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Encyclopedia > Argentina
República Argentina  (Spanish)
Argentine Republic (portal)
Flag of Argentina
Flag Coat of arms
MottoEn unión y libertad
"In Union and Liberty"
AnthemHimno Nacional Argentino
Capital
(and largest city)
Buenos Aires
34°20′S, 58°30′W
Official languages Spanish
Ethnic groups  Spanish, Italian, German, Jewish, Arabs, British, French, Native American
Demonym Argentine
Government Federal presidential republic
 -  President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner
 -  Vice President Julio Cobos
Independence from Spain 
 -  May Revolution 25 May 1810 
 -  Declared 9 July 1816 
Area
 -  Total 2,766,890 km² (8th)
1,073,514 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 1.1
Population
 -  2008 estimate 40,677,348 (30th)
 -  2001 census 36,260,130 
GDP (PPP) 2007 estimate
 -  Total $523.7 billion (2007)[1] (23rd)
 -  Per capita $13,307 (2007)[2][3] (57th)
GDP (nominal) 2007 estimate
 -  Total $245.6 billion[4] (31st)
 -  Per capita $6,548 (66th)
Gini (2006) 49[5] 
HDI (2005) 0.869 (high) (38th)
Currency Peso (ARS)
Time zone ART (UTC-3)
 -  Summer (DST) ART (UTC-2)
Internet TLD .ar
Calling code +54
Argentina also has a territorial dispute with the United Kingdom over an additional 1,000,000 km² (386,102 sq mi) of Antarctica, the Falkland Islands and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands has 2% population.

Argentina is a South American country, constituted as a federation of twenty-three provinces and an autonomous city. It is second in size on the South American continent to Brazil and eighth in the world. Argentina occupies a continental surface area of 2,766,890 km² (1,068,302 sq mi) between the Andes mountain range in the west and the southern Atlantic Ocean in the east and south. It is bordered by Paraguay and Bolivia in the north, Brazil and Uruguay in the northeast, and Chile in the west and south. The country claims the British-administered overseas territories of the Falkland Islands and South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. Argentina also claims 969,464 km² (374,312 sq mi) of Antarctica, known as Argentine Antarctica, overlapping other claims made by Chile and the United Kingdom (British Antarctic Territory). Look up Argentina in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... “Flag of Argentina” redirects here. ... The Coat of Arms of Argentina was established in its current form in 1944. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... The lyrics of the Himno Nacional Argentino (the national anthem of Argentina) were written by Vicente López y Planes, and the music was composed by Blas Parera. ... Image File history File links LocationArgentina. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... This article is about the demographics features of the population of Argentina, including distribution, ethnicity, economic status and other. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... The Spanish people or Spaniards are an ethnic group native to Spain, in southwestern Europe, who are primarily descended from the autochthonous pre-Indo-European Euskaldunak, Latin, Visigothic, Celtic and Moorish peoples. ... A stereotypical German The Germans (German: die Deutschen), or the German people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in German: Volk), defined more by a sense of sharing a common German culture and having a German mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or a member of the Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... The Federal Republic of Germany and its sixteen Bundesländer (federal states) A federal republic is a federation of states with a republican form of government. ... A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where an executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separately from the legislature, to which it is not accountable and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ... The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina. ... Cristina Elisabet Fernández Wilhem de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953), commonly known as Cristina Fernández or Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine lawyer, and/or politician from the Justicialist Party and the current President of Argentina. ... The office of Vice-President of Argentina did not exist until it was created by the 1853 Constitution. ... Julio César Cleto Cobos (born 1955-04-30) is an Argentine Radical Civic Union (UCR) politician, current governor of Mendoza Province. ... La Revolución de Mayo (the May Revolution) was the first attempt at independence in the Viceroyalty of the River Plate, which contains present-day Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Independence of Argentina was declared on July 9, 1816 by the Congress of Tucumán. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different surface areas  here is a list of areas between 1 million km² and 10 million km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... World map of GDP (Nominal and PPP). ... Look up Per capita in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of countries by 2006 GDP (nominal) per capita (IMF, October 2007). ... Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... The Argentine peso (originally established as the nuevo peso argentino or peso convertible) is the currency of Argentina. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Even though Argentina is located at the UTC-4 UT time zone, it uses the UTC-3, and does not observe daylight saving time. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .ar is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Argentina. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... Argentina made major changes to its telephone numbering plan in 1999, after its telephone system was privatized. ... The sovereignty of the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas in Spanish) [1] has been the subject of dispute between the United Kingdom, Spain, France and Argentina (all controlling the Falkland Islands at some point), lasting more than two centuries. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Motto Leo Terram Propriam Protegat(Latin) Let the Lion protect his own land or May the Lion protect his own land Anthem God Save the Queen Capital Grytviken (King Edward Point) Official languages English Government British overseas territory  -  Head of State Queen Elizabeth II  -  Commissioner Alan Huckle Area  -  Total 3... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... This article is about federal states. ... Countries by area. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This article is about the mountain range in South America. ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ... Motto Leo Terram Propriam Protegat(Latin) Let the Lion protect his own land or May the Lion protect his own land Anthem God Save the Queen Capital Grytviken (King Edward Point) Official languages English Government British overseas territory  -  Head of State Queen Elizabeth II  -  Commissioner Alan Huckle Area  -  Total 3... Antarctic portion between meridians 25º West and 74º West Argentine Antarctica (in Spanish, Antártida Argentina) is a sector of Antarctica which Argentina considers part of its National Territory. ... Motto: Research and Discovery Anthem: God Save the Queen Status British overseas territory Official language(s) - Commissioner Tony Crombie Administrator Michael Richardson Area 1,395,000 km² Population c. ...


Argentina has the highest Human Development Index level and the second highest Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in purchasing power parity in Latin America after its neighbor Chile[6] and its total national GDP is the 23rd largest in the world.[7][8] The country is currently classified as an Upper-Middle Income Country[9] or as a secondary emerging market by the World Bank.[10][11] Argentina's nominal GDP makes it the 31st largest economy in the world.[12] GDP redirects here. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Gross National Income (GNI) comprises the total value k produced within a country (i. ... Emerging markets are those countries that are on their way from a less developed to a developed country. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ...

Contents

Etymology

The name Argentina (from Latin argentum: silver) was first used extensively in the 1612 book Historia del descubrimiento, población, y conquista del Río de la Plata (History of the discovery, population, and conquest of the Río de la Plata) by Ruy Díaz de Guzmán, naming the territory Tierra Argentina (Land of Silver).[13][14] This article explains the origin and history of the names given to the South American country Argentina. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ...


History

Río de la Plata aboriginals, as pictured by Hendrick Ottsen (1603).
Río de la Plata aboriginals, as pictured by Hendrick Ottsen (1603).
Main article: History of Argentina

The first signs of human presence in Argentina are located in the Patagonia (Piedra Museo, Santa Cruz), and date from 11,000 BC(Santa María, Huarpes, Diaguitas, Sanavirones, among others). In 1480, the Inca Empire under the rule of king Pachacutec launched an offensive and conquered present-day northwestern Argentina, integrating it into a region called Collasuyu. In the northeastern area, the Guaraní developed a culture based on yuca and sweet potato. The central and southern areas (Pampas and Patagonia) were dominated by nomadic cultures, unified in the seventeenth century by the Mapuches. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2829x1826, 4759 KB) Indians from Rio de la Plata. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2829x1826, 4759 KB) Indians from Rio de la Plata. ... This article is about the history of Argentina. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Santa Cruz is a province of Argentina, located in the south of the country, in the Patagonia. ... Santa María or Santa Maria may refer to: The name of the Blessed Virgin Mary or Mary, the mother of Jesus, in various languages such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Catalan. ... The Diaguita, also called Diaguita-Calchaquí, are a group of South American indigenous peoples. ... For the a general view of Inca civilisation, people and culture, see Incas. ... Pachacuti as drawn by Guaman Poma Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui (or Pachacutec; Quechua Pachakutiq, literally world-turner, i. ... Collasuyu was the southwestern provincial region of the Tahuantinsuyu, or Inca Empire. ... For other uses, see Guaraní (disambiguation). ... Yuca or Yuka has been used as a semi despective term reffering to Metal and Rock music derivations and their followers (called Yuqueros). The term is used in Latin American countrys, thought most popularly in Venezuela. ... Binomial name (L.) Lam. ... The pampas (from Quechua for plain) are the fertile lowlands that extend across c. ... For the 2006 historical epic set in Kazakhstan, see Nomad (2006 film). ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Mapuche test of Wikipedia at Wikimedia Incubator Mapuche (Mapudungun; Che, People + Mapu, of the Land) are the Indigenous inhabitants of Central and Southern Chile and Southern Argentina. ...

Buenos Aires in 1536.
Buenos Aires in 1536.

European explorers arrived in 1516. Spain established a permanent colony on the site of Buenos Aires in 1580; the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata was created in 1776. During the early part of this period it was largely a country of Spanish immigrants and their descendants, known as criollos, some of them gathered in Buenos Aires and other cities, others living on the pampas as gauchos. Descendants of African slaves (See:Afro-Argentines) were present in significant numbers. Indigenous peoples inhabited much of the rest of Argentina. In 1806 and 1807 the British Empire launched two invasions to Buenos Aires, but the criollo population repelled both attempts. On May 25, 1810, after confirmation of the rumors about the overthrow of King Ferdinand VII by Napoleon, citizens of Buenos Aires created the First Government Junta (May Revolution).Two nations emerged in what is now Argentina United Provinces of South America (1810) and Liga Federal (1815) Other provinces through the reluctance of some factions and the centralist tendencies of the more radical activists delayed a combined State. In the meantime, Paraguay declared its independence in 1811. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x638, 35 KB) Summary View of Buenos Aires shortly after its foundation in 1536. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x638, 35 KB) Summary View of Buenos Aires shortly after its foundation in 1536. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Created in 1776, the Viceroyalty of La Plata (in Spanish, Virreinato del Río de la Plata) was the last and most shortlived viceroyalty created by Spain. ... Criollo, in the Spanish colonial Casta system (caste system) of Latin America, was a person born in the Spanish colonies deemed to have purity of blood in respect to the individuals European ancestry. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... The pampas (from Quechua for plain) are the fertile lowlands that extend across c. ... For other uses, see Gaucho (disambiguation). ... Afro-Argentines are Argentines of African descent. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... The British invasions of the Río de la Plata (Spanish: Invasiones Inglesas al Río de la Plata) were a series of unsuccessful British attempts at military control of the Spanish colonies located around the Río de la Plata basin in South America, between 1806 and 1807, as... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... The First Junta or Primera Junta was the first goverment that appeared in Argentina after the May Revolution. ... La Revolución de Mayo (the May Revolution) was the first attempt at independence in the Viceroyalty of the River Plate, which contains present-day Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. ... Flag of the United Provinces until 1818. ... in REDLiga de los Pueblos Libres in 1815, part of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata in BLUE The Liga Federal (Federal League) originates from the idea of José Gervasio Artigas to establish a federal government among the provinces of the former Viceroyalty of the R...


Military campaigns led by General José de San Martín between 1814 and 1817 made independence increasingly a reality. In 1820 Liga Federal was crushed by forces of the United Provinces of South America and Portugal armies from Brazil and its provinces absorbed into United Provinces of South America. Argentines revere San Martín, who campaigned in Argentina, Chile, and Peru, as the hero of their national independence. On July 9, 1816, a Congress gathered in Tucumán (the Congress of Tucumán) and finally issued a formal declaration of independence from Spain. Bolivia declared itself independent in 1825, and Uruguay was created in 1828 as a result of the Argentina-Brazil War. José Francisco de San Martín Matorras, also known as José de San Martín (25 February 1778 – 17 August 1850), was an Argentine general and the prime leader of the southern part of South Americas successful struggle for independence from Spain. ... in REDLiga de los Pueblos Libres in 1815, part of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata in BLUE The Liga Federal (Federal League) originates from the idea of José Gervasio Artigas to establish a federal government among the provinces of the former Viceroyalty of the R... Flag of the United Provinces until 1818. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... San Miguel de Tucumán (usually referred to as simply Tucumán) is the largest city in northwestern Argentina, with a population (2001) of 525,853. ... The Congress of Tucumán was the representative assembly of the United Provinces of the River Plate formed in 1816, initially meeting in Tucumán. ... Combatants Brazilian Empire United Provinces of the Río de la Plata (present Uruguay and Argentina) Commanders Pedro I of Brazil Rodrigo Pinto Guedes Marquis of Barbacena Juan Antonio Lavalleja Bernardino Rivadavia Francis Drummond Carlos María de Alvear The Argentina-Brazil War (Portuguese: Guerra da Cisplatina; Spanish: Guerra del...


In 1818, General José de San Martín crossed the Andes to free Chile and Peru, thus eliminating the Spanish threat. Centralist and federalist groups (Spanish: Unitarios and Federales) were in conflict until national unity was established and the constitution promulgated in 1853. The constitution was strongly defended in moving oratory by the patriot and Franciscan Mamerto Esquiú, for whom one of the country's departments is named. From 1865 to 1870, the bloody War of Triple Alliance was fought by Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay against Paraguay. José Francisco de San Martín Matorras, also known as José de San Martín (25 February 1778 – 17 August 1850), was an Argentine general and the prime leader of the southern part of South Americas successful struggle for independence from Spain. ... The Flag carried by the army The Crossing of the Andes was one of the most important feats in the Argentine War of Independence, in which an Argentine army liberated Chile from Spanish rule, in order to protect their country from possible Spanish incursions. ... Centralization is the process by which the activities of an organization, particularly those regarding decision-making, become concentrated within a particular location and/or group. ... For theological federalism, see Covenant Theology. ... Unitarians (Spanish Unitarios) was the name under which the liberal concept of a centralised government in Buenos Aires was known, during the years of civil war, short after the Declaration of Independence of Argentina in 1816, and opposed to the Federalism. ... Federales was the name under which the supporters of federalism in Argentina were known, opposing the Unitarios that pretended a centralised government of Buenos Aires Province, with no participation of the other provinces of the custom taxes benefits of the Buenos Aires port. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ...


Foreign investment and immigration from Europe led to the adoption of modern agricultural techniques. In the 1870s, the "Conquest of the Desert" subdued the remaining indigenous tribes throughout the southern Pampas and Patagonia, leaving 1,300 indigenous dead.[15][16] Invest redirects here. ... Non-native population in Argentina, 1869–1991 There is a theory that the original inhabitants of Argentina were descendants of Asian peoples that crossed the Bering Land Bridge into North America and then, over thousands of years, reached the southern end of South America. ... The Conquest of the Desert (Spanish: Conquista del desierto) was a military campaign directed mainly by General Julio Argentino Roca in the 1870s, which established Argentine dominance over Patagonia, which was inhabited by indigenous peoples. ... The pampas (from Quechua for plain) are the fertile lowlands that extend across c. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ...


From 1880 to 1916, Argentina enjoyed increasing prosperity, prominence and became one of the top 10 richest countries in the world, through an agricultural export-led economy. The population of the country swelled sevenfold. Conservative forces dominated Argentine politics through non-democratic means until 1916, when their traditional rivals, the Radicals, won control of the first free-elected government. The military forced Hipólito Yrigoyen from power in 1930, leading to another decade of Conservative rule. The country was neutral during World War II. Political change led to the presidency of Juan Perón in 1946, who worked to empower the working class and greatly expanded the number of unionized workers. The economy turned to more protectionist policies and the developing of industry. The self-proclamated Revolución Libertadora of 1955 deposed him. Conservative may refer to: Conservatism, political philosophy A member of a Conservative Party Conservative extension, premise of deductive logic Conservativity theorem, mathematical proof of conservative extension Conservative Judaism britney spears Category: ... The Radical Civic Union (in Spanish, Unión Cívica Radical, UCR) is a political party in Argentina. ... Juan Hipólito del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús Yrigoyen Alem (July 12, 1852 – July 3, 1933) was twice President of Argentina (from 1916 to 1922 and again from 1928 to 1930). ... A neutral country takes no side in a war between other parties, and in return hopes to avoid being attacked by either of them. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Juan Domingo Perón (October 8, 1895 – July 1, 1974) was an Argentine colonel and politician, elected three times as President of Argentina, serving from 1946 to 1955 and from 1973 to 1974. ... The Revolución Libertadora (Spanish, Liberating Revolution) was a military uprising that ended the second presidential term of Juan Domingo Perón in Argentina, in 1955. ...

President Juan Perón (1946).
President Juan Perón (1946).

From the 1950s to 1970s, soft military and weak civilian administrations traded power. During those years the economy grew strongly and poverty declined (to less than 7% in 1975). At the same time political violence continued to escalate, fighting against the military government, demanding the return of Perón from his Spanish exile. In 1973, Perón returned to the presidency, but he died within a year of assuming power. His third wife Isabel, the Vice President, succeeded him in office, but the military coup of March 24, 1976 removed her from office. Image File history File links Juan_Peron_con_banda_de_presidente. ... Image File history File links Juan_Peron_con_banda_de_presidente. ... Juan Domingo Perón (October 8, 1895 – July 1, 1974) was an Argentine colonel and politician, elected three times as President of Argentina, serving from 1946 to 1955 and from 1973 to 1974. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Terrorism. ... María Estela Martínez Cartas de Perón (born on February 4, 1931), better known as Isabel Martínez de Perón or Isabel Perón, was President of Argentina from 1974 to 1976 and the third wife of Argentine President Juan Perón. ... Coup redirects here. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The armed forces took power through a junta in charge of the self-appointed National Reorganization Process until 1983. The military government repressed opposition and leftist groups using harsh illegal measures (the "Dirty War"); thousands of dissidents "disappeared", while the SIDE cooperated with DINA and other South American intelligence agencies, and with the CIA in Operation Condor. Many of the military leaders that took part in the Dirty War were trained in the U.S.-financed School of the Americas, among them Argentine dictators Leopoldo Galtieri and Roberto Viola. The military dictatorship (1976-1983) greatly increased the extent of the country's foreign debt. From that point the economy of the country began to be controlled more and more by the conditions imposed on it by both its creditors and the IMF (International Monetary Fund) with priority given to servicing the repayment of the foreign debt. These and other economic problems, charges of corruption, public revulsion in the face of human rights abuses and, finally, the country's 1982 defeat by the British in the Falklands War discredited the Argentine military regime. Alternate cover US 1979 and 2002 reissue cover, also known as paint spatter cover For the military meaning, see Armed forces. ... A military dictatorship is a form of government wherein the political power resides with the military; it is similar but not identical to a stratocracy, a state ruled directly by the military. ... Jorge Rafael Videla, first president of the Proceso Proceso de Reorganización Nacional (Spanish, National Reorganization Process, often simply Proceso) was the name given by its leaders to the dictatorial regime that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983. ... Poster by the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo NGO with photos of disappeared. This article especially refers to the Argentine dirty war; however, the term has been used in other contexts, for example in Morocco; see also lead years. ... Disappear redirects here. ... Secretaría de Inteligencia (Intelligence Secretariat, S.I) is the premier intelligence agency of the Argentine Republic and head of its National Intelligence System. ... Look up Dina in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An intelligence agency is a governmental organization that for the purposes of national security is devoted to the gathering of information (known in the context as intelligence) by means of espionage, communication interception, cryptanalysis, cooperation with other institutions, and evaluation of public sources. ... CIA redirects here. ... For other uses of Operation Condor, please see Operation Condor (disambiguation) Operation Condor (Spanish: Operación Cóndor, Portuguese: Operação Condor) was a campaign of political repressions involving assassination and intelligence operations officially implemented starting in 1975 by the right-wing dictatorships that dominated the Southern Cone in South... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHISC), formerly School of the Americas (SOA), is a US Army facility at Fort Benning in Columbus, Georgia, USA. It is a training facility operated in the Spanish language especially for Latin American military personnel. ... Leopoldo Fortunato Galtieri Castelli (July 15, 1926 - January 12, 2003) was an Argentinian general and the de facto President of Argentina from 22 December 1981 to 18 June 1982, during the last military dictatorship. ... Roberto Eduardo Viola Prevedini (October 13, 1924 – September 30, 1994) was a military officer who briefly served as interim president of Argentina from March 29 to December 11, 1981 during a period of military rule. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner... Augusto Pinochet (sitting) was an army general who led a military coup in Chile in 1973. ...


Democracy was restored in 1983. Raúl Alfonsín's government took steps to account for the "disappeared", established civilian control of the armed forces, and consolidated democratic institutions. The members of the three military juntas were prosecuted and sentenced to life terms. Failure to resolve endemic economic problems and an inability to maintain public confidence led to Alfonsín's early departure six months before his term was to be completed. Raúl Ricardo Alfonsín (born 13 March 1927) is an Argentine politician, who was the President of Argentina from 10 December 1983 to 9 July 1989. ...


The 1990s began with hyperinflation. President Carlos Menem imposed a peso-dollar fixed exchange rate in 1991 to stop hyperinflation and adopted far-reaching market-based policies, dismantling protectionist barriers and business regulations, and implementing a privatization program. These reforms contributed to significant increases in investment and growth with stable prices through most of the 1990s. However, the peso was tied to the dollar at an artificially high rate that could only be maintained by flooding the market with dollars. As a result the foreign debt increased enormously and state companies and services were privatized. The total opening up of the market to foreign goods, which up until then were produced locally, resulted in the collapse of local industry. So while part of the population was saving in dollars, traveling overseas, and purchasing imported and luxury goods cheaply, the rest of the population was experiencing an increase in both poverty and unemployment. The IMF and the world economists praised the liberalization of the Argentine market, and the country was presented as a “model student”. Toward the end of the 1990s, large fiscal deficits and overvaluation of the pegged peso caused a gradual slide into economic crisis. In 1998 a period of profound economic recession began. This was a direct result of the economic measures which dominated the decade of the 90s and which produced a false sense of stability and well being. By the end of his term in 1999, these accumulating problems and perceived corruption had made Menem unpopular. In economics, hyperinflation is inflation that is out of control, a condition in which prices increase rapidly as a currency loses its value. ... Carlos Saúl Menem (born July 2, 1930) was President of Argentina from July 8, 1989 to December 10, 1999 for the Justicialist Party (Peronist) very infamous and criticized due corruption and his dubious handling of the investigations of the 1992 Israeli Embassy bombing and the 1994 bombing of the... The Argentine peso (originally established as the nuevo peso argentino or peso convertible) is the currency of Argentina. ... USD redirects here. ... The Argentine Currency Board pegged the Argentine peso to the U.S. dollar between 1991 and 2002 in an attempt to eliminate hyperinflation and stimulate economic growth. ... In economics, hyperinflation is inflation that is out of control, a condition in which prices increase rapidly as a currency loses its value. ... A market economy (also called a free market economy or a free enterprise economy) is an economic system in which the production and distribution of goods and services take place through the mechanism of free markets (though completley useless to some dumbasses) guided by a free price system. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... Origins People Theories Ideas Movements Topics Related Philosophy Portal Politics Portal        Privatization is the incidence or process of transferring ownership of business from the public sector (government) to the private sector (business). ... In economics, crisis is an old term in business cycle theory, referring to the sharp transition to a recession. ...


The Menem and de la Rúa administrations faced diminished competitiveness in exports, massive imports which damaged national industry and reduced employment, chronic fiscal and trade deficits, and the contagion of several economic crises. Unemployment reached as high as 25% of the economically active population, and another 15% had only part-time work. The Asian financial crisis in 1998 precipitated an outflow of capital that mushroomed into a recession, and culminated in economic crisis in November 2001. The governing coalition was forced to undertake a series of measures including the freezing of bank accounts. This was done to halt the flow of capital out of the country and to stem the growing debt crisis. However, a climate of popular discontent was unleashed as a result. On 20 December 2001 Argentina was thrown into its worst institutional and economic crisis for several decades. There were violent street protests, which brought about clashes with the police and resulted in several fatalities. The increasingly chaotic climate, amidst bloody riots, finally resulted in the resignation of President de la Rúa. The economic crisis accentuated the people's lack of trust in their politicians. During this time street protests were accompanied by the cry “they all should go.” The "they" referred to the politicians, especially those involved in many reported acts of corruption. They were also accused of dealing fraudulently with public goods and money, without any judicial sanctions in place to curb the corruption. Fernando de la Rúa Bruno (born September 15, 1937) is an Argentine politician. ... The Asian financial crisis was a financial crisis that started in July 1997 in Thailand and affected currencies, stock markets, and other asset prices in several Asian countries, many considered East Asian Tigers. ... Capital outflow is an economic term describing capital flowing out of (or leaving) a particular economy. ... In macroeconomics, a recession is a decline in a countrys real gross domestic product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ... The Argentine economic crisis was part of the situation that affected Argentinas economy during the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The December 2001 riots were a period of civil unrest and rioting in Argentina, which took place during December 2001, with the most violent incidents taking place on December 19 and December 20 in the capital, Buenos Aires. ...


In two weeks, several presidents followed in quick succession, culminating in Eduardo Duhalde's being appointed interim President of Argentina by the Legislative Assembly on 2 January 2002. Argentina defaulted on its international debt obligations. The peso's near eleven year-old linkage to the United States dollar was abandoned, resulting in major depreciation of the peso and a spike in inflation. Eduardo Alberto Duhalde Maldonado (born October 5, 1941) is a former president of Argentina. ... The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina. ... A Legislative Assembly in some parts of the Commonwealth refers to a legislature, or a chamber of the legislature. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... In finance, default occurs when a debtor has not met its legal obligations according to the debt contract, e. ... Currency depreciation is the loss of value of a countrys currency with respect to one or more foreign reference currencies, typically in a floating exchange rate system. ...


With a more competitive and flexible exchange rate, the country implemented new policies based on re-industrialization, import substitution, increased exports, and consistent fiscal and trade surpluses. By the end of 2002 the economy began to stabilize, mainly thanks to the soybean and other cereals' boom and floating of exchange rates. In 2003, Néstor Kirchner was elected president. During Kirchner's presidency, Argentina restructured its defaulted debt with a steep discount (about 66 percent) on most bonds, paid off debts with the International Monetary Fund, renegotiated contracts with utilities, and nationalized some previously privatized enterprises. Currently, Argentina is enjoying a period of economic growth. In 2007 Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, was elected president, becoming the first woman to be elected president of Argentina. Also in 2007, Center-left Fabiana Ríos (ARI) became the first woman to be elected governor of Tierra del Fuego and first elected female governor in Argentina's history. Import substitution industrialization (also called ISI) is a trade and economic policy based on the premise that a developing country should attempt to substitute products which it imports, mostly finished goods, with locally produced substitutes. ... Néstor Carlos Kirchner (born February 25, 1950), was the President of Argentina, from May 25, 2003 until December 10, 2007. ... Argentina went through an economic crisis since the mid-1990s; though it is debatable whether this crisis has ended, the situation has been more stable, and improving, since 2003. ... IMF redirects here. ... World GDP/capita changed very little for most of human history before the industrial revolution. ... Cristina Elisabet Fernández Wilhem de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953), commonly known as Cristina Fernández or Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine lawyer, and/or politician from the Justicialist Party and the current President of Argentina. ... María Fabiana Ríos (born 31 March 1964 in Rosario, Santa Fe) is an Argentine politician of the party ARI (Afirmación para una República de Iguales, Support for an Egalitarian Republic), residing in the province of Tierra del Fuego. ... The Alternative for a Republic of Equals (Spanish: Alternativa por una República de Iguales) is an Argentine political party. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Argentina

This article is about the political institutions and political parties of Argentina. ...

Government

The Casa Rosada, seat of executive power
The Casa Rosada, seat of executive power

Argentina's political framework is a federal presidential representative democratic republic, in which the President of The Argentine Nation is both head of state and head of government, complemented by a pluriform multi-party system. The current president (2007) is Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, with Julio Cobos as vice president. The Casa Rosada La Casa Rosada (Spanish for the Pink House), officially known as the Casa de Gobierno (Government House), is the official seat of the executive branch of the government of Argentina. ... This article is about federal states. ... A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where an executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separately from the legislature, to which it is not accountable and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ... Representative democracy is a form of government founded on the principles of popular sovereignty by the peoples representatives. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... A multi-party system is a type of party system. ... Cristina Elisabet Fernández Wilhem de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953), commonly known as Cristina Fernández or Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine lawyer, and/or politician from the Justicialist Party and the current President of Argentina. ... Julio César Cleto Cobos (born 1955-04-30) is an Argentine Radical Civic Union (UCR) politician, current governor of Mendoza Province. ...


The Argentine Constitution of 1853 mandates a separation of powers into executive, legislative, and judicial branches at the national and provincial level. Cover of the original manuscript of the 1853 Constitution The Argentine Constitution of 1853 was the first constitution of Argentina, approved with the support of the governments of the provinces —though without that of the Buenos Aires Province, who remained separated of the Argentine Confederation until 1859, after the modification... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Separation of powers is a term coined by French political Enlightenment thinker Baron de Montesquieu[1][2], is a model for the governance of democratic states. ... A Legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to create, amend and ratify laws. ... In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...


Executive power resides in the President and his or her cabinet. The President of The Argentine Nation and Vice President are directly elected to four-year terms, limited to two consecutive terms, and the cabinet ministers are appointed by the president. The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina. ... The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ...


Legislative power is vested in the bicameral National Congress or Congreso de la Nación, consisting of a Senate (Senado) of seventy-two seats, and a Chamber of Deputies (Cámara de Diputados) of 257 members. A Legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to create, amend and ratify laws. ... National Congress is a term used by various political parties and legislatures. ... The National Congress ( Spanish: Congreso de la Nación Argentina) is the legislative branch of the government of Argentina. ... For the band, see Senate (band). ... The Argentine Senate is the upper house of parliament in Argentina. ... Chamber of Deputies is the name given to a legislative body, which may either be the lower house of a bicameral legislature, or the name of a unicameral one. ... The Chamber of Deputies is the lower house of the National Congress, Argentinas parliament. ...


Senators serve six-year terms, with one-third standing for reelection every two years. Members of the Chamber of Deputies are directly elected to four-year term via a system of proportional representation, with half of the members of the lower house being elected every two years. A third of the candidates presented by the parties must be women. Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house. ...


The judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature. The Argentine Supreme Court of Justice has seven members who are appointed by the President in consultation with the Senate. The rest of the judges are appointed by the Council of Magistrates of the Nation, a secretariat composed of representatives of judges, lawyers, the Congress, and the executive (see Law of Argentina). In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... The Supreme Court of Argentina (in Spanish, Corte Suprema de Justicia de la Nación) is the highest court of law of the Argentine Republic. ... The Council of Magistrates of the Nation (Spanish: Consejo de la Magistratura de la Nación) is an organ of the Judicial Branch of the Government of Argentina. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Argentina is a member of an international bloc, Mercosur, which has some legislative supranational functions. Mercosur is composed of five full members: Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Venezuela. It has five associate members without full voting rights: Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Motto (Spanish) (Portuguese) (Guaraní) Our North is the South  â€¢  â€¢ Pro Tempore Secretariat Montevideo, Uruguay Largest city São Paulo, Brazil Official languages 3 Portuguese Spanish Guaraní Membership 5 Argentina Brazil Paraguay Uruguay Venezuela Leaders  -  Carlos Álvarez Establishment  -  Declaration of Foz do Iguaçu 30 December 1985   -  Treaty of Asunción...


Argentina was the only country from Latin America to participate in the 1991 Gulf War under mandate of the United Nations. It was also the only Latin American country involved in every phase of the Haiti operation. Argentina has contributed worldwide to peacekeeping operations, including in El Salvador-Honduras-Nicaragua, Guatemala, Ecuador-Peru, Western Sahara, Angola, Kuwait, Cyprus, Croatia, Kosovo, Bosnia and Timor Leste. In recognition of its contributions to international security, U.S. President Bill Clinton designated Argentina as a major non-NATO ally in January 1998. In 2005, it was elected as a temporary member of the UN Security Council. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... UN redirects here. ... Operation Uphold Democracy (September 19, 1994 – March 31, 1995) began in September 1994 with the deployment of the U.S. led multinational force. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... The Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, commonly known as East Timor, is an island nation in Southeast Asia, consisting of the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecussi-Ambeno, a political exclave of East Timor situated on the western side of... Global Security redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Map of countries designated by the United States as major non-NATO allies Major non-NATO ally (MNNA) is a designation given by the United States government to exceptionally close allies who have close strategic working relationships with American forces but are not members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ...


In 1993, Argentina launched the United Nations White Helmets indicative of humanitarian aid. Official logo of the White Helmets. ... Humanitarian aid arriving by plane at Rinas Airport in Albania in the summer of 1999. ...


On November 4-November 5, 2005, the Argentine city of Mar del Plata hosted the Fourth Summit of the Americas. This summit was marked by a number of anti-U.S. protests. As of 2006, Argentina has been emphasizing Mercosur as its first international priority; by contrast, during the 1990s, it relied more heavily on its relationship with the United States. is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Mar del Plata and the surrounding region Panoramic view of Varese beach, Mar del Plata Mar del Plata is an Argentine city located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Buenos Aires Province, 400 km south of Buenos Aires. ... The tourist resort of Mar del Plata, 400 kilometers southeast of the Argentine capital Buenos Aires, is the venue of the Fourth Summit of the Americas, which will gather the leaders of all the countries of the Western Hemisphere, except Cuba. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto (Spanish) (Portuguese) (Guaraní) Our North is the South  â€¢  â€¢ Pro Tempore Secretariat Montevideo, Uruguay Largest city São Paulo, Brazil Official languages 3 Portuguese Spanish Guaraní Membership 5 Argentina Brazil Paraguay Uruguay Venezuela Leaders  -  Carlos Álvarez Establishment  -  Declaration of Foz do Iguaçu 30 December 1985   -  Treaty of Asunción...

Current president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, elected in December 2007
Current president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, elected in December 2007

Argentina has long claimed sovereignty over the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas), the South Shetland Islands, the South Sandwich Islands and almost 1 million km² in Antarctica, between the 25°W and the 74°W meridians and the 60°S parallel. For more than a century, there has been an Argentine presence at the Orcadas Base. Cristina Elisabet Fernández Wilhem de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953), commonly known as Cristina Fernández or Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine lawyer, and/or politician from the Justicialist Party and the current President of Argentina. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Location of the South Shetlands The South Shetland Islands are a group of Antarctic islands, lying about 120 kilometres north of the Antarctic Peninsula. ... South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands is an overseas territory of the United Kingdom, also claimed by Argentina. ... Orcadas Base is the first permanently inhabited base Antarctica. ...


Argentina is a founding signatory and permanent consulting member of the Antarctic Treaty System and the Antarctic Treaty Secretariat is established in Buenos Aires.[17] The Antarctic Treaty and related agreements, collectively called the Antarctic Treaty System or ATS, regulate international relations with respect to Antarctica, Earths only continent without a native population. ... ATS logo. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ...


Military

Main article: Military of Argentina

Argentina's armed forces are controlled by the Defense Ministry, with the country's President as their Commander-in-Chief. Historically, Argentina's military has been one of the best equipped in the region (for example, developing its own advanced jet fighters as early as the 1950s),[18] but has faced expenditure cutbacks in comparison to other regional militaries. The age of allowable military service is 18 years; there is no obligatory military service and currently no conscription. The armed forces of Argentina are controlled by the Commander-in-Chief (the President) and a civilian Minister of Defense. ... The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... For military service in the meaning of an army as a military defense organization, see armed forces. ...


The armed forces are composed of a traditional Army, Navy, and Air Force. Controlled by a separate ministry (the Interior Ministry), Argentine territorial waters are patrolled by the Naval Prefecture, and the border regions by the National Gendarmerie; both arms however maintain liaison with the Defense Ministry. Argentina's Armed Forces are currently undertaking major operations in Haiti and Cyprus, in accordance with UN mandates. The Argentine Army (Ejército Argentino, EA) is the land armed force branch of the Argentine military and the senior military service of the country. ... The Navy of the Argentine Republic (Armada de la República Argentina, ARA) is the navy of Argentina. ... The Argentine Air Force (Fuerza Aérea Argentina or FAA) is the national aviation branch of the armed forces of Argentina. ... Map of Sealand and the United Kingdom, with territorial water claims of 3nm and 12nm shown. ... The Prefectura Naval Argentina (PNA; in English Argentine Naval Prefecture) is a military service of the Argentine Interior Ministry charged with protecting the countrys rivers and maritime territory. ... The Argentine National Gendarmerie (Spanish: Gendarmería Nacional Argentina, also abbreviated to GNA) is the gendarmerie of Argentina. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Provinces

Provinces of Argentina. Argentina claims the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas, a UK overseas territory) and a slice of Antarctica, both of which it considers a part of its Tierra del Fuego Province (#23 below).
Provinces of Argentina. Argentina claims the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas, a UK overseas territory) and a slice of Antarctica, both of which it considers a part of its Tierra del Fuego Province (#23 below).
See also: Governors in Argentina

Argentina is divided into twenty-three provinces (provincias; singular provincia), and one autonomous city (commonly known as the capital federal, but officially Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires): Image File history File links Download high resolution version (568x937, 38 KB) Sumario Mapa editado de: Argentina - Político. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (568x937, 38 KB) Sumario Mapa editado de: Argentina - Político. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (almost exclusively Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica, and South Atlantic Islands (Spanish: Provincia de Tierra del Fuego, Antártida e Islas del Atlántico Sur) is a province entirely separated by the Strait of Magellan from mainland Argentina on the Isla Grande of Tierra del Fuego, which it shares with Chile to the... Argentina is subdivided in 23 provinces (Spanish: provincias, singular - provincia) and 1 federal district (capital federal). ... Category: ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ...

1. Buenos Aires (autonomous city) For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ...


2. Buenos Aires (province) The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ...


3. Catamarca Catamarca is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ...


4. Chaco Chaco is an Argentine province located on the north of the country, near the border with Paraguay. ...


5. Chubut Chubut is a province in the southern part of Argentina, that lies between the 42nd Parallel South (forming the border with the Río Negro Province) and 46th Parallel South (bordering Santa Cruz Province), the Andes range separating Argentina from Chile, and the Atlantic ocean. ...


6. Córdoba Córdoba is a province of Argentina, located in the center of the country. ...


7. Corrientes Corrientes is a province in northeast Argentina, in the Mesopotamia region. ...


8. Entre Ríos Entre Ríos is a province of Argentina, it lays and borders north of Buenos Aires Province, south of Corrientes Province, east of Santa Fe Province, and west of Uruguay. ...


9. Formosa Formosa Province is in northeastern Argentina, part of the Gran Chaco Region. ...


10. Jujuy Jujuy is a province of Argentina, located in the extreme northwest of the country, at the borders with Chile and Bolivia. ...


11. La Pampa La Pampa is a province of Argentina, located in the Pampas in the centre of the country. ...


12. La Rioja La Rioja is a one of the provinces of Argentina and is located in the west of the country. ...

13. Mendoza Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ...


14. Misiones Misiones is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the northeastern corner of the country in the Mesopotamia region. ...


15. Neuquén Neuquén is a province of Argentina, located in the west of the country, at the northern end of Patagonia. ...


16. Río Negro Río Negro is a province of Argentina, located at the northern edge of Patagonia. ...


17. Salta Salta is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ...


18. San Juan San Juan is a province of Argentina, located in the western part of the country. ...


19. San Luis San Luis is a province of Argentina located near the geographical center of the country (on the 32º South parallel). ...


20. Santa Cruz Santa Cruz is a province of Argentina, located in the south of the country, in the Patagonia. ...


21. Santa Fe Santa Fe is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ...


22. Santiago del Estero Santiago del Estero is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ...


23. Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica, and South Atlantic Islands Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica, and South Atlantic Islands (Spanish: ) is a province entirely separated by the Strait of Magellan from mainland Argentina on the Isla Grande of Tierra del Fuego, which it shares with Chile to the west. ...


24. Tucumán Tucumán is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ...

Though declared the capital in 1853, Buenos Aires didn't become the capital of the country until 1880. There have been moves to relocate the administrative centre elsewhere. During the presidency of Raúl Alfonsín, a law was passed ordering the transfer of the federal capital to Viedma, a city in the Patagonian province of Río Negro. Studies were underway when economic problems halted the project in 1989. Though the law was never formally repealed, it is now treated as a relic. Federalisation is a term which in Argentine law defines the process of assigning federal status to a territory, with the purpose of making that territory the national capital. ... Raúl Ricardo Alfonsín (born 13 March 1927) is an Argentine politician, who was the President of Argentina from 10 December 1983 to 9 July 1989. ... Viedma is the capital city of the Argentine province of Río Negro and the Adolfo Alsina Department of that province. ... For the town, see Patagonia, Arizona. ...


Provinces are divided into smaller secondary units called departamentos ("departments"), of which there are 376 in total. The province of Buenos Aires has 134 similar divisions known as partidos. Departamentos and partidos are further subdivided into municipalities or districts. Departments (Spanish: departamentos) form the second level of administrative division in the provinces of Argentina. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ...


In descending order by number of inhabitants, the major cities in Argentina are Buenos Aires, Córdoba, Rosario, Mendoza, Tucumán, La Plata, Mar del Plata, Salta, Santa Fe, San Juan, Resistencia, and Neuquén. This is a list of cities in Argentina. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Córdoba is a city located near the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas mountains on the Suquía River, about 700 km west-northwest from Buenos Aires. ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Monument dedicated to the Army of the Andes, on the summit of the Cerro de la Gloria. ... San Miguel de Tucumán (usually referred to as simply Tucumán) is the largest city in northwestern Argentina, with a population (2001) of 525,853. ... La Plata is the capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as of the partido of La Plata. ... Map of Mar del Plata and the surrounding region Panoramic view of Varese beach, Mar del Plata Mar del Plata is an Argentine city located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Buenos Aires Province, 400 km south of Buenos Aires. ... The inside of Saltas main cathedral Salta is a city in northwestern Argentina and the capital city of the eponymous province. ... Santa Fe is the capital city of the Santa Fe Province of Argentina. ... San Juan is the capital city of the Argentine province of San Juan in the Cuyo region, located in the Tulúm Valley, west of the San Juan River, at 46 m (151 ft) above mean sea level, with a population of around 112,000 as per the 2001 census... Resistencia is a city in northern Argentina, the capital of the Chaco Province, located on a tributary of the Paraná River. ... Neuquén is the capital city of the Argentine province of Neuquén, located on the east of the province, at the confluence of the Limay and Neuquén rivers. ...


Geography

Topographic map of Argentina (including some territorial claims).
Topographic map of Argentina (including some territorial claims).

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x2153, 867 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Geography of Argentina ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x2153, 867 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Geography of Argentina ... Argentina is a country in southern South America, situated between the Andes in the west and the southern Atlantic Ocean in the east. ...

Main features

The total surface area of Argentina (not including the Antarctic claim),is as the following:

  • Total: 2,766,891 km²
  • Land: 2,736,691 km²
  • Water: 30,200 km²

Argentina is nearly 5,121 km (about 3,182 mi) long from north to south, and 1,400 km (about 870 mi) from east to west (maximum values). It can roughly be divided into four parts: the fertile plains of the Pampas in the center of the country, the source of Argentina's agricultural wealth; the flat to rolling, oil-rich plateau of Patagonia in the southern half down to Tierra del Fuego; the subtropical flats of the Gran Chaco in the north, and the rugged Andes mountain range along the western border with Chile. This article is about the lowland plains in South America. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Tierra del Fuego Cerro Sombrero Village, Chile. ... Landscape in the Gran Chaco, Paraguay The Gran Chaco (Quechua chaqu, hunting land), dubbed by some as the last South American frontier, is a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland region of the Río de la Plata basin, divided between Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina and a small portion in... This article is about the mountain range in South America. ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ...


The highest point above sea level in Argentina is located in Mendoza. Cerro Aconcagua, at 6,962 meters (22,834 feet), is the highest mountain in the Americas, the Southern,[19] and Western Hemisphere.[20] The lowest point is Laguna del Carbón in Santa Cruz, −105 meters (−344 ft) below sea level.[21] This is also the lowest point on the South American continent. The geographic center of the country is located in south-central La Pampa province. For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... For other uses, see Aconcagua (disambiguation). ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... Laguna del Carbón (Spanish for Coals lagoon) is a 105 metres (315 ft) below sea level depression located at coordinates in the Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. ... Categories: Argentina geography stubs | Argentine provinces ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... La Pampa is a province of Argentina, located in the Pampas in the centre of the country. ...


The country has a territorial claim over a portion of Antarctica (unrecognized by any other country), where, from 1904, it has maintained a constant presence. Orcadas Base is the first permanently inhabited base Antarctica. ...


Geographic regions

Source: CIA Political map of Argentina showing the area it controls. The Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) are controlled by the United Kingdom but are claimed by Argentina.
Source: CIA[22] Political map of Argentina showing the area it controls. The Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) are controlled by the United Kingdom but are claimed by Argentina.

The country is traditionally divided into several major geographically distinct regions: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (328x715, 30 KB) CIA World Fact Book Map of Argentina File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (328x715, 30 KB) CIA World Fact Book Map of Argentina File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Pampas
The plains west and south from Buenos Aires. Called the Humid Pampa, they cover most of the provinces of Buenos Aires and Córdoba, and big portions of the provinces of Santa Fe and La Pampa. The western part of La Pampa and the province San Luis also have plains (the Dry Pampa), but they are drier and used mainly for grazing. The Sierra de Córdoba in the homonymous province (extending into San Luis), is the most important geographical feature of the pampas.
Gran Chaco
The Gran Chaco region in the north of the country is seasonal dry/wet, mainly cotton growing and livestock raising. It covers the provinces of Chaco and Formosa. It is dotted with subtropical forests, scrubland, and some wetlands, home to a large number of plant and animal species. The province of Santiago del Estero lies in the drier region of the Gran Chaco.
Mesopotamia
The land between the Paraná and Uruguay rivers is called Mesopotamia and it is shared by the provinces of Corrientes and Entre Ríos. It features flatland apt for grazing and plant growing, and the Iberá Wetlands in central Corrientes. Misiones province is more tropical and belongs within the Brazilian Highlands geographic feature. It features subtropical rainforests and the Iguazú Falls.
Patagonia
The steppes of Patagonia, in the provinces of Neuquén, Río Negro, Chubut and Santa Cruz, are of Tertiary origin. Most of the region is semiarid in the north to cold and arid in the far south, but forests grow in its western fringes which are dotted with several large lakes. Tierra del Fuego is cool and wet, moderated by oceanic influences. Northern Patagonia (roughly Río Negro south of the homonymous river, and Neuquén) can also be referred as the Comahue region.
Cuyo
West-central Argentina is dominated by the imposing Andes Mountains. To their east is the arid region known as Cuyo. Melting waters from high in the mountains form the backbone of irrigated lowland oasis, at the center of a rich fruit and wine growing region in Mendoza and San Juan provinces. Further north the region gets hotter and drier with more geographical accidents in La Rioja province.
NOA or Northwest
This region is the highest in average elevation. Several parallel mountain ranges, several of which have peaks higher than 20,000 feet (6,000 m), dominate the area. These ranges grow wider in geographic extent towards the north. They are cut by fertile river valleys, the most important being the Calchaquí Valleys in the provinces of Catamarca, Tucumán, and Salta. Farther north the province of Jujuy near Bolivia lies mainly within the Altiplano plateau of the Central Andes. The Tropic of Capricorn goes through the far north of the region.

For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... The Humid Pampa (Spanish: Pampa Húmeda) is an extensive region of flat, fertile grassland of loessic origin in Argentina. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Córdoba is a province of Argentina, located in the center of the country. ... Santa Fe is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... La Pampa is a province of Argentina, located in the Pampas in the centre of the country. ... La Pampa is a province of Argentina, located in the Pampas in the centre of the country. ... San Luis is a province of Argentina located near the geographical center of the country (on the 32º South parallel). ... The Sierra de Córdoba (sometimes called the Sierras de Córdoba) is a mountain range in central Argentina, located between the Pampas to the east and south, the Chaco to the north and the foothills of the Andes to the west. ... Landscape in the Gran Chaco, Paraguay The Gran Chaco (Quechua chaqu, hunting land), dubbed by some as the last South American frontier, is a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland region of the Río de la Plata basin, divided between Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina and a small portion in... Chaco is an Argentine province located on the north of the country, near the border with Paraguay. ... Formosa Province is in northeastern Argentina, part of the Gran Chaco Region. ... Santiago del Estero is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... The sun rising over the Paraná River, from the north-east of Rosario, Argentina. ... La Mesopotamia, Región Mesopotámica or Litoral (Littoral) is the humid and verdant area of north-east Argentina, comprising the provinces of Misiones, Entre Ríos and Corrientes. ... Corrientes is a province in northeast Argentina, in the Mesopotamia region. ... Entre Ríos is a province of Argentina, it lays and borders north of Buenos Aires Province, south of Corrientes Province, east of Santa Fe Province, and west of Uruguay. ... Some lakes in the Iberá Wetlands, reflecting sunlight. ... Misiones is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the northeastern corner of the country in the Mesopotamia region. ... The Brazilian Highlands (or Planalto Brasileiro) are an extensive geographical region, covering most of the eastern, southern and central portions of Brazil, in all approximately half of the countrys land area, or some 4,000,000 km² (1,544,000 sq mi). ... Iguaçu Falls Iguazu Falls (Portuguese: Cataratas do Iguaçu, Spanish: Cataratas del Iguazú IPA ) are waterfalls of the Iguaçu River located on the border of the Brazilian state of Paraná (in the Southern Region) and the Argentine province of Misiones, around the coordinates 25°41S, 54°26... This article is about the ecological zone type. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Neuquén is a province of Argentina, located in the west of the country, at the northern end of Patagonia. ... Río Negro is a province of Argentina, located at the northern edge of Patagonia. ... Chubut is a province in the southern part of Argentina, that lies between the 42nd Parallel South (forming the border with the Río Negro Province) and 46th Parallel South (bordering Santa Cruz Province), the Andes range separating Argentina from Chile, and the Atlantic ocean. ... Santa Cruz is a province of Argentina, located in the south of the country, in the Patagonia. ... Tertiary geological time interval covers roughly the time span between the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs and beginning of the most recent Ice Age, approximately 65 million to 1. ... Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica, and South Atlantic Islands (Spanish: Provincia de Tierra del Fuego, Antártida e Islas del Atlántico Sur) is a province entirely separated by the Strait of Magellan from mainland Argentina on the Isla Grande of Tierra del Fuego, which it shares with Chile to the... This article is about the mountain range in South America. ... Cuyo is the name given to the wine-producing, mountainous area of north-west Argentina, comprising the provinces of San Juan, San Luis and Mendoza. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... San Juan is a province of Argentina, located in the western part of the country. ... La Rioja is a one of the provinces of Argentina and is located in the west of the country. ... Quebrada las Conchas, also known as Quebrada de Cafayate. ... Catamarca is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Tucumán is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Salta is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Jujuy is a province of Argentina, located in the extreme northwest of the country, at the borders with Chile and Bolivia. ... Puno, Peru, is one of larger cities of the Altiplano. ... World map showing the Tropic of Capricorn For the novel by Henry Miller, see Tropic of Capricorn (novel). ...

Rivers and lakes

Major rivers in Argentina include the Pilcomayo, Paraguay, Bermejo, Colorado, Río Negro, Salado, Uruguay and the largest river, the Paraná. The latter two flow together before meeting the Atlantic Ocean, forming the estuary of the Río de la Plata. Regionally important rivers are the Atuel and Mendoza in the homonymous province, the Chubut in Patagonia, the Río Grande in Jujuy, and the San Francisco River in Salta. The Pilcomayo is a river rising in the Bolivian Andes, east of Lake Poopó, flowing over 700 miles across Chaco into the Paraguay River near Asunción. ... The Bermejo River is a river in South America that travels a total of 1450 km from Bolivia to the Paraguay River in Argentina. ... The Colorado River (Spanish: Río Colorado) is a river in the south of Argentina. ... // Northern patagonia, main rivers, and political divisions and main cities. ... The Salado River (in Spanish Río Salado, literally Salty River) is a river that crosses several provinces of Argentina, flowing 1,500 kilometres from its source in the Salta Province to end in the Paraná River, in the Santa Fe Province. ... The sun rising over the Paraná River, from the north-east of Rosario, Argentina. ... This page is about the South American estuary. ... The course of the Atuel near San Rafael, Mendoza. ... The Mendoza River is a river in the province of Mendoza, Argentina. ... The Chubut River is a river in Southern Argentina. ...


There are several large lakes in Argentina, many of them in Patagonia. Among these are lakes Argentino and Viedma in Santa Cruz, Nahuel Huapi in Río Negro and Fagnano in Tierra del Fuego, and Colhué Huapi and Musters in Chubut. Lake Buenos Aires and O'Higgins/San Martín Lake are shared with Chile. Mar Chiquita, Córdoba, is the largest salt water lake in the country. There are numerous reservoirs created by dams. Argentina features various hot springs, such as those at Termas de Río Hondo with temperatures between 30 °C and 65 °C.[23] For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... Lake Argentino and Perito Moreno glacier Lake Argentino (in Spanish, Lago Argentino) is a freshwater lake located in the Patagonian province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, at . ... Lake Viedma from space, October 1994 Lake Viedma, approximately 50 miles (80 kilometers) long in extreme southwestern Argentina, is a major elongated trough lake formed from melting glacial ice (lake is located at ). The lake is fed primarily by the Viedma Glacier at the western end of the lake. ... View of the Nahuel Huapi lake and the city of Bariloche. ... The Fagnano (Spanish: Lago Fagnano or Lago Cami) is a lake located on the main island of the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, and shared by Argentina and Chile. ... Boat near Chile Chico, Chilean side. ... The lake known as OHiggins in Chile and San Martín in Argentina, is located around coordinates in the Patagonia, between the Aysén Region and the Santa Cruz Province. ... Mar Chiquita (Spanish for Little Sea) or Mar de Ansenuza is an endorheic saline lake located in the Córdoba Province in center Argentina, much saltier than the ocean. ... The Ashokan Reservoir, located in Ulster County, New York, USA. It is one of 19 that supplies New York City with drinking water. ... This article is about structures for water impoundment. ... Green Dragon Spring at Norris Geyser A hot spring is a place where warm or hot groundwater issues from the ground on a regular basis for at least a predictable part of the year, and is significantly above the ambient ground temperature (which is usually around 55~57 F or... Termas de Río Hondo is a city in the province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. ...


Coastal areas and seas

Argentina has 4,665 km (2,899 mi) of coastline.[24] The continental platform is unusually wide; in Argentina this shallow area of the Atlantic Ocean is called Mar Argentino. The waters are rich in fisheries and suspected of holding important hydrocarbon energy resources. Argentina's coastline varies between areas of sand dunes and cliffs. The two major ocean currents affecting the coast are the warm Brazil Current and the cold Falkland Current (Spanish: corriente antártica or corriente de las Malvinas). Because of the uneveness of the coastal landmass, the two currents alternate in their influence on climate and do not allow temperatures to fall evenly with higher latitude. The southern coast of Tierra del Fuego forms the north shore of the Drake Passage. A coastal image featured on a United States postal stamp. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... The Argentine Sea (Spanish: Mar Argentino) refers to the sea within the continental shelf off the Argentine mainland. ... A 3-dimensional rendered Ball-and-stick model of the methane molecule. ... For other uses, see Sand (disambiguation). ... Ocean currents (1911) Ocean currents (1943) An ocean current is any more or less continuous, directed movement of ocean water that flows in one of the Earths oceans. ... The Brazil Current is a warm water current that flows southward along the Brazilian south coast to the mouth of the River Plate. ... The Falkland Current is a cold water current that flows northward along the Atlantic coast of Patagonia as far north as the mouth of the River Plate. ... Tierra del Fuego Cerro Sombrero Village, Chile. ... Drake Passage between South America and Antarctica. ...


Climate

Main article: Climate of Argentina
Rural areas cover the region of Las Pampas.
Rural areas cover the region of Las Pampas.
The Andean range over the southern province of Chubut.
The Andean range over the southern province of Chubut.

Because of longitudinal and elevation amplitudes, Argentina is subject to a variety of climates. As a rule, the climate is predominantly temperate with extremes ranging from subtropical in the north to subpolar in the far south. The north of the country is characterized by very hot, humid summers with mild drier winters, and is subject to periodic droughts. Central Argentina has hot summers with thunderstorms (in western Argentina producing some of the world's largest hail), and cool winters. The southern regions have warm summers and cold winters with heavy snowfall, especially in mountainous zones. Higher elevations at all latitudes experience cooler conditions. In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... Subtropical (or semitropical) areas are those adjacent to the tropics, usually roughly defined as the ranges 23. ... Regions having a subarctic climate (also called boreal climate) are characterized by long, usually very cold winters, and brief, warm summers. ... This article is about the precipitation. ...


The hottest and coldest temperature extremes recorded in South America have occurred in Argentina. A record high temperature of 49.1 °C (120.4 °F), was recorded at Villa de María, Córdoba on January 2, 1920. The lowest temperature recorded was −39 °C (−38.2 °F) at Valle de los Patos Superior, San Juan, July 17, 1972. For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Córdoba is a province of Argentina, located in the center of the country. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Argentina geography stubs | Argentine provinces ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Major winds in Argentina include the cool Pampero blowing on the flat plains of Patagonia and the Pampas after a cold front; the Viento Norte, a warm wind that can blow from the north in mid and late winter creating mild conditions; and the Zonda, a hot and dry wind (see also Föhn wind), affecting west-central Argentina. Squeezed of all moisture during the 6,000 meter descent from the Andes, Zonda winds can blow for hours with gusts up to 120 km/h, fueling wildfires and causing damage. When the Zonda blows (June-November), snowstorms and blizzard (viento blanco) conditions usually affect the higher elevations. The pampero is a west or southwest wind in Southern Argentina. ... For the Star Trek: Enterprise episode, see Cold Front (Enterprise). ... Zonda wind (in Spanish, viento zonda) is a regional term for the föhn wind that often occurs on the eastern slope of the Andes, in Argentina. ... A föhn wind or foehn wind occurs when a deep layer of prevailing wind is forced over a mountain range (Orographic lifting). ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... For other uses, see Wildfire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ...


The Sudestada (literally “southeastern”) could be considered similar to the Noreaster, though snowfall is rarely involved (but is not unprecedented). Both are associated with a deep winter low pressure system. The sudestada usually moderates cold temperatures but brings very heavy rains, rough seas, and coastal flooding. It is most common in late autumn and winter along the coasts of central Argentina and in the Río de la Plata estuary. Sudestada (literally Southeast hit) is the Spanish name for a climatic phenomenon common to the Rio de la Plata and its surrounding region consisting of a sudden rotation of cold southern winds to the south-east. ... Noreaster is a colloquial term for a storm whose winds come from the northeast, especially in the coastal areas of the northeastern United States. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ...


The southern regions, particularly the far south, experience long periods of daylight from November to February (up to nineteen hours), and extended nights from May to August. All of Argentina uses UTC-3 time zone. The country does observe daylight saving time occasionally, the last summertime being started at 0:00 December 30, 2007 and being finished at 0:00 March 16, 2008. −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Extremities Argentina's eastermost continental point is northeast of the town of Bernardo de Irigoyen, Misiones (26°15′S, 53°38′W), the westernmost in the Mariano Moreno Range in Santa Cruz (49°33′S, 73°35′W). The northernmost point is located at the confluence of the Grande de San Juan and Mojinete rivers, Jujuy (21°46′S, 66°13′W), and the southernmost is Cape San Pío in Tierra del Fuego (55°03′S, 66°31′W).[25] Bernardo de Irigoyen is a city in the province of Misiones, Argentina. ... Misiones is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the northeastern corner of the country in the Mesopotamia region. ... Santa Cruz is a province of Argentina, located in the south of the country, in the Patagonia. ... Jujuy is a province of Argentina, located in the extreme northwest of the country, at the borders with Chile and Bolivia. ... Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica, and South Atlantic Islands (Spanish: Provincia de Tierra del Fuego, Antártida e Islas del Atlántico Sur) is a province entirely separated by the Strait of Magellan from mainland Argentina on the Isla Grande of Tierra del Fuego, which it shares with Chile to the...


Enclaves and exclaves

There is one Argentine exclave, the Martín García Island (co-ordinates 34°11′S, 58°15′W). It is near the confluence of the Paraná and Uruguay rivers, a kilometer (0.62 mi) inside Uruguayan waters, and 3.5 kilometres (2.1 mi) from the Uruguayan coastline near the small town of Martín Chico (itself halfway between Nueva Palmira and Colonia del Sacramento). This cites very few or no references or sources. ... Isla Martín García is an island off the Río de la Plata coast of Uruguay that is part of Argentina. ... City in Uruguay. ... Colonia del Sacramento is a city in southwestern Uruguay, by the Río de la Plata, facing Buenos Aires, Argentina. ...


An agreement reached by Argentina and Uruguay in 1973 reaffirmed Argentine jurisdiction over the island, ending a century-old dispute. Under the terms of the agreement, Martín García is to be devoted exclusively as a natural preserve. Its area is about 2 square kilometres (500 acres), and its population is about 200 people.


Flora

Subtropical plants dominate the north, part of the Gran Chaco region of South America. The genus Dalbergia of trees is well disseminated with representatives like the Brazilian Rosewood and the quebracho tree; also predominant are white and black algarrobo trees (prosopis alba and prosopis nigra). Savannah-like areas exist in the drier regions nearer the Andes. Aquatic plants thrive in the wetlands dotting the region. Landscape in the Gran Chaco, Paraguay The Gran Chaco (Quechua chaqu, hunting land), dubbed by some as the last South American frontier, is a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland region of the Río de la Plata basin, divided between Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina and a small portion in... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Species See text Dalbergia is a large genus of small to medium-size trees, shrubs and lianas in the pea family, Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. ... Species See text Dalbergia is a large genus of small to medium-size trees, shrubs and lianas in the pea family, Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. ... Quebracho is one of the common names, in Spanish, of at least three similar species of trees that grow in the Gran Chaco region of South America: Schinopsis lorentzii (quebracho colorado santiagueño), of the family Anacardiaceae; Schinopsis balansae (quebracho colorado chaqueño), of the same family; Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco... Algarrobo is the Spanish common name for several tree species, such as: The European carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua) South American trees of genus Prosopis: algarrobo blanco (Prosopis alba) algarrobo negro (Prosopis nigra) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Binomial name Prosopis alba Griseb. ... Binomial name Prosopis nigra Griseb. ... This article is about the mountain range in South America. ...

In central Argentina the humid pampas are a true tallgrass prairie ecosystem. The original pampa had virtually no trees; today along roads or in towns and country estates (estancias), some imported species like the American sycamore or eucalyptus are present. The only tree-like plant native to the pampa is the ombú, an evergreen. The surface soils of the pampa are a deep black color, primarily humus, known commonly as compost. It is this which makes the region one of the most agriculturaly productive on Earth. However, this is also responsible for decimating much of the original ecosystem, to make way for commercial agriculture. The western pampas receive less rainfall, this dry pampa is a plain of short grasses or steppe.[citation needed] Image File history File links Erythrina_crista-galli2. ... Image File history File links Erythrina_crista-galli2. ... Binomial name Erythrina crista-galli L. Erythrina crista-galli is a flowering tree in the family Fabaceae, found in Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil and Paraguay. ... Ceibo flower, national emblem of Argentine The National flower of Argentina is the Ceibo (Erythrina crista-galli) since December 23 of 1942, when by decree 13,847 the executive power appointed it. ... The pampas (from Quechua for plain) are the fertile lowlands that extend across c. ... Prairie grasses The tallgrass prairie is an ecosystem native to central North America, with fire as its primary periodic disturbance. ... A coral reef near the Hawaiian islands is an example of a complex marine ecosystem. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tree (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. The American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), also known as American plane, Occidental plane, and Buttonwood, is one of the species of Platanus native to North America. ... [[Link title]] This article is about the plant genus. ... Binomial name Phytolacca dioica L. The ombú is a massive evergreen herb native to the Pampas of South America. ... A handful of compost A double-width bin with compost at different stages of decomposition First step of compost Compost (pronounced or US ) also known as brown manure, is the aerobically decomposed remnants of organic matter. ... This article is about the ecological zone type. ...


Most of Patagonia in the south lies within the rain shadow of the Andes. The flora, shrubby bushes and plants, is well suited to withstand dry conditions. The soil is hard and rocky, making large-scale farming impossible except along river valleys. Coniferous forests grow in far western Patagonia and on the island of Tierra del Fuego. Conifers native to the region include alerce (Fitzroya cupressoides), ciprés de la cordillera (Austrocedrus chilensis), ciprés de las guaitecas (Pilgerodendron uviferum), huililahuán (Podocarpus nubigenus), lleuque (Prumnopitys andina), mañío hembra (Saxegothaea conspicua), and pehuén (Araucaria araucana), while native broadleaf trees include several species of Nothofagus including coigüe or coihue, lenga (Nothofagus pumilio), ñire (Nothofagus Antarctica). Other introduced trees present in forestry plantations include spruce, cypress, and pine. Common plants are the copihue and colihue (Chusquea culeou).[26] Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... This article is about the mountain range in South America. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... Fljótsdalur in East-Iceland A valley is a landform, which can range from a few square miles (square kilometers) to hundreds or even thousands of square miles (square kilometers) in area. ... Orders & Families Cordaitales † Pinales   Pinaceae - Pine family   Araucariaceae - Araucaria family   Podocarpaceae - Yellow-wood family   Sciadopityaceae - Umbrella-pine family   Cupressaceae - Cypress family   Cephalotaxaceae - Plum-yew family   Taxaceae - Yew family Vojnovskyales † Voltziales † The conifers, division Pinophyta, are one of 13 or 14 division level taxa within the Kingdom Plantae. ... Tierra del Fuego Cerro Sombrero Village, Chile. ... Binomial name Fitzroya cupressoides (Molina) I.M.Johnst. ... Binomial name Austrocedrus chilensis (D.Don) Pic. ... species Pilgerodendron uviferum Pilgerodendron uviferum is a species of conifer belonging to the Cypress family, Cupressaceae. ... Binomial name Podocarpus nubigenus Lindl. ... Binomial name Prumnopitys andina (Poepp. ... Binomial name Saxegothaea conspicua Lindl. ... Binomial name (Molina) K. Koch Araucaria araucana (Pehuén or Monkey-puzzle) is the hardiest species in the conifer genus Araucaria. ... Species Nothofagus alpina - Rauli Beech Nothofagus antarctica - Antarctic Beech Nothofagus betuloides - Magellanes Beech Nothofagus cunninghamii - Myrtle Beech Nothofagus dombeyi - Coigüe Beech Nothofagus fusca - Red Beech Nothofagus gunnii - Tanglefoot Beech Nothofagus menziesii - Silver Beech Nothofagus moorei - Negrohead Beech Nothofagus obliqua - Roble Beech Nothofagus pumilio - Lenga Beech Nothofagus solanderi - Black Beech... Binomial name Nothofagus dombeyi Mirb The coihue is a tree species (Nothofagus dombeyi) that inhabits the Andean heights of the Argentine Patagonia and central Chile, between 700 and 1,200 m above mean sea level. ... Binomial name (Poepp. ... Binomial name Nothofagus antarctica (Forster) Oerst. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... This article is about crop plantations. ... Species About 35; see text. ... Species See text. ... This article deals with the tree; for the e-mail client see Pine email client Species About 115. ... Binomial name Lapageria rosea Ruiz & Pav. ... Binomial name Desvaux. ...


In Cuyo, semiarid thorny bushes and other xerophile plants abound. Along the many river oasis, grasses and trees grow in significant numbers. The area presents optimal conditions for the large scale growth of grape vines. In the northwest of Argentina there are many species of cacti. In the highest elevations (often above 4,000mts), no vegetation grows because of the extreme altitude, and the soils are virtually devoid of any plant life. Cuyo screenshot of the level The Four Seasons (click image for details) Cuyo is a Tetris_style puzzle game for up to two players. ... Xerophiles are extremophilic organisms that can grow and reproduce in conditions with a low availability of water, also known as water activity. ... For the English rock band, see Oasis (band). ... Species Vitis acerifolia Vitis aestivalis Vitis amurensis Vitis arizonica Vitis x bourquina Vitis californica Vitis x champinii Vitis cinerea Vitis x doaniana Vitis girdiana Vitis labrusca Vitis x labruscana Vitis monticola Vitis mustangensis Vitis x novae-angliae Vitis palmata Vitis riparia Vitis rotundifolia Vitis rupestris Vitis shuttleworthii Vitis tiliifolia Vitis... Subfamilies Cactoideae Maihuenioideae Opuntioideae Pereskioideae See also taxonomy of the Cactaceae A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus) is any member of the succulent plant family Cactaceae, native to the Americas. ...


The ceibo flower, of the tree Erythrina crista-galli, is the national flower of Argentina. Binomial name Erythrina crista-galli L. Erythrina crista-galli is a flowering tree of the family Fabaceae, which is found in Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil and Paraguay, receiving several local common names (ceibo, seíbo, bucaré). In English it is known as Cockspur coral tree. ...


Fauna

See also: List of national parks of Argentina
The puma inhabits the northeast of the country.
The puma inhabits the northeast of the country.

Many species live in the subtropical north. Big cats like the jaguar, cougar, and ocelot; primates (howler monkey); large reptiles (crocodiles), and a species of caiman. Other animals include the tapir, capybara, peccary, bush dog, raccoon, and various species of turtle and tortoise. There are many birds, notably hummingbirds, flamingos, toucans, and parrots. North-East Iguazú National Park, home of Iguassu Falls. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1050x840, 663 KB) Summary Description: A Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge Source: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Digital Library System http://images. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1050x840, 663 KB) Summary Description: A Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge Source: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Digital Library System http://images. ... This article is about large cat species. ... keels is bent and she has a big nose which she picks every day. ... For other uses, see Cougar (disambiguation), Puma (disambiguation), or Panther. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Ocelot range The Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), also known as the Painted Leopard, McKenneys Wildcat or Manigordo (in Costa Rica), is a wild cat distributed over South and Central America and Mexico, but has been reported as far north as Texas and in Trinidad, in the... Type species Simia belzebul Linnaeus, 1766 Species Alouatta coibensis Alouatta palliata Alouatta pigra Alouatta belzebul Alouatta guariba Alouatta macconnelli Alouatta nigerrima Alouatta sara Alouatta seniculus Alouatta caraya The howler monkeys (genus Alouatta monotypic in subfamily Alouattinae) are among the largest of the New World monkeys. ... For other uses, see Crocodile (disambiguation). ... Genera Alligator Caiman Melanosuchus Paleosuchus Alligators and caimans are reptiles closely related to the crocodiles and forming the family Alligatoridae (sometimes regarded instead as the subfamily Alligatorinae). ... Species Tapirus bairdii Tapirus indicus Tapirus pinchaque Tapirus terrestris Tapirs (IPA:ˈteɪpÉ™r, pronounced as in taper, or IPA:təˈpɪər, pronounced as in tap-ear) are large browsing mammals, roughly pig-like in shape, with short, prehensile snouts. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Capybara range Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris,[1][2] also known as capibara, chigüiro and carpincho in Spanish,[3][4][5] and capivara in Portuguese[4]) is the largest living rodent in the world. ... Species Tayassu Tayassu tajacu Tayassu pecari Catagonus Catagonus wagneri The peccaries (also known by its Spanish name, javelina or pecarí) are medium-sized mammals of the family Tayassuidae. ... Binomial name Speothos venaticus (Lund, 1842) The Bush Dog (Speothos venaticus) is a canid found in Central and South America, including Panama, Venezuela, Bolivia, Peru (West of the Andes), Ecuador, the Guianas, Paraguay, northeast Argentina (Misiones province), and Brazil (from the Amazon rainforest to the state of Amazonas). ... For the river, see Raccoon River. ... For other uses, see Turtle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tortoise (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hummingbird (disambiguation). ... Species See text For other uses, see Flamingo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Toucan (disambiguation). ... Systematics (but see below) Family Cacatuidae (cockatoos) Subfamily Microglossinae (Palm Cockatoo) Subfamily Calyptorhynchinae (dark cockatoos) Subfamily Cacatuinae (white cockatoos) Family Psittacidae (true parrots) Subfamily Loriinae (lories and lorikeets) Subfamily Psittacinae (typical parrots and allies) Tribe Arini (American psittacines) Tribe Cyclopsitticini (fig parrots) Tribe Micropsittini (pygmy parrots) Tribe Nestorini (kakas and...

The hornero is one of the national emblems of Argentina.
The hornero is one of the national emblems of Argentina.

The central grasslands are populated by the giant anteater, armadillo, pampas cat, maned wolf, mara and the rhea (ñandú), a flightless bird. Hawks, falcons, herons, partridges inhabit the region. There are also deer and foxes. Some of these species extend into Patagonia. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 751 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (950 × 758 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Marcos Moreira I took the photo with my canon xt rebel at my house in Brazil. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 751 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (950 × 758 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Marcos Moreira I took the photo with my canon xt rebel at my house in Brazil. ... A national emblem symbolically represents a nation. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Giant Anteater, Myrmecophaga tridactyla, is the largest species of anteater. ... For other uses, see Armadillo (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Desmarest, 1816) The Pampas Cat (Leopardus pajeros) is a small feline from the Pampas area of Argentina and Chile. ... Binomial name Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger, 1815) The Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is the largest canid of South America, resembling a dog with reddish fur. ... Species , Patagonian Mara , Chacoan Mara The maras (Dolichotis) are a genus of the cavy family. ... Species R. americana R. pennata The Rhea, also known as ñandú (pronounced ) in Spanish, or ema in Portuguese, is a large flightless ratite bird native to South America. ... For the politican faction referred to as hawks see Bush administration. ... For other uses of the word falcon, see falcon (disambiguation). ... Heron (disambiguation) Genera Ardea Zebrilus Philherodias Tigrisoma Ardeola Bubulcus Egretta Agamia Butorides Tigriornis Tigrisoma Gorsachius Syrigma Zonerodius Nycticorax see also: Bittern Herons are medium to large long-legged, long-necked wading birds of the family Ardeidae, which also includes the egrets and bitterns. ... Genera Perdix Alectoris Lerwa Bambusicola Ptilopachus Rollulus Haematortyx Caloperdix Arborophila Xenoperdix Melanoperdix †See also Pheasant, Quail, Grouse Partridges are birds in the pheasant family, Phasianidae. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... A red fox The foxes comprise 23 species of omnivorous canids, found worldwide. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ...


The western mountains are home to different animals. These include the llama, guanaco, vicuña, among the most recognizable species of South America. Also in this region are the fox, viscacha, Andean Mountain Cat, kodkod and the largest flying bird in the New World, the Andean Condor. For other uses, see Llama (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Lama guanicoe (Müller, 1776) The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is an elegant, fine-boned camelid animal that stands approximately 1. ... Binomial name Vicugna vicugna (Molina, 1782) The vicuña (Vicugna vicugna) is a relative of the llama that lives in the high Andes. ... This article is about the animal. ... Genera  Lagidium  Lagostomus The viscacha or vizcacha is a rodent of the chinchilla family Chinchillidae. ... Binomial name Oreailurus jacobita Cornalia, 1865 The Andean Cat is also known as the Andean Mountain Cat. ... Binomial name Oncifelis guigna (Molina, 1782) Kodkod The Kodkod (Oncifelis guigna), also known as Guigna, is the smallest felid in the Americas and is found only in Chile and Argentina. ... For other uses, see condor (disambiguation). ...


Southern Argentina is home to the cougar, huemul, pudú (the world's smallest deer), and introduced, non-native wild boar.[26] The coast of Patagonia is rich in animal life: elephant seals, fur seals, sea lions, and species of penguin. The far south is populated by cormorant birds. For other uses, see Cougar (disambiguation), Puma (disambiguation), or Panther. ... Species Hippocamelus bisulcus Molina, 1782 Hippocamelus antisensis dOrbigny, 1834 The huemuls are endangered mammals of the Cervidae family, in the genus Hippocamelus. ... The pudú (Pudu spp. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domesticated pig. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Two adolescent seals at the Piedras Blancas seal sanctuary near San Simeon, California. ... Genera Callorhinus Arctocephalus Fur seals make up one of the two distinct groups of mammals called seals. Both the fur seals and the true seals are members of the Pinnipedia, which is usually regarded as a suborder of the order Carnivora but sometimes as an independent order. ... Genera Eumetopias Zalophus Otaria Neophoca Phocarctos A sea lion rookery at Monterey, California A sea lion is any of several marine mammals of the family Otariidae. ... Modern genera Aptenodytes Eudyptes Eudyptula Megadyptes Pygoscelis Spheniscus For prehistoric genera, see Systematics Some penguins are curious. ... For other uses, see Cormorant (disambiguation). ...


The territorial waters of Argentina have abundant ocean life; mammals such as dolphins, orcas, and whales like the southern right whale, a major tourist draw for naturalists. Sea fish include sardines, argentine hakes, dolphinfish, salmon, and sharks; also present are squid and spider crab (centolla) in Tierra del Fuego. Rivers and streams in Argentina have many species of trout and the South American dorado fish.[27] Outstanding snake species inhabiting Argentina include boa constrictors, and the very venomous yarará pit viper and South American rattle snake. This article is about the dolphin mammal. ... Binomial name Orcinus orca Linnaeus, 1758 Orca range (in blue) The Orca or Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) is the largest species of the oceanic dolphin family (Delphinidae). ... It has been suggested that Balaenidae be merged into this article or section. ... Sardines can refer to: The plural of sardine, a species of fish. ... The term hake refers to fish in either of: families Gadidae (subfamily Phycinae) families Merlucciidae (both subfamilies Merlucciinae and Steindachneriinae). ... Binomial name Coryphaena equiselis Linnaeus, 1758 The Pompano dolphinfish (Coryphaena equiselis) is a species of surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in tropical and subtropical waters. ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ... Sharks may refer to: Sharks, a group belonging to the cartilaginous fish Sharks, a British rock band from the 1970s davids real name is stewy Cronulla Sharks, an Australian rugby league team East Fremantle Sharks, an Australian rules cookie team Los Angeles Sharks, a former U.S. ice hockey... For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... The term spider crab can refer to different species of crab: Japanese spider crab (Macrocheira kaempferi), the largest crab alive, found on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean Portly spider crab (Libinia emarginata), a species of crab found in estuarine habitats on the east coast of North America Hyas, a... Tierra del Fuego Cerro Sombrero Village, Chile. ... For other uses, see Trout (disambiguation). ... Dourado refers to a kind of river-dwelling fish from South America, Salminus Brasiliensis and Salminus Hillari. ... Species Boa Constrictor Acrantophis dumerili Acrantophis madagascariensis Sanzinia madagascariensis Boa is a genus of snakes in the family Boidae. ... This article is about the toxin. ... Genera See text. ... Species about 30 Rattlesnakes is a group of venomous New World snakes, genera Crotalus and Sistrurus, which have a small noise-making jointed rattle on their tails. ...


The Hornero was elected the National Bird after a survey in 1928.[28] The Hornero, also known as an Ovenbird, is part of the Woodcreeper family. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Argentina

Argentina benefits from abundant natural resources, a highly literate population, an export-oriented agricultural sector, and a diversified industrial base, that was once one of the wealthiest nations[citation needed] with a large middle class but this segment of the population has suffered by a succession of economic crises. Argentina otherwise maintains a relatively high standard of living. Argentina benefits from rich natural resources, a highly literate population, an export-oriented agricultural sector, and a diversified industrial base. ... Children reading. ... Agriculture refers to the production of goods through the growing of plants, animals and other life forms. ... The standard of living refers to the quality and quantity of goods and services available to people and the way these services and goods are distributed within a population. ...


Argentina's economy started to slowly lose ground after 1945[citation needed] when it went from a wealthy nation with a strong and prosperous economy to a deep recession in the mid 50s, losing its place in the position of prosperous industrialized nations.[citation needed] The economy further declined during the military dictatorship that lasted from 1976 to 1983.[29]


During this period, the government took out large loans with high interest rates from the IMF and private banking institutions. The country engaged in a disorganized and corrupt rapid liberalization that marked the end of its industrial hegemony in Latin America. During the military dictatorship over 400,000 companies of all sizes went bankrupt. The economic decisions made from 1983 till 2001 failed to revert the situation. Finally, in 2001, after 3 years of recession, the economy broke down and reached its worst point in history.


Although significant since then, the result is that, today, while a significant segment of the population is still financially well-off, they stand in sharp contrast with the millions who have seen their purchasing power drastically reduced. Since 2002, there has been an improvement in the situation of the poorer sectors and a strong rebound of the middle class.


The urban poverty rate dropped to 26.9% by 2007, down from 48 percent observed in 2003, but is still above the level prior to the recession.[30] From the late 1970s the country piled up public debt and was plagued by bouts of high inflation. In 1991, the government pegged the peso to the U.S. dollar and limited the growth in the money supply. It then embarked on a path of trade liberalization, deregulation and privatization. Inflation dropped and gross domestic product grew, but external economic shocks and failures of the system diluted benefits, causing the economy to crumble slowly from 1995 until the collapse in 2001. A fixed exchange rate, sometimes (less commonly) called a pegged exchange rate, is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is matched to the value of another single currency or to a basket of other currencies, or to another measure of value, such as gold. ... USD redirects here. ... The money base, or the monetary base is a government liability, currency and bank reserves. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Deregulation is the process by which governments remove, reduce, or simplify restrictions on business and individuals in order to (in theory) encourage the efficient operation of markets. ... Origins People Theories Ideas Movements Topics Related Philosophy Portal Politics Portal        Privatization is the incidence or process of transferring ownership of business from the public sector (government) to the private sector (business). ... GDP redirects here. ... The Argentine economic crisis was part of the situation that affected Argentinas economy during the late 1990s and early 2000s. ...


By 2002, Argentina had defaulted on its debt, its GDP had shrunk, unemployment was more than 25%, and the peso had depreciated 75% after being devalued and floated. However, careful spending control and heavy taxes on then-soaring exports allowed the state to regain resources and conduct monetary policy. In finance, default occurs when a debtor has not met its legal obligations according to the debt contract, e. ... CIA figures for world unemployment rates, 2006 Unemployment is the state in which a person is without work, available to work, and is currently seeking work. ... Currency depreciation is the loss of value of a countrys currency with respect to one or more foreign reference currencies, typically in a floating exchange rate system. ... Devaluation is a reduction in the value of a currency with respect to other monetary units. ... A floating exchange rate or a flexible exchange rate is a type of exchange rate regime wherein a currencys value is allowed to fluctuate according to the foreign exchange market. ... Taxes redirects here. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        Monetary policy is the process by which the government, central bank...


In 2003, import substitution policies and soaring exports, coupled with lower inflation and expansive economic measures, triggered a surge in the GDP. This was repeated in 2004 and 2005, creating millions of jobs and encouraging internal consumption. Capital flight decreased, and foreign investment slowly returned. An influx of foreign currency from exports created a huge trade surplus. The Central Bank was forced to buy dollars from the market, and continues to do so from time to time to prevent the Argentine peso from appreciating significantly and cutting competitiveness. Import substitution industrialization (also called ISI) is a trade and economic policy based on the premise that a developing country should attempt to substitute products which it imports, mostly finished goods, with locally produced substitutes. ... Seen in Asian markets in the 1990s capital flight is when assets and/or money rapidly flow out of a country. ... Investment is a term with several closely-related meanings in finance and economics. ... Balance of trade figures are the sum of the money gained by a given economy by selling exports, minus the cost of buying imports. ...


The situation by 2006 was further improved. The economy grew 8.8% in 2003, 9.0% in 2004, 9.2% in 2005, 8.5% in 2006, and 8.7% in 2007, though inflation, estimated at around 12 to 15% (official numbers are 9.8% for 2006), has become an issue again, and income distribution is still considerably unequal.[31][32] This graphic shows the distribution of gross annual household income. ...


Sectors

See also: Tourism in Argentina

In 2007, agricultural output accounted for 10% of GDP, and nearly one third of all exports. Soy and vegetable oils are major export commodities at 32% of exports. Wheat, maize, oats, sorghum, and sunflower seeds totalled 7%.[33] Cattle is also a major industry. Beef, milk, leather products, and cheese were 6% of total exports.[33] Sheep and wool industries are important in Patagonia, pigs and caprines elsewhere. Tourism in Argentina is favored by its ample and varied natural assets (made possible by its geographical extension), by its cultural offer, and (since the devaluation of the Argentine peso after the 2001 crash) by its high exchange rate to foreign currencies. ... GDP is an acronym which can stand for more than one thing: (in economics) an abbreviation for Gross Domestic Product. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... A vegetable oil or vegoil is an oil extracted from oilseeds or another plant source. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Species References ITIS 41455 2002-09-22 Oats are the seeds of any of several cereal grains in the genus Avena. ... Species About 30 species, see text Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, some of which are raised for grain and many of which are utilised as fodder plants either cultivated or as part of pasture. ... The sunflower seed is the seed of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus). ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... A glass of cows milk. ... For other uses, see Leather (disambiguation). ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Species See text. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Genera Subfamily Caprinae   Nemorhaedus   Rupicapra   Oreamnos   Budorcas   Ovibos   Pseudonovibos   Hemitragus   Ammotragus   Pseudois   Capra   Ovis Subfamily Pantholopinae   Pantholops A goat antelope is any of the species of mostly medium-sized bovids that make up the subfamily Caprinae or the single species in subfamily Pantholopinae. ...


Fruits and vegetables made up 4% of exports: apples and pears in the Río Negro valley; oranges and other citrus in the northwest and Mesopotamia; grapes and strawberries in Cuyo, and berries in the far south. Cotton and yerba mate are major crops in the Gran Chaco, sugarcane and tobacco in the northwest, and olives and garlic in Cuyo. Bananas (Formosa), tomatoes (Salta), and peaches (Mendoza) are grown for domestic consumption. Argentina is the world's fifth-largest wine producer, and fine wine production has taken major leaps in quality. A growing export, total viticulture potential is far from met. Mendoza is the largest wine region, followed by San Juan.[34]As a strike by farmers, who are protesting an increase in export taxes for their products, continued for a 13th day March 25, 2008 with no solution in sight, butchers and supermarkets were among the first hit.[35] Popular Japanese fashion magazine throughout the 1990s; the photography of which has recently been reissued in two collections from Phaidon press. ... Vegetables on a market Vegetable is a nutritional and culinary term denoting any part of a plant that is commonly consumed by humans as food, but is not regarded as a culinary fruit, nut, herb, spice, or grain. ... For other uses, see Apple (disambiguation). ... Species Pyrus calleryana P. pyrifolia et al Pears are trees of the genus Pyrus and the edible fruit of that tree. ... // Northern patagonia, main rivers, and political divisions and main cities. ... Orange blossoms and oranges on tree For other uses of orange, see orange (disambiguation) The Orange Citrus x sinensis is a Citrus tree, and the fruits of this tree. ... For other uses, see Citrus (disambiguation). ... The Argentine Northwest is a region of Argentina composed by the provinces of Jujuy, Salta, Catamarca and Tucumán. ... La Mesopotamia, Región Mesopotámica or Litoral (Littoral) is the humid and verdant area of north-east Argentina, comprising the provinces of Misiones, Entre Ríos and Corrientes. ... Species Vitis acerifolia Vitis aestivalis Vitis amurensis Vitis arizonica Vitis x bourquina Vitis californica Vitis x champinii Vitis cinerea Vitis x doaniana Vitis girdiana Vitis labrusca Vitis x labruscana Vitis monticola Vitis mustangensis Vitis x novae-angliae Vitis palmata Vitis riparia Vitis rotundifolia Vitis rupestris Vitis shuttleworthii Vitis tiliifolia Vitis... Strawberries Promo Strawberries is an album by The Damned released October 1982 on Bronze Records (catalogue #BRON 542). ... Cuyo screenshot of the level The Four Seasons (click image for details) Cuyo is a Tetris_style puzzle game for up to two players. ... This article is about the fruit. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Binomial name A. St. ... Landscape in the Gran Chaco, Paraguay The Gran Chaco (Quechua chaqu, hunting land), dubbed by some as the last South American frontier, is a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland region of the Río de la Plata basin, divided between Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina and a small portion in... Species Saccharum arundinaceum Saccharum bengalense Saccharum edule Saccharum officinarum Saccharum procerum Saccharum ravennae Saccharum robustum Saccharum sinense Saccharum spontaneum Sugarcane or Sugar cane (Saccharum) is a genus of 6 to 37 species (depending on taxonomic interpretation) of tall perennial grasses (family Poaceae, tribe Andropogoneae), native to warm temperate to tropical... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Formosa Province is in northeastern Argentina, part of the Gran Chaco Region. ... Binomial name Solanumlycopersicum Linnaeus ref. ... Salta is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Peaches may refer to: Peaches, a type of fruit Peaches, an Electroclash musician Peaches, a song by The Stranglers Peaches, a character in the motion picture Ken Park Peaches, a song by The Presidents of the United States of America Peaches, a musical artist. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... wine grapes Viticulture (from the Latin word for vine) is the science, production and study of grapes which deals with the series of events that occur in the vineyard. ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... Categories: Argentina geography stubs | Argentine provinces ... For other uses, see Farmer (disambiguation). ... Taxes redirects here. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Industrial petrochemicals, oil, and natural gas are Argentina's second group of exports, 20% of totals. The most important oil fields lie in Patagonia and Cuyo. An impressive network of pipelines send raw product to Bahia Blanca, center of the petrochemical industry, and to the La Plata-Rosario industrial belt. Coal is also mined. A petrochemical is any chemical derived from fossil fuel. ... Petro redirects here. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Drilling rig in a small oil field Near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 An oil field is an area with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (oil) from below ground. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Cuyo screenshot of the level The Four Seasons (click image for details) Cuyo is a Tetris_style puzzle game for up to two players. ... Bah a Blanca is a city in eastern Argentina in Buenos Aires Province and a seaport at the head of the Bah Blanca (White Bay - an arm of the Atlantic Ocean). ... La Plata is the capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as of the partido of La Plata. ... This article or section should be merged with Rosario Rosario is a city in eastern Argentina, in Santa Fe Province, a port on the Paraná River. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


Mining is a rising industry. The northwest and San Juan Province are main regions of activity. Metals mined include gold, silver, zinc, magnesium, copper, sulfur, tungsten and uranium. In only ten years exports soared from US$ 200 million to 1.2 billion in 2004, 3% of total.[36] Estimates for 2006 are US$ 2bn, a 10 fold rise from 1996. This article is about mineral extractions. ... The Argentine Northwest is a region of Argentina composed by the provinces of Jujuy, Salta, Catamarca and Tucumán. ... Categories: Argentina geography stubs | Argentine provinces ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... General Name, symbol, number magnesium, Mg, 12 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, period, block 2, 3, s Appearance silvery white solid at room temp Standard atomic weight 24. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Tungsten (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ...


In fisheries, argentine hake accounts for 50% of catches, pollack and squid follow. Forestry has expanded in Mesopotamia; elm for cellulose, pine and eucalyptus for furniture, timber, and paper products. Both sectors each account for 2% of exports. A fishery (plural: fisheries) is an organized effort by humans to catch fish or other aquatic species, an activity known as fishing. ... The term hake refers to fish in either of: families Gadidae (subfamily Phycinae) families Merlucciidae (both subfamilies Merlucciinae and Steindachneriinae). ... Pollack is a surname, and may refer to: Alan W. Pollack Andrea Pollack Ben Pollack David M. Pollack Egon Pollack Eileen Pollack Frank L. Pollack Harvey Pollack Henry Pollack Howard Pollack James B. Pollack Kenneth Pollack Lew Pollack Mark Pollack-Rothschild Neal Pollack Olaf Pollack Rachel Pollack Reginald Pollack Robert... For other uses, see Squid (disambiguation). ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... La Mesopotamia, Región Mesopotámica or Litoral (Littoral) is the humid and verdant area of north-east Argentina, comprising the provinces of Misiones, Entre Ríos and Corrientes. ... Species See Elm species, varieties, cultivars and hybrids Elms are deciduous and semi-deciduous trees making up the genus Ulmus, family Ulmaceae, found throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Siberia to Indonesia, Mexico to Japan. ... Cellulose as polymer of β-D-glucose Cellulose in 3D Cellulose (C6H10O5)n is a polysaccharide of beta-glucose. ... Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... [[Link title]] This article is about the plant genus. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction or wood... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ...

The Yacyretá Dam hydroelectric complex is the second largest in the world.
The Yacyretá Dam hydroelectric complex is the second largest in the world.

Manufacturing is the nation's leading single sector in GDP output, with 35% of the share.[33] Leading sectors are motor vehicles, auto parts, and transportation and farming equipment (7% of exports), iron and steel (3%), foodstuffs and textiles (2%). Other manufactures include cement, industrial chemicals, home appliances, and processed wood. The biggest industrial centers are Buenos Aires, Rosario and Córdoba. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2362x1552, 339 KB) Vista externa desde el margen derecho de la central Hidroeléctrica Yacyretá File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Yaciretá Dam ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2362x1552, 339 KB) Vista externa desde el margen derecho de la central Hidroeléctrica Yacyretá File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Yaciretá Dam ... View of the dam from up-river. ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... Auto parts are components of automobiles. ... For the movement of people or objects, see transport. ... For other uses, see Tractor (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Food processing is the set of methods and techniques used to transform raw ingredients into food for consumption by humans or animals. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... For other uses, see Cement (disambiguation). ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... A major appliance is a large machine which accomplishes some routine housekeeping task, which includes purposes such as cooking, food preservation, or cleaning, whether in a household, institutional, commercial or industrial setting. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Córdoba is a city located near the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas mountains on the Suquía River, about 700 km west-northwest from Buenos Aires. ...


The telecommunication sector has been growing at a fast pace, with an important penetration of mobile telephony (More than 75% of the population)[37]internet (with more than 16 million people online),[38] and broadband services (4.1%). Regular telephone (with 9.5 million lines)[39]and mail are robust. Copy of the original phone of Alexander Graham Bell at the Musée des Arts et Métiers in Paris Telecommunication is the assisted transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... Cellular redirects here. ... Broadband in telecommunications is a term that refers to a signaling method that includes or handles a relatively wide range of frequencies, which may be divided into channels or frequency bins. ... For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mail (disambiguation). ...


The service sector is the biggest contributor to total GDP. Argentina produces energy in large part through well developed hydroelectric resources; nuclear energy is also of high importance.[40] The country is one of the largest producers and exporters (with Canada and Russia) of Cobalt-60, a radioactive isotope widely used in cancer therapy. Construction has led employment creation in the current economic expansion, and is 5% of GDP. This article is about a term used in economics. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... This article concerns the energy stored in the nuclei of atoms; for the use of nuclear fission as a power source, see Nuclear power. ... Cobalt 60 is a Front 242 side project featuring Front 242s Jean-Luc de Meyer and Dominique Lallement. ... Radioactive decay is the set of various processes by which unstable atomic nuclei (nuclides) emit subatomic particles. ... For other uses, see Isotope (disambiguation). ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... For other uses, see Construction (disambiguation). ...


Tourism is increasingly important, now providing 7% of economic output.[citation needed] Argentines are traveling more within their borders, and foreigners are flocking to a country seen as affordable, safe, and incredibly diverse:[citation needed] Cosmopolitan Buenos Aires and Rosario; the Iguazu Falls and colonial Salta; the South American indigenous Jujuy Province and fun-filled Córdoba; the wineries of Mendoza; the ski-suitable scenic Bariloche to the beaches of Pinamar; and Perito Moreno Glacier to Tierra del Fuego. 3.7 million tourists visited in 2005.[41] Tourist redirects here. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Iguazu falls from Brasil Iguazu Falls, Iguassu Falls, or Iguaçu Falls (Portuguese: Cataratas do Iguaçu, pronounced ; Spanish: Cataratas del Iguazú, ) are waterfalls of the Iguazu River located on the border of the Brazilian state of Paraná and the Argentine province of Misiones. ... The inside of Saltas main cathedral Salta is a city in northwestern Argentina and the capital city of the eponymous province, situated at the foothills of the Andes mountains. ... Jujuy is a province of Argentina, located in the extreme northwest of the country, at the borders with Chile and Bolivia. ... Córdoba is a province of Argentina, located in the center of the country. ... A winery is a facility where fruit, usually grapes, is processed into wine. ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... View of the Nahuel Huapi Lake, Bariloche San Carlos de Bariloche in Argentina is situated on the foothills of the Andes, surrounded by lakes (Nahuel Huapi, Gutiérrez, Moreno and Mascardi) and mountains (Tronador, Catedral, López). ... Pinamar Pinamar is a small Argentine city located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Buenos Aires Province. ... Patagonia, Argentina - Perito Moreno Glacier The Perito Moreno Glacier () is a glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park in the south west of Santa Cruz province, Argentina. ... Tierra del Fuego, Antarctica, and South Atlantic Islands (Spanish: ) is a province entirely separated by the Strait of Magellan from mainland Argentina on the Isla Grande of Tierra del Fuego, which it shares with Chile to the west. ...


Transportation

A cargo ship in front of the Rosario-Victoria Bridge.
A cargo ship in front of the Rosario-Victoria Bridge.
Light rail in Buenos Aires
Light rail in Buenos Aires

Argentina's infrastructure is advanced compared to other countries in Latin America.[42] There are nearly 215,471 km (133,887 mi)[43] of roads of which 68,809 km are paved, and 734 km are expressways,[44] many of which are privatized. Multilane highways now connect several main cities and more are now under construction.[45] Argentina has a complex net of routes, crossed by long distance buses, and a number of national and international airports. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 282 KB) Summary A cargo boat on the Paraná River, Argentina, just coming under the Rosario-Victoria Bridge that crosses the river from Rosario, province of Santa Fe, to Victoria, Entre Ríos. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 282 KB) Summary A cargo boat on the Paraná River, Argentina, just coming under the Rosario-Victoria Bridge that crosses the river from Rosario, province of Santa Fe, to Victoria, Entre Ríos. ... The cable-stayed Rosario-Victoria Bridge, spanning the Paraná River Rosario-Victoria Bridge (in Spanish, Puente Rosario-Victoria) is the informal name of the physical connection between the Argentine cities of Rosario (province of Santa Fe) and Victoria (province of Entre Ríos). ... Tranvía del Este is a public tram line currently in development in the Puerto Madero neighborhood of Buenos Aires. ...


The railway network has a total length of 31,902 km.[44] After decades of decaying service and lack of maintenance, most passenger services shut down in 1992 when the rail company was privatized, and thousands of kilometers of track are now in disrepair. Railway services are currently being reactivated among several cities. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ...


The country has around 3,000 kilometers of waterways, the most significant among these being the Río de la Plata, Paraná, Uruguay, Río Negro and Paraguay rivers. A waterway is any navigable body of water. ... This page is about the South American estuary. ... The sun rising over the Paraná River, from the north-east of Rosario, Argentina. ...


Water supply and sanitation

Water supply and sanitation in Argentina faces five key challenges: (i) low coverage with higher levels of service provision for its income level; (ii) poor service quality; and (iii) high levels of pollution; (iv) low cost recovery; and (v) unclear allocation of responsibilities between institutions in the sector. Argentina faces five key challenges in the water supply and sanitation sector: (i) low coverage with higher levels of service provision for its income level; (ii) poor service quality; and (iii) high levels of pollution; (iv) low cost recovery; and (v) unclear allocation of responsibilities between institutions in the sector. ...


Population

Contemporary figures

The National Institute of Statistics and Census of Argentina (INDEC) 2001 census showed the population of Argentina was 36,260,130. It ranks third in South America in total population and 30th globally. The 2007 estimate is 40,927,301. Argentina's population density is 14 inhabitants per square kilometer. However, the population is not evenly distributed: areas of the city of Buenos Aires have a population density of over 14,000 inhab./km², while Santa Cruz province has less than 1 inhab./km². Argentina is the only nation in South America with a net positive migration rate, of about +0.4 persons.[46] National Statistics and Censuses Institute (Spanish: Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos, INDEC) is the Argentine government agency responsible for the collection and processing of statistical data. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ...


Cities and metropolitan areas

Main article: List of cities in Argentina by population

As of 2005, Argentina's 20th largest metropolitan areas are: 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Cordoba city centre
Cordoba city centre
Puerto Madero Docklands, Buenos Aires
Puerto Madero Docklands, Buenos Aires
Monument to the Argentine flag in Rosario
Monument to the Argentine flag in Rosario
Rank City Province Population Region
1 Buenos Aires City + 24 partidos in Buenos Aires Province 11,453,725 Pampean
2 Córdoba Córdoba 1,513,200 Pampean
3 Rosario Santa Fe 1,295,100 Pampean
4 Mendoza Mendoza 1,009,100 Cuyo
5 La Plata Buenos Aires 857,800 Pampean
6 San Miguel de Tucumán  Tucumán 833,100  NOA (northwest) 
7 Mar del Plata Buenos Aires 699,600 Pampean
8 Salta Salta 530,400 NOA (northwest)
9 Santa Fe Santa Fe 525,300 Pampean
10 San Juan San Juan 456,400 Cuyo
11 Resistencia Chaco 399,800 Gran Chaco
12 Neuquén Neuquén 391,600 Patagonian
13 Santiago del Estero Santiago del Estero  389,200 Gran Chaco
14 Corrientes Corrientes 332,400 Mesopotamia
15 Bahía Blanca Buenos Aires 310,200 Pampean
16 Río Cuarto Cordoba 144,021 Pampean
17 Comodoro Rivadavia Chubut 140,628 Patagonia
18 Santa Rosa La Pampa 110,640 Pampean
19 Zárate Buenos Aires 101,271 Pampean
20 Tandil Buenos Aires 101,010 Pampean

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 414 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (874 × 1265 pixel, file size: 366 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 414 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (874 × 1265 pixel, file size: 366 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Córdoba is a city located near the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas mountains on the Suquía River, about 700 km west-northwest from Buenos Aires. ... There are two provinces named Córdoba: Córdoba (Spanish province) Córdoba (Argentinan province) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article or section should be merged with Rosario Rosario is a city in eastern Argentina, in Santa Fe Province, a port on the Paraná River. ... Santa Fe is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... Monument dedicated to the Army of the Andes, on the summit of the Cerro de la Gloria. ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... La Plata is the capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as of the partido of La Plata. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... San Miguel de Tucumán (usually referred to as simply Tucumán) is the largest city in northwestern Argentina, with a population (2001) of 525,853. ... Tucumán is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Map of Mar del Plata and the surrounding region Panoramic view of Varese beach, Mar del Plata Mar del Plata is an Argentine city located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Buenos Aires Province, 400 km south of Buenos Aires. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... The inside of Saltas main cathedral Salta is a city in northwestern Argentina and the capital city of the eponymous province, situated at the foothills of the Andes mountains. ... Salta is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Santa Fe is the capital city of the Santa Fe Province of Argentina. ... Santa Fe is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... San Juan is the capital city of the Argentine province of San Juan in the Cuyo region, located in the Tulúm Valley, west of the San Juan River, at 46 m (151 ft) above mean sea level, with a population of around 112,000 as per the 2001 census... Categories: Argentina geography stubs | Argentine provinces ... Resistencia is a city in northern Argentina, the capital of the Chaco Province, located on a tributary of the Paraná River. ... Chaco is an Argentine province located on the north of the country, near the border with Paraguay. ... Neuquén is the capital city of the Argentine province of Neuquén, located on the east of the province, at the confluence of the Limay and Neuquén rivers. ... Neuquén is a province of Argentina, located in the west of the country, at the northern end of Patagonia. ... Santiago del Estero is a town in northern Argentina, capital of Santiago del Estero Province, on the Dulce River. ... Santiago del Estero is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... The city of Corrientes and the Paraná River, photographed from the International Space Station. ... Corrientes is a province in northeast Argentina, in the Mesopotamia region. ... Plaza Rivadavia Bahía Blanca is a city located in the south east of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, by the Atlantic Ocean, head town of Bahia Blanca Partido. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Río Cuarto is a city in the province of Córdoba, Argentina. ... There are two provinces named Córdoba: Córdoba (Spanish province) Córdoba (Argentinan province) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Comodoro Rivadavia is a city in the Patagonian province of Chubut in southern Argentina, located on the Gulf of San Jorge, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, at the foot of the Cerro Chenque mountain. ... Chubut is a province in the southern part of Argentina, that lies between the 42nd Parallel South (forming the border with the Río Negro Province) and 46th Parallel South (bordering Santa Cruz Province), the Andes range separating Argentina from Chile, and the Atlantic ocean. ... Santa Rosa is a city in the Argentine Pampas, and the capital of La Pampa Province, Argentina. ... La Pampa is a province of Argentina, located in the Pampas in the centre of the country. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Tandil is a city in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, about 360 km away from Buenos Aires. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ...

Demographics

Fiesta del Inmigrante or "Immigrants' Festival" celebrates the immigration to Argentina during the 19th and 20th century in the town of Oberá, Misiones
Fiesta del Inmigrante or "Immigrants' Festival" celebrates the immigration to Argentina during the 19th and 20th century in the town of Oberá, Misiones

This article is about the demographics features of the population of Argentina, including distribution, ethnicity, economic status and other. ...

Ethnicity

Argentina is a melting pot of different peoples, both autochthonous and immigrants. Citizens of European descent make up the great majority of the population, with estimates varying from white 89.7%[47] to 97%[48] of the total population. The last national census, based on self-ascription, indicated a similar figure.[49]. Look up autochthonous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article deals with the white population of Latin America. ...


A study conducted by Argentine, Swedish and North American institutions, established that the genetic average structure of the Argentine population, contains 79.9% of European contribution[50], whereas the Amerindian admixture, though not fully visible in physical appearance, was estimated to be present in a high percentage of the population, close to 56% on either paternal or maternal lineages, of which just 10% were shown to have Amerindian ancestors on both lineages[51]. Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ...


After the Spanish colonists, waves of European settlers migrated to Argentina from the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. Major contributors included Italy (initially from Piedmont, Veneto and Lombardy, later from Campania and Calabria),[52] Spain (foremost among them Galicians and Basques,[53] and France (mostly to Buenos Aires and Mendoza).[citation needed] Smaller but significant numbers of immigrants came from Germany and Switzerland (to the Lakes Region of Patagonia; and to Córdoba), Scandinavia, (Denmark, Norway and Sweden), Greece, Lebanon, the United Kingdom and Ireland (to Buenos Aires, Santa Fé, and Patagonia; see also English settlement in Argentina), and Portugal. Eastern Europeans were also numerous, from Poland, Hungary, Russia, Ukraine, Croatia and Slovenia[54] and Lithuania, as well as Balkan countries (Romania Serbia and Montenegro, particularly in Chaco)[citation needed]. There is a large Armenian community, and the Patagonian Chubut Valley has a significant Welsh-descended population.[citation needed] Non-native population in Argentina, 1869–1991 There is a theory that the original inhabitants of Argentina were descendants of Asian peoples that crossed the Bering Land Bridge into North America and then, over thousands of years, reached the southern end of South America. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... Veneto is my fatherland. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Calabria (disambiguation). ... Motto: Galiza Ceibe Capital Santiago de Compostela Official languages Galician and Castilian Area  – Total  – % of Spain Ranked 7th  29 574 km²  5,8% Population  – Total (2003)  – % of Spain  – Density Ranked 5th  2 737 370  6,5%  92,36/km² Demonym  – English  – Galician  – Spanish  Galician  galego  gallego Statute of Autonomy April... This article is about the Basque people. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... This article is about the country in Europe. ... This article is about the country. ...


Minorities

See also: Welsh settlement in Argentina and Asian-Argentines
An Argentine gaucho.

Small but growing numbers of people from East Asia have also settled in Argentina, mainly in Buenos Aires. The first Asian-Argentines were of Japanese descent; Koreans, Vietnamese, and Chinese followed, now at over 60,000.[55] The Welsh settlement in Argentina began in the 19th century. ... History A small neighborhood grocery store in Buenos Aires owned by Asian-Argentines Argentinas Asian population is descended from several waves of Asian immigration that have occured in the last century. ... Image File history File links GauchoArgen. ... Image File history File links GauchoArgen. ... For other uses, see Gaucho (disambiguation). ...


The majority of Argentina's Jewish community derive from immigrants of north and eastern European origin (Ashkenazi Jews), and about 15–20% from Sephardic groups from Syria.[citation needed] Argentina is home to the fifth largest Ashkenazi Jewish community in the world. (See also History of the Jews in Argentina) Argentina has a large Arab community, made up mostly of immigrants from Syria and Lebanon. Many have gained prominent status in national business and politics, including former president Carlos Menem, the son of Syrian settlers from the province of La Rioja. Most of the Arab Argentines are Christian of the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Language(s) Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, English Religion(s) Judaism Related ethnic groups Sephardi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, and other Jewish ethnic divisions Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (Standard Hebrew: sing. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal: ספרד, Standard Hebrew Səfárad, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄áraḏ / Səp̄āraḏ), or whose ancestors were among the Jews expelled from... Jews have lived in Argentina for centuries, yet large Jewish populations did not appear in the country until the 19th and 20th centuries. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Carlos Saúl Menem (born July 2, 1930) was President of Argentina from July 8, 1989 to December 10, 1999 for the Justicialist Party (Peronist) very infamous and criticized due corruption and his dubious handling of the investigations of the 1992 Israeli Embassy bombing and the 1994 bombing of the... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ...


The officially recognized indigenous population in the country, according to the "Complementary Survey of Indigenous Peoples" based on 2001 Census data, stands at approximately 402,921 people (about 1 percent of the total population)[56] For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ...


Illegal immigrants

Illegal immigration has been a recent factor in Argentine demographics. Most illegal immigrants come from Bolivia and Paraguay, countries which border Argentina to the north. Smaller numbers arrive from Peru, Ecuador, and Romania.[57] The Argentine government estimates that 750,000 inhabitants lack official documents and has launched a program called Patria Grande ("Big Homeland"),[58] to encourage illegal immigrants to regularize their status; so far over 670,000 applications have been processed under the program. [5] Illegal alien and Illegal aliens redirect here. ...


Urbanization

Government house of Tucumán.
Government house of Tucumán.
Beach on the Atlantic Ocean, Mar del Plata.
Beach on the Atlantic Ocean, Mar del Plata.

Argentina's population is very highly urbanized. About 3 million people live in the autonomous city of Buenos Aires, and 12.4 million in Greater Buenos Aires (2007), making it one of the largest conurbations in the world. Together with their respective metropolitan areas, the second- and third-largest cities in Argentina, Córdoba and Rosario, comprise about 1.3 and 1.1 million inhabitants respectively. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 410 KB) This image was originally posted to Flickr as Casa de Gobierno - Tucumán. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 410 KB) This image was originally posted to Flickr as Casa de Gobierno - Tucumán. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Mar_del_Plata. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Mar_del_Plata. ... Map of Mar del Plata and the surrounding region Panoramic view of Varese beach, Mar del Plata Mar del Plata is an Argentine city located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Buenos Aires Province, 400 km south of Buenos Aires. ... This is a list of cities in Argentina. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Gran Buenos Aires (Spanish: Greater Buenos Aires) is the metropolitan area around the city of Buenos Aires, which comprises the following 24 partidos (administrative subdivisions) of the Province of Buenos Aires. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Córdoba is a city located near the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas mountains on the Suquía River, about 700 km west-northwest from Buenos Aires. ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ...


Most European immigrants to Argentina settled in the cities, which offered jobs, education, and other opportunities which enabled newcomers to enter the middle class. Many also settled in the growing small towns along the expanding railway system. Since the 1930s, many rural workers have moved to the big cities. Non-native population in Argentina, 1869–1991 There is a theory that the original inhabitants of Argentina were descendants of Asian peoples that crossed the Bering Land Bridge into North America and then, over thousands of years, reached the southern end of South America. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ...


The 1990s saw many rural towns become ghost towns when train services ceased and local products manufactured on a small scale were replaced by massive amounts of cheap imported goods. Many slums (villas miserias) sprouted in the outskirts of the largest cities, inhabited by impoverished lower-class urban dwellers, migrants from smaller towns in the interior, and also a large number of immigrants from neighbouring countries that came during the time of the convertibility and did not leave after the 2001 crisis. For other uses, see Ghost town (disambiguation). ... Homes in a villa miseria in Rosario. ...


Some urban areas appear European, reflecting the influence of European settlers. Many cities are built in a Spanish-grid style around a main square (plaza). A cathedral and important government buildings often face the plaza. The general layout of the cities is called damero (checkerboard), since it is based on a pattern of square blocks, though modern developments sometimes depart from it (the city of La Plata, built at the end of the nineteenth century, is organized as a checkerboard plus diagonal avenues at fixed intervals).


The city of La Plata was the first in South America with electric street illumination.[59]
La Plata is the capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as of the partido of La Plata. ...

Cities by population
Rank Core City Province Pop. Rank Core City Province Pop.
view  talk  edit

Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
Córdoba
Córdoba This is a list of cities in Argentina. ... Argentina is subdivided in 23 provinces (Spanish: provincias, singular - provincia) and 1 federal district (capital federal). ... This is a list of cities in Argentina. ... Argentina is subdivided in 23 provinces (Spanish: provincias, singular - provincia) and 1 federal district (capital federal). ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 414 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (874 × 1265 pixel, file size: 366 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... // The name of the Spanish city Córdoba had been spread all over the world: homonymous places etc. ...

1 Buenos Aires Buenos Aires 15,052,177 11 Resistencia Chaco 452,800
2 Córdoba Córdoba 1,613,211 12 Neuquén Neuquén 400,600
3 Rosario Santa Fe 1,325,090 13 Santiago del Estero Santiago del Estero 397,200
4 Mendoza Mendoza 1,109,104 14 Corrientes Corrientes 342,400
5 La Plata Buenos Aires 957,800 15 Avellaneda Buenos Aires 328,980
6 Tucumán Tucumán 903,100 16 Bahía Blanca Buenos Aires 310,200
7 Mar del Plata Buenos Aires 706,600 17 Río Cuarto Córdoba 144,021
8 Salta Salta 556,400 18 Comodoro Rivadavia Chubut 140,628
9 Santa Fe Santa Fe 534,300 19 Santa Rosa La Pampa 110,640
10 San Juan San Juan 498,400 20 Zárate Buenos Aires 101,271
2006 estimation[60]


For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Resistencia is a city in northern Argentina, the capital of the Chaco Province, located on a tributary of the Paraná River. ... Chaco is an Argentine province located on the north of the country, near the border with Paraguay. ... Córdoba is a city located near the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas mountains on the Suquía River, about 700 km west-northwest from Buenos Aires. ... Córdoba is a province of Argentina, located in the center of the country. ... Neuquén is the capital city of the Argentine province of Neuquén, located on the east of the province, at the confluence of the Limay and Neuquén rivers. ... Neuquén is a province of Argentina, located in the west of the country, at the northern end of Patagonia. ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Santa Fe is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... Santiago del Estero is a town in northern Argentina, capital of Santiago del Estero Province, on the Dulce River. ... Santiago del Estero is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... Monument dedicated to the Army of the Andes, on the summit of the Cerro de la Gloria. ... Mendoza is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. ... The city of Corrientes and the Paraná River, photographed from the International Space Station. ... Corrientes is a province in northeast Argentina, in the Mesopotamia region. ... La Plata is the capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as of the partido of La Plata. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Avellaneda is a city in eastern Argentina, a port in Buenos Aires Province, and capital of Avellaneda District. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... San Miguel de Tucumán (usually referred to as simply Tucumán) is the largest city in northwestern Argentina, with a population (2001) of 525,853. ... Tucumán is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Plaza Rivadavia Bahía Blanca is a city located in the south east of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, by the Atlantic Ocean, head town of Bahia Blanca Partido. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Map of Mar del Plata and the surrounding region Panoramic view of Varese beach, Mar del Plata Mar del Plata is an Argentine city located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Buenos Aires Province, 400 km south of Buenos Aires. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ... Río Cuarto is a city in the province of Córdoba, Argentina. ... Córdoba is a province of Argentina, located in the center of the country. ... The inside of Saltas main cathedral Salta is a city in northwestern Argentina and the capital city of the eponymous province. ... Salta is a province of Argentina, located in the northwest of the country. ... Comodoro Rivadavia is a city in the Patagonian province of Chubut in southern Argentina, located on the Gulf of San Jorge, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, at the foot of the Cerro Chenque mountain. ... Chubut is a province in the southern part of Argentina, that lies between the 42nd Parallel South (forming the border with the Río Negro Province) and 46th Parallel South (bordering Santa Cruz Province), the Andes range separating Argentina from Chile, and the Atlantic ocean. ... Santa Fe is the capital city of the Santa Fe Province of Argentina. ... Santa Fe is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... Santa Rosa is a city in the Argentine Pampas, and the capital of La Pampa Province, Argentina. ... La Pampa is a province of Argentina, located in the Pampas in the centre of the country. ... San Juan is the capital city of the Argentine province of San Juan in the Cuyo region, located in the Tulúm Valley, west of the San Juan River, at 46 m (151 ft) above mean sea level, with a population of around 112,000 as per the 2001 census... San Juan is a province of Argentina, located in the western part of the country. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ...


Culture

European and modern styles in Buenos Aires.
European and modern styles in Buenos Aires.
Street in Buenos Aires CBD.
Street in Buenos Aires CBD.
European style architecture.
European style architecture.
Main article: Culture of Argentina

Argentine culture has significant European influences. Buenos Aires, considered by many its cultural capital, is often said to be the most European city in South America, as a result both of the prevalence of people of European descent and of conscious imitation of European styles in architecture. The other big influence is the gauchos and their traditional country lifestyle of self-reliance. Finally, indigenous American traditions (like mate tea drinking) have been absorbed into the general cultural milieu. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (698x800, 164 KB) Example of European and Modern stiles in Buenos Aires (Tribunales). ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (698x800, 164 KB) Example of European and Modern stiles in Buenos Aires (Tribunales). ... CBD may stand for: Central business district Convention on Biological Diversity Cannabidiol, a cannabinoid from Cannabis sativa (hemp). ... The culture of Argentina is as varied as the countrys geography and mix of ethnic groups. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For other uses, see Gaucho (disambiguation). ... Binomial name A. St. ...


Literature

Main article: Argentine literature

Argentina has a rich history of world-class literature, including one of the twentieth century's most critically acclaimed writers, Jorge Luis Borges. The country has been a leader in Latin American literature since becoming a fully united entity in the 1850s, with a strong constitution and a defined nation-building plan. The struggle between the Federalists (who favored a loose confederation of provinces based on rural conservatism) and the Unitarians (pro-liberalism and advocates of a strong central government that would encourage European immigration), set the tone for Argentine literature of the time. Jorge Luis Borges Argentine literature is placed among the most important in Spanish language, with world-famous writers such as José Hernández, Jorge Luis Borges, Manuel Puig, Julio Cortázar and Ernesto Sábato. ... Borges redirects here. ... A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ...


The ideological divide between gaucho epic Martín Fierro by José Hernández, and Facundo[61] by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, is a great example. Hernández, although a federalist, opposed to the centralizing, modernizing, and Europeanizing tendencies. Sarmiento wrote immigration was the only way to save Argentina from becoming subject to the rule of a small number of dictatorial caudillo families, arguing such immigrants would make Argentina more modern and open to Western European influences, and therefore a more prosperous society. For other uses, see Gaucho (disambiguation). ... Martín Fierro is an epic poem by the Argentinean writer José Hernández. ... For the baseball player, see José Hernández. ... Domingo Faustino Sarmiento Albarracín (February 15, 1811 – September 11, 1888) was an Argentine statesman, educator, and author. ... Caudillo is a Spanish (caudilho in Portuguese) word usually used to designate a political-military leader at the head of an authoritative power. ...


Argentine literature of that period was fiercely nationalist. It was followed by the modernist movement, which emerged in France in the late nineteenth century, and this period in turn was followed by vanguardism, with Ricardo Güiraldes as an important reference. Jorge Luis Borges, its most acclaimed writer, found new ways of looking at the modern world in metaphor and philosophical debate, and his influence has extended to writers all over the globe. Borges is most famous for his works in short stories such as Ficciones and The Aleph. Modernist literature is the literary form of Modernism and especially High modernism; it should not be confused with modern literature, which is the history of the modern novel and modern poetry as one. ... In the context of revolutionary struggle, vanguardism is a strategy whereby an organization (usually a vanguard party) attempts to place itself at the center of the movement, and steer it in a direction consistent with its ideology. ... Ricardo Güiraldes (13 February 1886 — 8 October 1927)[1] was an Argentine novelist and poet, one of the most significant Argentine writers of his era, particularly known for his 1926 novel Don Segundo Sombra, set among the gauchos. ... Borges redirects here. ... Ficciones is the most popular anthology of short stories by Jorge Luis Borges, and is considered by many to be the best introduction to his work. ... For other uses, see Aleph (disambiguation). ...


Argentina has produced many more internationally noted writers, poets, and intellectuals: Juan Bautista Alberdi, Roberto Arlt, Enrique Banchs, Adolfo Bioy Cásares, Eugenio Cambaceres, Julio Cortázar, Esteban Echeverría, Leopoldo Lugones, Eduardo Mallea, Ezequiel Martínez Estrada, Tomás Eloy Martínez, Victoria Ocampo, Manuel Puig, Ernesto Sabato, Osvaldo Soriano, Alfonsina Storni, and María Elena Walsh. Quino (born Joaquin Salvador Lavado), has entertained readers the world over, while dipping into the events of modern times, with soup-hating Mafalda and her comic strip gang. Juan Bautista Alberdi (29 August 1810-19 June 1884) was a Argentian political theorist and diplomat. ... Roberto Arlt (1900-1942) was an Argentinian short-story writer, novelist and playwright. ... Enrique Banchs (1888 - 1968) was an Argentine poet. ... Adolfo Bioy Casares (September 15, 1914 - March 18, 1999) was an Argentine fiction writer. ... Eugenio Cambaceres (Buenos Aires, 1843 - Buenos Aires, 1888) Argentine writer and politician. ... Julio Cortázar (August 26, 1914 - February 12, 1984) was an Argentine intellectual and author of several experimental novels and many short stories. ... Esteban Echeverría (September 2, 1805 – January 19, 1851) was an Argentine poet, fiction writer, cultural promoter, and political activist who played a significant role in the development of Argentine literature, not only through his own writings but also through his sponsoring efforts. ... Leopoldo Lugones (13 June 1874 - 1938) was an Argentine writer and journalist. ... Eduardo Mallea (14 August 1903, Bahía Blanca, Argentina - 12 November 1982, Buenos Aires) was a writer and diplomat. ... Ezequiel Martínez Estrada (September 14, 1895-November 4, 1964) was an Argentine writer, poet, essayist, and literary critic. ... Tomás Eloy Martínez (born July 16, 1934 in Tucumán) is an Argentine journalist and writer. ... Victoria Ocampo (April 7, 1890? - January 27, 1979) was an Argentine intellectual, described by Jorge Luis Borges as la mujer más argentina (the most Argentine woman). Best known as an advocate for others and as publisher of the magazine Sur, she was also a writer and critic in her... Manuel Puig (General Villegas, December 28, 1932 - Cuernavaca, July 22, 1990) was an Argentinian author. ... Ernesto Sábato (born June 24, 1911) is an Argentine writer of Italian and Arbëreshë (Italian Albanian) descent. ... Alfonsina Storni was born in April of 1892 in the mountain village of Sala Capriasca. ... María Elena Walsh (born on February 1, 1930 in Ramos Mejía, Buenos Aires) is an Argentine musician and writer known for her songs and books for children. ... Joaquín Salvador Lavado, better known by his pen name Quino, is an Argentine cartoonist born on July 17, 1932 in Mendoza. ... Excerpt from strip #1822: Were screwed, guys! It turns out that if you dont hurry up and change the world, it ends up changing you! Mafalda, first written and drawn in 1962, is a comic and a series of animated cartoons and a movie (1982), written and drawn... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ...


Film and theatre

The Nueve de Julio Avenue, sometimes referenced to as "the world's widest street". Its name honors Argentine Independence Day (July 9, 1816).
The Nueve de Julio Avenue, sometimes referenced to as "the world's widest street". Its name honors Argentine Independence Day (July 9, 1816).
Main article: Cinema of Argentina

Argentina is a major producer of motion pictures. The world's first animated feature films were made and released in Argentina, by cartoonist Quirino Cristiani, in 1917 and 1918. Argentine cinema enjoyed a 'golden age' in the 1930s through the 1950s with scores of productions, many now considered classics of Spanish-language film. The industry produced actors who became the first movie stars of Argentine cinema, often tango performers such as Libertad Lamarque, Floren Delbene, Tito Lusiardo, Tita Merello, Roberto Escalada, and Hugo del Carril. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (923x520, 153 KB) Template:Ev File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Buenos Aires 9 de Julio Avenue ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (923x520, 153 KB) Template:Ev File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Buenos Aires 9 de Julio Avenue ... View looking south. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Cinema of Argentina has a long tradition, and plays an important role in the culture of Argentina. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... This is a list of animated feature-length films from around the world organised chronologically by year; theatrical releases as well as made-for-TV and direct-to-video movies. ... Quirino Cristiani (July 2, 1896 - August 2, 1984) was an Argentine animation director and cartoonist, responsible for the worlds first two animated feature films as well as the first animated feature film with sound. ... The Cinema of Argentina has a long tradition, and plays an important role in the culture of Argentina. ... Libertad Lamarque (born November 24, 1908 in Rosario—died December 12, 2000 in Mexico City) was an iconic Argentine actress who became famous in Latin America while working in Mexican cinema. ... Floren Delbene (1898 - 1978 in Buenos Aires) was an Argentine film actor of the classic era. ... Tito Lusiardo (September 13, 1896 - June 24, 1982 in Buenos Aires) was an iconic Argentine film actor and tango singer of the classic era. ... Tita Merello (11 October 1904 - 24 December 2002 in Buenos Aires) was a prominent Argentine film actress, and tango dancer and singer. ... Roberto Escalada born Aldo Roberto Leggero (4 July 1914-5 December 1986 in Buenos Aires) was a major Argentine film actor and cinema icon of the classic era. ... Pierre Bruno Hugo Fontana otherwise known as Hugo del Carril (30 November 1912 - 13 August 1989 in Buenos Aires) was an Argentine film actor and film director of the classic era. ...


More recent films from the "New Wave" of cinema since the 1980s have achieved worldwide recognition, such as The Official Story (La historia official), Nine Queens (Nueve reinas), Man Facing Southeast (Hombre mirando al sudeste), Son of the Bride (El hijo de la novia), The Motorcycle Diaries (Diarios de motocicleta), or Iluminados por el fuego. Although rarely rivaling Hollywood-type movies in popularity, local films are released weekly and widely followed in Argentina and internationally. Even low-budget films have earned prizes in cinema festivals (such as Cannes). The city of Mar del Plata organizes its own film festival, while Buenos Aires has its independent cinema counterpart. The per capita number of screens is one of the highest in Latin America, and viewing per capita is the highest in the region. A new generation of Argentine directors has caught the attention of critics worldwide.[62] Additionally, Argentina is a major center of cinema, it is compared to other European countries in terms of people who attend movie theaters. An example of this was Spider-Man 3 which took in 466,586 the first day a record in Argentina. In Italy it took in 400,000 and Germany 486,571, breaking all records for first day release.[63] The Official Story (Spanish: La Historia Oficial) is a 1985 Argentinean film directed by Luis Puenzo and written by Puenzo and Aída Bortnik. ... Nine Queens (original title in Spanish, Nueve reinas) is a 2000 Argentine film directed by Fabián Bielinsky and starring Gastón Pauls, Ricardo Darín, Leticia Brédice and Tomás Fonzi. ... El Hijo de la Novia (English: Son of the Bride) is an Argentine 2001 film, directed by Juan José Campanella, and written by Campanella and Fernando Castets. ... The Motorcycle Diaries (Spanish: Diarios de motocicleta) is a 2004 biographical film about the young man who would later become internationally known as Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara. ... ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Map of Mar del Plata and the surrounding region Panoramic view of Varese beach, Mar del Plata Mar del Plata is an Argentine city located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Buenos Aires Province, 400 km south of Buenos Aires. ... Upcoming 22nd Mar del Plata International Film Festival logo The Mar del Plata International Film Festival (Spanish: Festival Internacional de Cine de Mar del Plata) is a prestigious international film festival that takes place every year, during the month of March in the city of Mar del Plata, Argentina. ... Upcoming 9th Buenos Aires International Independent Film Festival logo The Buenos Aires Festival Internacional de Cine Independiente (BAFICI, English: Buenos Aires International Independent Film Festival) is an international festival of independent films organized each year in the month of April, in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... Spider-Man 3 is a 2007 superhero film written and directed by Sam Raimi, with a screenplay by Ivan Raimi and Alvin Sargent. ...


Buenos Aires is one of the great capitals of theater. The Teatro Colon is a national landmark for opera and classical performances. Built at the ending of XIX century, Teatro Colon's acoustic is considered the best in the world. Currently it is undergoing major refurbishment, in order to preserve its outstanding sound characteristics, the french-romantic style, the impressive Golden Room (a minor auditorium targeted to Chamber Music performances), and the museum at the entrance. Enrico Caruso, B.Gigli, Félix Weingartner, Artur Nikisch, Richard Strauss,Arturo Toscanini, Igor Stravinsky, Paul Hindemith, Camille Saint-Saëns, Manuel de Falla, Aaron Copland, Krzysztof Penderecki, Gian-Carlo Menotti, Wilhelm Furtwängler, Herbert von Karajan, Tullio Serafin, Gino Marinuzzi, Albert Wolff, Víctor De Sabata, Leonard Bernstein, Mstislav Rostropovich, Sir Malcolm Sargent, Karl Böhm, Fernando Previtali, Sir Thomas Beecham, Ferdinand Leitner, Lorin Maazel, Igor Markevitch, Bernard Haitink, Zubin Mehta, Marek Janowsky, Aldo Ceccato, Riccardo Muti, Kurt Masur, Michel Corboz, Franz-Paul Decker, Riccardo Chailly, Sir Simon Rattle, Claudio Abbado, René Jacobs are among the artists, composers and conductors who performed in this opera house. For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... For the song Caruso by Lucio Dalla, see Caruso (song). ...


Besides the Teatro Colón (one of the great opera houses of the world), with its program of national and international caliber, Calle Corrientes, or Corrientes Avenue, is synonymous with the art. It is dubbed 'the street that never sleeps', and sometimes referred to as the Broadway of Buenos Aires.[64] Many great careers in acting, music, and film have begun in its many theaters. The Teatro General San Martín is one of the most prestigious along Corrientes Avenue; the Teatro Nacional Cervantes is designated the national theater of Argentina. Another important theater is the Independencia in Mendoza. Florencio Sanchez and Griselda Gambaro are famous Argentine playwrights. Julio Bocca is one of the great ballet dancers of the modern era. Night shot of the Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... An opera house is a building where operas are performed. ... The Corrientes Avenue (also called “street”) in Buenos Aires, the city capital of Argentina, is where the Tango was created, in famous cafes and bars where the orchestras and singers acted in its pinnacle, in the decades of the 40s and 50s. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... Monument dedicated to the Army of the Andes, on the summit of the Cerro de la Gloria. ... Griselda Gambaro (born Buenos Aires, July 28, 1928) is a major Latin American playwright and novelist. ... Julio Bocca (b. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


Painting and sculpture

Perhaps one of the most enigmatic figures of Argentine culture is Oscar Agustín Alejandro Schulz Solari, aka Xul Solar, whose watercolor style and unorthodox painting media draws large crowds at museums worldwide; he also 'invented' two imaginary languages. The works of Candido Lopez (in Naïve art style), Emilio Pettoruti (cubist), Antonio Berni (neo-figurative style), Fernando Fader, and Guillermo Kuitca are appreciated internationally. Xul Solar was the adopted name of Oscar Agust n Alejandro Schulz Solari (December 14, 1887 - April 9, 1963), Argentinian painter, sculptor, writer, and inventor of imaginary languages. ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... Representation of the Brazilian Army at Curuzú during the War of the Triple Alliance Cándido López (1840-December 31, 1902) was an Argentine painter and soldier. ... Example of Henri Rousseaus work: The Repast of the Lion, circa 1907 Naïve art is created by untrained artists. ... Emilio Pettoruti (born 1892-10-01 in La Plata, dead 1971-10-16 in Paris) was an Argentine painter. ... Woman with a guitar by Georges Braque, 1913 Cubism was an avant-garde art movement that revolutionised European painting and sculpture in the early 20th century. ... Delesio Antonio Berni was a neofigurative artist, born in Rosario, province of Santa Fe, Argentina, on 14 May 1905, died on 13 October 1981. ... Neo-figurative art describes a expressionist revival in modern form of figurative art. ... Guillermo Kuitca, Visual Artist. ...


Benito Quinquela Martín is considered to be the quintesennial 'port' painter, to which the city of Buenos Aires and particularly the working class and immigrant-bound La Boca neighborhood, was excellently suited for. Lucio Fontana and Leon Ferrari are acclaimed sculptors and conceptual artists. Ciruelo is a world-wide famous fantasy artist and sculptor. Quinquela Martín Benito Quinquela Martín (March 1(?), 1890 — January 28, 1977) was an Argentine painter born in La Boca, Buenos Aires. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... La Boca is a neighborhood, or barrio of the Argentine capital, Buenos Aires. ... Lucio Fontana (19 February 1899 â€“ 7 September 1968) was a painter and sculptor born in Rosario, province of Santa Fe, Argentina, the son of an Italian father and an Argentine mother. ... León Ferrari (b. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Chairs (1965) Conceptual art is art in which the concept(s) or idea(s) involved in the work take precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns. ... Ciruelo Cabral (born July 20, 1963) is an argentinian fantasy artist, whose work focuses especially on dragons. ...


Food and drink

Argentine food is influenced by cuisine from Spain, Italy, Germany, France and other European countries, and many foods from those countries such as pasta, sausages, and desserts are common in the nation's diet. Argentina has a wide variety of staple foods, which include empanadas, a stuffed pastry; locro, a mixture of corn, beans, meat, bacon, onion, and gourd; and chorizo, a spicy sausage. Other popular items include facturas (Viennese-style pastry), Dulce de Leche and mate, Argentina's national beverage. This article was a former Spanish Translation of the Week. ... In Spain, Portugal, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Philippines, an empanada (Portuguese empada- a different dish) is essentially a stuffed pastry. ... Locro is a hearty stew popular in Argentina. ... Chorizo (in Spanish; IPA: [tʃoriθo] or [tʃoɹɪso]) or Chouriço (in Portuguese) is a term encompassing several types of pork sausage originating from the Iberian Peninsula. ... Basket of western-style pastries, for breakfast Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Pastries For the Pastry Distributed Hash Table, see Pastry (DHT). ... A jar of dulce de leche Dulce de leche in Spanish or doce de leite in Portuguese (milk candy), is a milk-based syrup. ... Mate Mate (pronounced ) is a caffeinated infusion prepared by steeping dried leaves of erva-mate (Portuguese) / yerba mate (Spanish) (Ilex paraguariensis) in hot water. ...

Asado
Asado

The Argentine barbecue, asado as well as a parrillada, is one of the most famous in the world and includes various types of meats, among them chorizo, sweetbread, chitterlings, and morcilla (blood sausage). Thin sandwiches, sandwiches de miga, are also popular. Argentines have the highest consumption of red meat in the world.[65] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1570x1235, 355 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Cuisine of Argentina Argentine beef Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1570x1235, 355 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Cuisine of Argentina Argentine beef Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Asado is cuts of meat, usually beef, which are cooked on a grill (parrilla) or open fire. ... Sweetbread is the name of a dish made of the pancreas (belly/stomach) or thymus gland (neck/throat/gullet/heart sweetbread) of an animal younger than one year old. ... Chitlins in broth. ... Morcilla cocida: Spanish-style blood sausage Blood sausage or black pudding or blood pudding is a sausage made by cooking down the blood of an animal with meat, fat or filler until it is thick enough to congeal when cooled. ... Sandwiches de miga are popular food items in Argentina. ... Red meat in culinary terminology refers to meat which is red-colored when raw, while in nutritional terminology, it refers to meat from mammals. ...


Since 1992 Argentina has invested over 650 million dollars to modernize the wine industry. The country is an important wine producer, rated fifth in the world, with the annual per capita consumption of wine amongst the highest in the world. (Malbec has become a representative variety from Argentina). Malbec grape, a discardable varietal in France (country of origin), has found in Province of Mendoza an ideal environment to successfully develop and turn itself into tthe world's best Malbec. The city of Mendoza is one of the eight wine capitals of the world,[66] and Mendoza accounts for 70% of the country total production (all varietals considered). "Wine tourism" is important in the Province of Mendoza, with the impressive landscape of Cordillera de Los Andes and the highest peak in America, Mount Aconcagua, 6952 meters high, providing a very desirable destination for international tourism. Vineyards in Agrelo, Mendoza. ... Malbec is a black, mellow grape variety originally grown in France, in the Loire Valley and Cahors. ... Monument dedicated to the Army of the Andes, on the summit of the Cerro de la Gloria. ...


Sports

See also: List of Argentines and Sport in Argentina
Ignacio Corleto of Los Pumas on his way to score a try against France in the 2007 Rugby World Cup. They beat France 34 - 10. Argentina reached third place in the tournament
Ignacio Corleto of Los Pumas on his way to score a try against France in the 2007 Rugby World Cup. They beat France 34 - 10. Argentina reached third place in the tournament

Football (soccer) is the most popular sport in Argentina, whose national team is twice FIFA World Cup Champion and one-time Olympic Gold medalist (also fourteen-time Copa América winners).[67] This is a list of Argentines who are famous or notable. ... Without doubt, the most important sport in Argentina is football (soccer). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 441 pixelsFull resolution (2548 × 1404 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 441 pixelsFull resolution (2548 × 1404 pixel, file size: 2. ... Ignacio Nani Corleto (born 21 June 1978, Buenos Aires) is an Argentine Rugby Union footballer who plays Fullback position. ... First international Argentina  3 - 28  British Isles (12 June 1910) Largest win Paraguay  0 - 152  Argentina (1 May 2002) Worst defeat New Zealand  93 - 8  Argentina (21 June 1997) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Bronze, 2007 The Argentina national rugby team, nicknamed Los Pumas, is currently... The 2007 Rugby World Cup is the sixth Rugby World Cup, a quadrennial international rugby union world championship inaugurated in 1987. ... British immigrants to Buenos Aires brought football (along with rugby and other sports) to Argentina in the 19th century. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... Without doubt, the most important sport in Argentina is football (soccer). ... First international Uruguay 2 - 3 Argentina (Montevideo, Uruguay; 16 May 1901) Biggest win Argentina 12 - 0 Ecuador (Montevideo, Uruguay; 22 January 1942) Biggest defeat Czechoslovakia 6 - 1 Argentina (Helsingborg, Sweden; 15 June 1958) Uruguay 5 - 0 Argentina (Guayaquil, Ecuador; 16 December 1959) Argentina 0 - 5 Colombia (Buenos Aires, Argentina; 5... The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the mens national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


Also widespread are volleyball and basketball; a number of basketball players participate in the NBA and European leagues. Manu Ginobili, Andres Nocioni, Carlos Delfino, and Fabricio Oberto are a few, and the national team won Olympic Gold in the Athens Olympics. Argentina has an important rugby union football team, "Los Pumas" (see Argentina national rugby union team), with many of its players playing in Europe. Argentina beat host nation France twice in the Rugby World Cup 2007, placing them third in the competition. The Pumas currently sit at third spot in the International Rugby Board's official world rankings. Argentine tennis is very competitive on the world stage, with dozens of players, male and female, in active tour. For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... This article is about the sport. ... NBA redirects here. ... Basketball at the 2004 Summer Olympics took place at the indoor arena in the Helliniko Olympic Complex for the preliminary rounds, with the latter stages being held in the Olympic Indoor Hall at the Athens Olympic Sports Complex. ... Argentina (blue) playing England (white) at Twickenham. ... First international Argentina  3 - 28  British Isles (12 June 1910) Largest win Paraguay  0 - 152  Argentina (1 May 2002) Worst defeat New Zealand  93 - 8  Argentina (21 June 1997) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Bronze, 2007 The Argentina national rugby team, nicknamed Los Pumas, is currently... The IRB logo. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...


Other popular sports include field hockey (the top female sport, see Las Leonas), golf, and sailing. Argentina has the highest number of highly-ranked polo players in the world and the national squad has been the uninterrupted world champion ever since 1949. The Open Polo Championship of Buenos Aires is the most important polo-related event in the world. Cricket is growing in popularity due to the National Team's recent successes where they came as the underdogs and finished runner's up of the Inaugural World Cricket League Division 3. Baseball is played in a most limited fashion, as well as the Gridiron.[68] A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... Las Leonas are Argentinas national womens field hockey team. ... This article is about the game. ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... The ICC World Cricket League is a series of international one-day cricket tournaments for national teams without Test status, administered by the International Cricket Council. ... This article is about the sport. ...


Motorsports are well represented in Argentina, with Turismo Carretera and TC 2000 being the most popular car racing formats. People all over the country enjoy the races, but it is most fervently followed in small towns and rural Argentina, attracting a rather similar demographic as NASCAR in the United States. The Rally Argentina is part of the World Rally Championship (currently held in Córdoba Province). In Formula 1 racing, the country produced one world champion (Juan Manuel Fangio, five times) and two runners-up (Froilán González and Carlos Reutemann, once each) Auto racing (also known as automobile racing or autosport) is a sport involving racing automobiles. ... Turismo Carretera (English: Road racing, lit. ... The TC 2000 or TC2000 (Turismo Competición 2000) is a series of races for tourism cars which is held each year in Argentina. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The Rally Argentina is the ninth rally on the World Rally Championship schedule for 2005, and the 25th Argentine rally. ... The World Rally Championship (WRC) is a rallying series organised by the FIA, culminating with a champion driver and manufacturer. ... Carlos Reutemann at the wheel of the Brabham BT44 during the 1974 Race of Champions at Brands Hatch. ...


The official national sport of the country is pato, played with a six-handle ball on horseback. Pato is a game played on horseback that combines elements from polo and basketball. ...


Music

Main article: Music of Argentina

Tango, the music and lyrics (often sung in a form of slang called lunfardo), is Argentina's musical symbol. The Milonga dance was a predecessor, slowly evolving into modern tango. By the 1930s, tango had changed from a dance-focused music to one of lyric and poetry, with singers like Carlos Gardel, Roberto Goyeneche, Hugo del Carril, Tita Merello, and Edmundo Rivero. The golden age of tango (1930 to mid-1950s) mirrored that of Jazz and Swing in the United States, featuring large orchestral groups too, like the bands of Osvaldo Pugliese, Anibal Troilo, Francisco Canaro, and Juan D'Arienzo. After 1955 tango turned more intellectual and listener-oriented, led by Astor Piazzolla. Today tango has worldwide popularity, and the rise of neo-tango is a global phenomenon with groups like Tanghetto, Bajofondo and Gotan Project. Internationally, Argentina is known mostly for the tango, which developed in Buenos Aires and surrounding areas, as well as Montevideo, Uruguay. ... Lunfardo was a colorful, slangy argot of the Spanish language which developed at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century in the lower classes in and around Buenos Aires. ... Milonga is a South American form of music, as dance, as the term for the place where tango is danced. ... Carlos Gardel (1933) Carlos Gardel (11 December 1887/18901 - 24 June 1935 Medellín, Colombia) was perhaps the most prominent figure in the history of tango. ... Roberto Goyeneche (January 29, 1926 ? August 27, 1994) was an Argentine tango singer who epitomized the archetype of 1950s Buenos Aires bohemian life, and became a living myth in the local music scene. ... Pierre Bruno Hugo Fontana otherwise known as Hugo del Carril (30 November 1912 - 13 August 1989 in Buenos Aires) was an Argentine film actor and film director of the classic era. ... Tita Merello (11 October 1904 - 24 December 2002 in Buenos Aires) was a prominent Argentine film actress, and tango dancer and singer. ... Leonel Edmundo Rivero (June 8, 1911 – January 18, 1986) was an Argentine tango singer and impresario. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see swing. ... Aníbal Troilo was the bandoneon player who defined the instrument for his generation. ... Uruguayan born violinist and (Argentine tango) orchestra leader Francisco Pirincho Canaro (1888-1964) had a career that spanned many decades, and his orchestra was one of the most recorded. ... Juan DArienzo ( 1900- 1976) was known as El Rey del Compas (King of the Beat). ... Photograph of Piazzolla playing his bandoneon. ... Tango is a style of music that originated among European immigrant populations of Argentina and Uruguay. ... Tanghetto in a live performance (2005) Tanghetto is a musical group based in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and one of the most important on the neo tango scene. ... Bajofondo Tango Club is a South American music band consisting of seven musicians from Argentina and Uruguay. ... Gotan Project is a musical group based in Paris, consisting of musicians Philippe Cohen Solal (French), Eduardo Makaroff (Argentine) and Christoph H. Müller (Swiss, former member of Touch El Arab). ...


Argentine rock, called rock nacional, is the most popular music among youth. Arguably the most listened form of Spanish-language rock, its influence and success internationally owes to a rich, uninterrupted evolution. Bands such as Soda Stereo or Sumo, and composers like Charly García, Luis Alberto Spinetta, and Fito Páez are referents of national culture. Mid 1960s Buenos Aires and Rosario were cradles of the music, and by 1970 Argentine rock was established among middle class youth (see Almendra, Sui Generis, Pappo, Crucis). Seru Giran bridged the gap into the 1980s, when Argentine bands became popular across Latin America and elsewhere (Enanitos Verdes, Fabulosos Cadillacs, Virus, Andres Calamaro). There are many sub-genres: underground, pop oriented, and some associated with the working class (La Renga, Attaque 77, Divididos, Los Redonditos). Current popular bands include: Babasonicos, Rata Blanca, El Otro Yo, Attaque 77, Bersuit, Los Piojos, Intoxicados, Catupecu Machu, and Miranda!. Argentine rock applies loosely to any variety of rock music, blues and heavy metal from Argentina. ... Soda Stereo or Soda Stéreo is an influential Argentine rock power trio formed in 1982 (see 1982 in music) consisting of guitarist and vocalist Gustavo Cerati, bassist Zeta Bosio and drummer Charly Alberti. ... Sumo was a 1980s Music group from Argentina. ... Charly García (born Carlos Alberto García Moreno in Buenos Aires on October 23, 1951) is an influential artist in the history of rock and roll in Argentina. ... Luis Alberto Spinetta (born January 23, 1950), is an Argentine musician. ... Fito Páez Rodolfo Fito Páez (born March 13, 1963 in Rosario, Santa Fe Province) is an Argentine popular rock and roll pianist, lyricist, Spanish language singer and film director. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Almendra may refer to: Almendra (band), a rock and roll band from Buenos Aires, Argentina Almendra, Salamanca, a village in western Spain aLmEnDRa RoOockS! Category: ... Sui generis is a (post) Latin expression, literally meaning a scholar like what pradeep is or unique in its characteristics. ... Pappo is the pseudonym of Argentine rock musician Norberto Napolitano (Buenos Aires, 10 March 1950 - Luján, Buenos Aires province, 24 February 2005). ... Crucis was an Argentinian band often considered to be one of the most important of national progressive rock. ... Serú Girán is one of the most important bands pf the Argentine rock. ... Los Enanitos Verdes (Little Green Men) is a successful music group from Argentina. ... Los Fabulosos Cadillacs are a latin-rock band from Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... Virus is an Argentine pop group, leaded by Federico Moura until his death on 1988. ... Andrés Calamaro (born August 22, 1961 in Buenos Aires) is an Argentine musician and composer. ... La Renga is a rock band from Argentina, started in 1987. ... Attaque 77 (Attack 77) is an Argentine Punk rock group formed in 1987. ... Divididos (Divided) is a rock band from Argentina with a significant place in the history of Argentine rock. ... Patricio Rey y Sus Redonditos de Ricota was a rock band originally from La Plata, Argentina whose tours in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s drew a cult-like following that mirrored The Grateful Dead frenzy in the United States. ... Babasónicos is an Argentine music band, formed in the early 1990s along with others such as Peligrosos Gorriones and Los Brujos. ... Rata Blanca is a classic heavy metal band from Argentina that formed in the 1980s. ... El Otro Yo is an Argentine alternative rock band formed in the early 1990s. ... Attaque 77 (Attack 77) is an Argentine Punk rock group formed in 1987. ... Bersuit Vergarabat, formed formally in 1989, is one of the most important Argentine rock bands of the 1990s/2000s. ... Los Piojos are a rock band from Argentina, highly popular, and one of the seminal bands of the 1990s argentine suburban rock movement. ... Catupecu Machu is an Argentine rock band, usually clasified as within Rock en Español. ... Miranda! is an Argentine electro pop band, formed in 2001. ...


European classical music is well represented in Argentina. Buenos Aires is home to the world-renowned Colón Theater. Classical musicians, such as Martha Argerich, Daniel Barenboim, Eduardo Alonso-Crespo, Eduardo Delgado, Lalo Schiffrin, and classical composers such as Alberto Ginastera, are internationally acclaimed. All major cities in Argentina have impressive theaters or opera houses, and provincial or city orchestras. Some cities have annual events and important classical music festivals like Semana Musical Llao Llao in San Carlos de Bariloche and the multitudinous Amadeus in Buenos Aires. Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Night shot of the Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires, Argentina The present Colón Theater (Spanish:Teatro Colón) in Buenos Aires, Argentina is one of the most famous opera houses in the world. ... Martha Argerich in 1962 Martha Argerich (born June 5, 1941) is a concert pianist of Argentine origin. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... // Argentine composer and conductor Eduardo Alonso-Crespo was born in San Miguel de Tucumán in 1956, and grew up in the neighboring city of Salta, in Northwestern Argentina. ... Lalo Schifrin (born on June 21, 1932) is an Argentinian pianist and composer, most famous for composing the burning-fuse theme tune from the Mission:Impossible television series. ... Alberto Evaristo Ginastera (Buenos Aires, April 11, 1916 – June 25, 1983 Geneva) was an Argentinian composer of classical music. ... Ever since its creation in 1993, Semana Musical has become an important event, awaited by critics, musicians, and audience. ... San Carlos de Bariloche is a city in the province of Río Negro, Argentina, situated on the foothills of the Andes, surrounded by lakes (Nahuel Huapi, Gutiérrez Lake, Moreno Lake and Mascardi Lake) and mountains (Tronador, Cerro Catedral, Cerro López). ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ...


Argentine folk music is uniquely vast. Beyond dozens of regional dances, a national folk style emerged in the 1930s. Perón's Argentina would give rise to Nueva Canción, as artists began expressing in their music objections to political themes. Atahualpa Yupanqui, the greatest Argentine folk musician, and Mercedes Sosa would be defining figures in shaping Nueva Canción, gaining worldwide popularity in the process. The style found a huge reception in Chile, where it took off in the 1970s and went on to influence the entirety of Latin American music.[69] Today, Chango Spasiuk and Soledad Pastorutti have brought folk back to younger generations. Leon Gieco's folk-rock bridged the gap between argentine folklore and argentine rock, introducing both styles to millions overseas in successive tours. Juan Domingo Perón (October 8, 1895 – July 1, 1974) was an Argentine military officer and the President of Argentina from 1946 to 1955 and from 1973 to 1974. ... Nueva canción (Spanish for new song) was a movement in Latin American music that emerged in the mid-1960s, taking root in South America, especially Chile and other Andean countries. ... Atahualpa Yupanqui performing for Radio Nacional, Buenos Aires. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Mercedes Sosa (born 9 July 1935) is an Argentine singer immensely popular throughout Latin America. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Chango Spasiuk in concert in London in 2004. ... Soledad in concert at the Salón Blanco of the Casa Rosada. ... Raúl Alberto Antonio Gieco, better known as León Gieco (born on November 20, 1951 in a farm near Cañada Rosquín on northern Santa Fe, Argentina) is a pop-folk music composer and interpreter. ... Internationally, Argentina is known mostly for the tango, which developed in Buenos Aires and surrounding areas, as well as Montevideo, Uruguay. ... Argentine rock applies loosely to any variety of rock music, blues and heavy metal from Argentina. ...


Other notable musicians include Gato Barbieri with his seductive saxophone and free jazz compositions, and Jaime Torres and his spacious andean music. Leandro Barbieri (born on November 28, 1934 in Rosario, Santa Fe Province) better known as El Gato Barbieri (Spanish for Barbieri the Cat) is an Argentine jazz tenor saxophonist and composer who rose to fame during the free jazz movement in the 1960s and from his latin jazz recordings in... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Jaime Torres may refer to: Jaime Torres Bodet (1902–1974), Mexican politician and intellectual, director-general of UNESCO Jaime Torres (musician) (b. ... A quena, a traditional Andean instrument Andean music comes from the approximate area inhabited by the Incas prior to European contact. ...


Religion

The Cathedral of Córdoba, dating back to the seventeenth century.
The Cathedral of Córdoba, dating back to the seventeenth century.
Main article: Religion in Argentina
See also: State-Church relations in Argentina

Argentines are predominantly Roman Catholic. Around 93% declare themselves Roman Catholic according to different surveys; the Church estimates an affiliation of 70%.[70][71] According to the Constitution, the Argentine government should support Roman Catholicism. However, this does not imply that it is the official religion of the Argentine Republic, nor does it imply that people working in the government should have this faith. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 422 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Córdoba, Argentina Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 422 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Córdoba, Argentina Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... A majority of the population of Argentina is nominally Roman Catholic. ... The first conflicts between the Roman Catholic Church and the Argentine government can be traced to the ideas of the May Revolution of 1810. ...


Evangelical churches have gained a foothold in Argentina since the 1980s, and their followers now number more than 3.5 million, about 10% of the total population. Traditional Protestant communities are present in most communities. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) numbering over 330,300, the seventh-largest concentration in the world, are also present.[72] For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ...


The country also hosts the largest Jewish population in all of Latin America, about 2 percent of the population.[73] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ...


Islam in Argentina constitutes approximately 1.5% of the population, or an estimated 500,000-600,000 (93% Sunni).[74] Argentina is also home to one of the largest mosques in Latin America, serving Argentina's Muslim community. Islam in Argentina is represented by one of Latin Americas largest Muslim minorities. ... Sunni Islam is the largest denomination of Islam. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Islam in Argentina is represented by one of Latin Americas largest Muslim minorities. ...


Approximately 12% of Argentines can be considered agnostic, and 4% are atheists. The term agnosticism and the related agnostic were coined by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1869. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ...


Language

See also: Languages of Argentina and List of indigenous languages in Argentina

The official language of Argentina is Spanish, usually called "Castellano" (Castilian) by Argentines. The spoken languages of Argentina number at least 40, including native and immigrant languages; two languages are extinct and others are endangered, spoken by elderly people whose descendants do not speak the languages. ... This is a list of Indigenous languages that are or were spoken in the present territory of Argentina. ... Castilian is a noun and adjective that refers to the region and former kingdom of Spain; in particular, it refers to the language of this region, and is therefore considered by many to be a synonym of Spanish, though with different nuances. ...


A phonetic study conducted by the Laboratory for Sensory Investigations of CONICET and the University of Toronto showed that the accent of the inhabitants of Buenos Aires (known as porteños) is closer to the Neapolitan dialect of Italian than any other spoken language. Italian immigration and other European immigrations influenced Lunfardo, the slang spoken in the Río de la Plata region, permeating the vernacular vocabulary of other regions as well. The Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (National Scientific and Technical Research Council, CONICET) is an Argentine government agency which directs and co-ordinates most of the scientific and technical research done in public universities and institutes. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Porteño is the Spanish demonym for those born in the Argentine city of Buenos Aires. ... Neapolitan (autonym: napulitano; Italian: ) is a Romance language spoken in the city and region of Naples, Campania (Neapolitan: Nàpule, Italian: Napoli); close dialects are spoken throughout most of southern Italy, including the Gaeta and Sora districts of southern Lazio, parts of Abruzzo, Molise, Basilicata, northern Calabria, and northern and... Lunfardo was a colorful, slangy argot of the Spanish language which developed at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century in the lower classes in and around Buenos Aires. ...


Argentines are the largest Spanish-speaking society that universally employs what is known as voseo (the use of the pronoun vos instead of (you), which occasions the use of alternate verb forms as well). The most prevalent dialect is Rioplatense, whose speakers are primarily located in the basin of the Río de la Plata. Countries that feature voseo. ... In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun is a pro-form that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase with or without a determiner, such as you and they in English. ... Main urban centers of Rioplatense Spanish. ... This page is about the South American estuary. ...


Standard German is spoken by between 400,000 and 500,000[75] Argentines of German ancestry, though it has also been stated that the there could be as much as 1,800,000.[76] German today, is the third or fourth most spoken language in Argentina. Standard German is the prescriptive norm variant of the German language used as a written language, in formal contexts, and for communication between different dialect areas. ...


According to one survey, there are around 1,500,000 Italian speakers[77] (which makes it the second most spoken language in the country) and 1,000,000 speakers of Levantine Arabic,[77] but these numbers are probably no longer current, as the newer generations mostly switch to Spanish and do not speak the ancestral language in the home. The same phenomenon applies to the Galician language that was used by many Spanish immigrants, Yiddish, and Japanese. The usage of these languages is in decline, as the respective immigration waves ended in the first half of the 20th century. Arabic redirects here. ... Galician (Galician: galego, IPA: ) is a language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch, spoken in Galicia, an autonomous community with the constitutional status of historic nationality, located in northwestern Spain and small bordering zones in neighbouring autonomous communities of Asturias and Castilla y León. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ...


Some indigenous communities have retained their original languages. Guaraní is spoken by some in the northeast, especially in Corrientes (where it enjoys official status) and Misiones. Quechua is spoken by some in the northwest, and has a local variant in Santiago del Estero. Aymara is spoken by members of the Bolivian community who migrated to Argentina from Bolivia. In Patagonia there are several Welsh-speaking communities. More recent immigrants have brought Chinese and Korean, mostly to Buenos Aires. English, Brazilian Portuguese and French are also spoken. English is commonly taught at schools, with Portuguese and French behind. This is a List of native American languages in Argentina Although the official language of Argentina is Spanish, there are still native American languages spoken there. ... Guaraní (local name: avañeẽ ) is an Amerindian language of South America that belongs to the Tupí-Guaraní subfamily. ... Corrientes is a province in northeast Argentina, in the Mesopotamia region. ... Misiones is one of the 23 provinces of Argentina, located in the northeastern corner of the country in the Mesopotamia region. ... Quechua (Runa Simi in Quechua; Runa, human + Simi, speech, literally mouth; i. ... Santiago del Estero is a province of Argentina, located in the north of the country. ... Aymara is an Aymaran language spoken by the Aymara of the Andes. ... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... The Welsh settlement in Argentina began in the 19th century. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Brazilian Portuguese (português do Brasil in Portuguese) is a group of dialects of Portuguese written and spoken by virtually all the 190 million inhabitants of Brazil and by a couple of million Brazilian emigrants, mainly in the United States, United Kingdom, Portugal, Canada, Japan, and Paraguay. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ...


Education

After independence, Argentina constructed a national public education system in comparison to other nations, placing the country high up in the global rankings of literacy. Today the country has a literacy rate of 97% (2003 Est.) [6] Children reading. ... World literacy rates by country, based on The World Factbook. ...

The ubiquitous white uniform of Argentine school children; it is a national symbol of learning.
The ubiquitous white uniform of Argentine school children; it is a national symbol of learning.

School attendance is compulsory between the ages of 5 and 17. The Argentine school system consists of a primary or lower school level lasting six or seven years, and a secondary or high school level lasting between five to six years. In the 1990s, the system was split into different types of high school instruction, called Educacion Secundaria and the Polimodal. Some provinces adopted the Polimodal while others did not. A project in the Executive to repeal this measure and return to a more traditional secondary level system was approved in 2006.[78] President Domingo Faustino Sarmiento is overwhelmingly credited in pushing and implementing a free, modern education system in Argentina. The 1918 University reform shaped the current tripartite representation of most public universities. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1244x818, 119 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Demographics of Argentina ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1244x818, 119 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Argentina Demographics of Argentina ... Domingo Faustino Sarmiento Albarracín (February 15, 1811 – September 11, 1888) was an Argentine statesman, educator, and author. ... The Argentine university reform of 1918 was a general modernisation of the universities, especially tending towards democratisation, brought about by student activism. ...


Education is funded by tax payers at all levels except for the majority of graduate studies. There are many private school institutions in the primary, secondary and university levels. Around 11.1 million people were enrolled in formal education of some kind: A graduate school is the school that a college student may attend after completion of his or her undergraduate education in order to obtain a degree higher than a Bachelors degree. ... Look up Primary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Secondary can mean: An ordinal adjective indicating Second or second hand, see Primary The secondary in American football refers to the group of (usually four) defensive backs. ...

  • 9,551,728 people attended either kindergarten, primary (lower school), or secondary (high school) establishments;
  • 494,461 people attended non-university level establishments (such as training or technical schools);
  • 1,125,257 people attended colleges or universities.[79]

Education in public schools (primary, secondary and tertiary) is free. Public education, which was perceived to be of the best quality during the mid 20th century,[citation needed] is now often perceived to be bad and in continuous decline because of lack of funding.[citation needed] This has helped private education to flourish, albeit it has also caused an imbalance in terms of who can afford it (usually middle and upper classes), as often private schools have no scholarship systems in place. // Public spending on education in 2005 Public education is education mandated for or offered to the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ...


There are thirty-eight public universities across the country[80], as well as several private. The Universities of Buenos Aires (the largest one, has 300,000 students), Córdoba (110,000 students and one of the oldest in the continent), Rosario (75,000 students), La Plata (75,000 students) and UTN (National Technological University, 70,000 students) are among the most important. Public universities faced cutbacks in spending during the 1980s and 1990s, which led to a decline in overall quality. This is a list of public and private universities in Argentina, grouped by region and/or province. ... The Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) is the largest university in Argentina, founded on August 12, 1821 in the city of Buenos Aires. ... The Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (UNC), is the oldest university in South America[1], and is the second oldest in Argentina[2]. It is located in Córdoba, the capital of Córdoba Province. ... The Universidad Nacional de Rosario (National University of Rosario), or UNR, is a research, educational and public university located in the city of Rosario, SF, Argentina. ... National University of La Plata (Spanish:Universidad Nacional de La Plata) is an Argentine state university, and the most important in La Plata, capital of Buenos Aires Province. ... The Universidad Tecnológica National (National Technological University, UTN) is a national university of Argentina, which specializes in the teaching of engineering sciences. ...


Holidays

Public holidays include most of the Catholic holidays, though holidays of other faiths are respected. The main historic holidays include the anniversaries of the May Revolution (May 25), the Independence Day (July 9), National Flag day (June 20), and the death of the hero José de San Martín (August 17). This is a table of national public holidays of Argentina. ... La Revolución de Mayo (the May Revolution) was the first attempt at independence in the Viceroyalty of the River Plate, which contains present-day Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Independence of Argentina was declared on July 9, 1816 by the Congress of Tucumán. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Flag of Argentina” redirects here. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... José Francisco de San Martín Matorras, also known as José de San Martín (25 February 1778 – 17 August 1850), was an Argentine general and the prime leader of the southern part of South Americas successful struggle for independence from Spain. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On Christmas Eve, the extended family gathers around 9 p.m. for dinner, music, and often dancing. Candies are served just before midnight, when fireworks displays begin. The evening also includes opening gifts from Papá Noel (Father Christmas or "Santa Claus"). New Year's Day is marked with fireworks as well. Other holidays include Good Friday and Easter; Labor Day (1 May); sovereignty Day (former Malvinas Day) (2 April); and Flag Day (20 June). This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Science and technology

Argentina has contributed many distinguished doctors, scientists, and inventors to the world, including three Nobel Prize laureates in sciences. The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ...

Luis Federico Leloir won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1970.
Luis Federico Leloir won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1970.

Argentines have been responsible for major breakthroughs in world medicine. Domingo Liotta designed and developed the first artificial heart successfully implanted in a human being in 1969. René Favaloro developed the techniques and performed the world's first ever coronary bypass surgery, and Francisco de Pedro invented a more reliable artificial cardiac pacemaker. Medicine's Nobel laureate Bernardo Houssay, the first Latin American awarded with a Nobel Prize, discovered the role of pituitary hormones in regulating glucose in animals; Medicine's Nobel laureate César Milstein did extensive research in antibodies; and Chemistry's Nobel laureate Luis Leloir discovered how organisms store energy converting glucose into glycogen, and the compounds which are fundamental in metabolizing carbohydrates. Luis Agote performed one of the first two blood transfusions with pre-stored blood in history. Enrique Finochietto designed operating table tools such as the surgical scissors that bear his name ("Finochietto scissors"), and a rib-spreader.[81] Roberto Zaldívar is a pioneer in laser-eye procedures and research. Argentine research has led to advancement in wound-healing therapies, heart disease, and in several forms of cancer. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (755x959, 97 KB) Summary Image from Leloirs Biography at the Houssays page. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (755x959, 97 KB) Summary Image from Leloirs Biography at the Houssays page. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... DOMINGO SANTO LIOTTA, MD HEART SURGEON PIONEER, FATHER OF THE ARTIFICIAL HEART EARLY LIFE Domingo Liotta born in Diamante Entre Rios Argentina, son of an italian immigrant, Nov, 29 1924. ... An artificial heart is a device that is implanted into the body to replace the original biological heart. ... René Favaloro Dr. René Gerónimo Favaloro (July 12, 1923 - July 29, 2000) was a famous Argentinian cardiologist who created the technique for coronary bypass surgery. ... Coronary artery bypass surgery Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The contractions of the heart are controlled by electrical impulses, these fire at a rate which controls the beat of the heart. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Bernardo Houssay Bernardo Alberto Houssay (April 10, 1887 – September 21, 1971) was an Argentine physiologist who received (with Carl and Gerty Cori) the 1947 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of the role played by pituitary hormones in regulating the amount of blood sugar (glucose) in animals. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... | Latin = hypophysis, glandula pituitaria | GraySubject = 275 | GrayPage = 1275 | Image = Gray1180. ... Glucose (Glc), a monosaccharide (or simple sugar), is an important carbohydrate in biology. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... César Milstein (October 8, 1927 – March 24, 2002) was an Argentine-born scientist who spent most of his life in Great Britain. ... Each antibody binds to a specific antigen; an interaction similar to a lock and key. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Luis Federico Leloir, born September 6, 1906 – died December 2, 1987, was a biochemist born in Paris but who lived all his life in Argentina. ... Glycogen Structure Segment Glycogen is a polysaccharide of glucose (Glc) which functions as the primary short term energy storage in animal cells. ... Structure of the coenzyme adenosine triphosphate, a central intermediate in energy metabolism. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Luis Agote (September 22, 1868-November 12, 1954) was an Argentinian physician and researcher. ... Blood transfusion is the process of transferring blood or blood-based products from one person into the circulatory system of another. ... Roberto Zaldivar, MD Argentine doctor who is one of the foremost opthalmologists and refracting surgeons in the world. ... Heart disease is an umbrella term for a number of different diseases which affect the heart and as of 2007 it is the leading cause of death in the United States,[1] and England and Wales. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ...


Argentina's nuclear program is highly advanced. Argentina developed its nuclear program without being overly dependent on foreign technology. Nuclear facilities with Argentine technology have been built in Peru, Algeria, Australia, and Egypt. In 1983, the country admitted having the capability of producing weapon-grade uranium, a major step to assemble nuclear weapons. Since then Argentina has pledged to use nuclear power only for peaceful purposes.[82] This article is about applications of nuclear fission reactors as power sources. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter A nuclear weapon derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions of fusion or fission. ...


In other areas, Juan Vucetich, a Croatian immigrant, was the father of modern fingerprinting (dactiloscopy).[83] (see fingerprint), Raúl Pateras de Pescara demonstrated the world's first flight of a helicopter, Hungarian-Argentine László Bíró mass-produced the first modern ball point pens, and Eduardo Taurozzi developed the more efficient pendular combustion engine.[84] Juan Maldacena, an Argentine-American scientist, is a leading figure in string theory. An Argentine satellite, the PEHUENSAT-1[85] was successfully launched on January 10, 2007 using the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). Juan Vucetich (July 20, 1858 – January 25, 1925) was a Croatian-born Argentinean anthropologist and police official who pioneered the use of fingerprinting. ... This article is about human fingerprints. ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... Bírós invention Birome László József Bíró (Hungarian: Bíró László József; Spanish:Ladislao Biro[1]) (September 29, 1899 – November 24, 1985) is the inventor of the modern ballpoint pen. ... A ballpoint pen A ballpoint pen is a writing instrument, more specifically a pen, similar to a pencil in size and shape. ... Juan Maldacena at Harvard Juan Maldacena is a theoretical physicist born in Argentina in 1968. ... This box:      String theory is a still developing mathematical approach to theoretical physics, whose original building blocks are one-dimensional extended objects called strings. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... PSLV or Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle is an expendable launch system operated by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). ...


Communications and media

Print

The printed media in Argentina is highly developed and independent. There are over two hundred newspapers in the country, influential in their home cities and regions. The major national newspapers are from Buenos Aires, including the centrist Clarín, one of the best selling daily in the Spanish speaking world.[citation needed] Other national papers are La Nación (center-right) in the streets since 1870, Página/12 (left), Ámbito Financiero (business conservative), Argentinisches Tageblatt in German, Le Monde Diplomatique in Spanish and French and Crónica (populist). Regional papers of importance include La Capital (Rosario), Los Andes (Mendoza), La Voz del Interior (Córdoba), and El Tribuno (Salta). The Buenos Aires Herald is a well-respected English language daily. Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. ... Clarín is a major newspaper in Argentina, founded by Roberto Noble on August 28, 1945. ... La Nación is an Argentine daily newspaper. ... Página/12 is a left-wing newspaper based in Buenos Aires, Argentina founded in May 25, 1987 by journalist Jorge Lanata. ... Ámbito Financiero is a Argentine newspaper founded on December 9, 1976 by economist Julio A. Ramos. ... Argentinisches Tageblatt is a German language weekly newspaper published in Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... Crónica is a newspaper from Buenos Aires city in Argentina. ... La Capital is a daily Spanish-language newspaper edited and published in Rosario, province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Los Andes is an Argentinean daily newspaper published in the city of Mendoza. ... Monument dedicated to the Army of the Andes, on the summit of the Cerro de la Gloria. ... La Voz del Interior is a daily Spanish language newspaper edited and published in Córdoba, capital of the province of Córdoba, Argentina and the second-largest city in the country. ... Córdoba is a city located near the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas mountains on the Suquía River, about 700 km west-northwest from Buenos Aires. ... El Tribuno is an Argentine newspaper and media group from Salta Province. ... The inside of Saltas main cathedral Salta is a city in northwestern Argentina and the capital city of the eponymous province. ... The Buenos Aires Herald is an English language daily newspaper from Buenos Aires, Argentina founded in 1876 by Scottish immigrant William Cathcart. ...


The Argentine publishing industry is together with those in Spain and Mexico the most important in the Spanish-speaking world. Argentina features the largest bookstore chains in Latin America, the El Ateneo and Yenny bookstores; numerous well-stocked independent stores abound. A number carry titles in English and other languages. There are hundreds of magazine publications covering a plethora of issues and hobbies, which are sold in kiosks on city sidewalks and in bookstores. For other uses, see Publishing (disambiguation). ... A bookstore. ... El Ateneo. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Radio and television

Argentina was a pioneering nation in radio broadcasting. At 9 pm on August 27, 1920, Sociedad Radio Argentina announced: "We now bring to your homes a live performance of Richard Wagner's Parsifal opera from the Coliseo Theater in downtown Buenos Aires"; only about twenty homes in the city had a receiver to tune in. The world's first radio station was the only one in the country until 1922, when Radio Cultura went on the air. By 1925, there were twelve stations in Buenos Aires and ten in other cities. The 1930s were the "golden age" of radio in Argentina, with live variety, news, soap opera, and sport shows.[86] is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Parsifal is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner. ...


At present there are more than 1,500 radio stations licensed in Argentina; 260 are AM broadcasting and 1150 FM broadcasting.[citation needed] Radio remains an important medium in Argentina. Music and youth variety programs dominate FM formats; news, debate, and sports are AM radio's primary broadcasts. Amateur radio is widespread in the country. Radio still serves a vital service of information, entertainment and even life saving in the most remote communities. AM broadcasting is radio broadcasting using Amplitude Modulation. ... FM broadcasting is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation (FM) to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... Amateur radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD and DSP capabilities Amateur radio, often called ham radio, is both a hobby and a service that uses various types of radio communications equipment to communicate with other radio amateurs for public service, recreation and self-training. ...


The Argentine television industry is large and diverse, widely viewed in Latin America, and its productions seen around the world. Many local programs are broadcast by networks in other countries, and others have their rights purchased by foreign producers for adaptations in their own markets. Argentina has five major networks. All provincial capitals and other large cities have at least one local station. Argentina boasts the highest penetration of cable and satellite television in Latin America, similar to percentages in North America.[87] Many cable networks operate from Argentina and serve the Spanish-speaking world, including Utilísima Satelital, TyC Sports, Fox Sports en Español (with the United States and México), MTV Argentina, Cosmopolitan TV, and the news network Todo Noticias. Torneos y Competencias (TyC) is a company of Argentine origin dedicated to the transition of sport events, and created by Paraguayan businessman Carlos Ávila. ... Fox Sports en Español is an cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ...


International rankings

Organization Survey Ranking
Heritage Foundation/The Wall Street Journal Index of Economic Freedom 107 out of 157
The Economist Worldwide Quality-of-life Index, 2005 40 out of 111
Reporters Without Borders Worldwide Press Freedom Index 76 out of 167
Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index 105 out of 163
United Nations Development Programme Human Development Index 38 out of 177

The Heritage Foundation is one of the most prominent conservative think tanks in the United States. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Map of Economic Freedom released by the Heritage Foundation. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB (French: Reporters sans frontières, Spanish: Reporteros Sin Fronteras, or RSF) is a French origin international non-governmental organization that advocates freedom of the press, founded by its current general-secretary, Robert Menard. ... Transparency International (TI) is an international organisation addressing corruption, including, but not limited to, political corruption. ... Overview of the index of perception of corruption, 2006 Since 1995, Transparency International has published an annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI)[1] ordering the countries of the world according to the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians.[2] The organization defines corruption as... The United Nations Development Programe (UNDP), the United Nations global development network, is the largest multilateral source of development assistance in the world. ...

See also

Map that frames the area named Southern Cone The term Southern Cone (Spanish: Cono Sur, Portuguese: Cone Sul) refers to a geographic region composed of the southernmost areas of South America, below the Tropic of Capricorn. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ...

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  86. ^ Radio With a Past in Argentina Don Moore
  87. ^ Homes with Cable TV in Latin America Trends in Latin American networking

“PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clarín is a major newspaper in Argentina, founded by Roberto Noble on August 28, 1945. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... La Nación is an Argentine daily newspaper. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Statistics and Censuses Institute (Spanish: Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos, INDEC) is the Argentine government agency responsible for the collection and processing of statistical data. ...

Bibliography

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
CIA World Fact Book, 2004/Argentina
  • (Spanish) Supreme Court of Justice of Argentina
  • (Spanish) Presidency of Argentina
  • (Spanish) Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Comercio Internacional y Culto (official website of the Argentine Ministry of Foreign Relations, International Trade and Worship)
  • The Special Relationship between Argentina and Brazil
  • (Spanish) Historia de las Relaciones Exteriores Argentinas. History of Argentine foreign relations.

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

External links

Argentina Portal
Find more about Argentina on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • Official website
  • Government of Argentina (Spanish)
  • Business News and Analysis in English
  • The President of Argentina
  • Wikimedia Atlas of Argentina
  • Argentina travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Argentina at the Open Directory Project
Country Data
  • Argentina entry at The World Factbook
  • World Bank's country data profile for Argentina.
  • World Intellectual Property Handbook: Argentina

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Headquarters Washington, D.C. Official languages English, French, Portuguese, Spanish Membership 35 countries Leaders  -  Secretary General José Miguel Insulza Chile (since 26 May 2005) Establishment  -  Charter first signed 30 April 1948 in effect 1 December 1951  Website http://www. ... [--168. ... For other uses, see Saint Lucia (disambiguation). ... Motto Pax et justitia(Latin) Peace and justice Anthem St Vincent Land So Beautiful Capital (and largest city) Kingstown Official languages English Demonym Vincentian Government (constitutional monarchy)  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II  -  Governor-General Sir Frederick Ballantyne  -  Prime Minister Ralph Gonsalves Independence  -  27 October 1979  Area  -  Total 389 km² (201st) 150... Motto Country Above Self Anthem O Land of Beauty! Royal anthem God Save the Queen Capital (and largest city) Basseterre Official languages English Government  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II  -  Governor-General Sir Cuthbert Sebastian  -  Prime Minister Dr. Denzil Douglas Independence  -  19 September 1983  Area  -  Total 261 km² (207th) 101 sq mi... Download high resolution version (656x651, 77 KB)Image downloaded from the Organization of American States Photo Gallery, which states: All Photos for free distribution Photographs of official events are available through OAS website and can be used, free of charge, as long as the source is acknowledged. ... President Fernando Henrique Cardoso speaks at the ZPCAS Summit held in Brasília. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
An Introduction to Argentina (368 words)
Argentina possesses some of the world's tallest mountains, expansive deserts, and impressive waterfalls, with the diversity of the land ranging from wild, remote areas in southern Patagonia to the bustling metropolis of Buenos Aires in the north.
Mesopotamia, a broad, flat plain between the Parana and Uraguay Rivers in northern Argentina, is wet, swampy and extremely hot during the summer.
This parched area in the west is part of the enormous Gran Chaco, a region that Argentina shares with Bolivia, Paraguay, and Br azil.
Argentina: History, Geography, Government, and Culture — Infoplease.com (1493 words)
Second in South America only to Brazil in size and population, Argentina is a plain, rising from the Atlantic to the Chilean border and the towering Andes peaks.
Argentina is also bordered by Bolivia and Paraguay on the north, and by Uruguay and Brazil on the east.
The IMF gave Argentina $13.7 billion in emergency aid in Jan. 2001 and $8 billion in Aug. 2001.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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