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Encyclopedia > Aristophon of Azenia

Aristophon (in Greek Aριστοφών; lived 4th century BC) was native of the deme of Azenia in Attica.1 He lived about and after the end of the Peloponnesian war. In 412 BC, Aristophon, Laespodias, and Melesias were sent to Sparta as ambassadors by the oligarchical government of the Four Hundred.2 In the archonship of Euclid, 404 BC, after Athens was delivered of the thirty Tyrants, Aristophon proposed a law which, though said to be beneficial to the republic, yet caused great uneasiness and troubles in many families at Athens; for it ordained that no one should be regarded as a citizen of Athens whose mother was not a freeborn woman.3 He also proposed various other laws, by which he acquired great popularity and the full confidence of the people4. Their great number may be inferred from his own statement5 that he was accused 75 times of having made illegal proposals, but that he had always come off victorious. His influence with the people is most manifest from his accusation of Iphicrates and Timotheus, two men to whom Athens was much indebted (354 BC). He charged them with having accepted bribes from the Chians and Rhodians, and the people condemned Timotheus on the mere assertion of Aristophon.6 After this event, but still in 354 BC, the last time that we hear of him in history, he came forward in the assembly to defend the law of Leptines against Demosthenes. The latter, who often mentions him, treats the aged Aristophon with great respect, and reckons him among the most eloquent orators.7 He seems to have died soon after. None of his orations has come down to us. (5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) // Events Invasion of the Celts into Ireland Battle of the Allia and subsequent Gaulish sack of Rome 383 BCE Second Buddhist Councel at Vesali. ... In biology, a deme (rhymes with team) is another word for a local population of organisms of one species that actively interbreed with one another and share a distinct gene pool. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Combatants Delian League led by Athens Peloponnesian League led by Sparta Commanders Pericles Cleon Nicias Alcibiades Archidamus II Brasidas Lysander Map of the Greek world at the start of the Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War began in 431 BC between the Athenian Empire (or The Delian League) and the Peloponnesian... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 417 BC 416 BC 415 BC 414 BC 413 BC - 412 BC - 411 BC 410 BC 409... Sparta (Doric: Σπάρτα, Attic (and Koine): Σπάρτη) was a state in ancient Greece, whose territory included, in Classical times, all Laconia and Messenia, and which was the most powerful state of the Peloponnesus. ... Look up Archon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC - 400s BC - 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC Years: 409 BC 408 BC 407 BC 406 BC 405 BC - 404 BC - 403 BC 402 BC... The Thirty Tyrants were a pro-Spartan oligarchy installed in Athens after Athens defeat in the Peloponnesian War in April 404 BC. Its two leading members were Tharamenes and Critias, a former acolyte of Socrates. ... Iphicrates (d. ... Timotheus was an Athenian statesman and general, son of Conon, the restorer of the walls of Athens. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC - 350s BC - 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 359 BC 358 BC 357 BC 356 BC 355 BC 354 BC 353 BC 352 BC 351... Chios (Χίος in Greek); alternative transliterations Khios and Hios, see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea. ... Rhodes, Greek Ρόδος (pron. ... Leptines, an Athenian orator, known as the proposer of a law that no Athenian, whether citizen or resident alien (with the sole exception of the descendants of Harmodius and Aristogeiton), should be exempt from the public charges (Atroup~ytai) for the state festivals. ... Bust of the Greek orator Demosthenes, Louvre museum, Paris, France. ...


References

Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Boston is a town and small port c. ...

Notes

1 Aeschines, Speeches, "Against Timarchus" , 64, 158, "Against Ctesiphon", 139, 194
2 Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, viii. 86
4 Demosthenes, Speeches, "Against Eubulides", 32
5 Aeschines, "Against Ctesiphon", 194
6 Cornelius Nepos, Lives of Eminent Commanders, "Timotheus", 3; Aristotle, Rhetoric, ii. 23; Dinarchus, Speeches, "Against Demosthenes", 14, "Against Philocles", 17
7 Demosthenes, "Against Leptines", 146

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1867). Aeschines (389 - 314 BC), Greek statesman and one of the ten Attic orators, was born at Athens. ... Bust of Thucydides residing in the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto Thucydides (between 460 and 455 BC–circa 400 BC, Greek Θουκυδίδης, Thoukudídês) was an ancient Greek historian, and the author of the History of the Peloponnesian War, which recounts the 5th century BC war between Sparta and Athens. ... Athenaeus (ca. ... The Deipnosophistes (deipnon “dinner” and sophistae, “the wise ones”) is variously translated as The Banquet of the Learned or Philosophers at Dinner or The Gastronomers is work of some 15 books (some complete and some surviving in summaries only) by the ancient Greek author Athenaeus of Naucratis in Egypt, written... Cornelius Nepos (c. ... Aristotle (Ancient Greek: AristotélÄ“s 384 – March 7, 322 BCE) was an ancient Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Aristotles Rhetoric (or Ars Rhetorica, or The Art of Rhetoric or Treatise on Rhetoric) places the discipline of public speaking in the context of all other intellectual pursuits at the time. ... Dinarchus, (c. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ...



Athenian statesmen | Ancient Greece
Aeschines - Agyrrhius - Alcibiades - Andocides - Archinus - Aristides - Aristogeiton - Aristophon - Autocles
Callistratus - Chremonides - Cleisthenes - Cleon - Critias - Demades - Demetrius Phalereus - Demochares - Democles - Demosthenes
Ephialtes - Eubulus - Hyperbolos - Hypereides - Kimon - Kleophon - Lycurgus
Miltiades - Moerocles - Nicias - Peisistratus - Pericles - Philinus - Phocion - Themistocles
Thrasybulus - Thucydides - Xanthippus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aristophon of Azenia (415 words)
Aristophon (in Greek Aριστοφων; lived 4th century BC) was native of the deme of Azenia in Attica.
In 412 BC, Aristophon, Laespodias and Melesias were sent to Sparta as ambassadors by the oligarchical government of the Four Hundred.
Smith, William (editor); Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, "Aristophon (1)", Boston, (1867)
Aristophon of Azenia at AllExperts (355 words)
Aristophon (in Greek Aριστοφών; lived 4th century BC) was native of the deme of Azenia in Attica.
In 412 BC, Aristophon, Laespodias, and Melesias were sent to Sparta as ambassadors by the oligarchical government of the Four Hundred.
After this event, but still in 354 BC, the last time that we hear of him in history, he came forward in the assembly to defend the law of Leptines against Demosthenes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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