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Encyclopedia > Argentine wine
Vineyards in Agrelo, Mendoza.

Argentine wine, as with some aspects of Argentine cuisine, has its roots in Spain. During the Spanish colonization of the Americas, Juan Cedrón (or Cidrón) brought the first vine cuttings to Santiago del Estero in 1557, and the cultivation of the grape and wine production stretched first to neighbouring regions, and then to other parts of the country. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... This article was a former Spanish Translation of the Week. ... The Spanish colonization of the Americas began with the arrival in the Western Hemisphere of Christopher Columbus (Cristóbal Colón) in 1492. ... Santiago del Estero is a town in northern Argentina, capital of Santiago del Estero Province, on the Dulce River. ...


Argentine winemakers have traditionally been more interested in quantity than quality and the country consumes 90% of the wine it produces (45 litres a year per capita according to 2006 figures). However, the desire to increase exports fueled significant advances in quality. Argentine wines started being exported during the 1990s, and are currently growing in popularity. The devaluation of the Argentine peso in 2002, following the economic collapse, further fueled the industry as production costs decreased and tourism significantly increased, giving way to a whole new concept of wine tourism in Argentina. The past years have seen the birth of numerous tourist-friendly wineries with free tours and tastings. Some wineries even provide accommodations (such as is the case of Salentein or Tapiz) for tourists interested in staying in boutique hotels specifically oriented towards wine-tourism. The Mendoza Province is now one of Argentina's top tourist destinations and the one which has grown the most in the past years. The Argentine peso (originally established as the nuevo peso argentino or peso convertible) is the currency of Argentina. ... The Argentine economic crisis was part of the situation that affected Argentinas economy during the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ...


Argentina is the largest wine producer in South America and the 5th largest in the world, with over 1,200 million liters (2003), and the 13th largest exporter in the world (431 million USD in 2005). Argentina probably produces the best Malbec. Ironically, in the 1980s, Argentina almost gave up on the grape through government vine pull schemes. ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Malbec is a black, mellow grape variety originally grown in France, in the Loire Valley and Cahors. ... Vine pull schemes are programs whereby grape growers receive a financial incentive to pull up their grape vines, a process known as arrachage in French. ...


Due to the high altitude and low humidity of the main wine producing regions, Argentine vineyards rarely face the problems of insects, fungi, moulds and other diseases that affect grapes in other countries. This permits cultivating with little or no pesticides, allowing even organic wines to be easily produced. A common vineyard. ... An organically-grown apple. ...

Tapiz Winery, located in Mendoza

Contents

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

Regions

The most important wine regions of the country are located in the provinces of Mendoza and San Juan (Cuyo region), and La Rioja. Salta, Catamarca and Río Negro are also wine producing regions. The Mendoza Province produces more than 60% of the Argentine wine and is the source of an even higher percentage of the total exports (84% by value during the first trimester of 2006). Argentina is subdivided in 23 provinces (Spanish: provincias, singular - provincia) and 1 federal district (capital federal). ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... San Juan is a province of Argentina, located in the westen part of the country. ... Cuyo is the name given to the wine-producing, mountainous area of north-west Argentina, comprising the provinces of San Juan, San Luis and Mendoza. ... La Rioja is a one of the provinces of Argentina and is located in the west of the country. ... Salta is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Catamarca is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Río Negro is a province of Argentina, located at the northern edge of Patagonia. ...

Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... Gates of General San Martín Park Mendoza is a city in the west of Argentina, and the capital of Mendoza Province. ... San Rafael is one of the departments of the Mendoza Province, Argentina. ... San Juan is a province of Argentina, located in the westen part of the country. ... Salta is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Quebrada las Conchas, also known as Quebrada de Cafayate. ... La Rioja is a one of the provinces of Argentina and is located in the west of the country. ... Famatina is a town in the province of La Rioja, Argentina. ... Catamarca is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Tinogasta is a city in the west of the province of Catamarca, Argentina, on the right-hand shore of the Abaucán River, about 280 km from the provincial capital San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca. ... Río Negro is a province of Argentina, located at the northern edge of Patagonia. ... // Negro River (Spanish: Río Negro) is the most important river of the Argentine province of Río Negro. ... Jujuy is a province of Argentina, located in the extreme northwest of the country, at the borders with Chile and Bolivia. ... Patio of the Main Cathedral San Salvador de Jujuy, city in northwestern Argentina, capital of the Jujuy Province. ... Neuquén is a province of Argentina, located in the west of the country, at the northern end of Patagonia. ... Córdoba is a province of Argentina, located in the center of the country. ...

Grapes

There are many different varieties of grapes cultivated in Argentina, reflecting her many immigrant groups. The French brought Auxerrois, which became known as Malbec, which makes most of Argentina's best known wines. The Italians brought vines that they called Bonarda, although Argentine Bonarda appears to be the Corbeau of Savoie, also known as Charbono in California, which may be related to Dolcetto. It has nothing in common with the light fruity wines made from Bonarda Piemontese in Piedmont. Auxerrois is a historical province of France, part of Burgundy. ... Malbec is a black, mellow grape variety originally grown in France, in the Loire Valley and Cahors. ... Charbono is an uncommon grape found primarily in California. ... Bonarda Piemontese is a red wine grape that is grown in northwestern Italy around Turin. ...


Torrontés is another typically Argentine grape and is mostly found in the provinces of La Rioja, San Juan, and Salta. It is a member of the Malvasia group that makes aromatic white wines. It has recently been grown in Spain. Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Chardonnay and other international favourites are becoming more widely planted, but some varieties are cultivated characteristically in certain areas. Torrontes is a fragrant, fruity white wine produced in Argentina. ... Malvasia (also known as Malvazia) is a group of wine grape varieties grown historically in the Mediterranean and the island of Madeira, but now grown in many of the winemaking regions of the world. ... Old vine Cabernet Sauvignon at Chateau Montelena in Napa Valley. ... Shiraz is one name, equivalent to Syrah, for a noble grape variety widely used to make dry red table wine. ... Oak-aged Chardonnay is particularly popular in the United States. ...


Red

Malbec is a black, mellow grape variety originally grown in France, in the Loire Valley and Cahors. ... Charbono is an uncommon grape found primarily in California. ... Old vine Cabernet Sauvignon at Chateau Montelena in Napa Valley. ... Shiraz is one name, equivalent to Syrah, for a noble grape variety widely used to make dry red table wine. ... Tempranillo is a variety of vitis vinifera, the red grape used commonly in winemaking. ... Merlot grapes on the vine. ... Pinot noir is a red wine grape variety of the species Vitis vinifera. ...

White

Oak-aged Chardonnay is particularly popular in the United States. ... Torrontes is a fragrant, fruity white wine produced in Argentina. ... Sauvignon blanc is a green-skinned grape variety which originates from the Bordeaux region of France. ... Riesling is a white grape variety and varietal appellation of wines grown historically in Germany (see German wine), Alsace (France), Austria, and northern Italy. ... Chenin Blanc (or often simply Chenin) is a widely grown wine grape variety, also known as Steen in South Africa, Pineau de la Loire in the Loire region of France. ... Viognier (pronounced vee-own-YAY[1]) is a white wine grape. ... Sémillon is a golden-skinned grape used to make dry and sweet white wines, most notably in France and Australia. ...

See also

The globalization of wine is largely a post-1976 phenomenon. ... This article is about the foreign trade of Argentina. ...

References

  • Zraly, Kevin. Windows of the World Complete Wine Course. NY: Sterling, 2005.
  • (Spanish) La Nación, 16 May 2006. Siguen creciendo las exportaciones de vinos y mostos.

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