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Encyclopedia > Arkham Asylum
Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series.
Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series.

The Elizabeth Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane is a fictional psychiatric hospital that appears in the DC Universe. It is located near Gotham City, and is where those of Batman's foes considered to be legally insane are incarcerated (other foes are incarcerated at Blackgate Penitentiary). Although it has had numerous administrators, its current head is Jeremiah Arkham. Inspired by the works of H.P. Lovecraft, the asylum was created by Dennis O'Neil and first appeared in Batman #258 (October 1974); much of its back-story was created by Len Wein during the 1980s. In the foreword to the book The Dark Ages: Grim, Great, and Gimmicky Post-Modern Comics, Jack C. Harris claims that it was he who conceptualized the idea of Arkham Asylum, and that any other such claims are false. Image File history File links Arkham_asylum. ... Image File history File links Arkham_asylum. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... A psychiatric hospital (also called, at various places and times, mental hospital or mental ward, historically often asylum, lunatic asylum, or madhouse), is a hospital specialising in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of correctional facilities in comics. ... Jeremiah Arkham is a character, and the current head of Arkham Asylum, in DC Comics Batman comic books. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... In narratology, a back-story (also back story or backstory) is the history behind the situation extant at the start of the main story. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ...


Arkham Asylum does not have a good record, at least with regard to the high profile cases; escapes are frequent (on at least one occasion, an obsessive-compulsive multiple murderer was signed out of Arkham into the care of an incontinent, alcoholic vagrant, on the grounds that he "looked like a responsible citizen"), and those who are 'cured' and released tend to re-offend. Furthermore, several staff members, including at least one director, have ended up as residents, notably Dr. Harleen Quinzel, Lyle Bolton and, in some incarnations, Drs. Jonathan Crane and Hugo Strange. This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Section 8 is a superhero team created by Garth Ennis and John McCrea which frequently appeared in the pages of Hitman. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character, a supervillainess in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, as well as the DC Comics Batman series and its spin-offs, and subsequently in various Batman-related comic books. ... Lock-Up is a DC Comics villain and an enemy of Batman, featured in one episode Batman: The Animated Series, in which he was voiced by Bruce Weitz. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hugo Strange is a fictional character in DC Comics, a nemesis of Batman. ...


In addition, prisoners with unusual medical conditions that prevent them from staying in a regular prison are housed there. For example, Mr. Freeze is not technically insane, but he requires a strongly refrigerated environment to stay alive, which only Arkham can provide. Mr Freeze (Dr. Victor Fries) (Pronounced as Victor Freese or Freeze) is a DC Comics supervillain, an enemy of Batman. ...

Contents

Origins

The one-shot graphic novel Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth establishes that the Asylum is named after Elizabeth Arkham, founder Amadeus Arkham's mother. Its dark history began in the early 1900s when Arkham's mother, having suffered from mental illness most of her life, committed suicide. (It is later revealed that she was actually euthanized by her son, which his mind repressed.) Amadeus Arkham decided, then, as the sole heir to the Arkham estate, to remodel his family home in order to properly treat the mentally ill, so others might not go untreated and suffer as his mother had. Prior to the period of the hospital's remodeling, Arkham treated patients at the State Psychiatric Hospital in Metropolis, where he and his wife, Constance, and daughter, Harriet, had been living for quite some time. A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Euthanasia (from Ancient Greek: ευθανασία, good death) is the practice of ending the life of a terminally ill person in a painless or minimally painful way, for the purpose of limiting suffering. ... Metropolis Skyline, as seen in Smallville. ...


Upon telling his family of his plans, they moved back to his family home to oversee the remodeling. While there, Arkham received a call from the police notifying him Martin "Mad Dog" Hawkins — a serial killer referred to Arkham by Metropolis Penitentiary while at State Psychiatric Hospital — had escaped from prison, and sought his considered opinion on his state of mind. Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ...


On April 1, 1921, Arkham returned to his home to find his front door wide open. Inside, he discovered the raped and mutilated bodies of his wife and daughter in an upstairs room, Hawkins having carved his nickname on Harriet's body. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Despite this family tragedy, the Elizabeth Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane officially opened that November. One of its first patients was Martin Hawkins, whom Arkham insisted on personally treating. On April 1, 1922, after treating Hawkins for six months, Arkham strapped him to the electroshock couch and purposely electrocuted him. The death was treated as an accident but contributed to Arkham's gradual descent into madness, which he began to believe was his birthright. Eventually, Arkham was institutionalized in his own hospital, where he eventually died. Shock therapy is the deliberate and controlled induction of some form or state of shock for the purpose of psychiatric treatment. ... Sign warning of possible electric shock hazard An electric shock can occur upon contact of a human or animal body with any source of voltage high enough to cause sufficient current flow through the muscles or nerves. ...


Influences

Arkham Asylum was named in honour of the fictional city of Arkham, Massachusetts, one of the settings of H. P. Lovecraft's horror stories. In fact, when the asylum first appeared, it was actually in the city of Arkham; its Gotham location, and the consequent alternative explanation of the name, were later retcons. Lovecraft's Arkham Sanitarium may have been inspired by the Danvers State Insane Asylum (aka the Danvers State Hospital) in Danvers, Massachusetts. Arkham is a fictional city in Massachusetts, part of the Lovecraft Country setting created by H. P. Lovecraft and is featured in many of his stories, as well as those of other Cthulhu Mythos writers. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author from Providence, Rhode Island of fantasy, horror and science fiction. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Seal of Danvers, MA Danvers, a town located in Essex County, Massachusetts was formerly named Salem Village. ...


Arkham is similar to several real life mental hospitals. Ward's Island in the East River was the home of the New York City Asylum for the Insane, opened around 1863, and the nearby Roosevelt Island once had several mental institutions and prisons including the New York City Lunatic Asylum. Aerial view of the Triborough Bridge (left) and the Hell Gate Bridge (right) to Wards Island (top) This article is about Wards Island in New York State. ... Main Street on Roosevelt Island Roosevelt Island, formerly known as Welfare Island, and before that Blackwells Island, is a narrow island in the East River of New York City. ...


Publication history

Arkham Asylum first appeared in 1974, in Batman #258 by Dennis O'Neil. In this story, it was named as "Arkham Hospital" (although it was already clear what kind of hospital it was); "Arkham Asylum" first appeared in another O'Neil story the following year, but it was not until 1979 that "Arkham Asylum" completely replaced "Arkham Hospital" (and the occasional "Arkham Sanatarium") as the institution's name. By 1979, too, the move to have the asylum closer to Gotham had begun; that was completed in 1980, when Batman #326 by Len Wein described the Asylum's location "deep in the suburbs of Gotham City". (Perhaps for this reason Batman #326 is listed in some histories as the first appearance of Arkham Asylum.) It was also Wein who, in 1985's Who's Who #1, created its current back-story. Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


Arkham Asylum has been demolished or destroyed several times in its history, notably during the events of Batman: The Last Arkham (see below). It was also seriously damaged at the beginning of the Knightfall storyline, when Bane used stolen munitions to blow up the facility and release all the inmates. After these events, the asylum was relocated to a large mansion known as "mercy house", where it remains to this day. At the beginning of the No Man's Land storyline, the asylum was closed down and all its inmates set free (a timer was used to open the doors two minutes before the city was sealed). This was orchestrated by the administrator himself, who had the choice of releasing the inmates or watching them all starve or kill each other. On the middle of the story, it is revealed that Batman has established a hidden base within the subbasement of the asylum during the Prodigal storyline known as "Northwest Batcave." [1] Cover to Batman #497: The breaking of the Bat. ... Bane is the DC Comics supervillain, and sometimes ally, best known for having broken Batmans back. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The Batcave. ...


During the No Man's Land, Arkham was taken over by the Joker and Harley Quinn. With the sole exception of the Riddler, the inmates elected to remain in the cut-off Gotham City. “The Joker” redirects here. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, as well as the DC Comics Batman series and its spin-offs, and subsequently in various Batman-related comic books. ... Detective Comics #140 (October 1948), the first appearance of The Riddler. ...


Inmates

Some of Arkham's inmates. Cover to Batman: Shadow of the Bat #82 (1999). Art by Glen Orbik.
Some of Arkham's inmates. Cover to Batman: Shadow of the Bat #82 (1999). Art by Glen Orbik.

Originally, Arkham Asylum was used only to house genuinely insane characters - the Joker and Two-Face were inmates from its very first appearance - but over the course of the 1980s a trend was established of having the majority of Batman's supervillain opponents end up at Arkham, whether or not they were actually insane. This is likely due to some of the facility's high-tech features that make it more efficient to hold a villain such as Clayface there than in another prison. Nearly all of Batman's enemies have spent some time in Arkham. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x761, 72 KB) Summary Cover to Batman: Shadow of the Bat #82 (1999). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x761, 72 KB) Summary Cover to Batman: Shadow of the Bat #82 (1999). ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Clayface is a name used by several DC Comics fictional characters, most of them possessing clay-like bodies and shapeshifting abilities. ...


Other DC Universe publications that feature Arkham Asylum and its inmates include Alan Moore's Swamp Thing (wherein Jason Woodrue -- The Floronic Man -- is detained) and The Sandman by Neil Gaiman, wherein John Dee (Doctor Destiny) escapes to wreak havoc on both the 'real' and 'dream' worlds assisted by the lesser villain, Nandani. Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... The Swamp Thing is a fictional character created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson for DC Comics, and featured in a long-running horror-fantasy comic book series of the same name. ... The Floronic Man is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Doctor Destiny is a fictional supervillain published by DC Comics. ...


Arkham has also been featured in varying capacities in a number of high profile DC miniseries events, such as Identity Crisis, Day of Vengeance, Countdown, and Crisis on Infinite Earths among others. Identity Crisis is a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics in 2004, written by Brad Meltzer and penciled by Rags Morales. ... Day of Vengeance #1; cover by Walter Simonson. ... Countdown is a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 9, 2007, directly following the conclusion of the last issue of 52. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


List of notable inmates

Batman villains

Abattoir is the alias of Arnold Etchison, a fictional character from DC Comics. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Amygdala is the alias of the DC Comics character, a sometime opponent of Batman. ... Bane is the DC Comics supervillain, and sometimes ally, best known for having broken Batmans back. ... Black Mask is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Calendar Man (real name: Julian Gregory Day) is a DC Comics supervillain. ...  The Cavalier is a minor enemy of Batman and a fictional supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Clayface is a name used by several DC Comics fictional characters, most of them possessing clay-like bodies and shapeshifting abilities. ... Cornelius Stirk is the name of a DC Comics villain and enemy to Batman. ... Crazy Quilt was a villian in the Batman comic books. ... Doctor Double X is the name of a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Dr. Phosphorus (real name Dr. Alex Sartorius) is fictional supervillain in the DC Universe. ... Film Freak is the name of a DC Comics villain and enemy to Batman. ... Firefly is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, as well as the DC Comics Batman series and its spin-offs, and subsequently in various Batman-related comic books. ... Hugo Strange is a fictional character in DC Comics, a nemesis of Batman. ... Hush is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... “The Joker” redirects here. ... Killer Croc is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Killer Moth is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Lock-Up is a DC Comics villain and an enemy of Batman, featured in one episode Batman: The Animated Series, in which he was voiced by Bruce Weitz. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ... Magpie is a fictional super-villainess who made several appearances in the DC Comics-owned Batman comic book series originally created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane. ... Maximillian Maxie Zeus is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Mr Freeze (Dr. Victor Fries) (Pronounced as Victor Freese or Freeze) is a DC Comics supervillain, an enemy of Batman. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an archenemy of Batman. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... Professor Achilles Milo is a fictional mad scientist in the DC Universe. ... Detective Comics #140 (October 1948), the first appearance of The Riddler. ... It has been suggested that Scarecrow in the DC Comics Animated Universe be merged into this article or section. ... Tweedledum and Tweedledee are characters in Lewis Carrolls Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There and in a nursery rhyme by an anonymous author. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Ventriloquist is a DC Comics villain, an enemy of Batman. ... The Great White Shark is the name of a DC Comics villain. ... Victor Zsasz (referred to as Zsasz or Mr. ...

Others

Ambush Bug is a fictional comic book character who has appeared in several DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Cheetah is a fictional character in the Wonder Woman stories published by DC Comics, and is also the archenemy of Wonder Woman. ... Doctor Destiny is a fictional supervillain published by DC Comics. ... Doug Moench (born February 23, 1948) is an American comic book writer. ... Norman Keith Norm Breyfogle is a US comic artist and fine artist. ... Cover to Batman #497: The breaking of the Bat. ... The Batcave. ... The Floronic Man is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Humpty Dumpty is an over weight seriel Killer. ... Jean Loring is a fictional character from DC Comics associated with The Atom. ... Professor Ivo is a fictional mad scientist from DC comics who created Amazo and Tomorrow Woman. ... The Psycho-Pirate was the name of two DC comics supervillains. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...

Graphic novels featuring Arkham Asylum

The Dark Knight Returns

Main article: The Dark Knight Returns

The Dark Knight Returns, written by Frank Miller in 1986, was set about twenty years in the future. It depicted an "Arkham Home for the Emotionally Troubled", presumably a renaming of the asylum which occurred as a result of the extreme political correctness which had evolved in Miller's dystopian setting. The Dark Knight Returns (commonly abbreviated to DKR) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman and was written and drawn by Frank Miller. ... Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist and film director best known for his film noir-style comic book stories. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Joker has been kept there, catatonic for the ten years since the retirement of Batman, but awakens when the vigilante resumes action. Under the employ of the home is Bartholemew Wolper, a condescending psychologist who treats the Joker humanely, even going so far to arrange for him to appear on a late night talk show. The Joker can mean any of the following: The Joker is a comic strip character, also included in movies and television programs based on the comic strip. ... Catatonia is a severe psychiatric and medical condition, characterized by, in catatonic stupor, a general absence of motor activity, and, in catatonic excitement, violent, hyperactive behavior directed at oneself or others but with no visible purpose. ...


Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth

Main article: Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth

Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth is an original graphic novel written by Grant Morrison and drawn by Dave McKean. It was published by DC Comics in 1989. The book sold over 500,000 and was for many years DC's best-selling graphic novel. Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Cages (1998) by Dave McKean David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


The book was praised for its exploration of ideas and storytelling and also proved financially and artistically lucrative for Morrison.


How and if the book fits in to the main DC continuity or if it is meant as a standalone Alternate Universe book is unclear. (Several characters seem to be killed in the book, but appear later in the main series. However, Batman: Shadow of the Bat makes references to the history of the asylum established in the novel.) In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... An alternative universe (also known as alternate universe) is a type or form of fan fiction in which known, canonical facts about the universe being explored or written about, are deliberately changed. ...


Arkham Asylum: Living Hell

Living Hell was written by Dan Slott, penciled by Ryan Sook, and inked by Sook, Wade Von Grawbadger, and Jim Royal, and edited by Valerie D'Orazio. The covers were designed by Eric Powell. Dan Slott Dan Slott is an American comic book writer known for injecting humor into typically serious superhero books. ... Ryan Sook is a comic book artist. ... Valerie DOrazio is a former assistant editor of Acclaim Comics and DC comics. ... Eric Powell (born November 16, 1979) is an American football player, currently playing for the Buffalo Bills. ...


This six-issue miniseries and the subsequent trade paperback provided an intricate and multi-layered look at Arkham Asylum from several points of view: the director (Dr. Jeremiah Arkham), a psychiatrist (Dr. Anne Carver), the guards (particularly one Aaron Cash), and the inmates (with particular focus on previously-unknown residents "Jane Doe", "Junkyard Dog", "Doodlebug", "Lunkhead", "Death Rattle", and, perhaps most memorably, "Humpty Dumpty"). The driving force is the recent incarceration of a ruthless investor, Warren "The Great White Shark" White, as well as the demonic element suggested by the title. White, facing charges of massive fraud, decided to cheat the system by pleading insanity, not realizing the horrors of Arkham. The most familiar characters, such as the Joker, Commissioner Gordon, Batgirl, and Batman himself, appear for comparatively few pages in this work. A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Jeremiah Arkham is a character, and the current head of Arkham Asylum, in DC Comics Batman comic books. ... Humpty Dumpty is an over weight seriel Killer. ... The Great White Shark is the name of a DC Comics villain. ... There have been several notable figures, both real and fictional, named James Gordon. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ...


Batman: The Last Arkham

Main article: Batman: The Last Arkham

Written by Alan Grant; pencils by Norm Breyfogle. Alan Grant is a Scottish comic book writer born in 1949. ... Norman Keith Norm Breyfogle is a US comic artist and fine artist. ...


Originally a four-issue storyline that kicked off the Shadow of the Bat series. In it, the old Arkham Asylum is destroyed, to be replaced by a new and more modern facility. The story introduces Jeremiah Arkham, the asylum's director, and nephew of Amadeus Arkham; and serial killer Victor Zsasz. These two have, in an uneasy partnership, captured Batman and are holding him prisoner in Arkham, attempting to see what makes him tick. Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Victor Zsasz (referred to as Zsasz or Mr. ...


This story makes a few passing references to the flashback events of Arkham Asylum, such as Amadeus Arkham taping over the mirror, and his journal is shown early in the story. Jeremiah also mentions his relative's descent into madness. This would seem to indicate that at least some of the events in the Arkham Asylum graphic novel did occur in the main continuity. In literature and film, a flashback (also called analepsis) takes the narrative back in time from the point the story has reached, to recount events that happened before and give the back-story. ...


An episode of Batman: The Animated Series titled "Dreams of Darkness", also about Batman in Arkham, seems to have been a very loose adaptation of this storyline, replacing Zsasz with the Scarecrow, and replacing Jeremiah Arkham with a more nondescript administrator, who is portrayed as clueless and naive rather than sinister. The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... It has been suggested that Scarecrow in the DC Comics Animated Universe be merged into this article or section. ...


Black Orchid

Black Orchid, written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Dave McKean, also featured Arkham Asylum. The award-winning graphic novel introduced the crimefighter Black Orchid, who dies, is reborn and starts a quest to find her identity. During this she encounters Batman, who directs her to Arkham Asylum, where she meets The Mad Hatter, Poison Ivy, Two-Face and the Joker. Arkham is viewed as a desperate place where inmates dwell in madness and terror, much in the same fashion as in A Serious House on Serious Earth (also illustrated by McKean). Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Cages (1998) by Dave McKean David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. ... Lets us talks some realities here before we get into the fictional works here. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ...


Arkham in other media

Arkham has appeared beyond the pages of the comics in numerous guises and designs. Its appearances include:

  • Batman Forever: Arkham was seen at the end of the film, and designed as a tall, spiraling castle-like structure, with narrow hallways lined with brightly-lit glass bricks. The Riddler was incarcerated in a large padded cell. The psychologist seen was named Dr. Burton, a reference to Tim Burton. There was a more in-depth sequence involving Two-Face escaping from Arkham at the beginning of the film, but it was cut.
  • Batman and Robin[2]: Arkham appeared a number of times in this film. It first appeared when Mr. Freeze was taken there midway through the film, and later at the end when both he and Poison Ivy were shown as cellmates.
  • Batman Begins: Arkham played a much larger role than a simple jail in this film, with Jonathan Crane (also known as the Scarecrow) being either the administrator or at least a high ranking doctor at the Asylum, and using it to conduct cruel experiments with his fear gas, using his own patients as guinea pigs. He also used the pipes under the Asylum to empty his toxin into the Gotham water supply. One notable change in this version of Arkham from the comics was the location. While the location has varied in the comics, it is generally located some distance outside of Gotham City, often in a rural or forested location. However, Batman Begins has it in the middle of Gotham City, located in the slum region known as the Narrows.
  • Batman: The Animated Series: Arkham has appeared frequently in the series. It is depicted as generally dark and gloomy, and the cells are similar to those in the comics, being primarily closed via glass doors. Much of the rest of the asylum resembles a prison more than a mental hospital, however; in one episode, it is explained that all criminals apprehended by the Batman are sent to Arkham rather than jail (although it is shown that the Penguin goes to Stonegate, a regular jail). In the series, neither Jeremiah or Amadeus Arkham are shown or mentioned, but the episode "Dreams in Darkness" features a character who is obviously modeled on Jeremiah, but toned down to a more compassionate persona.
The alternate Arkham Asylum as it appeared on the Justice League episode A Better World, Part 2.
The alternate Arkham Asylum as it appeared on the Justice League episode A Better World, Part 2.
  • Justice League featured Arkham in a brief cameo during A Better World, Part 2 in an alternate dimension where a Fascist League has taken over the world and dispatches villains via execution or lobotomy. The asylum is run by a lobotomized version of the Joker and is protected by robotic copies of Superman. The entire inmate population is lobotomized by the alternate Superman's heat vision. (If you watch closely, you can see that the Ventriloquist has not been lobotomized by Superman's heat vision, but his doll Scarface has.) It is noted that Joker, Two-Face and Poison Ivy are used in both Batman: The Animated Series and Justice League as the key inmates of the Asylum.
  • Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker: This direct-to-video animated film had the final battle between the original Batman and The Joker taking place at an abandoned Arkham. It is also the same spot where Robin (as a brainwashed, junior version of The Joker) killed Joker. A deleted scene (featured on both versions of the DVD as a special feature) has Bruce Wayne touring the abandoned Arkham, where Terry McGinnis, Wayne's successor as Dark Knight, follows and sees Joker's corpse hanging.
  • Batman Forever (SNES game): The video game adaptation of the film features Arkham as its first stage. While the film shows Arkham as being in a remote forested area, the backgrounds in the game seem to place it on the waterfront, directly across the bay from Gotham.
Arkham Asylum as it appeared on The Batman.
  • The Batman: Only occasionally shown in the series, Arkham is reminiscent of a jail, but with padded cells. Like the original Arkham, only the truly insane end up here (Joker, Riddler, Mr. Freeze , Ventriloquist, Hugo Strange and Clayface). Penguin frequently goes to Arkham in the series, as it is mentioned most times, while in some cases he goes to normal Jail. Firefly goes to a regular prison. However, in The Batman vs. Dracula, the inmates who would normally go to jail are in Arkham; they are sent there after pretending to be insane because they wanted a lesser charge for their crimes. Also, the staff is far more heavily armored than in its previous incarnation, wearing heavy trenchcoats and gloves, which is, in spite of itself, no deterrent for the inmates to easily escape.
  • There is an Arkham Asylum Lego set featuring Scarecrow, Nightwing, Poison Ivy, and the Riddler available at Toys "R" Us during late summer 2006.
  • In the first volume of Neil Gaiman's Sandman series Arkham Asylum is featured as Dr. Destiny escapes, holds a conversation with Prof. Crane and is returned to its safe-keeping by Morpheus. Prof. Crane makes two some what contrary remarks about the character of Arkham: that while its inmates escape from time to time, they all return as the world outside is truly frightening and also that it is a horrible place filled with darkness and the screams of the mad.

Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated American film director, writer and designer. ... The correct title of this article is Batman & Robin (1997 film). ... Batman Begins is a 2005 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Batman. ... Binomial name Cavia porcellus (Linnaeus, 1758) Guinea pigs (also called cavies) are rodents belonging to the family Caviidae and the genus Cavia, originally indigenous to the Andes. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an archenemy of Batman. ... Image File history File links Image-Arkham_10. ... Image File history File links Image-Arkham_10. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... Since its first use in 1851, a cameo role or cameo appearance has been a brief appearance in a play (or later, a movie) that stands out against the general context for its éclat or dramatic punch. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... A human brain that has undergone lobotomy. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... The Ventriloquist is a DC Comics villain, an enemy of Batman. ... Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker is a direct-to-video animated film featuring the comic book superhero Batman. ... A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Terry McGinnis (age 17). ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Image File history File links Bscap0116. ... Image File history File links Bscap0116. ... The Batman is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... The Batman is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... Firefly is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... The Batman vs. ... Lego Group logo. ... Toys R Us (often typeset as Toys Я Us to fit their logo) is a toy store chain based in the United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ...

References to Arkham Asylum

  • Shadow Hearts: From the New World: Unrelated to the DC Universe, a place called Arkham University is a destination for the heroes in this video game; however, this is more likely a reference to H.P. Lovecraft's Arkham, Massachusetts and Miskatonic University. Nods to the Batman comic books include a shady researcher named Gilbert who resembles The Penguin, and the "Arkham Underground" underneath the Singapore Management University.
  • Army of Darkness: the first issue of the Army of Darkness series finds Ash committed to Arkham Asylum. It's here that he runs afoul of a rather ghoulish and creepy Herbert West. This story is detailed in the story arc "Army of Darkness vs. Re-Animator."
  • I n the video game Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth, Arkham Asylum features prominently in the storyline. The asylum is a prominent feature in many areas of Cthulhu Mythos
  • There is also a small, lesser known reference to Arkham in The Rage: Carrie 2, the movie sequel to Carrie. In it, the school guidance councillor (Carrie's friend from the first movie) makes reference to having spent time at "Arkham as a patient" shortly after Carrie's death. Whether this is a reference to the Arkham of Batman, or simply Arkham, MA, is unclear, but is probably both as it gives a nod to both the infamous asylum, as well as the New England area, where many of Stephen King's novels are set. This could also nod to the fact that Arkham Asylum, in the DC comic world, co-exists with the horror/slasher icon world.
  • Luke Ski has written a song called "House Party at Arkham Asylum", an ode to the villains of the Batman universe, which is sung by the Joker who has taken over the hospital. He claims the inmates own the asylum, so the next twenty years to life will just be a party.
  • During his 2006 tour of the UK and Europe, Ryan Adams played a song (as yet unreleased) called "Arkham Asylum." Its lyrics include references to bats, the Joker and Bruce Wayne. At the end of the song, Adams and his band, The Cardinals, played a few bars of the Batman theme.[3]
  • "Asilo Arkham" (Arkham Asylum in Portuguese) was a name of gothic night club at São Paulo, Brazil in the eighties. The place was all decorated with Batman mithology, included paintings of the most famous Arkham patients, on the walls.

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Miskatonic University is a fictional university located in the equally fictitious Arkham, set in the real-world Essex County, Massachusetts. ... Army of Darkness (also known as Evil Dead III, The Medieval Dead, Bruce Campbell vs. ... Ashley J. Ash Williams (Ashly in the original Evil Dead script) is the fictional protagonist in the Evil Dead horror film franchise, played by Bruce Campbell, and created by director Sam Raimi. ... Herbert West is a fictional character created by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story Herbert West—Reanimator, first published in 1922. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Re-Animator (1985) is the first in a series of films based on the H.P. Lovecraft story Herbert West: Reanimator. ... Cthulhu in the lost city of Rlyeh For other uses, see Cthulhu (disambiguation). ... Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Supreme is a fictional superhero created by Rob Liefeld. ... Professor Night is a fictional character created by Alan Moore in the Supreme comic book, wherein most heroes and villains are thinly-disguised counterparts of DC icons. ... Miskatonic University is a fictional university located in the equally fictitious Arkham, set in the real-world Essex County, Massachusetts. ... Mutants & Masterminds (abbreviated M&M or MnM) is a superhero role-playing game written by Steve Kenson and published by Green Ronin Publishing based on a variant of the d20 System by Wizards of the Coast. ... “Providence” redirects here. ... Carrie (1974) is Stephen Kings first published novel. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... The great Luke Ski is the stage name of Luke Sienkowski, a parody, filk & rap musician who writes, records and performs comedy music. ... Not to be confused with Bryan Adams David Ryan Adams (born November 5, 1974) is an American alt-country/rock singer-songwriter from Jacksonville, North Carolina. ... The album cover of the bands 2005 release, Cold Roses The Cardinals is a band fronted by Ryan Adams. ... Nickname: Motto: Non ducor, duco(Latin) I am not led, I lead Location in the São Paulo state. ... 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Although Bob Kane achieved renown for creating the fictional superhero Batman, he and others have acknowledged the contributions of Bill Finger for fleshing the character out, writing many of his early stories, and creating the characters origin. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... // Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... 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Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, as well as the DC Comics Batman series and its spin-offs, and subsequently in various Batman-related comic books. ... “The Joker” redirects here. ... Killer Croc is a fictional character in DC comics. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ... Mr Freeze (Dr. Victor Fries) (Pronounced as Victor Freese or Freeze) is a DC Comics supervillain, an enemy of Batman. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an archenemy of Batman. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below (Comics-in-universe) has been proposed for deletion. ... Red Hood is a fictional character and title in the DC Universe. ... Jason Todd is a fictional character published in stories by DC Comics. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... It has been suggested that Scarecrow in the DC Comics Animated Universe be merged into this article or section. ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Batman. ... The Batcave. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Wayne Manor in 1989s Batman. ... Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... It has been suggested that Batmissile, Bat-Humvee, Batmobile (Batman Forever) and Batmobile (Batman Begins) be merged into this article or section. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... 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External links and references

  1. ^ Batman: No Man's Land Secret Files #1
  2. ^ I applaud Batman & Robin for being the only Batman film so far to give an adequate depiction of Arkham Asylum. On the outside, it's a massive gothic castle overlooking the ocean. Inside, it's dark, dirty and full of shadows... just the way it should be.
  3. ^ Songs > Arkham Asylum
  • Batman-On-Film.com BOF's review of ARKHAM ASYLUM, A Serious House on a Serious Earth
  • Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Arkham Asylum

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arkham Asylum (852 words)
In fact, when the asylum first appeared, it was actually in the city of Arkham; its Gotham location, and the consequent alternative explanation of the name, were later retcons.
Originally, Arkham Asylum was used only to house genuinely insane characters - the Joker and Two-Face were inmates from its very first appearance - but over the course of the 1980s a trend was established of having the majority of Batman's supervillain opponents end up at Arkham, whether or not they were actually insane.
Even a former Arkham employee is now an inmate; psychiatrist Dr. Harleen Quinzel went insane and turned to crime, as the loony Harley Quinn, after the Joker, then her patient, seduced her and enlisted her as his sidekick.
Arkham: Information from Answers.com (1103 words)
Arkham’s most notable characteristics are its gambrel roofs and the dark legends surrounding the city for centuries.
Arkham Sanitarium appears in the short story "The Thing on the Doorstep" and may have been inspired by the Danvers State Insane Asylum, aka Danvers State Hospital, located in Danvers, Massachusetts.
Arkham is the name of the mental hospital mentioned in The Rage: Carrie 2, which is about certain characters who survived the events in Carrie.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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