any former President of the United States.
  • Any former member of the Armed Forces who served on active duty (other than for training) and who held any of the following positions:
    • An elective office of the U.S. Government
    • Office of the Chief Justice of the United States or of an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.
    • An office listed, at the time the person held the position, in 5 USC 5312 or 5313 (Levels I and II of the Executive Schedule).
    • The chief of a mission who was at any time during his/her tenure classified in Class I under the provisions of Section 411, Act of 13 August 1946, 60 Stat. 1002, as amended (22 USC 866) or as listed in State Department memorandum dated March 21, 1988.
  • Any former prisoner of war who, while a prisoner of war, served honorably in the active military, naval, or air service, whose last period of military, naval or air service terminated honorably and who died on or after November 30, 1993.
  • The spouse, widow or widower, minor child, or permanently dependent child, and certain unmarried adult children of any of the above eligible veterans.
  • The widow or widower of:
    • a member of the Armed Forces who was lost or buried at sea or officially determined to be missing in action.
    • a member of the Armed Forces who is interred in a US military cemetery overseas that is maintained by the American Battle Monuments Commission.
    • a member of the Armed Forces who is interred in Arlington National Cemetery as part of a group burial.
  • The surviving spouse, minor child, or permanently dependent child of any person already buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
  • The parents of a minor child, or permanently dependent child whose remains, based on the eligibility of a parent, are already buried in ANC. A spouse divorced from the primary eligible, or widowed and remarried, is not eligible for interment.
  • Provided certain conditions are met, a former member of the Armed Forces may be buried in the same grave with a close relative who is already buried and is the primary eligible.
Panorama of a small section of Arlington National Cemetery.

October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration of the United States Army, awarded for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. ... The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... The Air Force Cross is a military decoration which is issued in the following countries: The Air Force Cross of the United Kingdom The Air Force Cross of the United States This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... The Distinguished Service Medal is a high level military and civilian decoration of the United States of America which is issued for meritorious service to the government of the United States in either a senior government service position or as a senior officer of the United States armed forces. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... For other meanings see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ... August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (81st in leap years). ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 30 is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 116 pixel Image in higher resolution (10086 × 1458 pixel, file size: 6. ...

Tomb of the Unknowns

Main article: Tomb of the Unknowns
The Tomb of the Unknowns. The World War I unknown is below the marble sarcophagus. Other unknowns are beneath the white slabs on the ground. They are the World War II unknown (left) and the Korean War unknown (right). The remains of the former Vietnam War unknown were under the middle slab until 1998, when it was identified by DNA analysis as being Michael Blassie's.

The Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery is also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and has never been officially named. The Tomb of the Unknowns stands on top of a hill overlooking Washington, D.C. Image File history File links Circle-contradict. ... Sailor and girl at the Tomb of the Unknowns, May 1943 The Tomb of the Unknowns (also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, although it has never been officially named) is a monument in Arlington National Cemetery, United States dedicated to the American soldiers who have died without... Download high resolution version (1000x750, 135 KB)Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. ... Download high resolution version (1000x750, 135 KB)Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. ... Genetic fingerprinting or DNA testing is a technique to distinguish between individuals of the same species using only samples of their DNA. Its invention by Sir Alec Jeffreys at the University of Leicester was announced in 1985. ... Then Cadet Michael Blassie in his Air Force Academy Cadet Uniform. ... Sailor and girl at the Tomb of the Unknowns, Arlington National Cemetery, USA, May 1943 Throughout history, many soldiers have died in numerous wars without their remains being identified. ...


One of the more popular sites at the Cemetery, the Tomb is made from Yule marble quarried in Colorado. It consists of seven pieces, with a total weight of 79 short tons (72 metric tons). The Tomb was completed and opened to the public April 9, 1932, at a cost of $48,000. The short ton is a unit of mass equal to 907. ... A tonne (also called metric ton) is a non-SI unit of mass, accepted for use with SI, defined as: 1 tonne = 103 kg (= 106 g). ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ...


It was initially named the "Tomb of the Unknown Soldier." Other unknown servicemen were later buried there, and the name became "Tomb of the Unknowns."

The Tomb of the Unknowns is perpetually guarded by the U.S. Army. The 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment ("The Old Guard") began guarding the Tomb April 6, 1948. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923, when he became the sixth president to die in office. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953-1961). ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Then Cadet Michael Blassie in his Air Force Academy Cadet Uniform. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The 3rd United States Infantry Regiment is a unit of the United States Army which serves as Escort to the President or Presidential Guard. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...


Arlington Memorial Amphitheater

Exterior facade of the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater is modeled on Roman amphitheatres. It is built of Vermont Imperial Danby marble in the Ionic order.
Exterior facade of the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater is modeled on Roman amphitheatres. It is built of Vermont Imperial Danby marble in the Ionic order.
Interior of the amphitheater showing the rostrum.
Interior of the amphitheater showing the rostrum.

The Tomb of the Unknowns is part of the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater. The Memorial Amphitheater has hosted state funerals and Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies. Ceremonies are also held for Easter. About 5,000 people attend these holiday ceremonies each year. The structure is mostly built of Imperial Danby marble from Vermont. The Memorial Display room, between the amphitheater and the Tomb of the Unknowns, uses Botticino stone, imported from Italy. The amphitheater was the result of a campaign by Ivory Kimball to construct a place to honor America's soldiers. Congress authorized the structure March 4, 1913. Woodrow Wilson laid the cornerstone for the building on October 15, 1915. The cornerstone contained 15 items including a Bible and a copy of the Constitution. [1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2016x944, 2342 KB) This is an image of the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater in the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2016x944, 2342 KB) This is an image of the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater in the Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. ... Architects first real look at the Greek Ionic order: Julien David LeRoy, Les ruines plus beaux des monuments de la Grèce Paris, 1758 (Plate XX) The Ionic order forms one of the three orders or organizational systems of classical architecture, the other two canonic orders being the Doric and... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (816 × 616 pixel, file size: 105 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arlington National Cemetery... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (816 × 616 pixel, file size: 105 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arlington National Cemetery... The Arlington Memorial Amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery, near the center of the Cemetery, is the home of the Tomb of the Unknowns where Unknown American Servicemembers from World War I, World War II, Korea and Vietnam are interred. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... Easter, the Sunday of the Resurrection, Pascha, or Resurrection Day, is the most important religious feast of the Christian liturgical year, observed at some point between late March and late April each year (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity), following the cycle of the moon. ... Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked {{{AreaRank}}}  - Total {{{TotalAreaUS}}} sq mi ({{{TotalArea}}} km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Botticino is a town and comune in the province of Brescia, in Lombardy, Italy. ... Judge Ivory G. Kimball ( 5 May 1843 in Wells, York, Maine - 15 May 1916) and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), was the 28th President of the United States. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Before the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater was completed in 1921, important ceremonies were held at what is now known as the "Old Amphitheater." This structure sits where Robert E. Lee once had his gardens. The amphitheater was built in 1868 under the direction of General John A. Logan. Gen. James Garfield was the featured speaker at the Decoration Day dedication ceremony, May 30, 1868. The amphitheater has an encircling colonnade with a latticed roof that once supported a web of vines. The amphitheater has a marble dais, known as "the rostrum", which is inscribed with the U.S. national motto found on the Great Seal of the United States, E pluribus unum ("Out of many, one"). The amphitheater seated 1,500 people and hosted speakers such as William Jennings Bryan. [2] For other persons with similar names, see John Logan. ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 - September 19, 1881) was the 20th President of the United States and the second U.S. President to be assassinated (Abraham Lincoln was the first). ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Dais (French dais, estrade, Italian predella), originally a part of the floor at the end of a medieval hall, raised a step above the rest of the building. ... Rostrum can mean one of several different things: A rostrum (Latin beak) is an anatomical structure resembling a birds beak, such as the snout of crocodiles or dolphins or the part of the carapace of a crustacean. ... Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... E pluribus unum included in the Great Seal of the United States, being one of the nations mottos at the time of the seals creation E Pluribus Unum was one of the first mottos adopted by the United States government. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ...


Other notable sites

Eternal flame and marker at the grave of John F. Kennedy, 35th president of the United States.
Eternal flame and marker at the grave of John F. Kennedy, 35th president of the United States.
Remembering the Maine: The memorial to the USS Maine.
Remembering the Maine: The memorial to the USS Maine.
Cenotaph memorial honoring the crew of the Space Shuttle Challenger.
Cenotaph memorial honoring the crew of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

Other frequently visited sites in the cemetery are the USMC War Memorial (commonly known as the "Iwo Jima Memorial") and the Netherlands Carillon (these sites are actually located adjacent to the cemetery), and the grave of President John F. Kennedy. Kennedy is buried with his wife and two of their children. He was placed here March 14, 1967. His grave is marked with an eternal flame. His brother, Senator Robert F. Kennedy, is also buried nearby. His grave is marked by a simple wooden cross. Download high resolution version (900x575, 152 KB)Large version, by mdoege@compuserve. ... Download high resolution version (900x575, 152 KB)Large version, by mdoege@compuserve. ... The eternal flame at the Monument to the Unknown Soldier in Sofia, Bulgaria Eternal Flame is also a song originally performed by The Bangles. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 1800 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 1800 pixel, file size: 1. ... USS Maine (ACR-1), the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the state of Maine, was a 6682-ton second-class pre-dreadnought battleship originally designated as Armored Cruiser #1. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 90 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 90 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Space Shuttle Challenger (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-099) was NASAs second Space Shuttle orbiter to be put into service. ... The Marine Corps War Memorial is a military memorial statue located near the Arlington National Cemetery in Rosslyn, Virginia, United States. ... The Netherlands Carillon at Arlington National Cemetery was a gift from the people of the Netherlands to the people of the United States of America in 1954. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Jacqueline Lee Bouvier Kennedy Onassis (July 28, 1929 – May 19, 1994) was the wife of John F. Kennedy from 1953 to 1963 and was known as Jacqueline Kennedy or Jackie Kennedy. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The eternal flame The John F. Kennedy eternal flame is a United States Presidential Memorial at the gravesite of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, in Arlington National Cemetery. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ...


The federal government dedicated a model community for freed slaves, Freedman's Village, near the current Memorial Amphitheater, December 4, 1863. More than 1,100 freed slaves were given land by the government, where they farmed and lived during and after the Civil War. They were turned out in 1890 when the estate was repurchased by the government and dedicated as a military installation. December 4th redirects here. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In Section 27, there are buried more than 3,800 former slaves, called "Contrabands" during the Civil War. Their headstones are designated with the word "Civilian" or "Citizen". Headstones in the Japanese Cemetry in Broome, Western Australia A cemetery in rural Spain A typical late 20th century headstone in the United States A headstone, tombstone or gravestone is a marker, normally carved from stone, placed over or next to the site of a burial. ...


Near the Tomb of the Unknowns stands a memorial to the 266 men who lost their lives aboard the USS Maine. The memorial is adorned by a mast salvaged from the wreckage. The Maine Memorial has served as the temporary resting place for foreign heads of state allied with the United States who died in exile in the United States during World War II, pending the return of their remains to their homeland. These were Manuel L. Quezon of the Philippines and Ignacy Jan Paderewski of Poland. USS Maine (ACR-1), the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the state of Maine, was a 6682-ton second-class pre-dreadnought battleship originally designated as Armored Cruiser #1. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Manuel Luis Quezon y Molina (b. ... Ignacy Jan Paderewski Ignacy Jan Paderewski (November 6, 1860 – June 29, 1941) was a Polish pianist, composer, diplomat and politician, the third Prime Minister of Poland. ...


The Space Shuttle Challenger Memorial was dedicated on May 20, 1986 in memory of the crew of flight STS-51-L, who died during launch on 28 January 1986. Transcribed on the back of the stone is the text of the John Gillespie Magee, Jr. poem entitled High Flight. Although many remains were identified and returned to the families for private burial, some were not, and were laid to rest under the marker. Two of the crew members, Scobee and Smith, are buried in Arlington, as well. There is also a similar memorial to those who died when the Shuttle Columbia broke apart during reentry on February 1, 2003, dedicated on the first anniversary of the disaster. NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ... Space Shuttle Challenger (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-099) was NASAs second Space Shuttle orbiter to be put into service. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger on mission 51L/STS-33, the 25th of the STS (Space Transportation System) program, began at an estimated time of 16:38:00. ... For further information about Challengers mission and crew, see STS-51-L. The iconic image of Space Shuttle Challengers smoke plume after its breakup 73 seconds after launch. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Gillespie Magee Jr Magees Grave, Scopwick Pilot Officer John Gillespie Magee, Junior (June 9, 1922 – December 11, 1941) was an American aviator and poet who died fighting in World War II while serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force, which he had joined before the United States had... John Gillespie Magee Jr Pilot Officer John Gillespie Magee, Junior (June 9, 1922 - December 11, 1941) was an American aviator and poet who died fighting in the Battle of Britain while serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force before the United States had officially entered the war. ... Francis Richard Dick Scobee (May 19, 1939 - January 28, 1986) was an American astronaut who died commanding the Space Shuttle Challenger, which suffered catastrophic booster failure during launch of the STS-51-L mission. ... Michael John Smith (April 30, 1945 – January 28, 1986) was an American astronaut, pilot of the Space Shuttle Challenger when it was destroyed during the STS-51-L mission. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster occurred on February 1, 2003, when the Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated over Texas during re-entry into the Earths atmosphere, shortly before concluding its 28th mission, STS-107. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On a knoll just south of Arlington House, with views of the Washingtom Monument and Capitol, is a memorial to Pierre-Charles L'Enfant the architect who laid out the city of Washington. His remains lay below a marble memorial incised with his plan for the city. L'Enfant envisioned a grand neoclassical capital city for the young republic that would rival the capitals of European monarchies. Pierre Charles LEnfant LEnfants plan for Washington Pierre Charles LEnfant (2 August 1754; Paris, France – 14 June 1825; Prince Georges County, Maryland) was a French-born American architect and urban planner. ...


There are memorials to those killed in two acts of terrorist violence:

  • The Pentagon memorial, which takes the shape of the Pentagon, is the memorial to the 184 victims of the terrorist attack on the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. The memorial lists the names of the 184 victims that were killed.
  • The cairn, the Lockerbie memorial, which is the memorial to the 270 killed in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. The memorial is made up of 270 stones, one for each person killed in the disaster (259 on the plane, 11 on the ground). The fact that 189 of the victims were Americans made the bombing the worst single act of terrorist violence against Americans prior to the September 11 attacks.

The noted composer, arranger, trombonist and Big Band leader Maj. Alton Glenn Miller of the U.S. Army Air Forces has been missing in action since December 15, 1944. Miller was eligible for a memorial headstone in Arlington National Cemetery as a service member who died on active duty whose remains were not recoverable. At his daughter's request, a stone was placed in Memorial Section H, Number 464-A on Wilson Drive in Arlington National Cemetery in April 1992. September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pan Am Flight 103 was Pan American World Airways third daily scheduled transatlantic flight from Londons Heathrow International Airport to New Yorks John F. Kennedy International Airport. ... Lockerbie Town Hall, 2006. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Alton Glenn Miller (March 1, 1904 — presumably December 15, 1944), was an American jazz musician and bandleader in the swing era. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was a part of the U.S. Army during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


There are only two mausoleums located within the confines of the Cemetery. One is for the family of General Nelson Appleton Miles located in Section 3 and the other one belongs to the family of General Thomas Crook Sullivan and it is located in Section 1. St. ... Nelson Appleton Miles (August 8, 1839 – May 15, 1925) was an American soldier who served in the American Civil War, Indian Wars, and the Spanish-American War. ... Thomas Crook Sullivan (November 14, 1833 - March 11, 1908) was a Brigadier General in the United States Army and the nephew of General George Crook. ...


There is a Canadian Cross of Sacrifice with the names of all the citizens of the USA who lost their lives fighting in the Canadian forces during the Korean War and the two World Wars. Cross of Sacrifice The Cross of Sacrifice was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and is the focal point of the numerous cemetaries honoring the war dead of World War I that dot the countryside of the Western Front, and as far afield as Kranji...


The Women in Military Service for America Memorial can be found at the Ceremonial Entrance to Arlington National Cemetery. The Women in Military Service for America Memorial is located at the Ceremonial Entrance to Arlington National Cemetery and honors all women who have served in the United States Armed Forces. ...


Also, in the cemetery, there is a Confederate section with graves of soldiers of the Confederate States of America and a Confederate Memorial. [3] Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President...


Burial procedures

Respectful silence is requested at Arlington.
Respectful silence is requested at Arlington.
Arlington House flag flying at half-staff. The flag is lowered during interrments.
Arlington House flag flying at half-staff. The flag is lowered during interrments.[2]

The flags in Arlington National Cemetery are flown at half-staff from a half hour before the first funeral until a half hour after the last funeral each day. Funerals are normally conducted five days a week, excluding weekends. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1800, 2087 KB) Summary A sign commanding silence and respect at Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.. Author: David Bjorgen Licensing This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1800, 2087 KB) Summary A sign commanding silence and respect at Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, D.C.. Author: David Bjorgen Licensing This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ... ImageMetadata File history File links ArlingtonLeeMansionFlag. ... ImageMetadata File history File links ArlingtonLeeMansionFlag. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Funerals, including interments and inurnments, average well over 20 a day. The Cemetery conducts approximately 5,400 burials each year. [4]


With more than 290,000 people interred there, Arlington National Cemetery has the second-largest number of people buried of any national cemetery in the United States. The largest of the 130 national cemeteries is the Calverton National Cemetery, on Long Island, near Riverhead, New York, which conducts more than 7,000 burials each year. Flag folding honors for a funeral service held at the Calverton National Cemetery in Long Island, New York Calverton National Cemetery is located in eastern Long Island between the towns of Manorville and Riverhead in Suffolk County. ... This article is about Long Island in New York State. ... The Riverhead is a hamlet in the Town of Riverhead in Suffolk County, New York. ...


In addition to in-ground burial, Arlington National Cemetery also has one of the larger columbariums for cremated remains in the country. Four courts are currently in use, each with 5,000 niches. When construction is complete, there will be nine courts with a total of 50,000 niches; capacity for 100,000 remains. Any honorably discharged veteran is eligible for inurnment in the columbarium. Columbarium niches built into the side of St. ...


Notable burials

Notable military figures

As of May 2006, there were 367 Medal of Honor recipients buried in Arlington National Cemetery,[4] nine of whom are Canadians. Creighton Williams Abrams Jr. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Henry Harley Hap Arnold (June 25, 1886 – January 15, 1950) was an aviation pioneer and Chief of the United States Army Air Corps (from 1938), Commanding General of the U.S. Army Air Forces (from 1941 until 1945) and the first and only General of the Air Force (in 1949). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... William Gordon Beecher, Jr. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Jeremy Michael Boorda (November 26, 1939 – May 16, 1996) was an admiral of the United States Navy and the 25th Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 - April 8, 1981) was one of the main US Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II. Bradley was born to a poor family near Clark, Missouri, the son of a schoolteacher. ... An army group is a military organization (formation) consisting of several armies, and is supposed to be self-sufficient for indefinite periods. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... Colonel Ruby Bradley (December 19, 1907-May 28, 2002) was one of the most decorated women in United States military history. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants United States of America Empire of Japan Commanders Chester W. Nimitz Frank J. Fletcher Raymond A. Spruance Isoroku Yamamoto Chuichi Nagumo Tamon Yamaguchi † Strength 3 carriers, ~50 support ships, 233 carrier aircraft, 127 land-based aircraft 4 carriers, 7 battleships, ~150 support ships, 248 carrier aircraft, 16 floatplanes Casualties... Roger Chaffee Roger Bruce Chaffee (February 15, 1935 - January 27, 1967) was a U.S. Navy pilot who became an American astronaut in the Apollo program. ... Virgil Ivan Gus Grissom (April 3, 1926 – January 27, 1967) was a United States Air Force pilot who became the second American astronaut and one of the first to die in the U.S. space program. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... Apollo One is the official name given to the Apollo/Saturn 204 (AS-204) spacecraft, destroyed by fire during a training exercise on January 27, 1967, at Pad 34 (Launch Complex 34 at Cape Canaveral - then known as Cape Kennedy) atop a Saturn IB rocket. ... Edward Higgins White, II (Lt. ... USMA redirects here. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Bertram Tracy Clayton (October 19, 1862-May 30, 1918) was an American soldier & politician. ... Louis Cukela (1 May 1888 – 19 March 1956) was a famous United States Marine. ... Gerald Francis DeConto (b. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... Captain is a nautical term, an organizational title, and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Jane Arminda Delano, born March 12, 1862 in Montour Falls, New York, United States – died April 15, 1919 in Savenay, Loire-Atlantique, France, was a nurse and founder of the American Red Cross Nursing Service. ... Field Marshal Sir John Greer Dill CMG DSO GCB (25 December 1881 - 4 November 1944) was a British commander in World War I and World War II who played a significant role in the formation of the special relationship. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... William Donovan William Joseph Donovan (January 1, 1883 – February 8, 1959) was born in Buffalo, New York on New Years Day, 1883, and is best remembered today as wartime head of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). ... The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was a United States intelligence agency formed during World War II. It was the wartime intelligence agency and was a lineage precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency, as well as for the Special Forces and Navy Seals, who have traced their lineage back to... Abner Doubleday Abner Doubleday (June 26, 1819 – January 26, 1893), was a career U.S. Army officer and Union general in the American Civil War. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Rene Arthur Gagnon (March 7, 1925 – October 12, 1979) was one of the U.S. Marines immortalized by Joe Rosenthals famous World War II photograph Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima. ... Ira Hamilton Hayes (January 12, 1923 – January 24, 1955) was a Akimel O’odham, or Pima Indian, and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Community. ... Sergeant Michael Strank (in Rusyn: Mykhal Strenk; in Slovak: Michal Strenk) (November 10, 1919 – March 1, 1945) was a U.S. Marine during World War II. He was photographed in Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima during the Battle of Iwo Jima. ... With the U.S. fleet off Iwo Jima in the background, Joe Rosenthal strikes a pose on the summit of Mount Suribachi Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) was an American photographer who received the Pulitzer Prize for his iconic World War II photograph Raising the Flag on... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... David H. Hackworth (November 11, 1930 – May 4, 2005) known affectionately as Hack as in a hack journalist who murdered an Admiral, was a retired United States Army colonel, bordello owner and prominent military journalist. ... William Bull Halsey William Frederick Bull Halsey, Jr. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Fleet Admiral Collar Device Fleet Admiral Shoulder Board Fleet Admiral Sleeve Insignia A Fleet Admiral in the United States Navy is an admiral considered to be the equivalent of the United States Armys General of the Army. ... Kara Hultgreen with her F-14 Tomcat Kara Spears Hultgreen (October 5, 1965 – October 25, 1994), a Lieutenant in the United States Navy, was the first female naval carrier-based fighter pilot. ... Daniel Chappie James Jr. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Philip Kearny (June 2, 1815–September 1, 1862) was a United States Army officer, notably in the Mexican and Civil wars. ... The Battle of Chantilly or Ox Hill took place on September 1, 1862, in Fairfax County, Virginia, as the concluding battle of the Northern Virginia Campaign of the American Civil War. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Mark Matthews (August 7, 1894 - September 6, 2005) was the oldest suriving Buffalo Soldier in the United States Army when he died at age 111. ... Saddle and acessories of the Buffalo Soldier. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... MIA is a three-letter acronym that is most commonly used to designate a combatant who is Missing In Action, and has not yet returned or otherwise been accounted for as either dead (KIA) or a prisoner of war (POW). ... Captain David McCampbell (January 16, 1910 - June 30, 1996) was an American aviator, who became the US Navy’s all-time leading ace with 34 aerial victories during World War II. McCambell was born in Bessemer, Alabama, and raised in West Palm Beach, Florida. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Montgomery C. Meigs Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (IPA: ) (May 3, 1816 – January 2, 1892) was a career U.S. Army officer, civil engineer, construction engineer for a number of facilities in Washington, D.C., and Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army during and after the American Civil War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... A burial vault is a structural underground tomb. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Francis Gary Powers (August 17, 1929 - August 1, 1977) was the American pilot whose U-2 plane was shot down while over the Soviet Union, thus causing the U-2 Crisis of 1960. ... Maj. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Ulysses S. Grant[2] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Alfred C. Richmond (January 18, 1902-March 15, 1984), He served as Commandant of the United States Coast Guard from 1954 to 1962. ... Commandant is a military or police title or rank and can mean any of the following: The commander of certain military corps and services, such as the Commandant of the Marine Corps and the Commandant of the Coast Guard in the United States or the Commandant of the (now obsolete... USCG HH-65 Dolphin The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States armed forces and is involved in maritime law enforcement, mariner assistance, search and rescue, and national defense. ... Hyman G. Rickover (1955) Admiral Hyman George Rickover, U.S. Navy, (January 27, 1900 – July 8, 1986) was known as the Father of the Nuclear Navy, which as of November 2005 had produced 199 nuclear-powered submarines, and 19 nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and cruisers, though many of these U... Nuclear navy, or nuclear powered navy consists of ships powered by relatively small onboard nuclear reactors known as naval reactors. ... Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Lauri Allan Törni (May 28, 1919 - October 1965) was a Finnish army captain who led an infantry unit in Finnish wars and moved to the United States after the war. ... Lt. ... Jonathan Mayhew Wainwright IV (August 23, 1883 – September 2, 1953), was a United States Army general and the commanding officer of Allied forces in The Philippines, at the time of their surrender to the Empire of Japan during World War II. // Early Life and Training Wainwright was born at Fort... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Bataan Region: Central Luzon (Region III) Capital: Balanga City Founded: —1754 Population: 2000 census—557,659 (46th largest) Density—406 per km² (12th highest) Area: 1,373. ... Corregidor and the entrance to Manila Bay Corregidor in 1941 Corregidor is an island in the entrance of the Philippines Manila Bay. ... Robert S. Webb was a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Air Forces who flew 55 straight missions over Germany and Italy as a B-17 Flying Fortress pilot during World War II. He was one of the youngest bomber pilots in the Army Air Forces. ... The Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress is an American four-engine heavy bomber aircraft developed for the US Army Air Corps (USAAC). ... Joseph Wheeler Joseph Wheeler (September 10, 1836 – January 25, 1906) was an American military commander and politician. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1] The Spanish–American... Combatants United States Philippines Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Strength 126,000 soldiers 80,000 soldiers Casualties 4,324 U.S. soldiers dead, 3,000 wounded 2,000 killed, dead, or wounded suffered by the Philippine Constabulary 16,000 soldiers killed est. ... Orde Charles Wingate Major General Orde Charles Wingate, DSO (February 26, 1903 – March 24, 1944), was a British major general and creator of two special military units during World War II. // Beginnings Orde Wingate was born February 23, 1903 in Naini Tal, India to a military family. ... The Chindits (Officially in 1942 77th Indian Infantry Brigade and in 1943 Indian 3rd Infantry Division) were a British Indian Army Special Force that served in Burma and India from 1942 until 1945 during the Burma Campaign in World War II. They were formed into long range penetration groups trained... Clark Howell Woodward (1877-1968) served the United States Navy in five wars: the Spanish-American War, Philippine-American War, the Chinese Boxer Rebellion, and both World Wars. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1] The Spanish–American... Combatants United States Philippines Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Strength 126,000 soldiers 80,000 soldiers Casualties 4,324 U.S. soldiers dead, 3,000 wounded 2,000 killed, dead, or wounded suffered by the Philippine Constabulary 16,000 soldiers killed est. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... May 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → May 1, 2006 (Monday) Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association outraged Vatican by planning to ordain another bishop, Liu Xinhong in Anhui Province. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ...


Wartime service members with other distinguished careers

Rows of tombstones at Arlington National Cemetery.
Rows of tombstones at Arlington National Cemetery.
Closer look at tombstones at Arlington National Cemetery.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2016x1512, 4495 KB) This is a picture of a field of tombstones at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2016x1512, 4495 KB) This is a picture of a field of tombstones at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Hugo Black Hugo LaFayette Black (February 27, 1886 – September 25, 1971) was a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1937 - 1971). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... William Joseph Brennan (April 25, 1906 - July 24, 1997) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Ronald Brown can refer to Ron Brown, a United States Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown, a Wisconsin State Senator Ron Brown, NBC International Affairs correspondent Ronald Brown, a former British member of Parliament for Hackney, South and Shoreditch Ronald Brown, a former British member of Parliament for Edinburgh, Leith This... William Francis Buckley (May 30, 1928 – June 3, 1985) was a U.S. Army officer and intelligence agency operative. ... For other uses, see Beirut (disambiguation). ... Clark McAdams Clifford (December 25, 1906 – October 10, 1998) was a highly influential American lawyer who served Presidents Truman, Kennedy, Johnson and Carter, serving as Secretary of Defense for Johnson. ... Cover of Time Magazine (December 15, 1924) Dwight Filley Davis (July 5, 1879 - November 28, 1945) was an American tennis player and politician. ... The great Australians Lew Hoad and Ken Rosewall with the Cup in 1953 The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in mens tennis. ... John Foster Dulles (February 25, 1888 – May 24, 1959) was an American statesman who served as Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. ... Medgar Wiley Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist from Mississippi. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories. ... Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy officer. ... NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ... Frank Kowalski (October 18, 1907 - October 11, 1974) was a United States Representative from Connecticut. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Pierre (Peter) Charles LEnfant LEnfants plan for Washington, as revised by Andrew Ellicott Pierre (Peter) Charles LEnfant (2 August 1754, Paris, France – 14 June 1825, Prince Georges County, Maryland) was a French-born American architect and urban planner. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... Robert Todd Lincoln (August 1, 1843 – July 26, 1926) was the first son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Ann Todd. ... Joseph Louis Barrow (May 13, 1914 – April 13, 1981), better known in the boxing world as Joe Louis and nicknamed The Brown Bomber, was a native of LaFayette, Alabama and is regarded as one of the greatest heavyweight boxing champions. ... Allard Kenneth Lowenstein, (January 16, 1929–March 14, 1980) was a liberal Democratic politician, a one-term congressman representing the 5th District in Nassau County, New York from 1968 until 1970. ... John Roy Lynch (September 10, 1847 - November 2, 1939) was the first African American Speaker of the House in Mississippi. ... Mike Mansfield, Congressional portrait This article describes the American politician. ... Lee Marvin (born on February 19, 1924 – August 29, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... William Henry Bill Mauldin (October 29, 1921 – January 22, 2003) was a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the United States. ... John C. Metzler (May 8, 1909- May 25, 1990), known as Jack, was the superintendent of Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia from 1951 to 1972. ... John C. Metzler, Jr. ... Daniel Patrick Pat Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... NY redirects here. ... Spottswood Poles (December 9, 1887 - September 12, 1962) was an American outfielder in baseballs Negro Leagues. ... Bud Fowler, the first professional black baseball player with one of his teams, Western of Keokuk, Iowa The Negro Leagues were American professional baseball leagues comprising predominantly African-American teams. ... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure, who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of... Dr. Earl W. Renfroe. ... Frank Reynolds (November 29, 1923 – July 20, 1983), was a TV journalist for ABC. He is best remembered as anchor of the ABC Evening News (now World News) from 1968-1970 and 1978-1983. ... Johnny Micheal Mike Spann (March 1, 1969 – November 25, 2001) was the first American killed in combat after the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. ... Congressman in from 1959 to 1988, Sam Strattono was Mayor of Schenectady, NY in the 1950s. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, a leader of the progressive conservative wing of the Republican Party in the early 20th century, a pioneer in international arbitration and... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of... George Westinghouse, Jr. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Westinghouse logo (designed by Paul Rand) The Westinghouse Electric Company, headquartered in Monroeville, Pennsylvania, is an organization founded by George Westinghouse in 1886. ... Harvey Washington Wiley Harvey Washington Wiley (October 30, 1844, Kent, Indiana - June 30, 1930, Washington, D.C.) was a noted chemist involved with the passage of the landmark Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. ... FDA logo The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is responsible for regulating food, dietary supplements, drugs, biological medical products, blood products, medical devices, radiation-emitting devices, veterinary products, and cosmetics in the United States. ... The Pure Food and Drug Act of June 30, 1906 is a United States federal law that provided for federal inspection of meat products, and forbide the manufacture, sale, or transportation of adulterated food products or poisonous patent medicines. ... Charles Willeford Charles Willeford was born 2 January 1919 in Little Rock, Arkansas. ...

Notable civilian citizens

Whether or not they were wartime service members, U.S. Presidents are eligible to be buried at Arlington since they oversaw the armed forces. American Embassy in Athens American Embassy in Brussels American Embassy in Budapest American Embassy in Dublin American Consulate General in Kraków American Embassy in London American Embassy in Moscow American Embassy in Oslo American Embassy in Stockholm American Embassy in Vienna American Embassy in Ottawa American Embassy in Bridgetown... Nairobi (pronounced ) is the capital and largest city of Kenya. ... Justice Harry Blackmun Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 to 1994. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898 – January 19, 1980) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice. ... Potter Stewart (January 23, 1915 – December 7, 1985) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Leslie William Coffelt (August 15, 1910 – November 1, 1950), was an American law enforcement officer. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Guerilla may refer to Guerrilla warfare. ... Phyllis Kirk (born 18 September 1929) is an American actress born in Syracuse, New York. ... Marie Teresa Rios, also Marie Teresa Rios Versace, (pen name Tere Rios) (November 9, 1917-October 17, 1999) was the author of a book was which the basis for a popular 1960s television sitcom, The Flying Nun. ... The Flying Nun was a sitcom produced by the ABC from 1967 until 1970. ... The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a police force charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its territories. ... Russell Eugene Weston Jr. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...


Three state funerals have been held at Arlington: those of Presidents William Howard Taft and John F. Kennedy, and that of General of the Armies John Pershing. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... General of the Armies of the United States is the highest possible land-based rank in the United States military hierarchy, equal to a Generalissimo. ... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ...


See also

Military of the United States Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Arlington National Cemetery

Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... The United States Air Force Memorial is a sculpture in progress in Arlington, Virginia and designed by American architect James Ingo Freed with the firm Pei Cobb Freed and Partners Architects LLP for United States Air Force Memorial Foundation. ... The Marine Corps War Memorial is a military memorial statue located near the Arlington National Cemetery in Rosslyn, Virginia, United States. ... The Netherlands Carillon at Arlington National Cemetery was a gift from the people of the Netherlands to the people of the United States of America in 1954. ... Rendering of Pentagon Memorial. ...

References

  1. ^ Eligibility for Interment (Ground Burial). A Guide to Burial at Arlington National Cemetery. Arlington National Cemetery. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  2. ^ Location of Arlington House flagpole: Hybrid satellite image/street map from WikiMapia
  3. ^ Atkinson, Rick (June 2007). "The Nation's Cemetary". National Geographic Magazine. 
  4. ^ Medal of Honor Recipients Buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington National Cemetery. (retrieved April 9, 2006)

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

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