FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Arctic fox
Arctic Fox[1]

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Canidae
Genus: Vulpes
Species: V. lagopus
Binomial name
Vulpes lagopus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Arctic Fox range
Arctic Fox range

The Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus), also known as the White Fox or Snow Fox, is a fox of the order Carnivora. It is a small fox native to cold Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere. It is common in all three tundra biomes. Although it is often assigned to its own genus Alopex, the definitive mammal taxonomy list places it in Vulpes with the majority of the other foxes.[1] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 768 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2868 × 2238 pixel, file size: 481 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) National parks of Canada File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dÄ“, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... Species Vulpes bengalensis Vulpes cana Vulpes chama Vulpes corsac Vulpes ferrilata Vulpes lagopus Vulpes macrotis Vulpes pallida Vulpes rueppelli Vulpes velox Vulpes vulpes Vulpes zerda Vulpes is a genus of the Canidae family. ... Latin name redirects here. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Cover of the tenth edition of Linnaeuss Systema Naturae (1758). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Distribution_arctic_fox. ... This article is about the animal. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... This article is about the animal. ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... Northern hemisphere highlighted in yellow. ... For other uses, see Tundra (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Species Vulpes bengalensis Vulpes cana Vulpes chama Vulpes corsac Vulpes ferrilata Vulpes lagopus Vulpes macrotis Vulpes pallida Vulpes rueppelli Vulpes velox Vulpes vulpes Vulpes zerda Vulpes is a genus of the Canidae family. ...

Contents

Adaptations

The Arctic Fox has evolved to live in the most frigid extremes on the planet. Among its adaptations for cold survival are its deep, thick fur, a system of countercurrent heat exchange in the circulation of paws to retain core temperature, and a good supply of body fat. The fox has a low surface-area-to-volume ratio, as evidenced by its generally rounded body shape, short muzzle and legs, and short, thick ears. Since less of its surface area is exposed to the cold, less heat escapes the body. Its furry paws allow it to walk on ice floors in search of food. It is also able to walk on top of snow and listen for the movements of prey underneath. Its thick fur is the warmest of any mammal.[citation needed] For other uses, see Adaptation (disambiguation). ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Sa/vol Ratio Usually used in biology, it stands for surface area to volume ratio. ... Prey can refer to: Look up Prey in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A prey animal eaten by a predator in an act called predation. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ...


Reproduction system

The Arctic Fox tends to be active in early September to early May. The gestation period is 52 days. Litters tend to average 6-7 pups but may be as many as 11.[3] Both the mother and the father help to raise their young. The female leave the family and form their own groups and the males stay with the family. The Gestation period in a viviparous animal refers to the length of its pregnancy. ...


Foxes tend to form monogamous pairs in the breeding season. Litters of between 4 and 11 kits are born in the early summer. The parents raise the young in a large den. Dens can be complex underground networks, housing many generations of foxes. Young from a previous year's litter may stay with the parents to help rear younger siblings.The cubs are brownish and as they get older they are white. Faithfulness redirects here. ... Look up Kit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up den in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Diet

The Arctic Fox will generally eat any meat it can find, including lemmings, Arctic Hare, reptiles and amphibians, eggs, and carrion. Lemmings are the most common prey. A family of foxes can eat dozens of lemmings each day. During April and May the Arctic Fox also preys on Ringed Seal kits when the young animals are confined to a snow den and are relatively helpless. Fish beneath the ice are also part of its diet. When its normal prey is scarce, the Arctic Fox scavenges the leftovers of larger predators, such as the Polar Bear, even though the bears' prey includes the Arctic Fox itself. This article is about the rodent. ... Binomial name Lepus timidus Linnaeus, 1758 The Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) is a hare, which is largely adapted to polar and mountainous habitats. ... Herpetology (from Greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... An American Black Vulture feeding on squirrel carrion For other uses, see Carrion (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Pusa hispida (Schreber, 1775) The Ringed Seal or Jar Seal (Pusa hispida formerly Phoca hispida) is an earless seal inhabiting the northern coasts. ... This article is about the animal. ...


Size

The length of the head and body is 55 cm (21.7 in) in the male and 53 cm (21 in) in the female. The tail is 31 cm (12.2 in) long in the male and 30 cm (11.8 in) long in the female. It is 25-30 cm (9.9-11.8 in) high at the shoulder, and males weigh 3.8 kg (8.2 lb) while females can weigh 6 to 12 pounds.


Subspecies

Besides the nominate, there are three subspecies of this fox:

  • Bering Islands Arctic Fox, Alopex lagopus beringensis
  • Iceland Arctic Fox, Alopex lagopus fuliginosus
  • Pribilof Islands Arctic Fox, Alopex lagopus pribilofensis
Arctic fox at Svalbard, Norway. Photo: Per Harald Olsen
The Arctic fox's seasonal furs, summer (top) to winter (bottom)

Image File history File links Fjellrev0003pho. ... Image File history File links Fjellrev0003pho. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 340 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (623 × 1097 pixel, file size: 217 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arctic fox ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 340 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (623 × 1097 pixel, file size: 217 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Arctic fox ...

Population and Distribution

The Arctic Fox has a circumpolar range, meaning that it is found throughout the entire Arctic, including the outer edges of Greenland, Russia, Canada, Alaska, and Svalbard, as well as in sub-Arctic and alpine areas, such as Iceland and mainland alpine Scandinavia. The conservation status of the species is good, except for the Scandinavian mainland population. It is acutely endangered there, despite decades of legal protection from hunting and persecution. The total population estimate in all of Norway, Sweden and Finland is a mere 120 adult individuals. Circumpolar stars are those stars which are located near the celestial poles of the celestial sphere, i. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... The subarctic is a region in the Northern Hemisphere immediately south of the true Arctic and covering much of Canada and Siberia, the north of Scandinavia, northern Mongolia and the extreme north of Heilongjiang. ... For the climate of the mountains named the Alps, see climate) for a region above the tree-line. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ...


The Arctic Fox is the only native land mammal to Iceland. It came to the isolated North Atlantic island at the end of the last ice age, walking over the frozen sea.


The abundance of the Arctic Fox species tends to fluctuate in a cycle along with the population of lemmings. Because the fox reproduces very quickly and often dies young, population levels are not seriously impacted by trapping. The Arctic Fox has, nonetheless, been eradicated from many areas where humans are settled. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The Arctic Fox is losing ground to the larger Red Fox. Historically, the Gray Wolf has kept Red Fox numbers down, but as the wolf has been hunted to near extinction in much of its former range, the Red Fox population has grown larger, and it has taken over the niche of top predator. In areas of northern Europe there are programs in place that allow hunting of the Red Fox in the Arctic Fox's previous range. For other uses, see Red Fox (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ... For other uses, see Extinction (disambiguation). ... Apex predators (also alpha predators, superpredators, or top-level predators) are predators that, as adults, are not normally preyed upon in the wild in significant parts of their ranges. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


As with many other game species, the best sources of historical and large scale population data are hunting bag records and questionnaires. There are several potential sources of error in such data collections.[4] In addition, numbers vary widely between years due to the large population fluctuations. However, the total population of the Arctic Fox must be in the order of several hundred thousand animals.[5]


The world population is thus not endangered, but two Arctic Fox subpopulations are. One is on Mednyi Island (Commander Islands, Russia), which was reduced by some 85-90%, to around 90 animals, as a result of mange caused by an ear tick introduced by dogs in the 1970s.[6] The population is currently under treatment with antiparasitic drugs, but the result is still uncertain. The Komandorski Islands or Commander Islands, (in Russian, Komandorskiye Ostrova) are a group of treeless islands east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in the Russian Far East, in the Bering Sea. ...


The other threatened population is the one in Fennoscandia (Norway, Sweden, Finland and Kola Peninsula). This population decreased drastically around the turn of the century as a result of extreme fur prices which caused severe hunting also during population lows.[7] The population has remained at a low density for more than 90 years, with additional reductions during the last decade.[8] The total population estimate for 1997 is around 60 adults in Sweden, 11 adults in Finland and 50 in Norway. From Kola, there are indications of a similar situation, suggesting a population of around 20 adults. The Fennoscandian population thus numbers a total of 140 breeding adults. Even after local lemming peaks, the Arctic Fox population tends to collapse back to levels dangerously close to non-viability.[5]


References

  1. ^ a b Wozencraft, W. C. (16 November 2005). in Wilson, D. E., and Reeder, D. M. (eds): Mammal Species of the World, 3rd edition, Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ Angerbjörn, A., Hersteinsson , P. & Tannerfeldt, M. (2004). Alopex lagopus. 2007 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2007. Retrieved on 2008-04-23.
  3. ^ http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Vulpes_lagopus.html
  4. ^ Garrott and Eberhardt (1987). "Arctic fox", in Novak, M. et al. (eds.): Wild furbearer management and conservation in North America, pp. 395-406. 
  5. ^ a b Tannerfeldt, M. (1997). Population fluctuations and life history consequences in the Arctic fox.. Stockholm, Sweden: Dissertation, Stockholm University. 
  6. ^ Goltsman et al. (1996). "The Mednyi Arctic foxes: treating a population imperilled by disease". Oryx 30: 251-258. 
  7. ^ Lönnberg, E. (1927). Fjällrävsstammen i Sverige 1926. Uppsala, Sweden: Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. 
  8. ^ Angerbjörn, A. et al. (1995). "Dynamics of the Arctic fox population in Sweden". Annales Zoologici Fennici 32: 55–68. 
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikispecies has information related to:
Alopex lagopus
  • Nowak, Ronald M. (2005). Walker's Carnivores of the World. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press. ISBN 0-8018-8032-7
is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Genera Alopex Atelocynus Canis Cerdocyon Chrysocyon Cuon Cynotherium † Dusicyon † Dasycyon † Fennecus (Part of Vulpes) Lycalopex (Part of Pseudalopex) Lycaon Nyctereutes Otocyon Pseudalopex Speothos Urocyon Vulpes The Canidae (′kanə′dÄ“, IPA: ) family is a part of the order Carnivora within the mammals (Class Mammalia). ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Families Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Mustelidae Nandiniidae Odobenidae Pinnipedia Procyonidae Ursidae Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora includes over 260 placental mammals. ... Species Canis adustus Canis aureus Canis dirus (extinct) Canis latrans Canis lupus Canis mesomelas Canis simensis   † also includes dogs. ... Binomial name Canis adustus Sundevall, 1847 The Side-striped jackal (Canis adustus) is a member of the family Canidae, native to central and Southern African. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Golden Jackal range The Golden Jackal (Canis aureus), also called the Asiatic or Common Jackal, is a mammal of the order carnivora native to North and East Africa, Southeastern Europe and South Asia to Burma. ... Binomial name Himalayan Wolf (Canis himalayaensis) is described as a new species of wolf native a small region in northern India (Jammu and Kashmir and then Himachal Pradesh) and eastern Nepal in the Himalayas. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus pallipes (Reginald Innes Pocock, 1941) Present distribution of Indian wolf in light blue The Indian Wolf (Canis lupus pallipes), also known as the Indian Gray Wolf or the Peninsular Gray Wolf, is the small subspecies of the Grey Wolf. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ... For other uses, see Red Wolf (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Schreber, 1775 Black-backed Jackal range The Black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas), also known as the Silver-backed jackal is a mammal of the order carnivora. ... Binomial name Canis simensis Ruppell, 1840 Map of the range of the Ethiopian Wolf. ... Binomial name Cuon alpinus (Pallas, 1811) The Dhole (Cuon alpinus) is a species of wild dog of the Canidae family. ... Binomial name Cuon alpinus (Pallas, 1811) The Dhole (Cuon alpinus) is a species of wild dog of the Canidae family. ... Binomial name (Temminck, 1820) African Wild Dog range The African Wild Dog, Lycaon pictus, also known as the African Hunting Dog, Cape Hunting Dog, Painted Dog, or Painted Wolf, is a carnivorous mammal of the Canidae family. ... Binomial name (Temminck, 1820) African Wild Dog range The African Wild Dog, Lycaon pictus, also known as the African Hunting Dog, Cape Hunting Dog, Painted Dog, or Painted Wolf, is a carnivorous mammal of the Canidae family. ... Binomial name Atelocynus Microtis (Sclater, 1883) Short-eared Dog (Atelocynus microtis) also known as Small Eared Zorro or Short-eared Fox can be found in South America. ... Binomial name Atelocynus Microtis (Sclater, 1883) Short-eared Dog (Atelocynus microtis) also known as Small Eared Zorro or Short-eared Fox can be found in South America. ... Binomial name Alopex lagopus ({{{author}}}, {{{date}}}) The Crab Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous), also called the Common Fox or forest fox is a medium-sized fox and is found in South America. ... Binomial name Alopex lagopus ({{{author}}}, {{{date}}}) The Crab Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous), also called the Common Fox or forest fox is a medium-sized fox and is found in South America. ... Lycalopex is a genus created by Burmeisteri in 1854 for the Hoary Fox (Pseudalopex vetulus). ... Binomial name Pseudalopex culpaeus (Molina, 1782) The culpeo is a South American species of wild dog. ... Binomial name Martin, 1837 Synonyms Dusicyon fulvipes Pseudalopex griseus fulvipes Darwins Fox or Darwins Zorro (Pseudalopex fulvipes) is a small endangered canine from the genus Pseudalopex, also know as Chiloé Zorro or Zorro Chilote in Spanish (zorros is false fox, more related to true dogs and included to... Binomial name Pseudalopex gymnocercus ( Fischer, 1814) Pampas Fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus), also known as Azaras fox, is a medium sized fox native to South America. ... Binomial name Pseudalopex sechurae Thomas, 1900 The Sechuran Fox (Pseudalopex sechurae), also called Peruvian Desert Fox and sechuran zorro is a South American species of canid. ... Binomial name Pseudalopex vetulus (Lund, 1842) Please note that the Blanfords Fox, or Afghan fox, is also known as Hoary Fox. The Hoary Fox, Pseudalopex vetulus, or Hoary zorro, is a species of zorro (false fox) endemic to Brazil. ... Binomial name Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger, 1815) The Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is the largest canid of South America, resembling a dog with reddish fur. ... Binomial name Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger, 1815) The Maned Wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is the largest canid of South America, resembling a dog with reddish fur. ... Binomial name Speothos venaticus (Lund, 1842) The Bush Dog (Speothos venaticus) is a canid found in Central and South America, including Panama, Venezuela, Bolivia, Peru (West of the Andes), Ecuador, the Guyanas, Paraguay, North-East Argentina (Misiones province), and Brazil (from the Amazon rainforest to the state of Santa Catarina). ... Binomial name Speothos venaticus (Lund, 1842) The Bush Dog (Speothos venaticus) is a canid found in Central and South America, including Panama, Venezuela, Bolivia, Peru (West of the Andes), Ecuador, the Guianas, Paraguay, northeast Argentina (Misiones province), and Brazil (from the Amazon rainforest to the state of Amazonas). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Arctic Fox range The Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus), also known as the White Fox or Snow Fox, is a fox of the order Carnivora. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Arctic Fox range The Arctic Fox (Vulpes lagopus), also known as the White Fox or Snow Fox, is a fox of the order Carnivora. ... Species Vulpes bengalensis Vulpes cana Vulpes chama Vulpes corsac Vulpes ferrilata Vulpes lagopus Vulpes macrotis Vulpes pallida Vulpes rueppelli Vulpes velox Vulpes vulpes Vulpes zerda Vulpes is a genus of the Canidae family. ... For other uses, see Red Fox (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Say, 1823) The Swift Fox (Vulpes velox) is a small fox found in the western grasslands of North America, such as Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. ... This article is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Binomial name Vulpes corsac (Linnaeus, 1768) The Corsac Fox (Vulpes corsac) is a species of fox. ... Binomial name Vulpes chama (A Smith, 1833) The Cape Fox (Vulpes chama), also called Cama Fox or Silver-backed Fox is a small fox. ... Binomial name Vulpes pallida (Cretzschmar, 1827) The Pale Fox (Vulpes pallida) is a species of fox which inhabits the Sahel from Senegal in the west to Sudan in the east. ... Binomial name Vulpes bengalensis (Shaw, 1800) // Range and Habitat The Indian fox (Vulpes bengalensis) is a fox endemic to the Indian subcontinent and is found from the Himalayan foothills and Terai of Nepal through southern India and from southern and eastern Pakistan to eastern India and southeastern Bangladesh Appearance Vulpes... Tibetan Fox (Vulpes ferrilata) Lives at a high plateau of Tibet, bordering on China and India. ... Binomial name Vulpes cana (Blanford, 1877) Range of Blanfords Fox Please note that two a. ... Binomial name Vulpes rueppelli (Schinz, 1825) Rüppells Fox or Sand Fox (Vulpes rueppelli) is a species of fox living in North Africa and the Middle East, from Morocco to Afghanistan. ... Binomial name (Zimmermann, 1780) Fennec range Synonyms Fennecus zerda Zimmermann, 1780 The fennec is a small fox found in the Sahara Desert of North Africa (excluding the coast) and in some parts of Arabia, which has distinctive oversized ears. ... Species Urocyon cinereoargenteus Urocyon littoralis The genus Urocyon is a genus contains two (possibly three) Western Hemisphere foxes in the family Canidae, the Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and the closely-related Island Fox (Urocyon littoralis). ... For other uses, see Gray Fox (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Urocyon littoralis (Baird, 1857) The Island Fox (Urocyon littoralis) is a small fox that is native to six of the eight Channel Islands of California. ... Binomial name Urocyon sp. ... Binomial name Otocyon megalotis (Desmarest, 1822) The Bat-eared Fox is a canid of the African savanna. ... Binomial name Otocyon megalotis (Desmarest, 1822) The Bat-eared Fox is a canid of the African savanna. ... Binomial name Nyctereutes procyonoides (Gray, 1834) The Raccoon Dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a member of the canid family and is considered to be a species of dog although it is often confused with raccoons and badgers. ... It has been suggested that tanuki be merged into this article or section. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Arctic Fox: Wildlife Notebook Series - Alaska Department of Fish and Game (750 words)
The arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) is found in treeless coastal areas of Alaska from the Aleutian Islands north to Point Barrow and east to the Canada border.
Life history: Arctic fox pups are born in dens excavated by the adults in sandy, well-drained soils of low mounds and river cutbanks.
Arctic foxes are generally less wary of humans than their near relative, the red fox.
Arctic Fox (501 words)
The arctic fox has fur on the bottom of its feet to protect it from the cold and keep frost out of their feet while digging.
Fox denning near rocky cliffs along the seacoast often depend heavily on nesting seabirds such as auklets, puffins, and murres.
The arctic fox's adaptation to its subzero habitat include a compact body with short legs, short ears, dense fur, and thickly haired foot pads, which insulate against the cold and provide traction on ice.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m