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Encyclopedia > Argonauts
The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa
The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa

In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: Αργοναύται) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. Their name comes from their ship, the Argo which in turn was named after its builder Argus. They were sometimes called Minyans, after a prehistoric tribe of the area. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x1322, 248 KB) Description: Title: de: Argonautenschiff Technique: de: Tempera auf Holz Dimensions: de: 47 × 58 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Padua Current location (gallery): de: Museo Civico Other notes: Source: The Yorck Project: DVD-ROM... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x1322, 248 KB) Description: Title: de: Argonautenschiff Technique: de: Tempera auf Holz Dimensions: de: 47 × 58 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Padua Current location (gallery): de: Museo Civico Other notes: Source: The Yorck Project: DVD-ROM... Greek mythology consists in part of a large collection of narratives that explain the origins of the world and detail the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was a war waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor (present-day Turkey), by the armies of the Achaeans, after Paris of Troy... This article is about the Greek mythological hero Jason. ... In ancient geography, Colchis (sometimes spelled also as Kolchis) (Greek: Κολχίς, kŏl´kĬs; Georgian: კოლხეთი, Kolkheti) was a nearly triangular district in Caucasus. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ... In Greek mythology, Argo was the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcus to retrieve the Golden Fleece. ... There are five figures in Greek mythology named Argus or Argos (Άργος). Argus Panoptes (Argus all eyes) is a giant with a hundred eyes. ... See Minyan (disambiguation) for other meanings of the term. ... Prehistory (Greek words προ = before and ιστορία = history) is the period of human history prior to the advent of writing (which marks the beginning of recorded history). ...

Contents

Story

After the death of King Cretheus, the Aeolian Pelias usurped the Iolcan throne from his half-brother Aeson and became king of Iolcus in Thessaly (near the modern city of Volos). Because of this unlawful act, an oracle had warned him that a descendant of Aeolus would seek revenge. Pelias put to death every prominent descendant of Aeolus he could reach, but spared Aeson at the dramatic pleas of his mother Tyro. Pelias, however, kept Aeson prisoner and forced him to renounce his inheritance. Later, Aeson married Polymele, who bore him a son named Diomedes. Pelias intended to kill the baby at once, but Polymele summoned her kinswomen to weep over him, as if he were a still-born. She faked a burial and smuggled the baby to Mount Pelion, where he was raised by the centaur Chiron, who renamed the boy Jason. In Greek mythology, Cretheus, or Krêtheus was the king and founder of Iolcus. ... King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Aeson (or Aison) was the son of Tyro and Cretheus, father of Jason and Promachus. ... Iolcos (also known as Iolkos or Iolcus, Greek: Ιώλκος) was an ancient city in Thessaly, central-eastern Greece (near the modern city of Volos). ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Volos (Greek: Βόλος) is a city situated at the center of the Greek mainland, about 326 km north from Athens and 215 km south from Thessaloniki. ... Aeolus Aiolos (), Latinized as Æolus, Eolus, Æolos,Aeolus, or Aiolus, was the name of three personages in Greek Mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Tyro was the daughter of Salmoneus and mother of Pelias and Neleus. ... It may have been generated by a computer or by a translator with limited proficiency in English or the original language. ... This article is on the mythological creatures. ... Chiron and Achilles In Greek mythology, Chiron (hand) — sometimes transliterated Cheiron or rarely Kiron — was held as the superlative centaur among his brethren. ... This article is about the Greek mythological hero Jason. ...


When Jason was 20 years old, he went to consult an oracle who ordered him to dress himself as a Magnesian, wear a leopard skin and carry two spears. Then he should head to the Iolcan court. Jason did as he was told. Now a new oracle warned Pelias to be on his guard against a man with one shoe. One day, Pelias was presiding a solemn sacrifice to Poseidon, to which some neighboring kings attended. Among the crowd there stood a tall youth in leopard skin with only one sandal. Pelias came to recognize him as his nephew. Jason had lost his sandal while crossing the muddy Anavros river. He helped an old woman who was begging to be transported. That woman was Hera under disguise, who wanted to punish Pelias for having neglected the customary sacrifices to her. When Pelias met Jason, he could not kill him on the spot, for some prominent kings of the Aeolian family were there. Instead, he approached the youth and asked: "What would you do if an oracle announced that one of your fellow-citizens were destined to kill you?". Jason replied that he would send him to go and fetch the Golden Fleece, not knowing that Hera had put those words in his mouth. Ancient Greek tribe of the Thessalian Magnesia who took part in the Trojan War. ... Neptune reigns in the city centre, Bristol, formerly the largest port in England outside London. ... The River Anavros (or Anauros or Anaurus) is a small stream near the ancient city of Iolkos (modern-day Volos), flowing from Mount Pelion into the Pagasetic Gulf. ... In the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hera (IPA pronunciation: ; Greek or ) was the wife and older sister of Zeus. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ...


Jason learned later that Pelias was being haunted by the ghost of Phrixus, who had fled from Orchomenus riding on a divine ram to avoid being sacrificed, and took refuge in Colchis where he was later denied proper burial. According to an oracle, Iolcus would never prosper unless his ghost were taken back in a ship, together with the golden ram's fleece. This fleece now hung from a tree in the grove of the Colchian Ares, guarded night and day by a dragon that never slept. Pelias swore before Zeus that he would give up the throne at Jason's return, while expecting that Jason's attempt to steal the Golden Fleece would be a fatal enterprise. Hera, however, would act on Jason's favour during this perilous journey. In Greek mythology, Phrixus figured prominently in the story of Jason and the Argonauts. ... A king in Greek mythology, Orchomenus was the father of Elara. ... In ancient geography, Colchis (sometimes spelled also as Kolchis) (Greek: Κολχίς, kŏl´kĬs; Georgian: კოლხეთი, Kolkheti) was a nearly triangular district in Caucasus. ... Statue of Zeus Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving In Greek mythology, Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive: Διός Díos) is...


Jason was accompanied by some of the principal heroes of ancient Greece. The number of Argonauts varies, but usually totals between 40 and 55; traditional versions of the story place their number at 50. The ancient Greek world circa 550 BC Ancient Greece is the period in Greek history which lasted for around one thousand years and ended with the rise of Christianity. ...


Some have hypothesised that the legend of the Golden Fleece was based on a practice of the Black Sea tribes of placing a lamb's fleece at the bottom of a stream to entrap particles of gold being washed down from upstream. This practice was still in use in recent times, particularly in the Svaneti region of Georgia. Map of the Black Sea. ... Svaneti (სვანეთი. Also known as Svanetia or Svania in Russian and Western languages) is a historic province in Georgia, in the northwestern part of the country. ...


The Argonauts (Jason and Medea are sometimes not counted) were: This article is about the Greek mythological hero Jason. ... Medea by Evelyn De Morgan. ...

Two Argonauts before a hunt. The personages have been tentatively identified as Heracles and Hylas. Engraving from the Cista Ficoroni, an Etruscan ritual vessel. Galleria Borghese, Rome(Digitally enhanced for visibility)
Enlarge
Two Argonauts before a hunt. The personages have been tentatively identified as Heracles and Hylas.
Engraving from the Cista Ficoroni, an Etruscan ritual vessel. Galleria Borghese, Rome
(Digitally enhanced for visibility)
  1. Acastus
  2. Admetus
  3. Aethalides
  4. Amphion
  5. Argus
  6. Ascalaphus
  7. Atalanta (others claim Jason forbade her because she was a woman)
  8. Autolycus
  9. Butes
  10. Calais
  11. Canthus
  12. Castor
  13. Cytissorus
  14. Echion
  15. Erginus
  16. Euphemus
  17. Euryalus
  18. Heracles
  19. Hylas
  20. Idas
  21. Idmon
  22. Iolaus
  23. Jason
  24. Laertes
  25. Lynceus
  26. Melas
  27. Meleager
  28. Nestor
  29. Oileus
  30. Orpheus
  31. Palaemon
  32. Peleus
  33. Philoctetes
  34. Phrontis
  35. Poeas
  36. Polydeuces
  37. Polyphemus
  38. Poriclymenus
  39. Talaus
  40. Telamon
  41. Theseus (others claim he was still in the underworld at the time)
  42. Tiphys
  43. Zetes

Download high resolution version (1175x1748, 864 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1175x1748, 864 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... The Villa Borghese Pinciana (begun 1605) houses the Galleria Borghese. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location within Province of Rome in the Region of Lazio Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Mayor of Rome Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... In Greek Mythology, Acastus was one of the men who sailed with Jason and the Argonauts. ... In Greek mythology, Admetus was a king of Pherae in Thessaly, succeeding his father Pheres after whom the city was named. ... In Greek mythology, Aethalides was a son of Hermes and herald for the Argonauts. ... There are several characters named Amphion in Greek mythology: Amphion, son of Zeus and Antiope, and twin brother of Zethus (see Amphion and Zethus). ... There are five figures in Greek mythology named Argus or Argos (Άργος). Argus Panoptes (Argus all eyes) is a giant with a hundred eyes. ... In Greek mythology, two people share the name Ascalaphus. ... Detail from Atalanta and Hippomenes, Guido Reni, c. ... The name Autolycus refers to several people: In Greek mythology, Autolycus, or Autólykos was the son of Chione and Hermes and father of Anticlea and several sons, of whom only Aesimus is named. ... In Greek mythology, the name Butes referred to four different people. ... The Boreads, in Greek mythology, were Calais and Zetes. ... Canthus (pl. ... In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... In Greek mythology, Echion was one of the Argonauts. ... In Greek mythology, Erginus was a Boeotian king and father of Trophonius and Agamedes. ... In Greek mythology, Euphemus was the son of Europa and Poseidon. ... In Greek mythology, Euryalus referred to two different people. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... Two Argonauts before a hunt. ... In Greek mythology, Idas was a son of Aphareus and Arene and brother of Lynceus. ... In Greek mythology, Idmon was a seer who knew he would die if he joined the Argonauts. ... In Greek mythology, Iolaus (Greek: ΄Ιόλαος) was a son of Iphicles and thus a nephew of Heracles. ... This article is about the Greek mythological hero Jason. ... GEEEEEEK! ... Lynceus is the name of two people from Greek mythology. ... MELAS is an acronym for Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, Stroke-like episodes. ... This article is about the mythological figure, for the Macedonian king see Meleager (king). ... The word may have one of the following meanings. ... In Greek mythology, Oileus, or Oïleus was the King of Locris. ... The head of Orpheus, from an 1865 painting by Gustave Moreau. ... Palaemon 1 This was the birth name given to the Greek hero Herakles and the name he used until the Pythoness at Delphi first addressed him as Herakles when he sought a cure for his madness. ... Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edimburg Painter, ca. ... In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ... In Greek mythology, Poeas, or Poias was one of the Argonauts and a friend of Heracles. ... In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... Odysseus and his men blinding the cyclop Polyphemus (detail of a proto-attic amphora, c. ... In Greek mythology, Poriclymenus (or Periclymenus) referred to two different people. ... In Greek mythology, Talaus was King of Argos and was one of the Argonauts. ... In Greek mythology, Telamon, son of Aeacus, King of Aegina, and Endeis and brother of Peleus, accompanied Jason as one his Argonauts, and was present at the hunt for the Calydonian Boar. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night. ... In Greek mythology, Tiphys, son of Hagnias (or of Phorbas and Hyrmina), was the helmsman of the Argonauts. ... The Boreads, in Greek mythology, were Calais and Zetes. ...

Spoken-word myths — audio files

Argonaut myths as told by story tellers
1. Heracles in Mysia (Hylas episode), read by Timothy Carter, music by Steve Gorn, compiled by Andrew Calimach
Bibliography of reconstruction: Homer, Odyssey, 12.072 (7th c. BC); Theocritus, Idylls, 13 (350 - 310 BC); Callimachus, Aetia (Causes), 24. Thiodamas the Dryopian, Fragments, 160. Hymn to Artemis (310 - 250? BC); Apollonios Rhodios, Argonautika, I. 1175 - 1280 (c. 250 BC); Apollodorus, Library and Epitome 1.9.19, 2.7.7 (140 BC); Sextus Propertius, Elegies, i.20.17ff (50 - 15 BC); Ovid, Ibis, 488 (AD 8 - 18); Gaius Valerius Flaccus, Argonautica, I.110, III.535, 560, IV.1-57 (1st c. AD); Hyginus, Fables, 14. Argonauts Assembled (1st c. AD); Philostratus the Elder, Images, ii.24 Thiodamas (AD 170 - 245); First Vatican Mythographer, 49. Hercules et Hylas
2. Orpheus and the Thracians, read by Timothy Carter, music by Steve Gorn, compiled by Andrew Calimach
Bibliography of reconstruction: Pindar, Pythian Odes, 4.176 (462 BC); Roman marble bas-relief, copy of a Greek original from the late 5th c. (c. 420 BC); Aristophanes, The Frogs 1032 (c. 400 BC); Phanocles, Erotes e Kaloi, 15 (3rd c. BC); Apollonios Rhodios, Argonautika, i.2 (c. 250 BC); Apollodorus, Library and Epitome 1.3.2 (140 BC); Diodorus Siculus, Histories I.23, I.96, III.65, IV.25 (1st c. BC); Conon, Narrations, 45 (50 - 1 BC); Virgil, Georgics, IV.456 (37 - 30 BC); Horace, Odes, I.12; Ars Poetica 391-407 (23 BC); Ovid, Metamorphoses X.1-85, XI.1-65 (AD 8); Seneca, Hercules Furens 569 (1st c. AD); Hyginus, Poetica Astronomica II.7 Lyre (2st c. AD); Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.30.2, 9.30.4, 10.7.2 (143 - 176 AD); Anonymous, The Clementine Homilies, Homily V Chapter XV.-Unnatural Lusts (c. 400 AD); Anonymous, Orphic Argonautica (5th c. AD); Stobaeus, Anthologium (c. 450 AD); Second Vatican Mythographer, 44. Orpheus

Homer (Greek HómÄ“ros) was a legendary early Greek poet and rhapsode traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey, commonly assumed to have lived in the 8th century BC. However, exact placement of these dates is unsure. ... Theocritus (Greek Θεόκριτος), the creator of Ancient Greek bucolic poetry, flourished in the 3rd century BC. Little is known of him beyond what can be inferred from his writings. ... Callimachus (ca. ... Apollonius of Rhodes (Apollonios Rhodios) (270 BC? – unknown, after 245 BC), Hellenistic Greek epic poet and scholar of the Library of Alexandria, during the reigns of Ptolemy II and Ptolemy III, and a chief librarian of the Library of Alexandria. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... Sextus Aurelius Propertius was a Latin elegiac poet born between 57 BC and 46 BC in or near Mevania, who died in around 12 BC. Like Virgil and Ovid, Propertius was also a member of the poetic circle of neoteric poets which collected around Mæcenas. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC â€“ Tomis, now Constanta AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ... Gaius Valerius Flaccus (late 1st century AD) was a Roman poet, who flourished under the emperors Vespasian and Titus. ... Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... Philostratus, was the name of four Greek sophists of the Roman imperial period: (c. ... Pindar Pindar (or Pindarus / Pindaros) (522 BC – 443 BC), considered the greatest of the nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, was born at Cynoscephalae, a village in Thebes. ... Bust of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: ΄Αριστοφανης, c. ... Phanocles, Greek elegiac poet, probably flourished about the time of Alexander the Great. ... Apollonius of Rhodes (Apollonios Rhodios) (270 BC? – unknown, after 245 BC), Hellenistic Greek epic poet and scholar of the Library of Alexandria, during the reigns of Ptolemy II and Ptolemy III, and a chief librarian of the Library of Alexandria. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... Diodorus Siculus (c. ... Conon was an Athenian general at the end of the Peloponnesian War, in charge during the decisive loss of the navy at the battle of Aegospotami. ... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD. For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC â€“ Tomis, now Constanta AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ... Bust, traditionally thought to be Seneca, now identified by some as Hesiod. ... Gaius Julius Hyginus, (c. ... Pausanias was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... Joannes Stobaeus, so called from his native place Stobi in Macedonia, was the compiler of a valuable series of extracts from Greek authors. ...

The Argonauts in literature

1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Portrait of Robert Graves (circa 1974) by Rab Shiell Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English scholar, poet, and novelist. ...

The Argonauts on film

Two movies titled Jason and the Argonauts have been made.


Jason and the Argonauts (1963), directed by Don Chaffey, shows Jason hosting Olympics-like games and selecting his crew from among the winners. Jason is very satisfied with his crew. Jason and the Argonauts (1963) is a fictional fantasy adventure movie based upon the characters Jason and the Argonauts of Greek mythology, regarded by many critics as one of the best fantasy films ever made. ...


A Hallmark presentation TV movie, Jason and the Argonauts (2000), on the other hand, shows Jason having to settle for men with no sailing experience. This includes a thief who says "Who better than a thief to grab the Golden Fleece?" Jason and the Argonauts is a TV movie, made by Hallmark Entertainment, based on the Greek myth of Jason and the Argonauts. ...


A movie titled "Vesyolaya hronika opasnogo puteshestviya" (Amusing Chronicle of a Dangerous Voyage) was made in the Soviet Union in 1986 staring a famous russian actor Alexander Abdulov. (imdb) 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Argonauts on radio

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation featured Jason and the Argonauts in its children's radio broadcasting in Australia. "The Argonauts' Club" ran from 1933 until its closure on 2 April 1972. Children listened to the afternoon radio program and interacted with the presenters, whose leader was "Jason", by sending in stories, poems, and art works, some of which were described on air. Their interaction helped them gain status within the organisation, such as the Order of the Dragon's Tooth and the Order of the Golden Fleece; but children were always only known by their Ship and number (Oar) in its crew. The format was devised initially by author Nina Murdoch. The longest serving presenter, and "Jason" throughout the show's run, was Athol Fleming who died in May of 1972. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) is Australias national public broadcaster. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Order of the Golden Fleece (Spanish: Orden del Toisón de Oro) is an order of chivalry founded in 1430 by Duke Philip III of Burgundy to celebrate his marriage to the Portuguese princess Isabelle of Aviz. ...


See also

The constellation Argo Navis drawn by Johannes Hevelius in 1690 Argo Navis (or simply Argo) was a large southern constellation representing the Argo, the ship used by Jason and the Argonauts in Greek mythology. ... This article is about the Greek mythological hero Jason. ... The Toronto Argonauts are a Canadian Football League team based in Toronto, Ontario. ...

Sources


 
 

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