FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Argument from inconsistent revelations

The Argument from Inconsistent Revelations, also known as the Avoiding the Wrong Hell Problem, is an argument against the existence of God. It asserts that it is unlikely that God exists because many theologians and faithful adherents have produced conflicting and mutually exclusive revelations. Since a person not privy to revelation must either accept it or reject it based solely upon the authority of its proponent, and there is no way for a mere mortal to resolve these conflicting claims by investigation, it is prudent to reserve one's judgment. The argument appears, among other places, in Voltaire's Candide and Philosophical Dictionary. Many arguments about the existence of God have been proposed over time. ... Michelangelos depiction of God in the painting Creation of the Sun and Moon in the Sistine Chapel Krishna, the eighth incarnation of Vishnu, one of the manifestations of the ultimate reality or God in Hinduism This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... The word faith has various uses; its central meaning is similar to belief, trust or confidence, but unlike these terms, faith tends to imply a transpersonal rather than interpersonal relationship – with God or a higher power. ... For information on the last book of the New Testament see the Book of Revelation. ... The last of Voltaires statues by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1781). ...


This argument against God can be seen as the reverse of Pascal's Wager and frequently arises as an objection to it. The Wager invites one to accept the existence of God in the absence of proof as the best strategy because the alternate outcome for disbelief is eternal damnation in Hell. The Argument from Inconsistent Revelations explains that, given the content of the proposed revelations, acceptance of one entails rejection of another; Pascal's Wager gives no assurance that a person has in fact made the safest choice. In his Pensées philosophiques, Denis Diderot stated this objection to the Wager by observing that "An imam could reason the same way." Blaise Pascal argued that it is a better bet to believe in God than not to do so. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is a place or a state of pain and suffering. ... Portrait of Diderot by Louis-Michel van Loo, 1767 Denis Diderot (October 5, 1713 – July 31, 1784) was a French philosopher and writer. ... Imam (Arabic: إمام , Persian: امام ) is an Arabic word meaning Leader. The ruler of a country might be called the Imam, for example. ...


In mathematical terms, it points out that, if there are a number (n) of inconsistent faiths one could believe in, the probability (p) of having chosen to practice the correct one by making Pascal's Wager is represented as p = 1 / n. However, the Wager gives no data as to whether or not the chosen religion is the correct one. Therefore, there is at best an even chance of doing so and, in practice, a greater-than-even chance that the incorrect religion was chosen and the believer will go to the correct religion's Hell rather than its Heaven. The word probability derives from the Latin probare (to prove, or to test). ... Michelangelos interpretation of Heaven Heaven is an afterlife concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies. ...


Christians believe that Jesus is the savior of the world and the son of God; Jews and Muslims believe just as strongly that he is not. Similarly, Muslims believe that the Qur'an was divinely authored, while Jews and Christians do not. There are many examples of such contrasting views, indeed, opposing fundamental beliefs can even be found within the confines of each major religion. Acceptance of any one of these religions thus requires a rejection of the others, and when faced with these competing claims in the absence of a personal revelation, it is not possible to decide amongst them. Were a personal revelation to be granted to a nonbeliever, the same problem of confusion would develop in each new person the believer shared the revelation with. Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of the character of Jesus of Nazareth, known by Christians as Jesus Christ, recounted in the New Testament. ... Jesus (8-2 BC/BCE– 29-36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (מָשִׁיחַ anointed one, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Aramaic , Arabic ) initially meant any person who was anointed by a prophet of God. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ,meaning Peace in English,( ) is a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the Quran. ... The Qurān, (Arabic: recitation, also transliterated as Quran, Koran), is the holy book of Islam. ...


Likewise, prayer may result in conflicting petitions addressed to the same God. On different sides of a battle or a football game, players and fans pray for victory to different Gods, or to the same God. God cannot simultaneously grant all of these prayers; therefore, for any one side to have claimed that God granted their prayer is not a falsifiable hypothesis. Maria Magdalene in prayer. ... The Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In science and the philosophy of science, falsifiability, contingency, and defeasibility are roughly equivalent terms referring to the property of empirical statements that they must admit of logical counterexamples. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Believers have a number of stratagems to counter this argument. It assumes, for example, that none of them make verifiable predictions about what can be found in history or science. The presence of a testable proposition in a revelation may provide a way to assess the credentials of the prophet who claims to speak for a deity; an error about an inter-subjectively demonstrable fact casts doubt on the remaining propositions that cannot be verified. A prophet is a person who is believed to speak through divine inspiration. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Argument from inconsistent revelations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (624 words)
The Argument from Inconsistent Revelations, also known as the Avoiding the Wrong Hell Problem, is an argument against the existence of God.
Since a person not privy to revelation must either accept it or reject it based solely upon the authority of its proponent, and there is no way for a mere mortal to resolve these conflicting claims by investigation, it is prudent to reserve one's judgment.
The presence of a testable proposition in a revelation may provide a way to assess the credentials of the prophet who claims to speak for a deity; an error about an inter-subjectively demonstrable fact casts doubt on the remaining propositions that cannot be verified.
god - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com (3785 words)
Cosmological arguments, or First Cause arguments, contend that the existence of the universe requires a self-sufficient prime mover, which can be called God.
Teleological arguments, or Arguments from Design, argue that the universe and its component parts display a compex and purposeful functionality that can only be the result of a designer, which can be called God.
Argument against the Cosmological argument: The universe is a cause and effect system.
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