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Encyclopedia > Ariadne
Drinking scene with Dionysus and Ariadne on his lap. Greco-Buddhist art from Gandhara, 3rd century CE.
Drinking scene with Dionysus and Ariadne on his lap. Greco-Buddhist art from Gandhara, 3rd century CE.

Ariadne, in Greek mythology, was daughter of King Minos of Crete and his queen, Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios, the Sun-titan.[1] She aided Theseus in overcoming the Minotaur and later became the consort of the god Dionysus. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1344x1172, 734 KB) Summary Drinking scene. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1344x1172, 734 KB) Summary Drinking scene. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Gandhara Buddha, 1st-2nd century CE. Greco-Buddhist art is the artistic manifestation of Greco-Buddhism, a cultural syncretism between the Classical Greek culture and Buddhism, which developed over a period of close to 1000 years in Central Asia, between the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century... Gandhāra (Sanskrit: गन्धार, Persian; Gandara, Waihind) (Urdu: گندھارا) is the name of an ancient Indian Mahajanapada, currently in northern Pakistan (the North-West Frontier Province and parts of northern Punjab and Kashmir) and eastern Afghanistan. ... Ariadne may refer to: Ariadne, a Greek goddess Ariadne (butterfly), a butterfly genus. ... Ariadnes thread, named for the legend of Ariadne, is the term used to describe the solving of a problem with multiple apparent means of proceeding - such as a physical maze, a logic puzzle, or an ethical dilemma - through an exhaustive application of logic to all available routes. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Front face of the MINOS far detector. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Pasiphaë (Eng. ... For other uses, see Helios (disambiguation). ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... This article is about the mythological monster. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ...

Contents

Minos and Theseus

Since ancient Greek legends were passed down through oral tradition, many variations of this and other myths exist.[2] According to one version of the legend, Minos attacked Athens after his son was killed there. The Athenians asked for terms, and were required to sacrifice seven young men and seven maidens every nine years to the Minotaur. One year, the sacrificial party included Theseus, a young man who volunteered to come and kill the Minotaur. Ariadne fell in love at the first sight of him, and helped him by giving him a sword and a ball of the red fleece thread she was spinning, so that he could find his way out of the Minotaur's labyrinth. This article is about the capital of Greece. ... This article is about the mythological monster. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ...


She ran away with Theseus after he achieved his goal, and according to Homer "but he had no joy of her, for ere that Artemis slew her in sea-girt Dia because of the witness of Dionysus" (Odyssey XI, 321-5). Homer does not enlarge on the nature of Dionysus' accusation: but the Oxford Classical Dictionary theorizes that she was already married to Dionysus when Theseus ran away with her. For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... The Oxford Classical Dictionary (OCD) is the standard one-volume encyclopedia in English of topics relating to Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. ...


Naxos

Bacchus and Ariadne by Titian: Dionysus discovers Ariadne on the shore of Naxos. The painting also depicts the constellation named after Ariadne
Bacchus and Ariadne by Titian: Dionysus discovers Ariadne on the shore of Naxos. The painting also depicts the constellation named after Ariadne

In Hesiod and most other accounts, Theseus abandoned Ariadne sleeping on Naxos, and Dionysus rediscovered and wedded her. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (781x707, 95 KB) Summary Bacchus and Ariadne by Titian National Gallery, London Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Ariadne National Gallery, London Bacchus and Ariadne ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (781x707, 95 KB) Summary Bacchus and Ariadne by Titian National Gallery, London Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Ariadne National Gallery, London Bacchus and Ariadne ... Bacchus and Ariadne (1520-3) is an oil painting by Titian. ... Also see: Titian (disambiguation). ... Naxos (Greek: Νάξος; Italian: Nicsia; Turkish: Nakşa) is a Greek island, the largest island (428 km²) in the Cyclades island group in the Aegean. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Naxos is the largest island (428 km² ) in the Cyclades island group in the Aegean Sea, which separates Greece and Turkey. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ...


With Dionysus, she was the mother of Thoas and of the twins Oenopion, the personification of wine, and Staphylus (or Staphylos). Her wedding diadem was set in the heavens as the constellation Corona. Thoas, son of Andraimon, was one of the heroes who fought for the Greeks in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Oenopion (wine-faced), son of Dionysus and Ariadne, was a legendary king of Khios, said to have brought winemaking to the island. ... Sun set in Stafilos STAPHYLOS or STAFILOS: Just 4 kilometres south of Skopelos Town and harbour, this nice bay is accessible by local bus, private car or on feet. ... Look up Diadem in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Corona Borealis (Latin for northern crown) is a small northern constellation whose main stars form a semicircular arc. ...


She remained faithful to Dionysus, but was later killed by Perseus at Argos. In other myths Ariadne hanged herself from a tree, like Erigone and the hanging Artemis — a Mesopotamian theme. Some scholars think, due to her thread and winding associations, that she was a weaving goddess such as Arachne, and they support the assertion with the mytheme of the Hanged Nymph (see weaving in mythology). Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths... This article is about the city in Greece. ... Erigone may refer to: Erigone, the daughter of Icarius in Greek mythology. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... The theme of weaving in mythology is ancient, and its lost mythic lore probably accompanied the early spread of this mysterious art. ... For other uses, see Arachne (disambiguation). ... In the study of mythology, a mytheme is an irreducible nugget of myth, an unchanging element, similar to a cultural meme, one that is always found shared with other, related mythemes and reassembled in various ways—bundled was Claude Lévi-Strausss image— or linked in more complicated relationships... The theme of weaving in mythology is ancient, and its lost mythic lore probably accompanied the early spread of this mysterious art. ...


Dionysus however descended into Hades and brought her and his mother Semele back. They then joined the gods in Olympus. Stimula redirects here. ...

Ariadne as the consort of Dionysos: bronze appliqué from Chalki, Rhodes, late fourth century BCE, (Louvre)
Ariadne as the consort of Dionysos: bronze appliqué from Chalki, Rhodes, late fourth century BCE, (Louvre)

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1400 × 1750 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1400 × 1750 pixel, file size: 2. ... Chalki (Halki, Khalki; Greek: Χάλκη) is a Greek island in Dodecanese archipelago in the Aegean Sea, some 6 km west or Rhodes. ... This article is about the Greek island of Rhodes. ... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...

Ariadne as a possible goddess figure

Karl Kerenyi (and Robert Graves) theorize that Ariadne (which they derive from a Cretan-Greek form for arihagne, "utterly pure" ) was a fertility goddess of Crete, "the first divine personage of Greek mythology to be immediately recognized in Crete" (Kerenyi 1976, p 89), once archaeology had begun. Kerenyi claims that her name is merely an epithet and that she was originally the "Mistress of the Labyrinth", both a prison with the dreaded Minotaur at its centre and a winding dance-ground. Professor Barry B. Powell has suggested she was Crete's Snake Goddess.[3] One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Look up epithet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the mazelike structure from Greek mythology. ... This article is about the mythological monster. ... Barry B. Powell is the Halls-Bascom Professor of Classics Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, visiting professor at the University of New Mexico, and author of the widely used textbook Classical Myth (fifth edition, Prentice-Hall, 2006), as well as The Greeks (Prentice-Hall 2005, with Ian Morris... Minoan Snake Goddess figurine c 1600 BCE Snake Goddess describes a number of figurines of a woman holding a snake in each hand found during excavation of Minoan archaeological sites in Crete dating from approximately 1600 BCE. By implication the term also describes the deity depicted although little more is...


Plutarch, in his vita of Theseus that treats him as a historical individual, reports that in the Naxos of his day, an earthly Ariadne was separate from a celestial one: Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ...

"Some of the Naxians also have a story of their own, that there were two Minoses and two Ariadnes, one of whom, they say, was married to Dionysos in Naxos and bore him Staphylos and his brother, and the other, of a later time, having been carried off by Theseus and then abandoned by him, came to Naxos, accompanied by a nurse named Korkyne, whose tomb they show; and that this Ariadne also died there."

In a kylix by the painter Aison (c. 425–c. 410 BC; National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid; see image), Theseus drags the Minotaur from a temple-like labyrinth, but the goddess who attends him, in this Attic representation, is Athena. Kylix by Euergides (circa 500 BC) in the British Museum, London. ... The National Archaeological Museum (Spanish: Museo Arqueológico Nacional) of Spain is in Madrid, beside the Plaza de Colón (Columbus Square), sharing its building with the National Library. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 612 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 1230 pixel, file size: 855 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ...


An ancient cult of Aphrodite-Ariadne was observed at Amathus, Cyprus, according to the obscure Hellenistic mythographer Paeon of Amathus; Paeon's works are lost, but his narrative is among the sources cited by Plutarch in his vita of Theseus (20.3-.5). According to the myth that was current at Amathus, the second most important Cypriote cult centre of Aphrodite, Theseus' ship was swept off-course and the pregnant and suffering Ariadne put ashore in the storm. Theseus, attempting to secure the ship, was inadvertently swept out to sea. The Cypriote women cared for Ariadne, who died in childbirth and was memorialized in a shrine. Theseus, returning, overcome with grief, left money for sacrifices to Ariadne and ordered two cult images, one of silver and one of bronze, set up. At the observation in her honour on the second day of the month Gorpiaeus, one of the young men lay on the ground vicariously experiencing the throes of labour. The sacred grove in which the shrine was located was called the grove of Aphrodite Ariadne.[4] The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Amathus was one of the most ancient royal cities of Cyprus, on the southern coast, about 24 miles west of Larnaka and 6 miles east of Limassol. ... The term Hellenistic (established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen) in the history of the ancient world is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... Vita or VITA can refer to any of a number of things: Vita (Latin for life) can also refer to a brief biography, often that of a saint (i. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sacred groves were a feature of the mythological landscape and the cult practice of Old Europe, of the most ancient levels of Scandinavian mythology, Greek mythology, Slavic mythology, Roman mythology, and in Druidic practice. ...


In reading the account, the primitive aspect of the cult at Amathus would appear to be much older than the Athenian-sanctioned shrine of Aphrodite, who has assumed Ariadne (hagne, "sacred") as an epithet at Amathus. Look up epithet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In post-classical culture

Non-musical works

  • "Ariadne auf Naxos" is a poem by Heinrich Wilhelm von Gerstenberg.
  • "Ariadne" is a story by Anton Chekhov.
  • Metaphysical painter Giorgio de Chirico painted eight works with a classical statue of Ariadne as a prop.
  • Ariadne was a 1924 play by A. A. Milne.
  • The HMS Ariadne is the name of a ship in Alistair MacLean's 1986 novel Santorini.
  • Claudia Crawford, To Nietzsche: Dionysus, I love you! Ariadne was published by State University of New York Press, Albany in 1995.
  • John Dempsey's 1996 Ariadne's Brother is a novel on the fall of Bronze Age Crete.
  • Ariadne is an important character in Sara Douglass's historical fantasy series The Troy Game, published by HarperCollins 2002-2006.
  • "Ariadne" is the protagonist of Montreal writer Tess Fragoulis's 2001 novel, Ariadne's Dream.
  • The Algerian-French writer, Hélène Cixous, calls[citation needed] Ariadne the anti-Ulysses.
  • A planet called Ariadne is mentioned in the backstory of the 2002-2006 game series Xenosaga.
  • The Minotaur myth is referenced repeatedly as a metaphor over the course of the trilogy The Golden Age, culminating at the end with a newly "born" machine-mind adopting Ariadne as her name.

Heinrich Wilhelm von Gerstenberg (1737-1823), German poet and critic, was born at Tondern in Schleswig on the 3rd of January 1737. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: , IPA: ) was a Russian short story writer and playwright. ... Giorgio de Chirico in 1936 photographed by Carl Van Vechten. ... Alan Alexander Milne (IPA pronunciation: ) (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ... Alistair Stuart MacLean (April 28, 1922 - February 2, 1987) was a Scottish novelist who wrote successful thrillers or adventure stories, the best known of which are perhaps The Guns of Navarone and Where Eagles Dare. ... Santorini is a novel Written by the well- known author Alistair MacLean. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Sara Douglass (Born 2 June 1957 in Penola, South Australia) is the pen name of Australian fantasy writer Dr. Sara Warneke, who lives in Hobart, Tasmania. ... The Troy Game is a quartet by Australian author Sara Douglass consisting of four books: Hades Daughter, Gods Concubine, Darkwitch Rising and Druids Sword. ... Tess Fragoulis is a Canadian writer and educator. ... Hélène Cixous (born June 5, 1937) is a professor, French feminist writer, poet, playwright, philosopher, literary critic and rhetorician. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... It has been suggested that List of Xenosaga cast members be merged into this article or section. ... The Golden Age (2002, ISBN 0-312-84870-6) is the science fiction novel by John C. Wright. ...

Musical works

This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... This list provides a guide to the most important operas, as determined by their presence on a majority of compiled lists of significant operas: see the Lists Consulted section for full details. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Ariadne auf Naxos (Ariadne on Naxos) is an opera by Richard Strauss with libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal. ... LArianna was the second opera written by Claudio Monteverdi, and one of the most influential and famous specimens of early baroque opera. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Carlo Agostino Badia (1672 - September 23, 1738), was an Italian composer best known for his operas. ... Heinrich Wilhelm von Gerstenberg (1737-1823), German poet and critic, was born at Tondern in Schleswig on the 3rd of January 1737. ... Georg Anton [Jiří Antonin] Benda (June 30, 1722–November 6, 1795) was a Bohemian-German kapellmeister and composer. ... “Haydn” redirects here. ... Greek Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Frogs Frogs (Βάτραχοι (Bátrachoi)) is a comedy written by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is a Tony Award and Emmy Award-winning actor of the stage and screen. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Saetia was a New York City-based screamo band that is often considered one of the definitive groups of the genre, and they are often credited as being the source of a resurgence in popularity the genre experienced in the late 1990s. ... The Crüxshadows (Pronounced as IPA: )[3] is an independent music group from Florida. ... DreamCypher is an album by The Crüxshadows. ...

References

  1. ^ Pasiphaë is mentioned as Ariadne's mother in Bibliotheke 3.1.2 (Pasiphaë, daughter of the Sun), in Apollonius' Argonautica iii.997, and in Hyginus Fabulae, 224.
  2. ^ MSN Encarta Encyclopedia: Greek Mythology
  3. ^ Powell, Barry B. Classical Myth. Second ed. With new translations of ancient texts by Herbert M. Howe. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1998, p. 368.
  4. ^ Edmund P. Cueva, "Plutarch's Ariadne in Chariton's Chaereas and Callirhoe" American Journal of Philology 117.3 (Fall 1996) pp. 473-484.
  • Kerenyi, Karl 1976. Dionysos: Archetypal Image of Indestructible Life, especially part I.iii "The Cretan core of the Dionysos myth" (Princeton:Princeton University Press)
  • Peck, Harry Thurston, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1898)
  • Ruck, Carl A.P., and Danny Staples, 1994. The World of Classical Myth. (Durham:Carolina Academic Press)
  • Barthes, Roland, "Camera Lucida." Barthes quotes Nietzsche, "A labyrinthine man never seeks the truth, but only his Ariadne," using Ariadne in reference to his mother, who had recently died.

The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ... Roland Barthes Roland Barthes (November 12, 1915 – March 25, 1980) (pronounced ) was a French literary critic, literary and social theorist, philosopher, and semiotician. ...

External links

  • Theoi Project - Ariadne

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ariadne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (542 words)
Ariadne, in Greek mythology, was daughter of King Minos of Crete and his queen, Pasiphae.
With Dionysus, she was the mother of Oenopion, the personification of wine, and was set in the heavens as the constellation Corona.
Her name is merely an epithet, for she was originally the "Mistress of the Labyrinth", both a prison with the dreaded Minotaur at its centre and a winding dance-ground.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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