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Encyclopedia > Arhat
A Chinese Luohan statue from the Liao Dynasty in Hebei Province, China

In the sramanic traditions of ancient India (most notably those of Mahavira and Gautama Buddha) arhat (Sanskrit) or arahant (Pali) signified a spiritual practitioner who had—to use an expression common in the tipitaka—"laid down the burden"—and realised the goal of nibbana, the culmination of the spiritual life (brahmacarya). Such a person, having removed all causes for future becoming, is not reborn after biological death into any samsaric realm. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Liao Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: Liáo Cháo), 907-1125, also known as the Khitan Empire, was an empire in northern China that ruled over the regions of Manchuria, Mongolia, and parts of northern China proper. ... Not to be confused with the unrelated province of Hubei Hebei (Chinese: 河北; pinyin: Hébĕi; Wade-Giles: Ho-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hopeh), is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A (Sanskrit) or (Pāli) is a wandering monk in certain ascetic traditions of ancient India, including: Jainism Buddhism Ä€jÄ«vika religion (now extinct) Mahavira, the 24th Jina, and Gautama Buddha were leaders of their shramana orders. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Standing Buddha sculpture, ancient region of Gandhara, northern Pakistan, 1st century CE, Musée Guimet. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Pali (IAST: ) is a Middle Indo-Aryan dialect or prakrit. ... The Tripitaka (Sanskrit, lit. ... The following article is about the term Nirvana in the context of Buddhism. ... Brahmacharya is a Sanskrit word. ... The Wheel of Life as portrayed within Buddhism, showing the cycle of Samsara, or reincarnation. ...


The word literally means "worthy one"[1] (an alternative etymology is "foe-destroyer") and constitutes the highest grade of noble person—ariya-puggala—described by the Buddha as recorded in the Pali canon. The word was used (as it is today in the liturgy of Theravada Buddhism) as an epithet of the Buddha himself as well as of his enlightened disciples. The most widely recited liturgical reference is perhaps the homage: Namo Tassa Bhagavato, Arahato, Samma-sammbuddhassa.Homage to him, the Blessed One, the Worthy One, the perfectly enlightened Buddha. Standard edition of the Thai Pali Canon The Pali Canon is the standard scripture collection of the Theravada Buddhist tradition. ... Theravada (Pali; Sanskrit: Sthaviravada) is one of the eighteen (or twenty) Nikāya schools that formed early in the history of Buddhism. ...

Contents

Origin

The word "arahan" literally means "worthy one"[2] (an alternative etymology is "foe-destroyer") and constitutes the highest grade of noble person—ariya-puggala—described by the Buddha as recorded in the Pali canon. The word was used (as it is today in the liturgy of Theravada Buddhism) as an epithet of the Buddha himself as well as of his enlightened disciples. The most widely recited liturgical reference is perhaps the homage: Namo Tassa Bhagavato, Arahato, Samma-sammbuddhassa.Homage to him, the Blessed One, the Worthy One, the perfectly enlightened Buddha. Standard edition of the Thai Pali Canon The Pali Canon is the standard scripture collection of the Theravada Buddhist tradition. ... Theravada (Pali; Sanskrit: Sthaviravada) is one of the eighteen (or twenty) Nikāya schools that formed early in the history of Buddhism. ...


Variations

  • Chinese: 阿羅漢/羅漢 (āluóhàn, luóhàn); rarer terms: 應供 (yinggong), 應真 (yingzhen), 真人 (zhenren). "真人" normally refers to a respected Taoist, and the term comes from the book Huangdi Neijing.
  • Hindi: अर्हन्त (arhant)
  • Japanese: 阿羅漢 羅漢 (arakan, rakan)
  • Korean: 나한 (nahan)
  • Tibetan: dgra bcom pa
  • Vietnamese: la hán

Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... The Huangdi Neijing 黃帝內經 ( Note, technically speaking, Thearch is more accurate than Emperor. ... Hindi ( , Devanagari: or , IAST: , IPA: ), an Indo-European language spoken mainly in northern and central India, is the official language of the Union along with English. ... The Tibetan language is spoken primarily by the Tibetan people who live across a wide area of eastern Central Asia bordering South Asia, as well as by large number of Tibetan refugees all over the world. ...

Jainism

A garden featuring depictions of various arhats (Hsi Lai Temple, California)
A garden featuring depictions of various arhats (Hsi Lai Temple, California)

In Jainism, the term "arhat" or "arihant" is a synonym for jina or tirthankara. The Jain Navakar Mantra starts with "Namo Arhantanam". An arihant has destroyed the karmas ("ari" means "enemy", "hant" means "destroyer") and is thus approaching nirvana. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Path To Buddhahood, linking both the Bodhisattva hall and the Main Shrine. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is under construction. ... In Jainism, a Tirthankara (Fordmaker) is a human who achieved enlightenment, became a Jiva, and whose religious teachings have formed the canon of Jainism; although not Gods, statues of Tirthankaras are found in temples. ... In Jainism, a Tirthankara (Fordmaker) is a human who achieved enlightenment, became a Jiva, and whose religious teachings have formed the canon of Jainism; although not Gods, statues of Tirthankaras are found in temples. ... Navakar Mantra, also called the Namokar Mantra or the Namaskar Mantra, is the most important prayer used in Jainism. ... ( Sanskrit: ; Pali: निब्बान Nibbāna; Vietnamese: Niết bàn; Chinese: 涅槃; Mandarin Pinyin: nièpán, Cantonese: nihppùhn; Japanese: nehan ); Korean: ì—´ë°˜, yeolbhan; Thai: nibpan นิพพาน); Tibetan mya-ngan-las-das-pa; Mongolian É£asalang-aca nögcigsen), is a Sanskrit word that literally means to cease blowing (as when a candle flame...


Theravada Buddhism

In Theravada Buddhism the Buddha himself is first named as an arahant, as were his enlightened followers, since he is free from all defilements, without greed, hatred, and delusion, rid of ignorance and craving, having no "assets" that will lead to a future birth, knowing and seeing the real here and now. This virtue shows stainless purity, true worth, and the accomplishment of the end, nibbana.[3] Theravada (Pāli: theravāda; Sanskrit: स्थविरवाद sthaviravāda; literally, the Way of the Elders) is the oldest surviving Buddhist school, and for many centuries has been the predominant religion of Sri Lanka (about 70% of the population[1]) and most of continental Southeast Asia (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand). ... Greed is excessive or uncontrolled desire for or pursuit of money, wealth, food, or other possessions, especially when this denies the same goods to others. ... For the emotion Hatred please see Hate Hatred (Nenavist) is a Soviet film of 1975 directed by Samvel Gasparov. ... Avidyā (Sanskrit) or Avijjā (Pāli) means ignorance or delusion. It is used extensively in Buddhist texts. ... Avidyā (Sanskrit) or Avijjā (Pāli) means ignorance or delusion. It is used extensively in Buddhist texts. ... Taṇhā (Pāli: तण्हा) or Tṛṣṇā (Sanskrit: तृष्णा) means thirst, desire, craving, wanting, longing, yearning. Synonyms: 愛 Cn: ài; Jp: ai; Vi: ái Tibetan: The most basic of these meanings (the literal meaning) is thirst; however, in Buddhism it has a technical meaning that is much broader. ... Birth is the process in animals by which an offspring is shot out from the body of its mama. ... The following article is about the term Nirvana in the context of Buddhism. ...


In the Pali canon, Ven. Ānanda states that he has known monastics to achieve nibbana in one of four ways: For Paulina Rubio album of the same title, see Ananda (album). ... A Buddhist Monk in Sri Lanka In Pāli, a bhikkhu (male) or bhikkhuni (female) is a fully ordained Buddhist monk. ...

  • one develops insight preceded by serenity (Pali: samatha-pubbaṇgamaṃ vipassanaṃ);
  • one develops serenity preceded by insight (vipassanā-pubbaṇgamaṃ samathaṃ);
  • one develops serenity and insight in a stepwise fashion (samatha-vipassanaṃ yuganaddhaṃ);
  • one's mind becomes seized by excitation about the dhamma and, as a consequence, develops serenity and abandons the fetters (dhamma-uddhacca-viggahitaṃ mānasaṃ hoti).[4][5]

Vipassanā (Pāli) or vipaÅ›yanā (Sanskrit) means insight. While it is often referred to as Buddhist meditation, the practice taught by the Buddha was non-sectarian, and has universal application. ... Samatha (Pāli; Sanskrit: Å›amatha), Tranquility or concentration meditation. ... The word dharma (Sanskrit; धर्म in the Devanagari script) or dhamma (Pali) is used in most or all philosophies and religions of Indian origin, Dharmic faiths, namely Hinduism (Sanatana Dharma), Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism. ... In Buddhism, a mental fetter or chain or bond (Pāli: samyojana, saÅ‹yojana, saññojana) shackles a person to samsara, the cycle of endless suffering. ...

Mahayana Buddhism

Arhat figurines in the Huating Temple in the Western Hills near Kunming, China
Arhat figurines in the Huating Temple in the Western Hills near Kunming, China

Mahayana Buddhists see the Buddha himself as the ideal towards which one should aim in one's spiritual aspirations. Hence the arhat as enlightened disciple of the Buddha is not regarded as the goal as much as is the bodhisattva. Bodhisattva carries a different meaning in Mahayana Buddhism to Theravada Buddhism. In the Pali scriptures the Tathagata when relating his own experiences of self-development uses a stock phrase "when I was an unenlightened bodhisattva". Bodhisattva thus connotes here the absence of enlightenment (Bodhi) of a person working towards that goal. In Mahayana Buddhism, on the other hand a bodhisattva is someone who seeks to put the welfare of others before their own, forfeiting their own enlightenment until all beings are saved. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1201x1765, 586 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kunming Arhat ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1201x1765, 586 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kunming Arhat ... Kunming (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kun-ming) is the capital city of Yunnan province, China. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Kuan Yin from Mt. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Tathāgata (Sanskrit; Pali The one thus-come or The one thus-gone; Chinese: 如來; Pinyin: Rú lái; Japanese: nyorai) This is traditionally interpreted as one who comes and goes in the same way (as the previous Buddhas). Tathāgata is the name which the historical Buddha Sakyamuni (Siddhattha Gotama...


See also

The four stages of enlightenment in Buddhism are the four degrees of approach to full enlightenment as an Arahant which a person can attain in this life. ...

Notes

  1. ^ An authoritative Pali-to-English translation of "arahant" can be found in Rhys Davids & Stede (1921–25), p. 77.[1]
  2. ^ An authoritative Pali-to-English translation of "arahant" can be found in Rhys Davids & Stede (1921–25), p. 77.[2]
  3. ^ Khantipalo (1989), "Introduction".[3]
  4. ^ Ven. Ānanda's teaching on achieving arhantship can be found in AN 4.170. Translations for this sutta can be found in Bodhi (2005) pp. 268–9, 439, and Thanissaro (1998).
  5. ^ Bodhi (2005), p. 268, translates this fourth way as: "a monk's mind is seized by agitation about the teaching." Thanissaro (1998) gives a seemingly contrary interpretation of: "a monk's mind has its restlessness concerning the Dhamma [Comm: the corruptions of insight] well under control." Thus, it appears possible to interpret the excitation (Pali: uddhacca, see Rhys Davids & Stede, 1921–25) as either something that the future arahant uses to impel their pursuit of the path or something that the future arahant controls in order to pursue the path.

The Anguttara Nikaya (Gradual Collection) is the fourth of the five nikayas, or collections, in the Sutta Pitaka, which is one of the three baskets that compose the Pali Tipitaka. ...

References

  • Bodhi, Bhikkhu (ed.) (2005). In the Buddha's Words: An Anthology of Discourses from the Pāli Canon.Boston: Wisdom Pubs. ISBN 0-86171-491-1.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arhat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (334 words)
In early Indian texts such as the Pali Canon, the stage of arhat is described as the final goal of Buddhist practice -- the attainment of complete and unexcelled Nirvāna.
In Jainism, the term arhat (or arihant) is a synonym for Jina or Tirthankara.
The concept of arhat may also be compared with that of bodhisattva.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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