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Encyclopedia > Arctic wolf
Arctic Wolf

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Canidae
Genus: Canis
Species: C. lupus
Subspecies: C. l. arctos
Trinomial name
Canis lupus arctos
Pocock, 1935

Arctic Wolf ranges

The Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus arctos), also called Polar Wolf or White Wolf, is a mammal of the Canidae family, and a subspecies of the Gray Wolf. Arctic Wolves inhabit the Canadian Arctic and the northern parts of Greenland. An Arctic wolf (Canis lupus arctos). ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dÄ“, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... Species Canis adustus Canis aureus Canis dirus (extinct) Canis latrans Canis lupus Canis mesomelas Canis simensis   † also includes dogs. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Trinomial nomenclature is a taxonomic naming system that extends the standard system of binomial nomenclature by adding a third taxon. ... Reginald Innes Pocock sucks!!! Partial bibliography Reginald I. Pocock (1902) Reginald Innes Pocock (1902) Reginald Innes Pocock (1900) The Fauna of British India (including Ceylon and Burma). ... Distribution of Arctic wolves Image created by Schnee based on image:Graywolf. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dÄ“, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... This article is about the zoological term. ... For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ... The North, the Canadian Arctic defined politically. ...

Contents

Anatomy

See also: Gray Wolf behavior and physiology For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ...


Arctic Wolves generally are smaller than Gray Wolves, being about 3 to 6 feet (0.9 to 1.8 m) long including the tail; males are larger than females. Their shoulder heights vary from 25 to 31 inches (63 to 79 cm); Arctic Wolves are bulkier than Gray Wolves, often weighing over 100 pounds (45 kg). Weights of up to 175 pounds (80 kg) have been observed in full-grown males. Arctic Wolves usually have small ears, which help the wolf maintain body heat.


Arctic Wolves have achieved life spans of over 18 years in captivity; however, in the wild, the average lifespan is only 7-10 years.


Hunting

Arctic wolves, like all wolves, hunt in packs; they mostly prey on Caribou and musk oxen, but will also kill a number of Arctic Hares, seals, ptarmigan and lemmings, as well as other smaller animals. Moose are also common prey; their long legs may render them slow and, at times, stuck, in thick snow, leaving them vulnerable to attacks by wolf packs. Due to the scarcity of grazing plants, they roam large areas to find prey up to and beyond 2600 kmĀ² (1000 square miles), and they will follow migrating caribou south during the winter. Recent footage filmed by a BBC Wildlife documentary crew shows arctic wolves hunting waterfowl.[1] Binomial name Rangifer tarandus The reindeer, known as caribou in North America, is an Arctic-dwelling deer (Rangifer tarandus). ... Binomial name Ovibos moschatus (Zimmermann, 1780) The Musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) is a bovine noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor of the male. ... Binomial name Lepus timidus Linnaeus, 1758 The Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) is a hare, which is largely adapted to polar and mountainous habitats. ... Binomial name Lagopus mutus (Montin, 1781) The Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) is a small (31-35 cm) bird in the grouse family. ... This article is about the rodent. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Falcated Duck at Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands centre, Gloucestershire, England Wildfowl or waterfowl, also waterbirds, is the collective term for the approximately 147 species of swans, geese and ducks, classified in the order Anseriformes, family Anatidae. ...


Reproduction

See also: Gray Wolf reproductive physiology and life cycle

Normally, only the alpha male and female breed, but in large packs others may mate as well. Due to the Arctic's permafrost soil and the difficulty it poses for digging dens, Arctic Wolves often use rock outcroppings, caves or even shallow depressions as dens instead; the mother gives birth to two or three pups in late May to early June, about a month later than Gray Wolves. It is generally thought that the lower number of pups compared to the average of 4 to 5 among Gray Wolves is due to the scarcity of prey in the Arctic. They give birth in about 63 days. For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ... While these two men dig in Alaska to study soil, the hard permafrost requires the use of a jackhammer In geology, permafrost or permafrost soil is soil at or below the freezing point of water (0 °C or 32 °F) for two or more years. ... Look up Month in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Distribution

The Arctic Wolf is the only subspecies of the Gray Wolf that still can be found over the whole of its original range, largely because, in their natural habitat, they rarely encounter humans. But their population is slowly declining due to hunting and shooting for sport (from an aerial craft). For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ...

A pack of Arctic Wolves in Toronto Zoo
A pack of Arctic Wolves in Toronto Zoo

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x582, 134 KB) A pack of Arctic Wolves at the Toronto Zoo. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x582, 134 KB) A pack of Arctic Wolves at the Toronto Zoo. ... The Toronto Zoo is a zoo located in the north eastern part of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...

References

  • L. David Mech (text), Jim Brandenburg (photos), At home with the arctic wolf, National Geographic Vol. 171 No. 5 (May 1987), pp. 562-593
  • L. David Mech, The arctic wolf: 10 years with the pack, Voyageur Press 1997, ISBN 0-89658-353-8
  • Wolf Specialist Group (2004). Canis lupus. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. Retrieved on 26 July 2007.

The National Geographic Society was founded in the USA on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Morelle, Rebecca (2009-01-31). Elusive wolves caught on camera. BBC. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.

2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikispecies has information related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Canis lupus arctos
Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Title: Arctic wolves and their prey - Mech (1150 words)
The arctic wolf is a race, subspecies, or geographic variant of the gray wolf (Canis lupus) species that originally lived throughout the northern hemisphere north of 15°N latitude (12°N latitude in India).
Year-around white coats and slightly shorter noses and ears distinguish these wolves from other races of the gray wolf, and the life of the arctic wolf is basically the same as the lives of wolves everywhere.
The arctic wolf lives in the area along the northern edge of the North American continent and northward to the North Pole, as well as along the eastern and northern shores of Greenland.
Arctic Refuge: Wolf Story (3343 words)
When the babysitter wolf arrives at the end of the talus slope, it continues moving backwards, and leads the pups easily across the low willows.
The babysitter wolf appears to know that it should go and bring back the final pup, because the babysitter wolf rises, crosses the low willows, the talus slope, and the tall willows, and finds the missing pup in the willow clearing.
The babysitter wolf shakes the bone close in front of the puppy's nose, growling softly, but each time the puppy leaps, the babysitter moves the bone just high enough so the puppy can't quite reach it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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