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Encyclopedia > Arles

Coordinates: 43°40′41″N, 04°37′46″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Commune of Arles

The Roman arena in Arles
arena of the city of Arles File links The following pages link to this file: Arles Categories: Images with unknown source ...

Location
Map highlighting the commune of
Coordinates 43°40′41″N, 04°37′46″E
Administration
Country France
Region Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Department Bouches-du-Rhône
(Subprefecture)
Arrondissement Arles
Canton Chief town of 2 cantons: Arles-Est and Arles-Ouest
Intercommunality Agglomeration community of Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette
Mayor Hervé Schiavetti (PS)
(2001-2008)
Statistics
Altitude 0 m–57 m
(avg. 10 m)
Land area¹ 758.93 km²
Population²
(2005)
52,600
 - Density 66/km² (2005)
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 13004/ 13200
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France
Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

State Party Flag of France France
Type Cultural
Criteria ii, iv
Reference 164
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 1981  (5th Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

Arles (Provençal Occitan: Arle in both classical and Mistralian norms) is a city in the south of France, in the Bouches-du-Rhône department, of which it is a subprefecture, in the former province of Provence. Image File history File links Paris_plan_pointer_b_jms. ... Image File history File links France_jms. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Alpes-de-Haute-Provence Alpes-Maritimes Bouches-du-Rhône Hautes-Alpes Var Vaucluse Arrondissements 18 Cantons 237 Communes 963 Statistics Land area1 31,400 km² Population (Ranked 3rd)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Bouches-du-Rhône is a département in the south of France named after the mouth of the Rhône River. ... A subprefecture in Verdun, France Subprefectures (French: sous-préfectures) are the administrative towns of arrondissements in France that do not contain the prefecture for its department. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The Arrondissement of Arles is located in the Bouches-du-Rhône département, in southern France. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... The Communauté dagglomération Arles-Crau-Camargue-Montagnette (CCAM) was created on January 1, 2004. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste, PS) is one of the largest political parties in France. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Rio de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Arles Roman theatre pillar ruins. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Provençal (Provençau) is one of several dialects of Occitan spoken by a minority of people in southern France and other areas of France and Italy. ... Occitan, or langue doc is a Romance language characterized by its richness, variability, and by the intelligibility of its dialects. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bouches-du-Rhône is a département in the south of France named after the mouth of the Rhône River. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... A subprefecture in Verdun, France Subprefectures (French: sous-préfectures) are the administrative towns of arrondissements in France that do not contain the prefecture for its department. ... The Kingdom of France was organised into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the département system superseded provinces. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) was a Roman province and now is a region of southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Italy. ...

Contents

Geography

The Rhône river forks into two branches just upstream of Arles, forming the Camargue delta. Because the Camargue is administratively part of Arles, the commune as a whole is the largest commune in Metropolitan France in terms of territory, although its population is only slightly more than 50,000. Its area is 758.93 km², which is more than seven times the area of Paris. The Rhône River, or the Rhône (French Rhône, Arpitan Rôno, Occitan Ròse, standard German Rhone, Valais German Rotten), is one of the major rivers of Europe, running through Switzerland and France. ... Shoreline of the Étang de Vaccarès For other uses, see Camargue (disambiguation). ... Nile River delta, as seen from Earth orbit. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... Metropolitan France Metropolitan France (French: or la Métropole) is the part of France located in Europe, including Corsica (French: Corse). ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


History

For the Ecclesiastical history see Archbishopric of Arles

The archbishoric has its episcopal see in the city of Arles, in southern France. ...

Roman Arles

Arles was established by the Greeks as early as the 6th century BC under the name of Theline. It was captured by the Celtic Salluvii in 535 BC, who renamed it to Arelate. The Romans took the town in 123 BC and expanded it into an important city, with a canal link to the Mediterranean Sea being constructed in 104 BC. However, it struggled to escape the shadow of Massalia (Marseille) further along the coast. This article is about the European people. ... Salyes (Gr. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC Events and Trends 538 BC - Babylon occupied by Jews transported to Babylon are allowed to return to... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120s BC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC Years: 128 BC 127 BC 126 BC 125 BC 124 BC - 123 BC - 122 BC 121 BC... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 109 BC 108 BC 107 BC 106 BC 105 BC - 104 BC - 103 BC 102 BC... City motto: Actibus immensis urbs fulget Massiliensis. ...


Its chance came when it sided with Julius Caesar against Pompey, providing military support. Massalia backed Pompey; when Caesar emerged victorious, Massalia was stripped of its possessions, which were transferred to Arelate as a reward. The town was formally established as a colony for veterans of the Roman legion Legio VI Ferrata, which had its base there. Its full title as a colony was Colonia Iulia Paterna Arelatensium Sextanorum, "the ancestral Julian colony of Arles of the soldiers of the Sixth." For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... A veteran refers to a person who is experienced in a particular area, particularly referring to people in the armed forces. ... The Roman Legion (from Latin , from lego, legere, legi, lectus — to collect) is a term that can apply both as a transliteration of legio (conscription or army) to the entire Roman army and also, more narrowly (and more commonly), to the heavy infantry that was the basic military unit of... Legio VI Ferrata (Ironclad) was a Roman legion. ...


Importance

Roman Arelate was a city of considerable importance in the province of Gallia Narbonensis. It covered an area of some 99 acres (400,000 m²) and possessed a wide array of monuments, including an amphitheater, triumphal arch, Roman circus, theater and a full circuit of walls. It was closer to the sea than it is now and served as a major port. It also had (and still has) the southernmost bridge on the Rhone. Very unusually, the Roman bridge was not fixed but used a pontoon-style bridge of boats, with towers and drawbridges at each end. The boats were secured in place with anchors and by being tethered to twin towers built just upstream of the bridge. This unusual design was a way of coping with the river's frequent violent floods, which would have made short work of a conventional bridge. Nothing now remains of the Roman bridge, which has been replaced by a more modern bridge near the same spot. Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Languedoc and Provence, in southern France. ... Arles Amphitheatre is a Roman amphitheatre in the southern French town of Arles. ... A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. ... Circus Maximus, Rome The Roman Circus, the theatre and the amphitheatre were the most important buildings in the cities for public entertainment in the Roman Empire. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... A bridge of boats over the Scheldt River, during World War I A bridge of boats over the Ravi River in Pakistan, 1895 A bridge of boats is a temporary type of bridge which floats on the river instead of having permanent pillars. ...


The city reached a peak of influence during the 4th and 5th centuries, when it was frequently used as headquarters for Roman Emperors during military campaigns. In 395 it became the seat of the Praetorian Prefecture of the Gauls, governing the western part of the Western Empire: Gaul proper plus Hispania (Spain) and Armorica (Brittany). As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This is a list of Roman Emperors with the dates they controlled the Roman Empire. ... The Praetorian Guard (sometimes Prætorian Guard) (in Latin: praetoriani) comprised a special force of bodyguards used by Roman emperors. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given,in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... Armorica or Aremorica is the name given in ancient times to the part of Gaul that includes the Brittany peninsula and the territory between the Seine and Loire rivers, extending inland to an indeterminate point and down the Atlantic coast. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ...


It became a favorite city of Emperor Constantine I, who built baths there, substantial remains of which are still standing. His son, Constantine II, was born there. Usurper Constantine III declared himself emperor in the West (407–411) and made Arles his capital in 408. For other uses, see Constantine I (disambiguation). ... Roman public baths in Bath, England. ... Constantine II, (February 317 - 340), was Roman Emperor (337 - 340). ... Usurpers were a common feature of the late Roman Empire, especially from the so-called crisis of the third century onwards, when political instability became the rule. ... Roman coin, with Constantine III portrayed on its face Constantine III (died 411 by September 18) was a Roman general who declared himself Western Roman Emperor in 407, abdicating in 411 (and being killed soon after). ... Events Theodosius II succeeds his father Arcadius as Emperor of the Eastern half of the Roman Empire In the summer of this year, the usurper Constantine III captures Spain, destroying the loyalist forces defending it. ...


Arles became renowned as a cultural and religious centre during the late Roman Empire. It was the birthplace of the skeptical philosopher Favorinus. It was also a key location for Roman Christianity and an important base for the Christianization of Gaul. The city's bishopric was held by a series of outstanding clerics, beginning with Saint Trophimus around 225 and continuing with Saint Honoré, then Saint Hilary in the first half of the 5th century. The political tension between the Catholic bishops of Arles and the Visigothic kings is epitomized in the career of the Frankish St Caesarius, bishop of Arles 503–542, who was suspected by the Arian Visigoth Alaric II of conspiring with the Burgundians to turn over the Arelate to Burgundy, and was exiled for a year to Bordeaux in Aquitaine, and again in 512 when Arles held out against Theodoric the Great, Caesarius was imprisoned and sent to Ravenna to explain his actions before the Ostrogothic king.[1] Favorinus (2nd century AD), was a Greek sophist and philosopher who flourished during the reign of Hadrian. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... According to Catholic lore, Saint Trophimus of Arles or Saint Trophime was the first bishop of Arles, in todays southern France. ... St. ... Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... This article needs cleanup. ... Arian may refer to: Arian, being well endowed. ... Alaric II, also known as Alarik, Alarich, and Alarico in Spanish or Alaricus in Latin (d. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Theodoric the Great (454 - August 30, 526), known to the Romans as Flavius Theodoricus, was king of the Ostrogoths (488-526), ruler of Italy (493-526), and regent of the Visigoths (511-526). ... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ...


The friction between the Arian Christianity of the Visigoths and the Catholicism of the bishops sent out from Rome established deep roots for religious heterodoxy, even heresy, in Occitan culture. At Treves in 385, Priscillian achieved the distinction of becoming the first Christian burned alive for heresy (Manichaean in his case, see also Cathars, Camisards). Despite this tension and the city's decline in the face of barbarian invasions, Arles remained a great religious centre and host of church councils (see Council of Arles), the rival of Vienne, for hundreds of years. Migrations The Visigoths (Western Goths) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Heterodoxy includes any opinions or doctrines at variance with an official or orthodox position.[1] As an adjective, heterodox is used to describe a subject as characterized by departure from accepted beliefs or standards (status quo). ... Look up Heresy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Occitan, or langue doc is a Romance language characterized by its richness, variability, and by the intelligibility of its dialects. ... Trier: The Porta Nigra, viewed from outside Trier (French: Trèves), is Germanys oldest city. ... Priscillian of Avila (died 385) was a Spanish theologian and the founder of a party which advocated strong asceticism. ... Look up Heresy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Manichaeism was one of the major ancient religions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catharism. ... After the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, a revolt by the Camisards (Occitan camisa, smock or shirtsleeves) broke out in 1702, in the rugged and isolated Cevennes region of south-central France, the traditional heartland of religious heterodoxy (see Cathar). ... For other uses, see Barbarian (disambiguation). ... ... Vienne (Vièna in Arpitan) is a commune of France, located 30 km south of Lyon, on the Rhône River. ...

Cloister of Saint Trophimus.

cloister of St. ... cloister of St. ...

Medieval Arles

Arles was badly affected by the invasion of Provence by the Muslim Saracens and the Franks, who took control of the region in the 8th century. In 855 it was made the capital of a Frankish Kingdom of Arles, which included Burgundy and part of Provence, but was frequently terrorised by Saracen and Viking raiders. In 888, Rodolphe, Count of Auxerre (now in north-western Burgundy), founded the kingdom of Bourgogne Transjurane (literally, beyond the Jura mountains), which included western Switzerland as far as the river Reuss, Valais, Geneva, Chablais and Bugey. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... In older Western historical literature, the Saracens were the people of the Saracen Empire, another name for the Arab Caliphate under the rule of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... Events Louis II succeeds Lothar as western emperor. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year A.D. 888. ... Coordinates Administration Country France Region Bourgogne Department Yonne (Prefecture) Arrondissement Auxerre Canton Chief town of 5 cantons Intercommunality Communauté de Communes de lAuxerrois Mayor Guy Ferez (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 93 m–217 m (avg. ... Coat of arms of the 2nd duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: Bourgogne) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Pre-Indo-European people, Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks. ... The Valais (German:  ) is one of the 26 cantons of Switzerland in the south-western part of the country, in the Pennine Alps around the valley of the Rhone River from its springs to Lake Geneva. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... The Bugey (French: le Bugey) is a historical region in the département of Ain, France. ...


In 933, Hugh of Arles ("Hugues de Provence") gave his kingdom up to Rodolphe II, who merged the two kingdoms into a new Kingdom of Arles. In 1032, King Rodolphe III died, and the Kingdom was inherited by Emperor Conrad II the Salic. Though his successors counted themselves kings of Arles, few went to be crowned in the cathedral. Most of the territory of the Kingdom was progressively incorporated into France. During these troubled times, the amphitheatre was converted into a fortress, with watchtowers built at each of the four quadrants and a minuscule walled town being constructed within. The population was by now only a fraction of what it had been in Roman times, with much of old Arles lying in ruins. Now the people of Arles walk around with underwear on their heads screaming! Events Jersey was seized by William Longsword, Duke of Normandy . ... Hugh of Arles was born sometime before 887, the son of Theobald of Arles and of Bertha, illegitimate daughter of Lothar II of Lotharingia. ... Events February 2 - Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, becomes King of Burgundy. ... Rudolf III of Burgundy, died September 6, 1032, King of Burgundy (993–1032). ... Conrad II (circa 990 - June 4, 1039) was the son of count Henry of Speyer. ... Arles Amphitheatre is a Roman amphitheatre in the southern French town of Arles. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ...


The town regained political and economic prominence in the 12th century, with the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbarossa traveling there in 1178 for his coronation. In the 12th century, it became a free city governed by an elected podestat (chief magistrate; literally "power"), who appointed the consuls and other magistrates. It retained this status until the French Revolution of 1789. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Frederick I (German: Friedrich I. von Hohenstaufen)(1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Friedrich Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ... Events June 18 - Five Canterbury monks see what was possibly the Giordano Bruno crater being formed The Sung Document written detailing the discovery of Mu-Lan-Pi (suggested by some to be California) by Muslim sailors The Chronicle of Gervase of Canterbury written The Leaning Tower of Pisa begins to... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... For information on the phantom island of the same name, see Podesta (island). ... For modern diplomatic consuls, see Consulate general. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Arles joined the countship of Provence in 1239 but suffered its prominence being eclipsed once more by Marseille. In 1378, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV ceded the remnants of the Kingdom of Arles to the Dauphin of France (later King Charles VI of France) and the Kingdom ceased to exist even on paper. // Events Births June 17 - King Edward I of England (died 1307) December 17 - Kujo Yoritsugu, Japanese shogun (died 1256) Peter III of Aragon (died 1285) John II, Duke of Brittany (died 1305) Ippen, Japanese monk (died 1289) Deaths March 3 - Vladimir III Rurikovich, Grand Prince of Kiev (born 1187) March... Events March - John Wyclif tried to gain public favour by laying his theses before parliament, and then made them public in a tract. ... Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of France. ... Charles VI Charles VI the Well-Beloved, later known as the Mad (French: Charles VI le Bien-Aimé, later known as le Fol) (December 3, 1368 – October 21, 1422) was a King of France (1380 – 1422) and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ...


Modern Arles

The Place Du Forum in Arles today.
The Place Du Forum in Arles today.

Arles remained economically important for many years as a major port on the Rhône. The arrival of the railway in the 19th century eventually killed off much of the river trade, leading to the town becoming something of a backwater. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 645 KB)The Place du Forum in Arles, France, as famously depicted by Vincent van Gogh in Cafe Terrace at Night. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 645 KB)The Place du Forum in Arles, France, as famously depicted by Vincent van Gogh in Cafe Terrace at Night. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Cafe Terrace at Night by Vincent Van Gogh (September 1888). It depicts the warmth of a café in Arles.
Cafe Terrace at Night by Vincent Van Gogh (September 1888). It depicts the warmth of a café in Arles.
Portal of Saint Trophimus cathedral.
Garlic stand in the Arles street market.
Garlic stand in the Arles street market.
Arlésiennes in costume.
View of the city center, with the Rhone in the background.
Roman arena, inside view.

This made it an attractive destination for the painter Vincent van Gogh, who arrived there on 21 February 1888. He was fascinated by the Provençal landscapes, producing over 300 paintings and drawings during his time in Arles. Many of his most famous paintings were completed there, including The Night Cafe, the Yellow Room, Starry Night Over the Rhone, and L'Arlésienne. Paul Gauguin visited van Gogh in Arles. However, van Gogh's mental health deteriorated and he became alarmingly eccentric, culminating in the infamous ear-severing incident in December 1888. The concerned Arlesians circulated a petition the following February demanding that van Gogh be confined. In May 1889 he took the hint and left Arles for the asylum at nearby Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2539, 604 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Vincent van Gogh Arles Cafe Terrace at Night ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2539, 604 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Vincent van Gogh Arles Cafe Terrace at Night ... Cafe Terrace at Night, also known as The Cafe Terrace on the Place du Forum, is a painting by the Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh which he rendered in Arles, France in September 1888. ... “van Gogh” redirects here. ... Coffeehouse in Damascus A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or café shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... Portal of Cathedral of St. ... Portal of Cathedral of St. ... Lallée des Alyscamps, Vincent van Gogh, 1888 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Lallée des Alyscamps, Vincent van Gogh, 1888 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Falling Autumn Leaves (Les Alyscamps) is a painting by Vincent van Gogh. ... “van Gogh” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Arlesmarketgarlicstand. ... Image File history File links Arlesmarketgarlicstand. ... Image File history File links ArlesiensInCostume. ... Image File history File links ArlesiensInCostume. ... View of Arles from the Arena, with the Rhone in the background File links The following pages link to this file: Arles Categories: Images with unknown source ... View of Arles from the Arena, with the Rhone in the background File links The following pages link to this file: Arles Categories: Images with unknown source ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2074 × 1383 pixel, file size: 769 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roman arena in Arles, J Malik, Oct 2006 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2074 × 1383 pixel, file size: 769 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roman arena in Arles, J Malik, Oct 2006 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... “van Gogh” redirects here. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Vincent Willem van Gogh (March 30, 1853 – July 29, 1890) was a Dutch painter, generally considered one of the greatest painters in European art history. ... Bedroom in Arles (French: La Chambre à Arles; Dutch: Slaapkamer te Arles) is a painting by 19th-century Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh. ... Starry Night over the Rhone (1888) is one of Vincent van Goghs famous paintings of Arles at night. ... LArlésienne LArlésienne was a painting by Vincent van Gogh in 1888. ... Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... Saint-Rémy-de-Provence is a commune of southern France, in the Bouches-du-Rhône département, in the former province of Provence. ...


Economy

Arles is the center of a large agricultural area, and other household products as well as clothing are sold at the street market that occurs on the Boulevard des Lices every Saturday.


Relatively important rice paddies and salt pans are located in Camargue. For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... A salt pan is a geological formation found in deserts. ... Shoreline of the Étang de Vaccarès For other uses, see Camargue (disambiguation). ...


Main sights

Arles has important remains of Roman times, which have been listed as World Heritage Sites since 1981. They include: Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ...

The Church of St. Trophime (Saint Trophimus), formerly a cathedral, is a major work of Romanesque architecture, and the representation of the Last Judgment on its portal is considered one of the finest examples of Romanesque sculpture, as are the columns in the adjacent cloister. ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Arles Amphitheatre is a Roman amphitheatre in the southern French town of Arles. ... The Alyscamps, Arles, France The Alyscamps is a large Roman necropolis a short distance outside the walls of the old town of Arles, France. ... For the record label, see Necropolis Records. ... Roman public baths in Bath, England. ... In Ancient Roman architecture a cryptoporticus is a covered corridor or passageway, often underground, and often used as a gallery for pieces of artwork. ... Portal of Church of Saint Trophime Saints from facade of Saint Trophime Saints from facade of Saint Trophime Figures from facade of Saint Trophime The Church of St. ... According to Catholic lore, Saint Trophimus of Arles or Saint Trophime was the first bishop of Arles, in todays southern France. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... This article is about the Christian concept. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is a part of cathedral, monastic and abbey architecture. ...

Spice stand in the Arles street market.

The town also has an outstanding museum of ancient history, the Musée de l'Arles et de la Provence antiques, with one of the best collections of Roman sarcophagi to be found anywhere outside Rome itself. Another museum is the Museon Arlaten. However, perhaps surprisingly given the town's importance to van Gogh, none of his works are on display in Arles. Image File history File links Arlesmarketspicestand. ... Image File history File links Arlesmarketspicestand. ... A sarcophagus is a stone container for a coffin or body. ...


Miscellaneous

The Arlésiens (citizens of Arles) were noted for distinctive traditional dress which is now worn publicly at certain festivals and occasions.


A famous photography festival takes place in Arles every year, and the French national school of photography is located there. The major French publishing house Actes Sud is also situated in Arles. Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ...


The film Ronin was partially filmed in Arles. DVD cover Ronin is a 1998 film which tells the story of a group of former intelligence agents who team up to steal a mysterious metal case. ...


Bull fights are conducted in the Roman amphitheater, including Provencal-style bullfights (courses camarguaises) in which the bull is not killed but rather a team of athletic men attempt to remove a tassle from the bull's horn without getting injured. Every Easter and on the first weekend of September, Arles also holds Spanish-style corridas (in which the bulls are killed) with an encierro (bull-running in the streets) preceding each fight. Bull attacking a matador Bullfighting or tauromachy (Spanish toreo, corrida de toros or tauromaquia; Portuguese corrida de touros or tauromaquia) is a blood sport that involves, most of the times, professional performers (matadores) who execute various formal moves with the goal of appearing graceful and confident, while masterful over the... Arles Amphitheatre is a Roman amphitheatre in the southern French town of Arles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An encierro in Pastrana, Spain. ...


People

Frédéric Mistral (September 8, 1830 - March 25, 1914) was a French poet who led the 19th century revival of Occitan (Provençal) language and literature. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Jeanne Louise Calment (February 21, 1875 – August 4, 1997) reached the longest confirmed lifespan in history at 122 years and 164 days. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Christian Marie Marc Lacroix (May 16, 1951 in Arles, France) is a French fashion designer. ... First international Belgium 3 - 3 France (Brussels, Belgium; 1 May 1904) Biggest win France 10 - 0 Azerbaijan (Auxerre, France; 6 September 1995) Biggest defeat Denmark 17 - 1 France (London, England; 22 October 1908) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1930) Best result Winners, 1998 European Championship Appearances 6 (First in... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Djibril Aruun Cissé (IPA: , born 12 August 1981 in Arles, France) is a French international football player of Ivorian descent who plays as a striker for both France and Olympique de Marseille. ... Saint Genesius of Arles was a notary martyred under Maximianus in 303 or 308. ... Notary can refer to either of the following two professions: Notary public. ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ... Maximian Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius (c. ... Events Diocletian launched the last major persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire; Hierocles was said to have been the instigator of the fierce persecution of the Christians under February 24 - Galerius, Roman Emperor, publishes his edict that begins the persecution of Christians in his portion of the Empire. ... Events November 11 - The Congress of Carnuntum: Attempting to keep peace within the Roman Empire, the leaders of the Tetrarchy declare Maxentius Augustus, and rival contender Constantine I is declared Caesar (junior emperor of Britain and Gaul) Births Deaths Categories: 308 ... Matador Antonio Barrera in the capote de paseo (dress cape) before a bullfight during the 2003 Aste Nagusia festival in Bilbao, Spain A torero (roughly bull handler) is the main performer in bullfighting events in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. ... Matador Antonio Barrera in the capote de paseo (dress cape) before a bullfight during the 2003 Aste Nagusia festival in Bilbao, Spain A torero (roughly bull handler) is the main performer in bullfighting events in Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. ...

Twin towns

Arles is twinned with:

Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... The Trinity Cathedral (1682-99) is a symbol of Pskovs former might and independence. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... “Jerez” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... , Fulda (IPA: ) is a city in Hessen, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country United States State Pennsylvania County York Incorporated  - Borough September 24, 1787  - City January 11, 1887 Government  - Mayor John Brenner Area  - City  5. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Cubelles (Catalan: Cubelles, Spanish: Cubelles) is a town in Catalonia, in the province of Barcelona, Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Vercelli (Varséj in Piedmontese; Vercellae in Latin) is a commune and city of about 46,000 inhabitants in the Province of Vercelli, Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mauritania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Pothia Kalymnos, Greek: Κάλυμνος; (Turkish: Kilimli; Italian: Càlino) is a Greek island in the south-eastern Aegean Sea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... OS Grid Reference: TF460098 Lat/Lon: Population: 20,200 (2001 Census) Dwellings: 9,145 (2001 Census) Formal status: Town Administration County: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Nation: England Post Office and Telephone Post town: Wisbech Postcode: PE13, PE14 Dialling Code: 01945 Wisbech (IPA: ) is a market town and inland port... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Town of Zhouzhuang Zhouzhuang (周庄) is a town in Jiangsu province, China. ...

See also

The archbishoric has its episcopal see in the city of Arles, in southern France. ... Montmajour Abbey (French: Abbaye Notre Dame de Montmajour) is located near Arles in the Bouches-du-Rhône département, Provence, in the south of France. ... The bridge of Trinquetaille, by Vincent van Gogh, 1888 Trinquetaille is an area in the town of Arles, in southern France. ... Saint-Martin-de-Crau is a commune of the Bouches-du-Rhône département, in southern France. ...

Sources and external links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

References

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
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Arles was one of the richest urban centers in France during the Gallo-Roman period.
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