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Encyclopedia > Arlen Specter
Arlen Specter
Arlen Specter

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 5, 1981
Serving with Bob Casey, Jr.
Preceded by Richard Schweiker
Succeeded by Incumbent (2011)

Born February 12, 1930 (1930-02-12) (age 77)
Wichita, Kansas
Political party Republican
Spouse Joan Specter
Alma mater University of Pennsylvania

Yale University Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Robert Patrick Casey, Jr. ... Richard S. Schweiker Richard Schultz Schweiker (born June 1, 1926) is a former U.S. Congressman and Senator representing the state of Pennsylvania. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Kansas County Sedgwick Government  - Mayor Carl Brewer (D) Area  - City 359. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... “Yale” redirects here. ...

Religion Jewish
Signature

Arlen J. Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Republican Party, and was first elected in 1980. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and career

Specter was born in Wichita, Kansas to Jewish parents Lillie Shanin and Harry Specter.[1] He was raised in Russell, Kansas (also the hometown of 1996 Republican Presidential nominee Bob Dole). His father was Harry Specter, a peddler, tailor and junkyard owner; both he and his mother immigrated to the United States from Russia. Specter studied at universities before and after serving in the United States Air Force from 1951 to 1953, during the Korean War. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, majoring in International Relations, in 1951 and from Yale Law School in 1956. He passed the Pennsylvania Bar in 1956. Nickname: Location in the state of Kansas County Sedgwick Government  - Mayor Carl Brewer (D) Area  - City 359. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Russell is a city in Russell County, Kansas, United States. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... A peddler, Brit. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... A bar examination is an examination to determine whether a candidate is qualified to practice law in a given jurisdiction. ...


In 1953, he married Joan L. Levy, a former at-large member of the Philadelphia City Council. The couple now have two sons, Shanin and Steve.


Soon after graduation from Yale, Specter became a prominent lawyer in Philadelphia and active in politics, beginning his political life as a Democrat. At the recommendation of Rep. Gerald R. Ford, he worked for the Warren Commission, investigating the assassination of John F. Kennedy. As an assistant counsel for the commission, he authored the controversial "single bullet theory" to attempt to explain the commission's finding that a lone assassin killed Kennedy. His connections with the case are dubious after former CIA and Watergate figure Howard Hunt wrote a book just before his death[2] implicating Johnson in the assassination. Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Warren Commission report cover page The Presidents Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy, known unofficially as The Warren Commission, was established on November 29, 1963, by Lyndon B. Johnson to investigate the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. ... The Single Bullet Theory (pejoratively referred to as the magic bullet theory by critics and conspiracy theorists) is thought to be an essential element of the Warren Commission theory that only one assassin was responsible for the assassination of United States President John F. Kennedy. ...


He eventually became a Republican and scored an upset by winning a 1965 race for District Attorney in heavily Democratic Philadelphia running on an anti-corruption platform against the Democratic machine. His slogan, deemed "brilliant" by The Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne, was "We need these guys to watch those guys."[3] Before his run for District Attorney, Specter briefly represented the "unicorn killer," Ira Einhorn, who remained at large for years after Specter successfully argued that Einhorn should only pay 10% of his $40,000 bond. A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... E.J. Dionne, Jr. ... 1979 mugshot and a 2001 mugshot taken upon his arrival Ira Samuel Einhorn (born May 15, 1940) was an activist in the 1960s and 1970s who is now serving a life sentence for the murder of Holly Maddux in 1977. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


He mounted an unsuccessful campaign for mayor of Philadelphia in 1967 and was defeated for re-election to a third term as district attorney in 1973. He was defeated in the 1976 Republican Primary for U.S. Senate by John Heinz and in the 1978 primary for Governor of Pennsylvania by Dick Thornburgh.[4] List of mayors of Philadelphia, arranged chronologically. ... John Heinz Henry John Heinz III (October 23, 1938 – April 4, 1991) was an American politician from Pennsylvania, a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives (1971–1977) and the United States Senate (1977–1991). ... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... Richard L. Dick Thornburgh (born July 16, 1932) is a lawyer and Republican politician who served as the Governor of Pennsylvania from 1979 to 1987, and then as the U.S. Attorney General from 1988 to 1991. ...


He also made an abortive bid for the Republican nomination in the 1996 presidential race, before withdrawing and endorsing future nominee Bob Dole. Presidential electoral votes. ...


Senate career

Elections

Senator Specter's official portrait
Senator Specter's official portrait

In 1980, Specter became the Republican candidate for Senate when Republican incumbent Richard Schweiker announced his retirement. Specter won the election and was reelected in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2004. He is the longest-serving Senator in Pennsylvania's history; no one else from the state has been elected to five terms in that body. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2256x2879, 574 KB) http://judiciary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2256x2879, 574 KB) http://judiciary. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1980 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald W. Reagans election to the presidency. ... Richard S. Schweiker Richard Schultz Schweiker (born June 1, 1926) is a former U.S. Congressman and Senator representing the state of Pennsylvania. ... Retirement is the point where a person stops employment. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1986 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Ronald Reagans second presidential term. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1992 was an election for the United States Senate in which the victory of Bill Clinton in the presidential election was not accompanied by major Democratic... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1998 was a roughly even contest between the Republican and Democratic parties. ... Results -- light red represents Republican holds, dark red Republican pickups, light blue Democratic holds, dark blue Democratic pickups. ...


In 2004, Specter, who is often dubbed a "Republican In Name Only" (RINO) by more conservative critics, faced a challenge in the Republican primary election from conservative Congressman Pat Toomey. Toomey charged that Specter was too much of a liberal and big spender to represent the Republican Party. The match-up was closely watched nationally, being seen as a symbolic clash between the conservative and moderate wings of the Republican Party. However, most of the state's Republican establishment, including the state's other senator, Rick Santorum (who is almost as conservative as Toomey), closed ranks behind Specter. Polls showed that had Toomey won the primary, he would have almost certainly lost to the Democratic candidate, Congressman Joe Hoeffel. Specter was strongly supported by President George W. Bush. Specter narrowly avoided a major upset with 51 percent of the vote. Some considered this primary battle to have damaged his re-election hopes, moving him to the right of his past moderate stances. In the general election, he faced Hoeffel, Betsy Summers of the Libertarian Party, and Constitution Party candidate James Clymer in November 2004's general election. He was easily reelected. Republican In Name Only, or RINO, is a disparaging term for a member of the Republican Party of the United States whose political views or actions are perceived as not conservative and outside the conservative mainstream. ... A primary election is an election in which voters in a jurisdiction select candidates for a subsequent election (nominating primary). ... Pat Toomey Patrick Joseph Pat Toomey (born November 17, 1961 in Providence, Rhode Island) is a United States politician. ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Santorum” redirects here. ... Rep. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative third party in the United States, founded as the U.S. Taxpayers Party in 1992. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Results -- light red represents Republican holds, dark red Republican pickups, light blue Democratic holds, dark blue Democratic pickups. ...


Recent reports suggest that he is planning to run for re-election to his Senate Seat in 2010, when he will be eighty-one.[5] He was briefly a candidate for the Republican Presidential nomination in the 1996 election, but dropped out early in the race. He was chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence from 1995, when the Republicans gained control of the Senate, until 1997, when he became chairman of the Committee on Veterans Affairs. He chaired that committee until 2001 and again from 2003 to 2005, during the times the Republicans controlled the Senate. He also chaired the Judiciary Committee from 2005 to 2007. 2010 (MMX) will be a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is dedicated to overseeing the American Intelligence Community—the agencies and bureaus of the U.S. federal government who provide information and analysis for leaders of the executive and legislative branches. ...


Political leanings

Overview

Specter is a leading moderate Republican, reflecting his roots in Kansas and in Philadelphia. He is generally considered pro-choice on abortion (although he received a 50% rating from pro-choice group NARAL) and supports civil unions for gay couples.[6] On the immigration issue, Senator Specter supports a "pathway to citizenship" and a "guest worker program" which opponents call amnesty. He introduced Senate Bill S. 2611 (the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006 on April 6, 2006 and it was passed on May 25, 2006, before reaching a stalemate in the House. He supports affirmative action and voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1990. He was one of only four Republicans to vote against the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act and in recent years has been less enthusiastic about lawsuit reform than many members of his party. In 1995 he was the only Republican to vote to limit tax cuts to individuals with incomes of less than one million dollars. He voted against CAFTA. Specter also supports an increase in the federal minimum wage. In part because of these stances, he won his first three reelection bids (1986, 1992, and 1998) during bad years for Republicans. This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... NARAL Pro-Choice America (pronounced Nay-ral) is a United States group that favors the right to legal abortions and engages in political action to oppose restrictions on what it portrays as womens right to abort. ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing homosexual couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married heterosexuals (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by couples of differing sexes who do not... Senate Bill 2611 (Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act) (abbreviated CIRA), is a United States Senate bill dealing with immigration reform. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (PSLRA) implemented several significant substantive changes affecting certain cases brought under the federal securities laws, including changes related to pleading, discovery, liability, and awards fees and expenses. ... The Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) is a free trade agreement between the United States and the Central American countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and Canada, and Mexico. ...


On the conservative side, he strongly supports the death penalty and opposes most gun control, voting against the Brady Bill, background checks at gun shows, the ban on assault weapons, and trigger locks for handguns. His work has included numerous articles on the deterring effect the death penalty has on future crimes. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993. ...


His opposition to Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork is seen as an important factor in the nomination's failure; indeed, many conservative Republicans have never forgiven him for opposing Bork. However, he raised the ire of many Democrats who had supported him for years with his aggressive questioning of Anita Hill during the Clarence Thomas hearings. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Robert Heron Bork (born March 1, 1927) is a conservative American legal scholar who advocates the judicial philosophy of originalism. ... Anita Hill Anita F. Hill (born July 30, 1956) is a professor of social policy, law, and womens studies at Brandeis University at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management and a former colleague of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ...


In 1998 and 1999, Specter criticized his own party for its impeachment of President Bill Clinton. Believing that Clinton had not received a fair trial, Specter famously cited Scots law to render a verdict of "not proven" on President Clinton's impeachment. However, his verdict was recorded as "not guilty" in the Senate records. Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Scots law is a unique legal system with an ancient basis in Roman law. ... Not proven is a verdict available to a court in Scotland. ...



Specter is a member of The Republican Main Street Partnership and supports stem cell research. He is also a member of The Republican Majority For Choice, Christine Todd Whitman's Its My Party Too, Republicans For Choice and Republicans for Environmental Protection. The Republican Main Street Partnership is a group of social liberals and moderates in the United States Republican Party. ... Christine Todd Christie Whitman (born September 26, 1946) is an American Republican politician and author, who served as the 50th Governor of New Jersey and was the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... Republicans for Choice, an organization based in the Washington, DC area (Headquarters: 2760 Eisenhower Ave, Suite #260, Alexandria, Virginia 22314) is a political action committee (PAC) composed of members of the United States Republican Party who support legalized abortion. ... Republicans for Environmental Protection (or REP America), is a national organization of Republican voters formed in 1995 with the stated purpose of educating and advocating environmental issues and supporting efforts to conserve natural resources and protect human and environmental health. ...


On March 16, 2006, Specter upset some conservative Republican activists when he proclaimed, "The Republican Party is now principally moderate, if not liberal!" after securing $7 billion for domestic spending programs. This has only further cemented the attitude of many Republicans that Specter is a Republican In Name Only.[7] March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Republican In Name Only, or RINO, is a disparaging term for a member of the Republican Party of the United States whose political views or actions are perceived as not conservative and outside the conservative mainstream. ...



In April 2006, he was selected by Time as one of "America's 10 Best Senators." According to polls by SurveyUSA, Specter has a higher approval rating among registered Democrats in Pennsylvania than Republicans (though the difference is within the margin of error). Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... SurveyUSA is a major polling firm in the United States. ...


Reputation as abrasive

Specter is notoriously abrasive, and has earned the nickname "Snarlin' Arlen" among his foes on Capitol Hill and in the public. Specter, through a feud with Senator Harry Reid on the floor of the Senate, his position as Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee and his opposition to a new budget plan proposed by the Bush administration, has emerged as a nationally recognized figure from his previous, more taciturn role in the public eye. Capitol Hill is the name of a district in the following cities: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Capitol Hill, Seattle, Washington Capitol Hill, Washington, DC It is also a common nickname for the United States Congress and the politicians who serve it (e. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ...


Opinions on the Supreme Court

Soon after the 2004 election, Specter stepped into the public spotlight as a result of controversial statements about his views of the future of the Supreme Court. At a press conference, he stated that "when you talk about judges who would change the right of a woman to choose, overturn Roe vs. Wade, I think [confirmation] is unlikely. The president is well aware of what happened, when a number of his nominees were sent up, with the filibuster. ... And I would expect the president to be mindful of the considerations which I am mentioning." Activist groups interpreted his comments as warnings to President Bush about the implications of nominating Supreme Court justices who are opposed to the Roe v. Wade decision. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ...


Specter maintained his comments were a prediction, not a warning. He met with many conservative Republican senators, and based on assurances he gave them, he was recommended for the Judiciary Committee's chairmanship in late 2004. He officially assumed that position when the 109th Congress convened on January 4, 2005. The Judiciary Committee is responsible for holding hearings on federal judicial nominations made by the President, including Supreme Court nominees, for oversight of the United States Department of Justice, and for other matters. is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DOJ headquarters in Washington, D.C. Justice Department redirects here. ...


Tax issues

Despite Specter's mixed voting record on tax issues, he is a strong advocate of the flat tax system. On May 15, 2003, he submitted an amendment calling on the Senate Finance Committee and the Joint Economic Committee to hold hearings and consider legislation providing for a flat tax. The amendment passed 70-30, and was supported by all Republican Senators. A flat tax, also called a proportional tax, is a system that taxes all entities in a class (typically either citizens or corporations) at the same rate (as a proportion on income), as opposed to a graduated, or progressive, scheme. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Criticism of Bush for wire tapping and classified intelligence leak

Specter while he was being interviewed by Margot Adler for an episode of Justice Talking on Presidential Signing statements
Specter while he was being interviewed by Margot Adler for an episode of Justice Talking on Presidential Signing statements

Specter has been very critical of President Bush's wiretapping of US persons without warrants. When the story first broke, he called the effort "inappropriate" and "clearly and categorically wrong." He said he intended to hold hearings into the matter early in 2006, and had Alberto Gonzales appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee to answer for the program (though Specter declined to force Gonzales to testify under oath). On January 15, 2006, Specter mentioned impeachment and criminal prosecution as potential remedies if President Bush broke the law, though he downplayed the likelihood of such an outcome. From http://bioguide. ... From http://bioguide. ... Margot Adler (born 5 November 1946 in Little Rock, Arkansas) is a journalist and correspondent for National Public Radio. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The NSA warrantless surveillance controversy concerns surveillance of United States persons incident to the collection of foreign intelligence by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) as part of the war on terror. ... Alberto Gonzales (born August 4, 1955), is the 80th and current Attorney General of the United States. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Some have called for the impeachment of U.S. President George W. Bush. ...


On April 9, 2006 Specter, speaking on Fox News about the Bush administration's leaking of classified intelligence, said that "The president of the United States owes a specific explanation to the American people"[8] is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ...


Controversies

On June 9, 2006 The Washington Post reported Specter had proposed legislation that would allow Bush to seek a warrant from a special court for an electronic surveillance program "such as the one being conducted by the National Security Agency." Adding to that, Specter's bill would also grant "blanket amnesty to anyone who authorized warrantless surveillance under presidential authority."[3] Specter denied his bill would grant blanket amnesty, calling it an "erroneous report".[9] June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


The Philadelphia Inquirer reported December 25, 2006, that Specter met with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad over the protest of Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.[10]. The Philadelphia Inquirer is one of a two Knight Ridder newspaper duopoly daily for the Philadelphia area. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr Bashar al-Assad (Arabic: , ) (born 11 September 1965) is the President of the Syrian Arab Republic, Regional Secretary of the Baath Party, and the son of former President Hafez al-Assad. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ...

Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy

On March 9, 2006, The USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 2005 was signed into law. It amended the process for interim appointments of U.S. Attorneys, written into the bill by Arlen Specter during his chairmanship of the Senate Judiciary Committee.[11] The change allowed the Bush Administration to appoint interim U.S. attorneys without term limits, and without confirmation by the Senate. The Bush administration used the law to place at least eight interim attorneys into office in 2006. Specter claims that the changes were added by staffer Brett Tolman.[12] For more information, see dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy. The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act... This article details the chonology of events that occured regarding the Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy. ... This article about dismissed U.S. attorneys summarizes the circumstances surrounding a number of U.S. attorneys dismissed from office in the United States Department of Justice in 2006. ... Main article: Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy The various documents obtained by request or subpoena during dissmissal of U.S attorneys controversy by both the the United States House and Senate Committees on the Judiciary, originally produced by the Department of Justice (DOJ) or White House have been made... Main article: Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy See Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy documents for publicly released documents and hearings transcripts. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an American act which President George W. Bush signed into law on October 26, 2001. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... George W. Bush administration is the administration of the 43rd president of the United States of America, 2001-present George H. W. Bush administration is the administration of the 41st president of the United States of America, 1989-1993 This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise... Brett Tolman is the United States Attorney for the District of Utah and a former counsel in the Senate Judiciary Committee headed by Arlen Specter, R-Pa. ... The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act...


Health problems

On February 16, 2005, Specter announced that he had been diagnosed with an advanced form of Hodgkin's disease, a type of cancer. Despite the advanced form, Specter continued working during chemotherapy. He ended treatment on July 22. Senator John Sununu(R-New Hampshire) shaved his head to show solidarity with Specter when he was undergoing chemotherapy and was temporarily bald. February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Chemotherapy is the use of chemical substances to treat disease. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Edward Sununu (born September 10, 1964) is a Republican United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ...


Electoral history

  • 2004 Race for U.S. Senate
  • 2004 Race for U.S. Senate — Republican Primary
    • Arlen Specter (R) (inc.), 51%
    • Pat Toomey (R), 49%
  • 1998 Race for U.S. Senate
    • Arlen Specter (R) (inc.), 61%
    • Bill Lloyd (D), 35%
  • 1998 Race for U.S. Senate — Republican Primary
  • 1992 Race for U.S. Senate
    • Arlen Specter (R) (inc.), 49%
    • Lynn Yeakel (D), 47%
    • John Perry (Libertarian), 5%
  • 1992 Race for U.S. Senate — Republican Primary
    • Arlen Specter (R) (inc.), 65%
    • Stephen Friend (R), 35%
  • 1986 Race for U.S. Senate
    • Arlen Specter (R) (inc.), 56%
    • Bob Edgar (D), 43%
  • 1986 Race for U.S. Senate — Republican Primary
    • Arlen Specter (R) (inc.), 76%
    • Richard Stokes (R), 24%
  • 1980 Race for U.S. Senate
  • 1980 Race for U.S. Senate — Republican Primary
    • Arlen Specter (R), 36%
    • Harold Haabestad (R), 33%
    • Ed Howard (R), 13%

Rep. ... Pat Toomey Patrick Joseph Pat Toomey (born November 17, 1961 in Providence, Rhode Island) is a United States politician. ... Tom Lingenfelter is a teacher, historian, intelligence agent, businessman, and political activist from the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Rev. ... Peter Francis Flaherty (June 25, 1924—April 18, 2005) was an American politician from Pennsylvania, a Democratic mayor of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1970 to 1977, Deputy United States Attorney General during the Carter Administration from 1977 to 1978, and county commissioner of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania from 1984...

Trivia

  • During football season, Arlen is a frequent guest on the 610 WIP morning radio show. He generally calls in early on Monday mornings, to talk about the Philadelphia Eagles game, or other NFL happenings.
  • In addition to his "Snarlin' Arlen" moniker, Sen. Specter is sometimes referred to by fellow Republicans who dissent with his aggressive behavior toward the Bush administration as “Specter the Defector.”

United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... WIP is a Philadelphia radio station with an all-sports format. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... They Might Be Giants (commonly abbreviated to TMBG) is an American alternative rock duo consisting of John Linnell and John Flansburgh that formed in 1982. ...

References

  1. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/senators/specter.htm
  2. ^ Hunt, E. Howard, American Spy: My Secret History in the CIA, Watergate and Beyond, Wiley, 2007. ISBN-10: 0471789828
  3. ^ a b E.J. Dionne. ""Watch Those Guys"", Washington Post, May 24, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-7-16. 
  4. ^ Terence Samuel. "Irritating Them All", US News and World Report, September 4, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-7-16. 
  5. ^ Jonathan Singer, (Monday March 19, 2007). Senate 2010: Snarlin' Arlen Wants Another Six Years. Direct Democracy blog. Retrieved on July 16, 2007.
  6. ^ Congressional Record on Choice by State. NARAL. Retrieved on July 16, 2007.
  7. ^ A rising conservative star. Free Republic blog (March 23, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-7-16.
  8. ^ David Jackson. "Specter urges Bush, Cheney to explain CIA leak", USA Today, April 10, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-7-16. 
  9. ^ Specter denies giving Amnesty over NSA wiretapping, Crooks and liars, June 11, 2006
  10. ^ [1],
  11. ^ http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/news/nation/16555903.htm
  12. ^ http://www.tpmmuckraker.com/archives/002487.php

E.J. Dionne, Jr. ... ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Direct democracy, classically termed pure democracy,[1] comprises a form of democracy and theory of civics wherein sovereignty is lodged in the assembly of all citizens who choose to participate. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... NARAL Pro-Choice America (pronounced Nay-ral) is a United States group that favors the right to legal abortions and engages in political action to oppose restrictions on what it portrays as womens right to abort. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Free Republic is a for-profit, non-tax exempt [1] moderated Internet forum, activist and chat site for conservatives, primarily within the United States. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Jackson (?? - July 13, 2001) was the life partner of poet James Merrill (1926-1995). ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

United States Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania (right) is a long-term brain tumor survivor who continues to serve in public office. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Articles Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Sarasota Herald-Tribune is a daily newspaper located in Sarasota, Florida. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

Preceded by
Richard Schweiker
United States Senator (Class 3) from Pennsylvania
1981–
Served alongside: H. John Heinz III, Harris Wofford, Rick Santorum, Bob Casey, Jr.
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
David L. Boren
Oklahoma
Chairman of Senate Intelligence Commmittee
1995–1997
Succeeded by
Richard Shelby
Alabama
Preceded by
Alan K. Simpson
Wyoming
Chairman of Senate Veterans' Affairs Commmittee
1997–2001
Succeeded by
Jay Rockefeller
West Virginia
Preceded by
Jay Rockefeller
West Virginia
Chairman of Senate Veterans' Affairs Commmittee
2003–2005
Succeeded by
Larry Craig
Idaho
Preceded by
Orrin Hatch
Utah
Chairman of Senate Judiciary Commmittee
2005–2007
Succeeded by
Patrick Leahy
Vermont
Persondata
NAME Specter, Arlen J.
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION United States Senator from Pennsylvania
DATE OF BIRTH February 12, 1930
PLACE OF BIRTH Wichita, Kansas
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arlen Specter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1657 words)
Specter won the election and was reelected in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2004.
Specter is notoriously abrasive, and earned the nickname "Snarlin' Arlen" among his foes on Capitol Hill and in the public.
Specter, through a feud with Senator Harry Reid on the floor of the Senate, his position as Chairman of the Judiciary Committee and his opposition to a new budget plan proposed by the Bush administration, has emerged as a nationally recognized figure from his previous, more taciturn role in the public eye.
Arleln Specter (277 words)
Arlen Specter(R-PA) is referred to as a moderate even though he received an 80% scorecard from Christian Coalition.
After a bruising primary which Specter won by a narrow margin, he returned to the Senate Juciciary Committee where he was next in line to assume the chairmanship.
After that Specter promised that he would support all of Bush's nominations, and he would support a move by the theocratic right to end the practice of filibusters in the Senate.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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