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Aristides or Aristeides (Greek Ἀριστείδης, 530468 BC) was an Athenian soldier and statesman. He was one of the 10 commanders against the Persians in the Battle of Marathon under Miltiades. This article is about the Christian author. ... Note: This article is about Aristides the statesman. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Aelius Aristides. ... Aristides of Thebes, a Greek painter of the 4th century BC. He is said to have excelled in expression. ... A horse named Aristides won the very first Kentucky Derby in 1875. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC Events and Trends 538 BC - Babylon occupied by Jews transported to Babylon are allowed to return to... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 473 BC 472 BC 471 BC 470 BC 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC 465... Persia redirects here. ... Combatants Athens, Plataea Persia Commanders Miltiades, Callimachus â€ , Arimnestus Datis â€ ?, Artaphernes Strength 10,000 Athenians, 1,000 Plataeans 20,000 - 100,000 a Casualties 192 Athenians killed, 11 Plataeans killed (Herodotus) 6,400 killed, 7 ships captured (Herodotus) a These are modern consensus estimates. ... Miltiades the Younger Miltiades the Younger (c. ...


Aristides was nicknamed "the Just" because he was popularly recognized as never seeking personal glory or financial gain in his public service to the people of Athens. As a result, during his adult life, Aristides was asked to arbitrate difficult private and public issues. Herodotus, writing just 40 years after the death of Aristides, said that "there was not in all Athens a man so worthy or so just as he".[1] Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hēródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ...


Aristides strongly defended the Athenian aristocrats cause and opposed Themistocles' naval policy until he was ostracized by his political enemies, led by Themistocles. Nonetheless, Aristides' ostracism came to a sudden end when Persia under Xerxes I was about to invade Attica and he was allowed to return to Athens from banishment in Aegina. Themistocles (Greek: ; c. ... Pieces of broken pottery as voting tokens. ... Persia redirects here. ... Xerxes I of Persia (sometimes known as Xerxes the Great, in old Persian, 𐎧𐏁𐎹𐎠𐎼𐏁𐎠[2]) was a king of Persia (reigned 486–465 BC) of the Achaemenid dynasty. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Aegina (Greek: Αίγινα (Egina)) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 31 miles (50 km) from Athens. ...


Aristides was one of the ten Athenian strategoi during the Greco-Persian war. He was involved in a number of major battles against the Persians, including the famous victories at Marathon (490 BC), Salamis (480 BC), and Plataea (479 BC), although it was only at Plataea that Aristides was the primary commander of the Athenian contingent. After these battles, the Persians never again seriously attempted to invade the Greek mainland. Bust of an unidentified strategos with Corinthian helmet; Hadrianic Roman copy of a Greek sculpture of c. ... Combatants Athens, Plataea Persia Commanders Miltiades, Callimachus â€ , Arimnestus Datis â€ ?, Artaphernes Strength 10,000 Athenians, 1,000 Plataeans 20,000 - 100,000 a Casualties 192 Athenians killed, 11 Plataeans killed (Herodotus) 6,400 killed, 7 ships captured (Herodotus) a These are modern consensus estimates. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC Years: 495 BC 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC - 490 BC - 489 BC 488 BC... For other uses, see Battle of Salamis (disambiguation). ... The Persian invasion of Greece in 480-479 BC May — King Xerxes I of Persia marches from Sardis and onto Thrace and Macedonia. ... Combatants Greek city-states Persia Commanders Pausanias Mardonius â€  Strength 110,000 (Herodotus) ~40,000 (Modern Consensus) 300,000 (Herodotus) 50,000-70,000 [1][2][3] (Modern Consensus) Casualties 10,000+ (Ephorus and Diodorus) 1,360 (Plutarch) 759 (Herodotus) 43,000 survived (Herodotus) The Battle of Plataea was the final... 479 pr. ...


In 487 BC, he introduced sweeping changes to the Athenian constitution which allowed all citizens, without taking into account their rank, to be admitted to the archonship. Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 492 BC 491 BC 490 BC 489 BC 488 BC - 487 BC - 486 BC 485 BC... For other uses, see Archon (disambiguation). ...


He was instrumental in having Athens, rather than Sparta, become the ruling state of the Delian League. For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... Delian League (Athenian Empire), right before the Peloponnesian War in 431 BC. Corcyra was not part of the League The Delian League was an association of Greek city-states in the 5th century BC. It was led by Athens. ...

Contents

Early life

Aristides was the son of Lysimachus and a member of a family of moderate fortune. His tribe was the Antiochis. Otherwise, very little is known of his early life, other than his becoming a follower of the statesman Cleisthenes. His strong admiration of the famous Spartan leader Lycurgus meant that Aristides favoured and later led and publicly defended the aristocratic party in Athens.[2] Cleisthenes (also Clisthenes or Kleisthenes) was a noble Athenian of the accursed Alcmeonidate family. ... // Lycurgus Lycurgus (Greek: , Lukoûrgos; 700 BC?–630 BC) was the legendary lawgiver of Sparta, who established the military-oriented reformation of Spartan society in accordance with the Oracle of Apollo at Delphi. ...


From the evidence now available about life in Athens at the time of Aristides' youth, the difference between the rich and poor in Athens was not too great. So despite Aristides’ rather humble origins, he was able to gain membership of Athens' aristocratic party.[3]


Aristides knew Themistocles from their very childhood. Both fought about a boy, Stesilaus of Chios. Additionally, they rivaled, in many sports where--even then--Aristides distinguished himself always by his clean play.[4] Themistocles (Greek: ; c. ... Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios), is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea seven kilometres (five miles) off the Turkish coast. ...


Military career

Plutarch points out that Aristides was there in the most glorious Athenian victories, which were Marathon, Salamis, & Plataea, although Aristides never distinguished himself conspicuously. At Marathon, the victory was credited to Militiades. At Salamis, Themistocles got absolutely all the glory. At Plataea, Pausanias was most celebrated.[5]


Strategos at Marathon

The Greek wings (black) envelop the Persian wings (red) while their strategically-thinned centre filled the gap made between them.
The Greek wings (black) envelop the Persian wings (red) while their strategically-thinned centre filled the gap made between them.

In 490 BC, the Persians under Darius I attempted to invade Attica. Aristides was named strategos for his own Antiochis tribe. Miltiades was selected ahead of Aristides to lead the Athenians. Aristides supported Miltiades' plans in the Athenian Assembly and gained the Athenians' support for attacking the Persians at Marathon. Image File history File links Map of the Battle of Marathon, 490 BC. Taken from http://www. ... Image File history File links Map of the Battle of Marathon, 490 BC. Taken from http://www. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC Years: 495 BC 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC - 490 BC - 489 BC 488 BC... Darius I the Great (c. ... Bust of an unidentified strategos with Corinthian helmet; Hadrianic Roman copy of a Greek sculpture of c. ... Miltiades the Younger Miltiades the Younger (c. ...


At the battle camp, Aristides relinquished his command to Miltiades, an example followed by all the other Athenian strategoi. This action united the leadership of the Athenian army.


During the Battle of Marathon, Aristides fought bravely alongside Themistocles, who, like Aristides, was strategos of his tribe. Their tribes were placed in the middle of the battle front where the Persians were tightly concentrated and where the fiercest fighting took place. Combatants Athens, Plataea Persia Commanders Miltiades, Callimachus â€ , Arimnestus Datis â€ ?, Artaphernes Strength 10,000 Athenians, 1,000 Plataeans 20,000 - 100,000 a Casualties 192 Athenians killed, 11 Plataeans killed (Herodotus) 6,400 killed, 7 ships captured (Herodotus) a These are modern consensus estimates. ...


After the Athenian victory, Aristides was left to protect the treasures captured in the battle as he was regarded as incorruptible. Additionally, he also looked after the prisoners of war.[6]


As a consequence of the distinction with which he served in the battle, he was elected Chief Archon for the ensuing year (489488 BC). This is a list of the eponymous archons of Athens. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC 490 BC - 489 BC - 488 BC 487 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC 490 BC 489 BC - 488 BC - 487 BC 486 BC...


Defending Athens in the Battle of Salamis

Early in 480 BC Aristides took advantage of the Athenian decree recalling exiles. It is thought that Themistocles agreed to allow Aristides' return to prevent the latter joining the Persian forces. His recall is also believed to have been supported by the Athenian people. Image File history File links Acap. ... The Persian invasion of Greece in 480-479 BC May — King Xerxes I of Persia marches from Sardis and onto Thrace and Macedonia. ...


After returning from exile in Aegina, Aristides was appointed strategos and immediately joined Themistocles in preparing the defence of Athens.[7] Aegina (Greek: Αίγινα (Egina)) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 31 miles (50 km) from Athens. ...

Aristides captured the key Psyttaleia island.
Aristides captured the key Psyttaleia island.

At the Battle of Salamis the Persians were attacking due to Themistocles' strategem; Aristides was amongst the first to perceive the Persian manoeuvers. The night of the Persian's attack, Aristides rushed from Aegina sailing dangerously through the enemy's blockade towards Salamis. There he met Themistocles in his tent. Themistocles thought that, with his reputation, Aristides could convince the Greek navy, particularly the difficult Spartan Admiral Eurybiades, that the Persians had indeed blocked the Greeks inside the bay. Themistocles told Aristides that he had, indeed, provoked the enemy in order to force the Greeks to fight rather than retreat to a different position. Aristides supported this decision and defended him. Image File history File links Battle_of_salamis. ... Image File history File links Battle_of_salamis. ... For other uses, see Battle of Salamis (disambiguation). ... Aegina (Greek: Αίγινα (Egina)) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 31 miles (50 km) from Athens. ... Eurybiades was the Spartan commander in charge of the Greek navy during the Persian Wars. ...


Immediately after meeting Themistocles, Aristides commanded the toughest Athenian infantry at Psyttaleia destroying the Persian garrison. He captured several notable Persians, among them three of Xerxes I's nephews. Before the main battle, it was rumoured that these children were sacrificed to Bacchus. [8] Psyttaleias location in the Saronic Gulf. ... Xerxes I of Persia (sometimes known as Xerxes the Great, in old Persian, 𐎧𐏁𐎹𐎠𐎼𐏁𐎠[2]) was a king of Persia (reigned 486–465 BC) of the Achaemenid dynasty. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ...


Salamis was an historically decisive Athenian victory. The battle left the Persian naval expedition unable to support its land troops. Aristides was questioned by Themistocles because, initially, the popular Athenian leader wanted to tear down the Persian bridges that spanned the Hellespont. Immediately Aristides opposed this, convincing Themistocles that it would be better to allow Xerxes to withdraw his 300,000 man army out of Greece. Consequently, Themistocles dispatched a missive to Xerxes threatening to immediately destroy the bridges. The Persians believed the lie and withdrew most of their troops.[9]


The battle at Plataea

With prestige thus increased, Aristides was re-elected as strategos for another year. Thus, in 479 BC, he commanded the Athenian army in the Battle of Plataea, along the Asopus river. There, the whole Greek army was led by the Spartan Pausanias while the Persians were led by Mardonius. 479 pr. ... Combatants Greek city-states Persia Commanders Pausanias Mardonius â€  Strength 110,000 (Herodotus) ~40,000 (Modern Consensus) 300,000 (Herodotus) 50,000-70,000 [1][2][3] (Modern Consensus) Casualties 10,000+ (Ephorus and Diodorus) 1,360 (Plutarch) 759 (Herodotus) 43,000 survived (Herodotus) The Battle of Plataea was the final... Asopus or Asôpos is the name of five different rivers in Greece and also in Greek mythology the name of the gods of those rivers. ... Pausanias is the name of several ancient people: Pausanias was a Spartan general of the 5th century BC. Pausanias of Sparta was King of Sparta from 409 BC-395 BC. Pausanias was the servant/lover who assassinated Philip II of Macedon in 336 BC Pausanias, Greek traveller and geographer of... Mardonius was a Persian commander during the Persian Wars with Greece in the 5th century BC. He was the son of Gobryas and the son-in-law of Darius I of Persia, whose daughter Artozostra he had married. ...


Advised by reports of a series of oracles, dreams, and prophecies, Aristides was instrumental in evoking a voluntary gift of territory by the Plataeans to Attica. As a result, part of one of the oracles was fulfilled, namely that the Athenians would win victory if they fought within their own territory.[10]


Later, Aristides was particularly upset when many Athenian soldiers who were former aristocrats whose land had been damaged by the Persian occupation began conspiring on the Persians' behalf.[11]


Right before the battle, the Macedonian King Alexander sneaked out of the Persian camp and told Aristides that Mardonius - whose troops were starving - was about to attack.[12]


After the Greek victory, Aristides made proposals to the general council of Greeks concerning the division of Persian booty, commemorative religious celebrations, and about a levy which would finance new Greek forces to combat Persia.[13]


Aristides' respect for the common body of Athenians that had fought so well against Persia, combined with his recognition that the forces for democracy were strong, led him to propose that the archons henceforth be chosen out of the whole body of the citizens and not just the higher census of property holders.[14]


At the Aegean Sea

In 478, Aristides was sent to Ionia, and, there, he won the local Greek cities' trust because he opposed the tyrannical policies implemented by the Spartan Pausanias. These complaints led Sparta from here on out to look to the corruption of its captains. The Greek colonies gave absolute discretion to Aristides in the fixing of the contributions of the newly formed confederacy, the Delian League. Aristides' annual 460 talent assessment was universally accepted as equitable, but was later raised by Pericles and the demagogues who followed.[15] Aristides also performed a ceremony that celebrated Athens' devotion to the league. He ordered that all local Greeks pledge enmity against Persia. Then he threw burning iron wedges into the sea so the gods "might treat any traitor similarly."[16] Location of Ionia Ionia (Greek Ιωνία; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was an ancient region of southwestern coastal Anatolia (in present-day Turkey, the region nearest İzmir,) on the Aegean Sea. ... Pausanias was a Spartan general of the 5th century BC. He was the nephew of Leonidas I and served as regent after his uncles death. ... Delian League (Athenian Empire), right before the Peloponnesian War in 431 BC. Corcyra was not part of the League The Delian League was an association of Greek city-states in the 5th century BC. It was led by Athens. ... A talent is an ancient unit of mass. ...


However, as Athens' power in the League increased and events seemed to demand it, Aristides took a nationalist position. He defended the proposal to move to the League's treasury to Athens from Delos, betraying the earlier spirit of the League, and is reported to have said "this isn't a just action, but it's expedient."[17]


Political career

Though comrades in arms at Marathon, Aristides and Themistocles were constant opponents in the Athenian assembly. Pursuing the aristocratic party policy, which focused on maintaining Athens as a land power, Aristides was among the chief opponents of the pro-naval policies of Themistocles.


Aristides was very critical of Themistocles, noting that Themistocles was "a clever man, however with an itching palm".[18]


Indeed, this struggle forced Aristides to oppose any political initiative that could benefit Themistocles, even if it would have been of benefit to the people of Athens. In the Athenian assembly, Aristides is said to have stated that unless they sent both Themistocles and himself to the barathrum (a deep pit into which criminals were thrown), there could be no safety for Athens.[19]

Ostracon with the inscription of Aristides

By 484 BC, Themistocles was left face-to-face with Aristides, the last hope of the conservative aristocratic party. Both sought popularity by offering to resolve disputes amongst their fellow citizens. Therefore, they criticised each other for setting themselves up as judges and bypassing the courts of law. Themistocles favoured developing an Athenian navy, a policy more popular with the poor, for whom it provided work, than with the rich, who would have had to pay for it. Themistocles had no doubt that the Persians would attempt another invasion, this time by sea. Aristides argued in favour of retaining land forces, as the troops were provided by the richer citizens of Athens and were unpaid (therefore costing the government treasury little). Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... An ostracon with Pericles name written on it (c. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 489 BC 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC - 484 BC - 483 BC 482 BC...


The conflict between the two leaders ended in the ostracism of Aristides around 483 BC. Themistocles argued that Aristides had weakened the Athenian courts by requiring all Athenians to seek arbitration through Aristides' office. Thus, Themistocles argued that Aristides would effectively become "king of Athens" although "he didn't have any bodyguard, yet." .[20] Pieces of broken pottery as voting tokens. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC Years: 488 BC 487 BC 486 BC 485 BC 484 BC - 483 BC - 482 BC 481 BC...


It is said that on this occasion, an illiterate voter who did not know Aristides came up to him and, giving him his voting sherd, desired him to write upon it the name of Aristides. The latter asked if Aristides had wronged him. "No," was the reply, "and I do not even know him, but I am tired of hearing him everywhere called, 'The Just'." After hearing this Aristides wrote his own name on the sherd. He was then exiled for a period of five years.


Leaving Athens, Aristides raised his hands and he prayed that "no crisis may force that Athens may have to remember me."[21]


His Later Years

Afterwards, he continued to hold a predominant position in Athens. At first he seems to have remained on good terms with Themistocles, whom he is said to have helped in outwitting the Spartans in the rebuilding of the walls of Athens. Indeed, Aristides witnessed his ostracism although he abstained from declaring against Themistocles and didn't celebrate his condemnation.[22]


Later, some sources report that Aristides was banished, others that he was condemned on false charges. His name was sometimes included with those of other Athenian generals who suffered similar ill treatment.[23]


Some said that Aristides died at Athens, cherished and honored by the people, whereas other sources said he died on an official journey to the Black Sea, at Pontus. The date of his death is given by Nepos as 468 BC, before Pericles' ascendancy. In any case, Aristides' tomb was located at Phalerum, where they say it was built at public expense because he could not afford his own funeral expenses. For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Traditional rural Pontic house A man in traditional clothes from Trabzon, illustration Pontus is the name which was applied, in ancient times, to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the main), by... Centuries: 4th century BC - 5th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 473 BC 472 BC 471 BC 470 BC 469 BC 468 BC 467 BC 466 BC 465... For the Shakespeare play, see Pericles, Prince of Tyre. ...


His estate thus seems to have suffered severely from the Persian invasions and from his own scrupulous honesty in public affairs. Plutarch cites evidence that his descendants even in the 4th century received state pensions.


His Humble Traits

Plutarch states at the beginning of the Life that reports of Aristides' wealth varied and cites evidence that he was of the upper economic class throughout his lifetime. Later in the Life, however, Plutarch often suggests the contrary, for example citing stories that illustrate Aristides' poverty and his lack of shame at being poor.[24] For instance, in a trial at which Aristides' cousin Callias, the richest man in Athens, faced capital charges, the officials compared him unfavorably with Aristides, whom they said had helped Callias in his affairs but had received no material help in return: "How do you think his family lives at home, when he appears publicly wearing such a worn-out cloak? Is it not probably that someone who goes out so exposed to the cold must lack food and other necessities at home?"[25] Callias was the head of a wealthy Athenian family, and fought at the battle of Marathon (490) in priestly attire. ...


Quotes

  • "As long as that [the sun] retains the same course, so long shall the citizens of Athens wage war with the Persians for the country which has been wasted and the temples that have been profaned and burnt by them."[26]

References

  1. ^ The Histories of Herodotus, Book 8
  2. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  3. ^ Plutarch compares both Aristides & Marcus Cato. It is in Wikisource.
  4. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  5. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  6. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  7. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  8. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  9. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  10. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  11. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  12. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  13. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  14. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  15. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  16. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  17. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  18. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  19. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  20. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  21. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  22. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  23. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  24. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  25. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.
  26. ^ Aristides by Plutarch, in Wikisource.

Sources

  • Cornelius Nepos, Aristides (German)(Latin)
John Dryden John Dryden (August 19 {August 9 O.S.}, 1631 - May 12 {May 1 O.S.}, 1700) was an influential English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright, who dominated the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles... Sir Thomas North (1535? - 1601?), English translator of Plutarch, second son of the 1st Baron North, was born about 1535. ... Jacques Amyot (October 30, 1513 - February 6, 1593), French writer, was born of poor parents, at Melun. ... Philemon Holland (1552 - 1637) was an English translator. ... Arthur Hugh Clough (January 1, 1819 – November 13, 1861) was an English poet, and the brother of Anne Jemima Clough. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aristides. Plutarch. 1909-14. Plutarch’s Lives. The Harvard Classics (5854 words)
Aristides being the friend and supporter of that Clisthenes, who settled the government after the expulsion of the tyrants, and emulating and admiring Lycurgus the Lacedæmonian above all politicians, adhered to the aristocratical principles of government; and had Themistocles, son of Neocles, his adversary on the side of the populace.
Aristides, as soon as he saw them, going a considerable space before the rest, cried out to them, conjuring them by the guardian gods of Greece to forbear the fight, and be no impediment or stop to those, who were going to succor the defenders of Greece.
Aristides, therefore, having acquired a wonderful and great reputation by this levy of the tribute, Themistocles is said to have derided him, as if this had been not the commendation of a man, but a money-bag; a retaliation, though not in the same kind, for some free words which Aristides had used.
The Internet Classics Archive | Aristides by Plutarch (5824 words)
Aristides, the son of Lysimachus, was of the tribe Antiochis, and township of Alopece.
Aristides being the friend and supporter of that Clisthenes, who settled the government after the expulsion of the tyrants, and emulating and admiring Lycurgus, the Lacedaemonian, above all politicians, adhered to the aristocratical principles of government; and had Themistocles, son to Neocles, his adversary on the side of the populace.
Aristides, as soon as he saw them, going a considerable space before the rest, cried out to them, conjuring them by the guardian gods of Greece to forbear the fight, and be no impediment or stop to those who were going to succour the defenders of Greece.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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