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Encyclopedia > Ark of the Covenant
A late 19th-century artist's conception of the Ark of the Covenant, employing a Renaissance cassone for the Ark and cherubim as latter-day Christian angels.
A late 19th-century artist's conception of the Ark of the Covenant, employing a Renaissance cassone for the Ark and cherubim as latter-day Christian angels.

The Ark of the Covenant (Hebrew: אָרוֹן הָבְרִית ʔārōn hāb’rīθ, Modern aron habrit) is described in the Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the Tablets of stone containing the Ten Commandments as well as Aaron's staff and manna. According to the Biblical account, the Ark was built at the command of God, in accord with Moses' prophetic vision on Mount Sinai (Exodus 25:9-10). God communicated with Moses "from between the two cherubim" on the Ark's cover (Exodus 25:22). The Ark and its sanctuary were "the beauty of Israel" (Lamentations 2:1). Rashi and some Midrashim suggest that there were two arks - a temporary one made by Moses, and a later one made by Bezalel.[1] The cassone (large chest) was one of the trophy furnishings of rich merchants and aristocrats in Italian culture, from the late Middle Ages onward. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Tablets of Stone or Stone Tablets, also known as the Tablets of Law, (in Hebrew: Luchot HaBrit - the tablets [of] the covenant) refers to the two pieces of special stone inscripted with the Ten Commandments when Moses ascended Mount Sinai as recorded in the Book of Exodus. ... For other uses, see Ten Commandments (disambiguation). ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Not to be confused with the rune Mannaz. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Moses with the Ten Commandments by Rembrandt (1659) Biblical Mount Sinai refers to the place where, according to the Hebrew Bible (Exod. ... CHERUB is a series of childrens books written by the author Robert Muchamore about a group of children who are trained to be agents working for the British Government in the top secret organisation known as CHERUB. It is similar to the British security service MI5, and is based... A 16th-century depiction of Rashi Note: For the astrological concept, see Rashi - the signs. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... Bezalel is the name of a personage from the Bible and is the name of Israels national school of art. ...


The Biblical account relates that during the trip of the Israelites, the Ark was carried by the priests ~2,000 cubits (Numbers 35:5; Joshua 4:5) in advance of the people and their army or host (Num. 4:5-6; 10:33-36; Psalms 68:1; 132:8). When the Ark was borne by priests into the bed of the Jordan, the river was separated, opening a pathway for the whole of the host to pass over (Josh. 3:15-16; 4:7-18). The Ark was borne in a seven-day procession around the wall of Jericho by seven priests sounding seven trumpets of rams' horns, the city taken with a shout (Josh. 6:4-20). When carried, the Ark was always wrapped in a veil, in tachash skins (the identity of this animal is uncertain), and a blue cloth, and was carefully concealed, even from the eyes of the Levites who carried it. This derivation of the Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci, depicts nine historical units of measurement: the Yard, the Span, the Cubit, the Flemish Ell, the English Ell, the French Ell, the Fathom, the Hand , and the Foot. ... The Book of Numbers is the fourth of the books of the Pentateuch, called in the Hebrew ba-midbar במדבר, i. ... The Book of Joshua (Hebrew: Sefer Yhoshua ספר יהושע) is the sixth book in both the Hebrew Tanakh and the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... A shofar made from the horn of a kudu, in the Yemenite Jewish style. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the Jewish tradition, a Levite (לֵוִי Attached, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) is a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi. ...

Contents

Terminology

Transporting the Ark of the Covenant: gilded brass-relief at the Auch Cathedral
Transporting the Ark of the Covenant: gilded brass-relief at the Auch Cathedral

The Hebrew word aron is used in the Bible to refer to any type of ark, chest or coffer, for any purpose (Book of Genesis 50:26; 2 Kings 12:9, 10). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 600 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1417 × 1415 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 600 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1417 × 1415 pixel, file size: 1. ... Genesis redirects here. ... The Books of Kings (‎) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ...


The Ark of the Covenant is distinguished from all others by such titles as:

  • Holy Ark
  • Ark of God, (1 Samuel 3:3)
  • Ark of thy God's strength
  • Ark of the Covenant, (Josh. 3:6; Hebrews 9:4)
  • Ark of the Covenant of the Lord of all the Earth
  • Ark of the Testimony, (Ex. 25:22)

The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... Covenant is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bərîṯ, Standard Hebrew bərit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible. ... The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ... In law and in religion, testimony is a solemn attestation as to the truth of a matter. ...

Description

The Bible describes the Ark as made of shittah-tree wood (acacia), known to the Egyptians as the Tree of Life and an important plant in traditional medicine containing in many cases psychoactive alkaloids. It was a cubit and a half broad and high, and two and a half cubits long (about 130 cm x 78 cm x 78 cm or 4.29 x 2.57 x 2.57 feet, for Egyptian royal cubit was most likely used). The Ark was covered all over with the purest gold. Its upper surface or lid, the mercy seat (Hebrew: כפורת, Kaporet), was surrounded with a rim of gold. Shittah-tree is Hebrew for acacia. ... For other uses, see Acacia (disambiguation). ... The Tree-of-Life is a fictional plant (the ancestor of yams, with similar appearance and taste) in Larry Nivens Known Space universe, for which all Hominids have an in-built genetic craving. ... An assortment of psychoactive drugs A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior. ... Chemical structure of ephedrine, a phenethylamine alkaloid An alkaloid is a nitrogen-containing naturally occurring compound, produced by a large variety of organisms, including fungi, plants, animals, and bacteria. ... This derivation of the Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci, depicts nine historical units of measurement: the Yard, the Span, the Cubit, the Flemish Ell, the English Ell, the French Ell, the Fathom, the Hand , and the Foot. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... For other uses, see mercy seat (disambiguation). ... Hebrew redirects here. ...


On each of the two sides were two gold rings, wherein were placed two wooden poles (with a decorative sheathing of gold), to allow the Ark to be carried (Num. 7:9; 10:21; 4:5,19, 20; 1 Kings 8:3, 6). Over the Ark, at the two extremities, were two cherubim, with their faces turned toward one another (Leviticus 16:2; Num. 7:89). Their outspread wings over the top of the Ark formed the throne of God, while the Ark itself was his footstool (Ex. 25:10-22; 37:1-9). The Ark was placed in the "Holy of Holies," so that one end of the carrying poles touched the veil separating the two compartments of the tabernacle (1 Kings 8:8). The Book of Deuteronomy describes the Ark as a simple wooden container with no mention of ornaments or gold. Similarly, the Quran makes a reference to the Ark as a wooden box with holy relics inside it. For other uses of the word staff, see staff. ... A cherub (Hebrew כרוב; plural cherubim, כרובים) is an angelic creature mentioned several times in the Tanakh, or Old Testament, and in the Book of Revelation. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh (back) in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa are usually occupied by the Governor General and his/her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Kodesh Hakodashim, in Hebrew: (Biblical: קֹדֶשׁ הַקָּדָשִׁים ), Holy of Holies, the Most Holy Place in traditional Judaism, is the inner sanctuary within the Tabernacle and Temple in Jerusalem when Solomons Temple and the Second Temple were standing. ... Deuteronomy (Greek deuteronomium, second, from to deuteronomium touto, this second law, pronounced ) is the fifth book of the Torah of the Hebrew bible and the Old Testament. ... The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ...


Contents

According to the Bible, the two tablets of stone constituting the "testimony" or evidence of God's covenant with the people (i.e. The Ten Commandments) were kept within the Ark itself. A golden jar containing some of the manna from the Israelites' trek in the wilderness, and the rod of Aaron that budded, were added to the contents of the Ark (Ex. 16:32-34; Heb. 9:4), but apparently were later removed at some point prior to the building of Solomon's temple, as the Tanakh states in I Kings 8:9 that there "was nothing in the Ark save the two tablets of stone." While Heb. 9:4 states these items were placed "inside" the Ark, Ex. 16:33-34 and Num. 17:10 use the expression "before" the Ark; some see a contradiction here, as the correct meaning of these phrases is open to interpretation. A Rabbinic tradition states that Moses also put the broken fragments of the first tablets of the Law into the Ark.[2] This article is about the geological substance. ... A covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn promise to do or not do something specified. ... Not to be confused with the rune Mannaz. ... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ...


Sanctity and consecration

Even Aaron, brother of Moses and the High Priest, was forbidden to enter the place of the Ark, except once per year on a designated day, called The Day of Atonement, when he was to perform certain ceremonies there (Lev. 16). Moses was directed to consecrate the Ark, when completed, with the oil of holy ointment (Ex. 30:23-26); he was also directed to have the Ark made by Bezalel, son of Uri of the tribe of Judah, and by Aholiab, the son of Ahisamach of the tribe of Dan (Ex. 31:2-7). These instructions Moses carried out, calling upon every "wisehearted" one among the people to assist in the work (Ex. 35:10-12). Bezalel the artist made the Ark (Ex. 37:1); and Moses approved the work, put the testimony in the Ark, and installed it. The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Even in death, many Kohanim choose to have this symbol, the special positioning of their fingers and hands during the Priestly Blessing, placed as a crest or symbol on their gravestones to indicate their status. ... A year (from Old English gÄ“r) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... To consecrate an inaminate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... Bezalel is the name of a personage from the Bible and is the name of Israels national school of art. ... Uri is mentioned in Exodus 31 and 1 Chronicles 2 as a member of the Tribe of Judah. ... The Tribe of Judah (Hebrew: יְהוּדָה, Praise; Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) is one of the Hebrew tribes, founded by Judah, son of Jacob(Israel). ... Aholiab - tent of the father, an artist of the Tribe of Dan, appointed to the work of preparing materials for the tabernacle (Exodus. ... . ... Tribe of Dan was also a band from the mid 1990s. ...


According to the Haggadah written in the Mishnaic and Talmudic periods (circa 200-500 CE), after installment in the second Temple, the Ark and the operation of the Temple was supervised by the angel Metatron. There are numerous possible etymologies for the name Metatron, one being from two Greek words μετὰ θρóνος after and throne. There are no references to Metatron in the Jewish Tanakh (Old Testament), the Christian Scriptures (New Testament) or any Islamic source. Haggadah for Passover (fourteenth century). ... The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... For the Darkwell album, see Metatron (album). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


In Deut. 10:1-5, a different account of the making of the Ark is given. Moses is made to say that he constructed the Ark before going upon Mount Horeb to receive the second set of tablets. The charge of carrying the Ark and the rest of the holy implements was given to the family of Kohath (of the tribe of Levi). They, though, were not to touch any of the holy things that were still uncovered by Aaron (Num. 4:2-15). For other places named Mount Sinai, see Mount Sinai (disambiguation) Sunrise on the Mount Sinai Sinai Peninsula, showing location of Jabal Musa Mount Sinai (2,285 meters) is a mountain in the southern Sinai Peninsula of Egypt. ... In the Old Testament, Kohath is both the name of one of the three sons of Levi and the name of one of the 3 subtribes of the tribe of Levi. ... In the Jewish tradition, a Levite (לוי Attached, Standard Hebrew Levi, Tiberian Hebrew Lēwî) is a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi. ...


Other references to the Ark in Scripture

The Ark of the Covenant is mentioned in both the Bible and the Qur'an. For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...


In the Bible

The Ark carried into the Temple
The Ark carried into the Temple

The Ark is mentioned in the books Joshua, Exodus, Deuteronomy, Hebrews and Jeremiah. It is referenced by Jeremiah, who, speaking in the days of Josiah (Jer. 3:16), prophesies a future time when the Ark will no longer be used. In the Psalms, the Ark is twice referred to. In Ps. 78:61 its capture by the Philistines is spoken of, and the Ark is called "the strength and glory of God"; and in Ps. 132:8, it is spoken of as "You and the ark of Your strength." The Ark is also mentioned in several passages in Exodus and 1 Samuel, including Exodus 25:10-22 and 1 Samuel 4:3-22 and 5:7-8. The Ark is mentioned in one passage in the deuterocanonical 2 Maccabees 2:4-10, which contains a reference to a document saying that the prophet Jeremiah, "being warned of God," took the Ark, and the tabernacle, and the altar of incense, and buried them in a cave on Mount Nebo (Deut. 34:1), informing those of his followers who wished to find the place that it should remain unknown "until the time that God should gather His people again together, and receive them unto mercy." Hebrews 9:4 states that the Ark contained "the golden pot that had manna, and Aaron's rod that budded, and the tables of the covenant." Finally, in the Book of Revelation the Ark is described as being in the 'temple' of God in heaven (Rev. 11:19). The Ark is last seen in God's 'temple' just before a woman gives birth to the man child (Rev. 12:1-2), both stalked by a dragon and his angels cast to earth (Rev. 12:3-17). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (404x691, 90 KB) Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio 29r - The Ark of God Carried into the Temple the Musée Condé, Chantilly. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (404x691, 90 KB) Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio 29r - The Ark of God Carried into the Temple the Musée Condé, Chantilly. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Josiah listening to the reading of the law by Julius Schnoor von Carolsfeld Josiah or Yoshiyahu (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; supported of the Lord) was king of Judah, and son of Amon and Jedidah, the daughter of Adaiah of Bozkath. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Deuterocanonical books is a term used since the sixteenth century in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Christianity to describe certain books and passages of the Christian Bible, in contrast to the protocanonical books which are contained in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with the rune Mannaz. ... In botany and horticulture, the popular name given to various tall flowering plants : Common mullein or great mullein (Verbascum thapsus), a biennal medicinal herb used in Amerindian medicine as a tonic for lung problems, such as cough, asthma or bronchitis; Snapdragon or Figwort family (Scrophulariaceae)(other common names: shepherds... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ...


In the Qur'an

There is a brief mention of the Ark of the Covenant in Islamic literature. This mention is in the middle of the narrative of the choice of Saul to be king. The Qur'an states: Saul (שאול המלך) (or Shaul) (Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Standard Tiberian  ; asked for or borrowed) is a figure identified in the Books of Samuel and Quran as having been the first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

And (further) their Prophet said to them: "A Sign of his authority is that there shall come to you the Ark of the covenant, with (an assurance) therein of security (Sakina) from your Lord, and the relics left by the family of Moses and the family of Aaron, carried by angels. In this is a symbol for you if ye indeed have faith. (Qur'an 2:248)

Islamic scholar Al Baidawi mentions that the Sakina could be Tawrat, Books of Moses or idol of emeralds and rubies.[3] According to Al-Jalalan, the relics in the Ark were the fragments of the two tablets, rods, robes, shoes, mitres of Moses and the vase of Manna.[3] Al-Tha'alibi, in Qisas Al-Anbiya (The Stories of the Prophets), has given an earlier and later history of the Ark. Sakina (Arabic: سكينة) is an Arabic word derived from Sakoon, meaning peace or tranquility. Usage in the Quran Sakina is the Spirit of Tranquillity, or Peace of Reassurance, mentioned in the Quran which descended upon Muhammad and the believers, when faced with opposing forces at Hudaybiyah. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Baidawi (Abdallah ibn Umar al-Baidawi Arabic: عبدالله بن عمر البيدوي), Muslim critic, was born in Fars, where his father was chief judge, in the time of the Atabek ruler Abu Bakr ibn Sad (1226-60). ... Sakina (Arabic: سكينة) is an Arabic word derived from Sakoon, meaning peace or tranquility. Usage in the Quran Sakina is the Spirit of Tranquillity, or Peace of Reassurance, mentioned in the Quran which descended upon Muhammad and the believers, when faced with opposing forces at Hudaybiyah. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... The Qisas al-anbiya (قصص الأنبياء) or Stories of the Prophets refers to various collections of tales adapted from the Quran. ...


According to most Muslim scholars, the Ark of the Covenant has a religious basis in Islam, and Islam gives it special significance. Muslims believe that it will be found by Mahdi near the end of times from Lake Tiberias.[4] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Muhammad al-Mahdi. ... Yawm al-Qīyāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... The Sea of Galilee with the Jordan River flowing out of it to the south and into the Dead Sea The Sea of Galilee is Israels largest freshwater lake, approximately 53 kilometers (33 miles) in circumference, about 21 km (13 miles) long, and 13 km (8 miles) wide; it...


Biblical account

Mobile vanguard

In the march from Sinai, and at the crossing of the Jordan, the Ark preceded the people, and was the signal for their advance (Num. 10:33; Josh. 3:3, 6). The Ark of the Covenant burned the thorns and other obstructions in the wilderness roads. According to tradition, sparks from between the two cherubim killed serpents and scorpions. (I and II Chronicles)[5] During the crossing of the Jordan, the river grew dry as soon as the feet of the priests carrying the Ark touched its waters; and remained so until the priests -- with the Ark -- left the river, after the people had passed over (Josh. 3:15-17; 4:10, 11, 18). As memorials, twelve stones were taken from the Jordan at the place where the priests had stood (Josh. 4:1-9). For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... Superfamilies Pseudochactoidea Buthoidea Chaeriloidea Chactoidea Iuroidea Scorpionoidea See classification for families. ... These Twelve Stones are twelve מצבות (matzevot) or standing stones. ...


The Ark was carried into battle, such as in the Midian war (Num. 31). In the capture of Jericho the Ark was carried round the city once a day for six days, preceded by the armed men and seven priests sounding seven trumpets of rams' horns (Josh. 6:4-15). On the seventh day the seven priests sounding the seven trumpets of rams' horns before the Ark compassed the city seven times and with a great shout, Jericho's wall fell down flat and the people took the city (Josh. 6:16-20). After the defeat at Ai, Joshua lamented before the Ark (Josh. 7:6-9). When Joshua read the Law to the people between Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal, they stood on each side of the Ark. The Ark was again set up by Joshua at Shiloh; but when the Israelites fought against Benjamin at Gibeah, they had the Ark with them, and consulted it after their defeat. The Midian War documented in the Hebrew Bible, Numbers 31, is the final military action that Moses personally led. ... Ai (Hebrew: ; heap of ruins) refers to one or two places in ancient Israel: A city mentioned along with Heshbon by Jeremiah 49:3, whose location is currently unknown, and which may or may not be the same as: A Canaanite royal city which according to the Book of Joshua... Old view of Mount Gerizim Mount Gerizim (Samaritan Hebrew Ar-garízim, Arabic جبل جرزيم Jabal Jarizīm, Tiberian Hebrew הַר גְּרִזִּים Har Gərizzîm, Standard Hebrew הַר גְּרִיזִּים Har Gərizzim) is one of the two mountains in the immediate vicinity of the West Bank city of Nablus (Biblical Shechem), and forms the southern... Mount Ebal, a mountain peak 940 meters above sea level just north of the West Bank city of Nablus. ... Shiloh (Hebrew: ) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible as a city and as denoting a person. ... Name Gibeah – could be a variation of the Hebrew word of Geba, meaning “hill”, other names include Gibeah of Benjamin and Gibeah of Saul Tell el Ful – modern name of the Arabic town, meaning “mound of horse beans” Location Central Benjamin Plateau 3 miles north of Jerusalem along the Watershed...


Captured by the Philistines

The Ark is next spoken of as being in the tabernacle at Shiloh during Samuel's apprenticeship (1 Sam. 3:3). After the settlement of the Israelites in Canaan, the Ark remained in the tabernacle at Gilgal for a season, then was removed to Shiloh until the time of Eli, between 300 and 400 years (Jeremiah 7:12), when it was carried into the field of battle, so as to secure, as they supposed, victory to the Hebrews; and it was taken by the Philistines (1 Sam. 4:3-11), who sent it back after retaining it seven months (1 Sam. 5:7, 8) because of the events said to have transpired. After their first defeat at Eben-ezer, the Israelites had the Ark brought from Shiloh, and welcomed its coming with great rejoicing. The Tabernacle is known in Hebrew as the Mishkan ( משכן Place of [Divine] dwelling). It was to be a portable central place of worship for the Hebrews from the time they left ancient Egypt following the Exodus, through the time of the Book of Judges when they were engaged in conquering... Look up Israelite in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... Gilgal is a place name in the Hebrew Bible. ... Eli (עֵלִי Ascent, Standard Hebrew ʿEli, Tiberian Hebrew ʿĒlî) is the name of one of the last Israelite judges before the rule of kings in ancient Israel. ... The Book of Jeremiah, or Jeremiah (יִרְמְיָהוּ YirmÉ™yāhÅ« in Hebrew), is part of the Hebrew Bible, Judaisms Tanakh, and later became a part of Christianitys Old Testament. ... Map showing the location of Philistine land and cities of Gaza, Ashdod, and Ashkelon Map of the southern Levant, c. ... Eben-ezer - stone of help, the memorial stone set up by Samuel after a signal defeat of the Philistines, as a memorial of the help received on the occasion from God (1 Sam. ...


In the second battle, the Israelites were again defeated, and the Philistines captured the Ark (1 Sam. 4:3-5, 10, 11). The news of its capture was at once taken to Shiloh by a messenger "with his clothes rent, and with earth upon his head." The old priest, Eli, fell dead when he heard it; and his daughter-in-law, bearing a son at the time the news of the capture of the Ark was received, named him Ichabod—explained as "Where is glory?" in reference to the loss of the Ark (1 Sam. 4:12-22). Ichabod, in the Bible, is the son of Phinehas. ...


The Philistines took the Ark to several places in their country, and at each place misfortune resulted to them (1 Sam. 5:1-6). At Ashdod it was placed in the temple of Dagon. The next morning Dagon was found prostrate, bowed down, before it; and on being restored to his place, he was on the following morning again found prostrate and broken. The people of Ashdod were smitten with hemorrhoids; a plague of mice was sent over the land (1 Sam. 6:5). The affliction of boils was also visited upon the people of Gath and of Ekron, whither the Ark was successively removed (1 Sam. 5:8-12). Hebrew Founded in 1956 Government City (from 1968) District South Population 204,400 (2005) Jurisdiction 60,000 dunams (60 km²) Mayor Zvi Zilker Ashdod (Hebrew: ‎; Arabic: , Isdud), located in the Southern District of Israel towards the south of the Israeli Coastal Plain, is a city of over 200,000 people... Dagon was a major northwest Semitic god, reportedly of grain and agriculture. ... Gath (גת Hebrew: winepress), a common place name in ancient Israel and the surrounding regions. ... The city of Ekron (Hebrew עֶקְרוֹן, Standard Hebrew Ê»Eqron, Tiberian Hebrew Ê»Eqrôn) was one of the five Philistine cities in southwestern Canaan. ...


After the Ark had been among them seven months, the Philistines, on the advice of their diviners, returned it to the Israelites, accompanying its return with an offering consisting of golden images of the hemorrhoids and mice wherewith they had been afflicted. The Ark was set in the field of Joshua the Beth-shemite, and the Beth-shemites offered sacrifices and burnt offerings (1 Sam. 6:1-15). Out of curiosity the men of Beth-shemesh gazed at the Ark; and as a punishment, seventy of them (fifty thousand seventy in some ms.) were smitten by the Lord (1 Sam. 6:19). The Bethshemites sent to Kirjath-jearim, or Baal-Judah, to have the Ark removed (1 Sam. 6:21); and it was taken to the house of Abinadab, whose son Eleazar was sanctified to keep it. Kirjath-jearim was the abode of the Ark for twenty years. Under Saul, the Ark was with the army before he first met the Philistines, but the king was too impatient to consult it before engaging in battle. In 1 Chronicles 13:3 it is stated that the people were not accustomed to consult the Ark in the days of Saul. Bet Shemesh is a large Jewish neighborhood near Jerusalem in the modern State of Israel. ... Bet Shemesh is a large Jewish neighborhood near Jerusalem in the modern State of Israel. ... Kiriath-Jearim - city of woods - was a city in ancient Israel. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Eleazar (or Elazar), (אֶלְעָזָר [My] God has helped, Standard Hebrew ElÊ¿azar, Tiberian Hebrew ʾElʿāzār) refers to a number of persons in the Hebrew Bible and in Jewish history: A son of Aaron, and a Levite priest. ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ... Saul (שאול המלך) (or Shaul) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; asked for) is identified in the Books of Samuel, 1 Chronicles and the Quran as the first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. ...


In the days of King David

At the beginning of his reign, David removed the Ark from Kirjath-jearim amid great rejoicing. On the way to Zion, Uzzah, one of the drivers of the cart whereon the Ark was carried, put out his hand to steady the Ark, and was smitten by the Lord for touching it. David, in fear, carried the Ark aside into the house of Obed-edom the Gittite, instead of carrying it on to Zion, and here it stayed three months (2 Sam. 6:1-11; 1 Chron. 13:1-13). Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... For pre-Islamic goddess, see Uzza Uzzah - strength, a son of Abinadab, in whose house the men of Kirjath-jearim placed the ark when it was brought back from the land of the Philistines (1 Sam. ... Obed-Edom - servant of Edom. ... Gath (גת Hebrew: winepress), a common place name in ancient Israel and the surrounding regions. ...


On hearing that the Lord had blessed Obed-edom because of the presence of the Ark in his house, David had the Ark brought to Zion by the Levites, while he himself, "girded with a linen ephod," "danced before the Lord with all his might" — a performance that caused him to be despised and scornfully rebuked by Saul's daughter Michal (2 Sam. 6:12-16, 20-22; 1 Chron. 15). This derision of David on her part prompted God to take away her fertility. In Zion, David put the Ark in the tabernacle he had prepared for it, offered sacrifices, distributed food, and blessed the people and his own household (2 Sam. 6:17-20; 1 Chron. 16:1-3; 2 Chron. 1:4). The ephod (pronounced either ē´fod or ef´od) was one of eight ritual garments worn by the Israelite and later the Jewish High Priest while serving in the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. ... Gustave Doré, 1865, Michal helps young David escape. ...


Levites were appointed to minister before the Ark (1 Chron. 16:4). David's plan of building a temple for the Ark was stopped at the advice of God (2 Sam. 7:1-17; 1 Chron. 17:1-15; 28:2, 3). The Ark was with the army during the siege of Rabbah (2 Sam. 11:11); and when David fled from Jerusalem at the time of Absalom's conspiracy, the Ark was carried along with him until he ordered Zadok the priest to return it to Jerusalem (2 Sam. 15:24-29). This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Absalom or Avshalom (אַבְשָׁלוֹם Father/Leader of/is peace, Standard Hebrew Avšalom, Tiberian Hebrew ʾAḇšālôm), in the Bible, is the third son of David, king of Israel. ... Zadok (Hebrew: Tzadok meaning Righteous) was the Israelite High Priest of the tenth century BCE. // Zadok in the Bible A son of Ahitub, of the line of Eleazar (2 Samuel 8:17; 1 Chronicles 24:3), high priest in the time of David (2 Sam. ...


In Solomon's temple

When Abiathar was dismissed from the priesthood by Solomon for having taken part in Adonijah's conspiracy against David, his life was spared because he had formerly borne the Ark (1 Kings 2:26). It was afterwards placed by Solomon in the temple (1 Kings 8:6-9). Solomon worshiped before the Ark after his dream in which the Lord promised him wisdom (1 Kings 3:15). In Solomon's Temple, a Holy of Holies was prepared to receive the Ark (1 Kings 6:19); and when the Temple was dedicated, the Ark—containing nothing but the two Mosaic tables of stone—was placed therein. When the priests emerged from the holy place after placing the Ark there, the Temple was filled with a cloud, "for the glory of the Lord had filled the house of the Lord" (1 Kings 8:10-11; 2 Chron. 5:13, 14). Abiathar (Heb. ... This article is about the Biblical character . ... Adonijah is a Hebrew name, meaning YHVH is my lord. A number of characters in the Bible bear this name. ... In a political sense, conspiracy refers to a group of persons united in the goal of usurping or overthrowing an established political power. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew:  ; The Holy House), refers to a series of structures located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... Solomons Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Beit HaMikdash), also known as the First Temple, was, according to the Bible, the first Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. ...


When Solomon married Pharaoh's daughter, he caused her to dwell in a house outside Zion, as Zion was consecrated because of its containing the Ark (2 Chron. 8:11). King Josiah had the Ark put into the Temple (2 Chron. 35:3), whence it appears to have again been removed by one of his successors.


The Babylonians and afterwards

Area believed to be the place where the Ark of the Covenant sat before King Solomon's Temple was destroyed. A dome was later built by the Arabs who now refer to it as the Dome of Spirits.
Area believed to be the place where the Ark of the Covenant sat before King Solomon's Temple was destroyed. A dome was later built by the Arabs who now refer to it as the Dome of Spirits.

When the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem and plundered the temple, the Ark entered the domain of legend. Many historians[who?] suppose that the ark was probably taken away by Nebuchadnezzar and destroyed. The absence of the ark from the Second Temple was acknowledged. The Ark is finally re-established to the Temple in vision: "Then God's temple in heaven was opened, and within his temple was seen the Ark of his Covenant" (Rev. 11:19 NIV). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 993 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Bruce Lee in 2006 in Jerusalem. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 993 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Bruce Lee in 2006 in Jerusalem. ... Babylonia was a state in southern Mesopotamia, in modern Iraq, combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Nebuchadnezzar (or Nebudchadrezzar) II (ca. ... A stone (2. ...


Fate of the Ark

Guesses of the ultimate fate of the Ark include the intentional concealing of the Ark under the Temple Mount; the removal of the Ark from Jerusalem in advance of the Babylonians (this variant usually ends up with the Ark in Ethiopia); the removal of the Ark by the Ethiopian prince Menelik I (purported son of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba); removal by Jewish priests during the reign of Manasseh of Judah, possibly taken to the Jewish Temple at Elephantine in Egypt; the miraculous removal of the Ark by divine intervention (Cf. 2 Chronicles); and even the destruction of the original ornate Ark under King Josiah's reforms (when it may have been seen as violating the commandment against graven images) and replacement with a simple wooden box, easily lost when the Temple fell. The Temple Mount A reconstruction of Herods Temple in Jerusalem. ... Menelik I, first Emperor of Ethiopia, is traditionally believed to be the son of King Solomon of ancient Israel and Makeda, Queen of Sheba. ... It has been suggested that Sulayman be merged into this article or section. ... The Queen of Sheba, (Hebrew מלכת שבא , Arabic ملكة سبأ , Geez: ንግሥተ ሳባ Nigista Saba), referred to in the Hebrew scriputures (Old Testament), Bible books of 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles, the New Testament, the Quran, and Ethiopian history, was the ruler of Sheba, an ancient kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament). ... Manasseh of Judah was the king of Judah and only son and successor of Hezekiah. ... Elephantine Island, showing the nilometer (lower left) and the Aswan Museum. ...


The fate of the Ark plays a major role in the film Raiders of the Lost Ark This article is about the film. ...


Rumoured present locations

Some have claimed to have discovered or have possession of the Ark.


Africa

Some sources[who?]suggest that during the reign of King Manasseh (2 Chron 33) the Ark was smuggled from the temple by way of the Well of Souls and taken to Egypt, eventually ending up in Ethiopia. There are some carvings on the Cathedral of Chartres in France that may refer to this possible event. Well of Souls can mean several things: 1. ... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles (80 km) from Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture. ...


Ethiopian Orthodox Church

The Chapel of the Tablet at the Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion allegedly houses the original Ark of the Covenant.
The Chapel of the Tablet at the Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion allegedly houses the original Ark of the Covenant.

The Ethiopian Orthodox Church in Axum, Ethiopia, is the only one in the world that still claims to possess the Ark of the Covenant. According to the Kebra Nagast, after Menelik I had come to Jerusalem to visit his father, King Solomon, his father had given him a copy of the Ark, and had commanded the first-born sons of the elders of his kingdom to travel back to Ethiopia to settle there. However, the sons of the elders did not want to live away from the presence of the Ark, so they switched the copy with the original and smuggled the Ark out of the country. Menelik only learned that the original was with his group during the journey home. Solomon lost not only the Ark to his son by the Queen of Sheba but the divine favour that went with it.[6] Image File history File links Ark_of_the_Covenant_church_in_Axum_Ethiopia. ... Image File history File links Ark_of_the_Covenant_church_in_Axum_Ethiopia. ... The Chapel of the Tablet The Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion (“Re-ese Adbarat Kidiste Kidusan Dingel Maryam Ts’iyon” in the languages of Ethiopia) of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church is the most important and the oldest church of Ethiopia. ... The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Church until it was granted its own Patriarch by Cyril VI, the Coptic Pope, in 1959. ... Axum, also Aksum, is a city in northern Ethiopia, located at the base of the Adoua mountains. ... Modern book cover of Kebra Nagast: The Glory of the Kings The Kebra Nagast (var. ... Menelik I, first Emperor of Ethiopia, is traditionally believed to be the son of King Solomon of ancient Israel and Makeda, Queen of Sheba. ... The Queen of Sheba, (Hebrew מלכת שבא , Arabic ملكة سبأ , Geez: ንግሥተ ሳባ Nigista Saba), referred to in the Hebrew scriputures (Old Testament), Bible books of 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles, the New Testament, the Quran, and Ethiopian history, was the ruler of Sheba, an ancient kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament). ...


Although it was once paraded before the town once each year, the object is now kept under constant guard in a "treasury" near the Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion, and only the "Guardian of the Ark" as he refers to himself, is allowed to see it (not even the Patriarch of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, His Holiness Abuna Paulos, is allowed to view the Ark).[7] The Chapel of the Tablet The Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion (“Re-ese Adbarat Kidiste Kidusan Dingel Maryam Ts’iyon” in the languages of Ethiopia) of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church is the most important and the oldest church of Ethiopia. ...


In a December 2007 article, Smithsonian Magazine detailed a trip to Ethiopia in search of the Ark.[8] Ethiopian Christians have claimed that the Ark rests in a chapel in the small town of Aksum after arriving nearly 3,000 years ago. It has been guarded by a succession of virgin monks who, once anointed, are forbidden to set foot outside the chapel grounds until they die. Author Paul Raffaele reached the chapel but was only able to go so far as to meet the guardian. He expressed fear that if he sneaked past the guardian the alarm would have been sounded and feared possible harm by the Ark itself. He noted that the Ark was paraded through the streets during one of the holy ceremonies, but the guardian paid it no attention. This led Raffaele to presume that the Ark on display was one of several false arks rumoured to exist. Smithsonian is a monthly magazine published by the Smithsonian Institution of the United States in Washington, DC External link Smithsonian webpage Categories: Smithsonian Institution | United States magazines | Stub ...


Zimbabwe

The Lemba people, who claim to have and do have some Jewish descent, have a tradition that their ancestors carried the Ark calling it the ngoma lungundu or "voice of God", south and hid it in a deep cave in Dumghe mountain, the spiritual home of the Lemba people.[9][10][11] The Lemba or Lembaa are a group of people numbering 70,000 in southern Africa. ...


In a documentary aired in the U.K. on April 14, 2008,[12] Tudor Parfitt, taking a literalist approach to the Biblical story, describes his research into their claim. He says that the object is described as having similar attributes to the Ark. It was of similar size, was carried on poles by priests, was not allowed to touch the ground, was revered as a voice of their God, and was used as a weapon of great power, sweeping enemies aside. Parfitt's book The Lost Ark of the Covenant (2008) suggests that the Ark was taken to Arabia following the Second Book of Maccabees, and cites Arabic sources which maintain it was brought in distant times to the Yemen. The Lemba clan called the Buba, which was supposed to have brought the Ark to Africa, have a genetic signature called the Cohen Modal Haplotype which connects them with the ancient priesthood in Jerusalem. The Lemba also came to Africa from the Yemen. Lemba tradition maintains that the Ark spent some time in Sena in Yemen. Later, it was taken across the sea to East Africa and may have been taken inland at the time of the Great Zimbabawe civilisation. According to their oral traditions, some time after the arrival of the Lemba with the Ark, it self-destructed. Using a core from the original, the Lemba priests constructed a new one. This replica was discovered in a cave by a Swedish German missionary named Harald von Sicard in the 1940s and eventually found its way to the Museum of Human Science in Harare. Parfitt had it radio-carbon dated to about 1350 CE, which coincides with the sudden end of the Great Zimbabwe civilization.[13] Jewish sources in the Talmud as well as the Jewish exegete Rashi (Rashi's commentary of Deuteronomy) suggest that there were two Arks: one was the original simple wooden Ark of Moses described in the Book of Deuteronomy, the other was the later golden Ark made by Bezalel as described in the Book of Exodus. Rabbinic opinion maintains that the first of these Arks was the Ark of War and the second was a ceremonial object which stayed in the Temple. Parfitt suggests that the Ark he found was the descendant of the Ark of War—that a wooden chest being used as a weapon was replicated at least once, and possibly many times. Parfitt offers the suggestion that the wooden ark may always have been a drum as well as a weapon of some sort, like the ngoma. It was often found in musical processions; David danced in front of it and it was covered over with a piece of leather. Parfitt makes no mention as to the principal contents of the Ark, the stone tablets. 2 Maccabees is a deuterocanonical book of the Bible which focuses on the Jews revolt against Antiochus and concludes with the defeat of the Syrian general Nicanor in 161 BC by Judas Maccabeus, the hero of the work. ... The Lemba or Lembaa are a group of people numbering 70,000 in southern Africa. ... Y-chromosomal Aaron is the name given to the hypothesised ancestor of the Kohanim, a patrilineal priestly caste in Judaism. ... Motto: Pamberi Nekushandria Vanhu (Forward with Service to the People) Map of Zimbabwe showing the location of Harare. ... Radiocarbon dating is the use of the naturally occurring isotope of carbon-14 in radiometric dating to determine the age of organic materials, up to ca. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ...


Middle East

In 1989, Ron Wyatt claimed to have broken into a chamber while digging underground beneath the Calvary Escarpment. He claimed to have seen the Ark and taken photographs. All photos came out blurry (leading to scepticism of the claim). According to Wyatt the excavations were closed off (because of private property concerns) and, to the extent of knowledge, no one has seen the Ark since. Ron Wyatt was widely seen in the Biblical archaeology community as an attention seeker, often announcing he had found Biblically important objects with little or no hard evidence to back up his claims. Ron Wyatt Ronald Eldon Wyatt (1933 - August 4, 1999) was an amateur archaeologist (he had no training in the discipline and held no professional position) who claimed to have discovered many significant biblical sites and artifacts. ...


Vendyl Jones claimed to have found the entrance to the chamber in the Cave of the Column near Qumran. Here, he stated, is where the Ark was hidden prior to the destruction of the First Temple. Arutz Sheva quoted Jones stating he would reveal the Ark on Tisha B'Av (August 14, 2005), the anniversary of the destruction of both the First and Second Temples;[14] however, this did not occur. On Jones' website he states that he was misquoted and actually said it would be appropriate if he discovered the Ark on Tisha B'Av. Jones is waiting for funding to explore the cave. Vendyl Texas Jones Vendyl Jones (born May 29, 1930 in Sudan, Texas) is an American religious scholar who has directed archaeological searches for Biblical artifacts such as the Ark of the Covenant. ... Qumran (Hebrew:חירבת קומראן Khirbet Qumran) is located on a dry plateau about a mile inland from the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea in Israel. ... Arutz Sheva Israel National Radio is a right wing Israeli radio station. ... Tisha BAv (Hebrew: תשעה באב or ט׳ באב), or the Ninth of Av, is an annual fast day in Judaism. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Modern excavations near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem have found tunnels, but digging beneath the Temple Mount is somewhat restricted. One of the most important Islamic shrines, the Dome of the Rock, sits in the location where the First Temple of Solomon once stood. Messianic preacher Michael Rood claims that King Solomon married into the Egyptian royal family so as to gain the Egyptians' famed knowledge of sand hydraulic technology. King Solomon reportedly, when building the temple, put the Ark of the Covenant on a platform which could be lowered down into a tunnel system if the Temple were ever overrun. In 586 BCE King Nebuchadnezzar's troops destroyed the temple and carried off the temple treasures but did not find the Ark of the Covenant, which had been lowered into the cave system below and secreted away by Levite priests. The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount The Dome of the Rock, (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... Michael Rood is a Messianic preacher who traveled the globe exhibiting . ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC - 590s BC - 588s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC Events and trends 589 BC - Apries succeeds Psammetichus II as king of Egypt 588 BC - Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon...


Europe

Languedoc

Several legends hold that the Ark was carried home to Languedoc by Templars returning from the Crusades.[15] For the language called Langue doc, see Occitan language. ...


England

In 2003, historical author Graham Phillips traced the route of the Ark through research using Biblical texts as being taken to Mount Sinai in the Valley of Edom by the Maccabees, along with other religious treasures. Phillips claims it remained there until the 1180s, when Ralph de Sudeley, the leader of the Templars who apparently found the Maccabean treasure at Jebel al-Madhbah, returned home to his estate at Herdewyke in Warwickshire, England, taking the treasure with him.[16] Moses with the Ten Commandments by Rembrandt (1659) Biblical Mount Sinai refers to the place where, according to the Hebrew Bible (Exod. ... Edomite redirects here. ... Wojciech Stattlers Machabeusze (Maccabees), 1844 The Maccabees (Hebrew: מכבים or מקבים, Makabim) were Jewish rebels who fought against the rule of Antiochus IV Epiphanes of the Hellenistic Seleucid dynasty, who was succeeded by his infant son Antiochus V Eupator. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... The Siq, facing the Treasury, which lies at the foot of Jebel al-Madhbah Jebel al-Madhbah is a mountain at Petra, in present-day Jordan, which a number of scholars have proposed as the Biblical Mount Sinai[1], beginning with Ditlef Nielsen in 1927[2]. The mountain is colloquially... A detailed map Stratford-upon-Avon Kenilworth Castle Warwickshire (pronounced // or //) is a landlocked non-metropolitan county in central England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Ireland

During the turn of the 20th century British Israelites carried out some excavations of the Hill of Tara looking for the Ark of the Covenant – the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland campaigned successfully to have them stopped before they ruined the hill.[17] British Israelism (sometimes called Anglo-Israelism) is a Christian theology based on the premise that many early British people, Europeans and/or their royal families were direct lineal descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel and in some cases of the Tribe of Judah. ... The Hill of Tara (Irish Teamhair na Rí, Hill of the Kings), located near the River Boyne, is a long, low limestone ridge that runs between Navan and Dunshaughlin in County Meath, Leinster, Ireland. ...


See also

Ethopia
Hebrews
Middle Eastern
"Manna"
People
Other

(Redirected from 1050s BCE) Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1100s BC 1090s BC 1080s BC 1070s BC 1060s BC - 1050s BC - 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC 1000s BC Events and Trends 1053 BC - Death of Zhou kang wang, King of the... // Paintings from Val Camonica, Italy, c. ... [1] Drawing of the 3 pieces. ... Haile Selassie I The Rastafari movement (also known as Rastafari, or simply Rasta) is a new religious movement[1] that accepts Haile Selassie I, the former Emperor of Ethiopia, as God incarnate, called Jah[2] or Jah Rastafari. ... This article is about the film. ... Shishak (Hebrew: שישק, Tiberian: []) or Shishaq is the biblical Hebrew form of the ancient Egyptian name of a pharaoh. ... Look up Ethiopia on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Relief Organizations The Denan Project - Provides Qualified Medical Relief For The People Of Denan Government Embassy of Ethiopia in Washington DC information about the Ethiopian government Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ethiopia Ministry of Information of Ethiopia The Crown Council of Ethiopia... Axum, properly Aksum, is a city in northern Ethiopia. ... Ethiopian Church in Jerusalem This Ethiopian icon shows St. ... This article is about the Hebrew people. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy of Holies. ... Solomons Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Beit HaMikdash), also known as the First Temple, was, according to the Bible, the first Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. ... Ajax prepares to violate the sanctuary of Athena by abducting Cassandra by force: red-figure vase, c. ... Shittah-tree is Hebrew for acacia. ... CHERUB is a series of childrens books written by the author Robert Muchamore about a group of children who are trained to be agents working for the British Government in the top secret organisation known as CHERUB. It is similar to the British security service MI5, and is based... For the pre-history of the region, see Pre-history of the Southern Levant. ... The Tabernacle is known in Hebrew as the Mishkan ( משכן Place of [Divine] dwelling). It was to be a portable central place of worship for the Hebrews from the time they left ancient Egypt following the Exodus, through the time of the Book of Judges when they were engaged in conquering... Jewish symbolism is any form or type of symbolism in Judaism; a symbol in this sense is defined as some kind of visible representation of an object or an idea. ... Book of Judges (Hebrew: Sefer Shoftim ספר שופטים) is a book of the Bible originally written in Hebrew. ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Hebrew Founded in 1956 Government City (from 1968) District South Population 204,400 (2005) Jurisdiction 60,000 dunams (60 km²) Mayor Zvi Zilker Ashdod (Hebrew: ‎; Arabic: , Isdud), located in the Southern District of Israel towards the south of the Israeli Coastal Plain, is a city of over 200,000 people... Not to be confused with the rune Mannaz. ... Shittah-tree is Hebrew for acacia. ... Ley lines are alignments of a number of places of geographical interest, such as ancient megaliths. ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... The Prophet Samuel, fresco painting from the Mikhailovskr monastery of Kiev, c. ... This article is about the Biblical character . ... Menelik I, first Emperor of Ethiopia, is traditionally believed to be the son of King Solomon of ancient Israel and Makeda, Queen of Sheba. ... Theodulf, Bishop of Orléans, France, (born about A.D. 760 - died at Angers, France, December 18, 821), a Visigoth either from a still-Christian portion of Spain (which had been conquered by Muslims after 710) or the South of France (which was a former possession of the Visigoths), came... The various books of the Hebrew Bible contain descriptions of the physical world, and can be considered a source of information of the history of science in the Iron Age Levant. ... For other uses, see Acacia (disambiguation). ... Cover of Foucaults Pendulum, 1989 Picador edition. ... Many significant things throughout history have been lost, inspiring archaeologists and treasure-hunters around the world to try and find them. ... This mikoshi enshrines Tokugawa Ieyasu at the Toshogu in Nikko A mikoshi (神輿、みこし) is a portable Shinto shrine that serves as the vehicle of a divine spirit in Japan at the time of a parade of deities. ...

Further reading

  • Carew, Mairead, Tara and the Ark of the Covenant: A Search for the Ark of the Covenant by British Israelites on the Hill of Tara, 1899-1902]. Royal Irish Academy, 2003. ISBN 0954385527
  • Fisher, Milton C., The Ark of the Covenant: Alive and Well in Ethiopia?. Bible and Spade 8/3, pp. 65-72, 1995.
  • Grierson, Roderick & Munro-Hay, Stuart, The Ark of the Covenant. Orion Books Ltd, 2000. ISBN 0-7538-1010-7
  • Hancock, Graham, The Sign and the Seal: The Quest for the Lost Ark of the Covenant. Touchstone Books, 1993. ISBN 0-671-86541-2
  • Hertz, J.H., The Pentateuch and Haftoras. Deuteronomy. Oxford University Press, 1936.
  • Leeman, Bernard, Queen of Sheba and Biblical Scholarship. Queensland Academic Press, 2005. ISBN 0-9758022-0-8
  • Ritmeyer, L., The Ark of the Covenant: Where it Stood in Solomon's Temple. Biblical Archaeology Review 22/1: 46-55, 70-73, 1996.

Feather, Robert,"The Mystery of the Copper Scroll of Qumran". Bear & Co., Vermont, U.S.A.,2003. ISBN 1-59143-014-3 Graham Hancock (born August 2, 1950) is a British writer and journalist. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ...


References

  1. ^ Hertz 1936
  2. ^ Hertz 1936
  3. ^ a b A Dictionary of Islam By Patrick Hughes, Thomas Patrick Hughes, pg 624
  4. ^ Iqd al-Durar fi Akbar al-Imam al-Muntadhar, by Shaikh Jamaluddin Yusuf al Damishqi, p. 51-a
  5. ^ "Ark of the Covenant". Jewish Encyclopedia.
  6. ^ See Hancock, excerpt
  7. ^ Smithsonian magazine investigates the Ark
  8. ^ Smithsonian Magazine | People & Places | Keepers of the Lost Ark?
  9. ^ The real Indiana Jones: Intrepid British don Tudor Parfitt's mission to find the Lord Ark By ZOE BRENNAN , Daily Mail, 22nd February 2008 [1]
  10. ^ THE LOST ARK OF THE COVENANT by Tudor Parfitt, published by HarperCollins 2008.
  11. ^ A Lead on the Ark of the Covenant Time.com http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1715337,00.html
  12. ^ http://www.channel4.com/culture/microsites/C/can_you_believe_it/debates/lostark.html Debates & Controversies - Quest for the Lost Ark
  13. ^ http://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem4308
  14. ^ Robins, Gerard, "Vendyl Jones and the Ark of the Covenant". [Original: Jewish Herald Voice Newspaper, Houston, TX. May 2000.] (mirror site).
  15. ^ Opening the Ark of the Covenant: The Secret Power of the Ancients, by Frank Joseph, 2007, p. 226
  16. ^ Phillips, Graham (April 2005). The Templars and the Ark of the Covenant: The Discovery of the Treasure of Solomon. Bear & Company. ISBN 1591430399. 
  17. ^ http://www.rsai.ie/index.cfm?action=obj.display&obj_id=133 News 2005

Graham Phillips is an Australian television presenter. ... Inner Traditions - Bear & Company (or just Inner Traditions) is a book publisher founded in 1975 and based in Rochester, Vermont in the United States. ...

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  • "Shemot - Chapter 25". Tanach - Torah, Judaica Press.
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  • "The Ark of the Covenant". Old Testament - Exodus, The Brick Testament.
  • "[2]". Book and Interactive CD-ROM detailing find of the Ark.
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Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Look up Israelite in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In the Jewish tradition, a Levite (לוי Attached, Standard Hebrew Levi, Tiberian Hebrew Lēwî) is a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi. ... Even in death, many Kohanim choose to have this symbol, the special positioning of their fingers and hands during the Priestly Blessing, placed as a crest or symbol on their gravestones to indicate their status. ... Bezalel is the name of a personage from the Bible and is the name of Israels national school of art. ... The Tribe of Judah (Hebrew: יְהוּדָה, Praise; Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) is one of the Hebrew tribes, founded by Judah, son of Jacob(Israel). ... Aholiab - tent of the father, an artist of the Tribe of Dan, appointed to the work of preparing materials for the tabernacle (Exodus. ... Tribe of Dan was also a band from the mid 1990s. ... In the Old Testament, Kohath is both the name of one of the three sons of Levi and the name of one of the 3 subtribes of the tribe of Levi. ... In the Jewish tradition, a Levite (לוי Attached, Standard Hebrew Levi, Tiberian Hebrew Lēwî) is a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi. ... For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... Menelik I, first Emperor of Ethiopia, is traditionally believed to be the son of King Solomon of ancient Israel and Makeda, Queen of Sheba. ... The Prophet Samuel, fresco painting from the Mikhailovskr monastery of Kiev, c. ... This article is about the Biblical character . ... The Tablets of Stone or Stone Tablets, also known as the Tablets of Law, (in Hebrew: Luchot HaBrit - the tablets [of] the covenant) refers to the two pieces of special stone inscripted with the Ten Commandments when Moses ascended Mount Sinai as recorded in the Book of Exodus. ... For other uses, see Ten Commandments (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with the rune Mannaz. ... In botany and horticulture, the popular name given to various tall flowering plants : Common mullein or great mullein (Verbascum thapsus), a biennal medicinal herb used in Amerindian medicine as a tonic for lung problems, such as cough, asthma or bronchitis; Snapdragon or Figwort family (Scrophulariaceae)(other common names: shepherds... CHERUB is a series of childrens books written by the author Robert Muchamore about a group of children who are trained to be agents working for the British Government in the top secret organisation known as CHERUB. It is similar to the British security service MI5, and is based... The Copper Scroll is one of the Dead Sea Scrolls found at Khirbet Qumran, but differs significantly from the others. ... For the Biblical Mount Sinai, and a discussion of its possible locations, see Biblical Mount Sinai. ... This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... This article is about the Jordan River and its valley in western Asia. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... Kodesh Hakodashim, in Hebrew: (Biblical: קֹדֶשׁ הַקָּדָשִׁים ), Holy of Holies, the Most Holy Place in traditional Judaism, is the inner sanctuary within the Tabernacle and Temple in Jerusalem when Solomons Temple and the Second Temple were standing. ... Ai (Hebrew: ; heap of ruins) refers to one or two places in ancient Israel: A city mentioned along with Heshbon by Jeremiah 49:3, whose location is currently unknown, and which may or may not be the same as: A Canaanite royal city which according to the Book of Joshua... Name Gibeah – could be a variation of the Hebrew word of Geba, meaning “hill”, other names include Gibeah of Benjamin and Gibeah of Saul Tell el Ful – modern name of the Arabic town, meaning “mound of horse beans” Location Central Benjamin Plateau 3 miles north of Jerusalem along the Watershed... Gilgal is a place name in the Hebrew Bible. ... Eben-ezer - stone of help, the memorial stone set up by Samuel after a signal defeat of the Philistines, as a memorial of the help received on the occasion from God (1 Sam. ... The Temple Mount A reconstruction of Herods Temple in Jerusalem. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount The Dome of the Rock, (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... Well of Souls can mean several things: 1. ... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles (80 km) from Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture. ... The Chapel of the Tablet The Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion (“Re-ese Adbarat Kidiste Kidusan Dingel Maryam Ts’iyon” in the languages of Ethiopia) of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church is the most important and the oldest church of Ethiopia. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Ark of the Covenant (7912 words)
The Ark of the Covenant, which the L-rd had Moses construct, was a model of that which was in heaven.
The Ark of the Covenant is hard physical evidence which proves the absolute truth of the Bible and that Mohammed is a false prophet.
He said that when the Ark of the Covenant and the Temple furnishings were moved to the hidden chamber, that location became the Temple of the Lord, or the Holy of Holies.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ark of the Covenant (4127 words)
Ark of the Covenant was a kind of chest, measuring two cubits and a half in length, a cubit and a half in breadth, and a cubit and a half in height.
Ark of the Covenant was taken by the victorious army that ransacked Jerusalem after having taken it (IV Esd., x, 22).
Ark of the Covenant as one of the purest and richest
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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