FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Argument from free will

The argument from free will is an argument against the Existence of God which contends that omniscience and free will are incompatible, and that any conception of God which incorporates both properties is therefore inherently contradictory. The argument goes as follows: Many arguments about the Existence of God have been proposed by philosophers, theologians, and other thinkers. ... Omniscience is the capacity to know everything, or at least everything that can be known about a character/s including thoughts, feelings, etc. ... Free will is the philosophical doctrine that holds that our choices are ultimately up to ourselves. ... The Incompatible-properties argument is the idea that no description of God is consistent with reality. ...

  1. By definition, if someone has free will, then at any point in time they may either choose to do a certain thing or choose not to do it.
  2. By definition, an omniscient God knows everything that will happen in the future, including all of the choices he will make at any future point in time.
  3. By the definitions of "knowledge" and "choice", if one knows for certain what choice one will make in the future, one will not be able to make the opposite choice.
  4. Omniscience and free will are logically contradictory.
  5. Either nobody has free will, or nobody is omniscient.

Most monotheistic religions hold that God is omniscient, and both God and humans have free will. A common response to the above argument states that God exists beyond the constraints of linear time, and that the temporal terminology used above is meaningless when applied to him - God doesn't need to know any event "before" it happens but rather is capable of knowing/experiencing it "while" it happens. Free will is the philosophical doctrine that holds that our choices are ultimately up to ourselves. ... Omniscience is the capacity to know everything, or at least everything that can be known about a character/s including thoughts, feelings, etc. ... Knowledge is information of which someone is aware. ... Choice consists of that mental process of thinking involved with the process of judging the merits of multiple options and selecting one for action. ... Monotheism (in Greek μόνος = single and θεός = God), in contrast with polytheism, is the belief in one god, simply put it is the belief in a single deity. ... A pocket watch. ...


However, the above does not eliminate the seeming contradiction of free will by itself. Omniscience requires that God would have knowledge of all things in all times, even if God's view of time was vastly different as compared to ours. However, "in all times" wouldn't apply if a God exists outside of the framework of time. Most of the apparent contradictions arise by trying to attribute temporal attributes to an atemporal idea/being.


Some would contend that no being can be all-knowing if there is free will (different possible futures). They believe this shows that omniscience and free will are logically contradictory.


This argument is one of the bases of Deism and various other non-omniscient religious philosophies. Historical and modern deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ...


See also

  • Predestination
  • http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/God_for_the_Third_Millennium/Deus_ex_machina

  Results from FactBites:
 
Argument from free will - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (358 words)
The argument from free will is an argument against the Existence of God which contends that omniscience and free will are incompatible, and that any conception of God which incorporates both properties is therefore inherently contradictory.
By definition, if someone has free will, then at any point in time they may either choose to do a certain thing or choose not to do it.
This argument is one of the bases of Deism and various other non-omniscient religious philosophies.
Problem of evil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2451 words)
However, this approach does not refute the argument, as the logic of the argument is still valid if applied to a clearly stated definition such as suffering or pain, and "benevolence" includes being against human suffering.
Free will theodicies attempt to address the problem of moral evil, whereas law-consistency theodicies attempt to address the problem of natural evil.
This argument is of the logically valid form modus tollens (denying the consequent).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m