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Encyclopedia > Argead dynasty

Argead dynasty (in Greek: οἱ Ἀργεάδαι hoi Argeádai) were the ruling family and founders of Macedon, a kingdom in northern Greece from c. 700 BC - c. 309 BC. Supposedly descended from Heracles, the demigod, the family's greatest members were Philip II of Macedon, who united the Greeks, and Alexander the Great, who defeated the Persian Empire and created the Empire of Alexander. The Argead line ended during the wars of the Diadochi when Alexander III's sister Cleopatra was murdered in Sardis by the local garrison commander at the behest of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, before she could flee to Egypt to accept the marriage proposal of Ptolemy I. The last legitimate male of the Argead line was Alexander IV, son of Alexander III with Roxanne, the daughter of the Bactrian warlord and later Satrap of Paropamisadai Oxyartes. He was murdered by Cassander, the current King and formally strategos of Macedon, after he entered into a treaty with his fellow Diadochi, acknowledging the end of their independent rule when Alexander's young son came of age. Ancient Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (Greek ) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordered by the kingdom of Epirus to the west and the region of Thrace to the east. ... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 750s BC 740s BC 730s BC 720s BC 710s BC - 700s BC - 690s BC 680s BC 670s BC 660s BC 650s BC Events and Trends 708 BC - Spartan immigrants found Taras (Tarentum, the modern Taranto) colony in southern Italy. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 314 BC 313 BC 312 BC 311 BC 310 BC 309 BC 308 BC 307 BC 306... Alcides redirects here. ... Philip II of Macedon: victory medal (niketerion) struck in Tarsus, 2nd c. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Persia redirects here. ... The word Diadochi means successors in Greek. ... Cleopatra of Macedonia (ca. ... A recent view of the ceremonial court of the thermae–gymnasium complex in Sardis, dated to 211—212 AD Sardis, also Sardes (Lydian: Sfard, Greek: Σάρδεις, Persian: Sparda), modern Sart in the Manisa province of Turkey, was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, the seat of a proconsul under... Antigonus I Cyclops or Monophthalmos (the One-eyed, so called from his having lost an eye) (382 BC - 301 BC) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great. ... For the unrelated astronomer, see Ptolemy Ptolemy I Soter (367 BC–283 BC), ruler of Egypt (reigned 323 BC - 283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. ... Alexander IV Aegus (in Greek, Aλέξανδρος Aιγός — 323–309 BC) was the son of Alexander III of Macedon and the princess Roxana, of Bactria. ... Oxyartes was a Bactrian, father of Roxana, the wife of Alexander the Great. ...  Kingdom of Cassander Other diadochi  Kingdom of Seleucus  Kingdom of Lysimachus  Kingdom of Ptolemy  Epirus Other  Carthage  Rome  Greek colonies Cassander (in Greek, Κάσσανδρος — Kassandros, ca. ...


Before acquiescing to Cassander, the successor to the imperial regency (an office first held by Perdiccas, until his murder at the failure of his Nile campaign) Polyperchon championed the cause of an illegitimate son of Alexander III, Heracles, born of his union with the Persian Barsine. He had been raised in Pergamon, unacknowledged by Alexander, but was sufficient for the now deposed and ineffective regent's attempt to topple Cassander. Before he could be put to any use however, Polyperchon was bribed by Cassander with a minor position in Southern Greece and a personal army, in exchange for the murder of the Argead "pretender." With him the Argead line terminated, his murder having come only a few years after Alexander IV. Perdiccas (d. ... Polyperchon (394 - 303 BC) was a Macedonian general who served under Philip II and Alexander the Great, accompanying Alexander throughout his long journeys. ... Heracles was the name of an illegitimate son born to Alexander the Great by his mistress Barsine, daughter of Satrap Artabazus of Phrygia in 327 BC. The first son to be born to Alexander, he was named after the mythical hero from whom the royal family of Macedonia claimed its... Barsine (in Greek Βαρσινη; born 363? - died 309 BC) was daughter of Artabazus, the satrap of Hellespontine Phrygia, and wife of Memnon of Rhodes. ... View of the reconstructed Temple of Trajan at Pergamon Sketched reconstruction of ancient Pergamon Pergamon or Pergamum (Greek: Πέργαμος, modern day Bergama in Turkey, ) was an ancient Greek city, in Mysia, north-western Anatolia, 16 miles from the Aegean Sea, located on a promontory on the north side of the river...


Monarchs

King Karanus (808- 778 BC)was the first king of ancient Macedon. ... King Koinos, after Karanus, he was the second king of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia. ... Perdiccas I was king of Macedonia from about 700 BC to about 678 BC. Categories: People stubs | Macedonian monarchs ... Argaeus I (Greek: Αργαίος) was king of Macedon from about 678 BC to about 640 BC. He succeeded in the throne his father Perdiccas I. Argaeus left as successor his son Philip I . ... Philip I of Macedon the son of Argaeus I, the father of Aeropus I. Herodotus Histories viii Justin vii. ... Aeropus I of Macedon (Αεροπος), the son of Philip I, the great-grandson of Perdiccas, the first king, and the father of Alcetas. ... Amyntas I, king of Macedon (c. ... Alexander I was ruler of Macedon from 495 BC to 450 BC. He was the son of Amyntas I of Macedon. ... Perdiccas II was king of Macedonia from about 454 BC to about 413 BC. He was the son of Alexander I. Categories: Stub | Macedonian monarchs ... Archelaus I was king of Macedon from 413 to 399 BC, following the death of Perdiccas II. The son of Perdiccas by a slave woman, Archelaus obtained the throne by murdering his uncle, his cousin, and his half-brother, the legitimate heir, but proved a capable and beneficent ruler, known... Aeropus II (Αεροπος), king of Macedon, guardian of Orestes, the son of Archelaus, reigned nearly six years from 399 BC. The first four years of this time he reigned jointly with Orestes, and the remainder alone. ... Amyntas II (or III), son of Arrhidaeus, great-grandson of Alexander I, king of Macedon from 393 (or 389) to 369 BC. He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus II, the patron of art and literature, and showed the same... Amyntas III, stater Amyntas III (or II), son of Arrhidaeus, grandfather of Alexander the Great, was king of Macedon from 393 (or 389) to 369 BC. He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus II, the patron of art and literature. ... Amyntas III, stater Amyntas III (or II), son of Arrhidaeus, grandfather of Alexander the Great, was king of Macedon from 393 (or 389) to 369 BC. He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus II, the patron of art and literature. ... Alexander II was king of Macedon from 370 - 368 BC, following the death of his father Amyntas II. He was the eldest of the three sons of Amyntas and Eurydice. ... Perdiccas III was king of Macedonia from 365 to 359 BC, succeeding his brother Alexander II. Son of Amyntas III and Eurydice, he was underage when Alexander II was killed by Ptolemy of Aloros, who then ruled as regent. ... Amyntas IV was titular king of Macedonia in 359 BC and member of Argead dynasty. ... Philip II of Macedon: victory medal (niketerion) struck in Tarsus, 2nd c. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Antipater (Greek: Αντίπατρος Antipatros; c. ... Philip III (Arrhidaeus) (c. ... Alexander IV Aegus (in Greek, Aλέξανδρος Aιγός — 323–309 BC) was the son of Alexander III of Macedon and the princess Roxana, of Bactria. ... Perdiccas (d. ... Antipater (Greek: Αντίπατρος Antipatros; c. ... Polyperchon (394 - 303 BC) was a Macedonian general who served under Philip II and Alexander the Great, accompanying Alexander throughout his long journeys. ...  Kingdom of Cassander Other diadochi  Kingdom of Seleucus  Kingdom of Lysimachus  Kingdom of Ptolemy  Epirus Other  Carthage  Rome  Greek colonies Cassander (in Greek, Κάσσανδρος — Kassandros, ca. ...

External links


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Argead dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (103 words)
Argead dynasty were the ruling family of Macedonia, a nation in northern Greece from c.
Supposedly descended from Heracles, the family's greatest members were Philip II of Macedonia who united the Greeks and Alexander the Great who defeated the Persian Empire and created the Empire of Alexander.
The Argead line ended during the wars of the Diadochi when Alexander IV of Macedon and his mother Roxana were murdered.
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