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Encyclopedia > Argos
Argos  (Άργος)
A view of Argos showing the remains of the ancient theatre
A view of Argos showing the remains of the ancient theatre
Location
Coordinates 37°37′N 22°43′E / 37.617, 22.717Coordinates: 37°37′N 22°43′E / 37.617, 22.717
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Elevation (center): 42 m (138 ft)
Government
Country: Greece
Periphery: Peloponnese
Prefecture: Argolis
Mayor: Vasilios Mpoures
Population statistics (as of 2001)
City Proper
 - Population: 30,239
 - Area:[1] 14.5 km² (6 sq.mi.)
 - Density: 2,085 /km² (5,401 /sq.mi.)
Codes
Postal codes: 21200
Area codes: 2751
License plate codes: AP
Website
www.argos.gr

Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos, IPA /'arɣos/) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnese near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. City Name Argos is a city in the northeast Peloponnese in Greece. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1197 KB) The modern city of Argos in Greece with a part of the excavation area of the classical Argos, seen from a high-up row of the ancient theatre. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 685 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 700 pixel, file size: 27 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Adapted from Image:Greece outline map. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving Eastern European Time (EET) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Summer Time (EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3 time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... The peripheries (περιφέρειες) are the subnational divisions of Greece. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Greece consists of 13 administrative regions known as Peripheries of Greece, which are further subdivided into 51 prefectures (nomoi, singular - nomos, Greek: νομοί, νομός)): See also List of the prefectures of Greece by area List of the prefectures of Greece by population density List of the prefectures of Greece by population External... Argolis (Greek, Modern: Αργολίδα Argolida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Αργολίς -- still the official, formal name) is one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This is an alphabetical list of municipalities and communities in Greece. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Here are list of postal codes in Greece. ... This is a list of dialing codes in Greece. ... Greek car number plates are composed of three letters and four digits per plate (e. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Náfplio (Ναύπλιον) is a town on the Peloponnese in Greece. ... In Greek mythology, Nauplius was the name of two characters, one descended from the other. ...

Contents

Name

The region of Argos is called the Argolid. The inhabitants of Argos were called Αργεῖοι, Argīvī in Latin, hence English Argives. Argolis (Greek, Modern: Αργολίδα Argolida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Αργολίς -- still the official, formal name) is one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ... Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnesus near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. ...


The name is pre-Greek ("Pelasgian"), as is the name of its acropolis, Larissa[citation needed]. Aitiology derives it from a mythological founder, Argos son of Zeus and Niobe (see also Danaus). Ancient Greek writers used the name Pelasgian to refer to groups of people who preceded the Greeks and dwelt in several locations in mainland Greece, Crete, and other regions of the Aegean as neighbors of the Hellenes. ... Acropolis (Gr. ... Larissa is the ancient and medieval acropolis of Argos, located in a high rocky hill, within the towns boundaries. ... Etiology (alternately aetiology, aitiology) is the study of Greek words aitia = cause and logos = word/speech) is used in philosophy, physics and biology in reference to the causes of various phenomena. ... There are five figures in Greek mythology named Argus or Argos (Άργος). Argus Panoptes (Argus all eyes) is a giant with a hundred eyes. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... Apollo and Artemis slaying the children of Niobe by Niobid Painter (c. ... Danaus, or Danaos (sleeper) was a Greek mythological character, twin brother of Aegyptus and son of Belus, a mythical king of Egypt. ...


History

Ancient Argos

A Neolithic settlement was located near the central sanctuary of Argolis, removed 45 stadia from Argos, closer to Mycenae. The sanctuary was dedicated to "Argivian Hera". The main festival of that temple were the Hekatombaia, one of the major festivals of Argos itself. Walter Burkert (Homo necans, p. 185) connected the festival to the myth of the slaying of Argus Panoptes by Hermes. There have been speculations that Hermes' epitheton Argeiphontes, which was understood as "Argus-slayer" very early, is in fact related to the adjective argós "shimmering" or "quick", from a root arg- (PIE *arǵ-, hence also argyros, silver), with a meaning "shining brightly" or similar, and only secondarily connected with the toponym or mythological Argus. An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... In Ancient Greece, a Hecatomb (Ancient Greek / hekatómbê) was the sacrifice to the gods of 100 cattle (hecaton = one hundred). ... Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Homo necans is a book on Ancient Greek religion and mythology by Walter Burkert. ... Hera/Juno, offered the head of Argus by Hermes, places his eyes in the peacocks tail, in a decoration by Jacopo Amigoni (ca 1682 - 1752) In Greek mythology, Argus Panoptes, brother to the nymph Io, was a giant with a hundred eyes. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ...


Argos was a major stronghold of Mycenaean times, and along with the neighboring acropoleis of Mycenae and Tiryns became very early settlements because of their commanding positions in the midst of the fertile plain of Argolis. Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... Plan of Tiryns excavations Tiryns (in ancient Greek Τίρυνς and in modern Τίρυνθα) is a Mycenaean archeological site in the Greek nomos of Argolis in the Peloponnese peninsula, some kilometres north of Nauplion. ...


In Homeric times it belonged to a follower of Agamemnon and gave its name to the surrounding district; the Argolid which the Romans knew as Argeia. The importance of Argos was eclipsed by nearby Sparta after the 6th century BC. For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... The so-called Mask of Agamemnon. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. ... Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: Spártē) is a city in southern Greece. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 6th century BC started on January 1, 600 BC and ended on December 31, 501 BC. // Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta The 5th and 6th centuries BC were a time of empires, but more importantly, a time...


Because of its refusal to fight in the Greco-Persian Wars, Argos was shunned by most other city-states. Argos remained neutral or the ineffective ally of Athens during the 5th century BC struggles between Sparta and Athens. Persian Wars redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... The 5th century BC started the first day of 500 BC and ended the last day of 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ...


Mythological Kings of Argos include : Inachus, Phoroneus, Argos, Agenor, Triopas, Iasus, Crotopus, Sthenelas, Pelasgus (aka Gelanor), Danaus, Lynceus, Abas, Acrisius, Proteus, Megapénthês, Perseus, Argeus, and Anaxagoras. A mythological king is an archetype in mythology. ... Inachus is one of the Oceanids in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Phoroneus was a culture-hero, son of Inachus and Melia. ... In history and Greek mythology, Agenor (which means very manly) was a king of Tyre. ... In Greek mythology, Triopas was one of the Heliadae, sons of Helios and Rhodus. ... In Greek mythology, Iasus was the name of several individuals: Iasus was the father of Atalanta by Clymene; he was the son of King Lycurgus of Arcadia. ... In Greek mythology, King Crotopus of Argos was the father of Psamathe. ... In Greek mythology, Pelasgus referred to several different people. ... In Greek mythology, King Gelanor of Argos welcomed Danaus and his daughters. ... Danaus, or Danaos (sleeper) was a Greek mythological character, twin brother of Aegyptus and son of Belus, a mythical king of Egypt. ... Lynceus is the name of two people from Greek mythology. ... Abas may refer to: Abas (sophist), a Greek sophist and rhetorician An old Persian measurement for pearls, about 0,1458 gram Several figures in Greek mythology share the name Abas, including: Abas, son of Poseidon and Arethusa. ... Acrisius was a mythical king of Argos, and a son of Abas and Ocalea. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Megapénthês was a son of Proetus. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits helped establish the hegemony of Zeus and the Twelve... In Greek mythology, King Argeus of Argos was the son of Megapenthes, and possibly the father of Anaxagoras. ... In Greek mythology, Anaxagoras was a King of Argos and son of either Megapenthes or his son Argeus. ...


After this there were three kings ruling Argos at any time, one descended from each of Bias, Melampus, and Anaxagoras. Melampus was succeeded by his son Mantius, then Oicles, and Amphiaraus, and his house of Melampus lasted down to the brothers Alcmaeon and Amphilochus, who fought in the Trojan War. In Greek mythology, Bias was a brother of Melampus who received one third of Argos (see Melampus for more information). ... In Greek Mythology, Melampus, or Melampous, was a soothsayer and healer who could talk to animals. ... In Greek mythology, Anaxagoras was a King of Argos and son of either Megapenthes or his son Argeus. ... In Greek mythology, Mantius was the son of Melampus and Lysippe and the father of Clitus and Oicles Categories: Stub | Greek mythological people ... In Greek mythology, Oicles (also Oikleiês, Oecles, or Oecleus) was an Argive king, father of Amphiaraus, son of Mantius and grandson of Melampus. ... In Greek mythology, Amphiaraus, or Amphiaraos (doubly-cursed) was the son of Oicles and husband of Eriphyle. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... In Greek mythology, Amphilochus, or Amphílokhos, is the name of three men. ...


Bias was succeeded by his son Talaus, and then by his son Adrastus who, with Amphiaraus, lead the disastrous Seven Against Thebes. In Greek mythology, Bias was a brother of Melampus who received one third of Argos (see Melampus for more information). ... In Greek mythology, Talaus was King of Argos and was one of the Argonauts. ... In Greek mythology, Adrastus, or Adrastos (he who stands his ground, son of Talaus) was one of the three kings at Argos, along with Iphis and Amphiaraus, who was married to Adrastus sister Eriphyle. ... In Greek mythology, Amphiaraus, or Amphiaraos (doubly-cursed) was the son of Oicles and husband of Eriphyle. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Επτά επί Θήβας The Seven Against Thebes is a mythic narrative that finds its classic statement in the play by Aeschylus (467 BCE) concerning the battle between the Seven led by Polynices and the army of Thebes headed by Eteocles and his supporters, traditional Theban...


Anaxagoras was succeeded by his son Alector, and then Iphis. Ithis left his kingdom to his nephew Sthenelus, the son of his brother Capaneus. This house lasted longer than those of Bias and Melampus, and eventually the kingdom was reunited under its last member, Cyanippus. In Greek mythology, Anaxagoras was a King of Argos and son of either Megapenthes or his son Argeus. ... Iphis is the name of seven characters in Greek mythology: 1. ... In Greek mythology, Sthenelus refers to four different people. ... In Greek mythology, Capaneus was a son of Hipponous and husband of Evadne, with whom he fathered Sthenelus. ... In Greek mythology, Bias was a brother of Melampus who received one third of Argos (see Melampus for more information). ... In Greek Mythology, Melampus, or Melampous, was a soothsayer and healer who could talk to animals. ...


Medieval Argos

In the 12th century, a castle was built on Larissa Hill - the site of the ancient Acropolis - called Kastro Larissa. Argos fell to the Crusaders then the Venetians, and was taken by the Ottomans in 1463. Morosini captured it for Venice in 1686 but it was retaken by the Ottomans in 1716. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... “Ottoman” redirects here. ... Morosini, a noble Venetian family, probably of Hungarian extraction, which gave many doges, statesmen, generals and admirals to the Venetian Republic, and cardinals to the Church. ...


At the beginning of the Greek War of Independence, when many petty local republics that were formed in different parts of the country, the "Consulate of Argos" was proclaimed on 26 May 1821, under the Senate of the Peloponnese. It had a single single head of state, styled Consul, 28 March 1821 - 26 May 1821: Stamatellos Antonopoulos. Combatants Greek revolutionaries United Kingdom France Russian Empire  Ottoman Empire Egyptian Khedivate Commanders Theodoros Kolokotronis Alexander Ypsilanti Georgios Karaiskakis Omer Vryonis Mahmud Dramali Pasha ReÅŸid Mehmed Pasha Ibrahim Pasha. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Consul (abbrev. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Later, Argos accepted the authority of the unified Provisional Government at the First National Assembly at Epidaurus, and eventually became part of the Kingdom of Greece. The First National Assembly of Epidaurus (1821–1822) was the first metting of the Greek National Assembly, a national representative political gathering of the Greek revolutionaries. ... Capital Athens Language(s) Greek Religion Greek Orthodox Government Constitutional Monarchy King  - 1832-1862 Otto  - 1863-1913 George I  - 1913-1917 Constantine I  - 1917-1920 Alexander  - 1920-1922 Constantine I  - 1922-1924 George II Historical era Enlightenment Era  - London Protocol August 30, 1832  - Military junta April 21, 1967 The Kingdom...


Modern Argos

The Argos demarkheio - its town hall
The Argos demarkheio - its town hall

The city of Argos is the seat of the province of the same name, one of the three subdivisions of the Argolis prefecture. According to the 2001 Greek census, the city has a population of 27,550. It is the largest city in the prefecture, one of the few prefectures in Greece where the largest city in population is larger than the prefectural capital. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Argolis (Greek, Modern: Αργολίδα Argolida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Αργολίς -- still the official, formal name) is one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ...


Considerable remains of the city survive and are a popular tourist attraction. Agriculture, however, is the primary economic activity in the area, with citrus fruits the predominant crop. Olives are also popular here.


Argos has a railway station (Kalamata - Tripoli - Corinth), and a junior soccer team. The Argos Archaeological Museum houses ancient artifacts recovered not only from the principal archaeological sites of the city, including the theater and agora but also from Lerna. [1] Organismós Sidirodrómon Elládos (Greek: Οργανισμός Σιδηροδρόμων Ελλάδος, the Hellenic Railways Organisation) is the Greek national railway company, operating both freight and passenger trains on a network which includes lines in the Peloponnese, mainland Greece, parts of Macedonia and Thrace, as well as new lines connecting Thessaloniki to Istanbul and Sofia. ... Stoa of the ancient agora de Thessaloniki An agora (αγορά), translatable as marketplace, was a public space and an essential part of an ancient Greek polis or city-state. ... For the municipality, see Myloi (Argolida), Greece, the seat of the municipality of Lerna In classical Greece, Lerna was a region of springs and a former lake near the east coast of the Peloponnesus, south of Argos. ...

Kastro Larissa
Kastro Larissa

Image File history File links Moving this from Wikipedia so it can be shared. ... Image File history File links Moving this from Wikipedia so it can be shared. ...

See also

Here are communities of the prefecture of Argolis or Argolida in Greece: A-B Achladokampos Adami Agia Triada Agios Adrianos Agios Nikolaos Alea Amarianos Andritsa Arachnaio Argos Aria Aria Asini Avgo Bolati Borsa Broutzeika C-D Chonika Choutaleika Dalamanara Didyma Dimena Drepano Douka Vrysi E-F Epidaurus/Epidavros Ermioni Exosti... Subdivisions Akova Kokla Larissa Timenio Communities The two large communities of Argos and Kryovrysi cover about three-thirds of the entire municipality. ... In Greek mythology, Argos was Odysseus faithful dog. ...

References

  1. ^ Basic Characteristics. Ministry of the Interior. www.ypes.gr. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Official site
  • The Theatre at Argos, The Ancient Theatre Archive, Theatre specifications and virtual reality tour of theatre

  Results from FactBites:
 
Argos - definition of Argos in Encyclopedia (334 words)
Argos (Greek: Άργος;, Árgos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnesus near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius.
Argus (Argos) is the son of Zeus and Niobe.
Argos is famous for selling goods using a catalogue format, where customers place orders at a till in store for items selected from a catalogue.
Argos - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (465 words)
Argos, along with the neighboring acropoleis of Mycenae and Tiryns became very early settlements because of their commanding positions in the midst of the fertile plain of Argolid.
The city of Argos is the seat of the province of the same name, one of the three subdivisions of the Argolis prefecture.
Argos has a school, a lyceum, a high school, a church, banks, a police station, a post office, a castle a train station (Kalamata - Tripoli - Corinth) a water tower, a junior soccer team, and a square (plateia).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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