FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Archytas" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Archytas
Archytas
Archytas

Archytas (428 BC - 347 BC) was a Greek philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, statesman, strategist and commander-in-chief. Image File history File links Archytas. ... Image File history File links Archytas. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC Years: 433 BC 432 BC 431 BC 430 BC 429 BC - 428 BC - 427 BC 426 BC... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC - 340s BC - 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 352 BC 351 BC 350 BC 349 BC 348 BC 347 BC 346 BC 345 BC 344... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... An astronomer or astrophysicist is a scientist whose area of research is astronomy or astrophysics. ... The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... Military strategem in the Battle of Waterloo. ... Army (from French armée) can, in some countries, refer to any armed force. ...


Archytas was born in Tarentum, Magna Graecia (now Italy) and was the son of Mnesagoras or Histiaeus. He was taught for a while by Philolaus and he was a teacher of mathematics to Eudoxus of Cnidus. He was scientist of the Pythagorean school, famous as the good friend of Plato. His and Eudoxus' student was Menaechmus. Map of Italy showing Taranto in the bottom right Taranto is a coastal city in Apulia, southern Italy. ... Map of Magna Graecia Italy. ... Philolaus (circa 480 BC – circa 405 BC) was a Greek mathematician and philosopher. ... Eudoxus of Cnidus (Greek Εύδοξος) (410 or 408 BC - 355 or 347 BC) was a Greek astronomer, mathematician, physician, scholar and friend of Plato. ... The Pythagoreans were an Hellenic organization of astronomers, musicians, mathematicians, and philosophers; who believed that all things are, essentially, numeric. ... Plato Plato (Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn) (c. ... Greek mathematician and geometer said to have been the tutor of Alexander the Great. ...


Sometimes he is believed to be the founder of mathematical mechanics. Mechanics refers to: a craft relating to machinery (from the Latin mechanicus, from the Greek mechanikos, meaning one skilled in machines), or a range of disciplines in science and engineering. ...


He is also reputed to have designed and built the first artificial, self-propelled flying device, a bird-shaped model propelled by a jet of what was probably steam, said to have actually flown some 200 yards. This machine, which its inventor called The Pigeon, may have been suspended on a wire or pivot for its flight.


According to Eutocius Archytas solved the problem of duplicating the cube in his manner with a geometric construction. Hippocrates of Chios before reduced this problem to finding mean proportionals. Archytas' theory of proportions is treated in the book VIII of Euclid's Elements. Doubling the cube is one of the three most famous geometric problems unsolvable by straightedge and compass alone. ... Hippocrates of Chios was an ancient Greek mathematician (geometer) and astronomer, who lived c. ... The word proportionality may have one of a number of meanings: In mathematics, proportionality is a mathematical relation between two quantities. ... Euclid Euclid of Alexandria (Greek: ) (ca. ...


The Archytas curve, which he used in his solution of the doubling the cube problem, is named after him.


Archytas was drowned in the Adriatic Sea; his body lay unburied on the shore till a sailor humanely cast a handful of sand on it, otherwise he would have had to wander on this side the Styx for a hundred years, such the virtue of a little dust, munera pulveris, as Horace calls it. The Adriatic Sea Source: NASA The Adriatic Sea (Italian Mare Adriatico, German Adriatisches Meer or Adria, Slovenian Jadransko morje or Jadran, Croatian Jadransko more or Jadran, Serbian Јадранско море or Јадран, Albanian Deti Adriatik) is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea separating the Apennine peninsula (Italy) from the Balkan peninsula, and the system... Styx may refer to: Styx (mythology), the river that forms the boundary between the underworld and the world of the living, as well as a goddess and a nymph that represent the river Styx (band), an American rock band popular in the 1970s and 1980s Styx (protocol), the network protocol... Horace Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading lyric poet in Latin, the son of a freedman, but himself born free. ...


External links



BITCH!111 ...

This article is part of The Presocratic Philosophers series
Thales | Anaximander | Anaximenes of Miletus | Pythagoras | Philolaus | Archytas | Empedocles | Heraclitus | Parmenides | Zeno of Elea | Melissus of Samos | Xenophanes | Anaxagoras | Leucippus | Democritus | Protagoras | Gorgias | Prodicus | Hippias | Pherecydes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Archytas - Greek Philosopher - Crystalinks (548 words)
Archytas (428 BC - 347 BC), was a Greek philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, statesman, strategist and commander-in-chief.
Archytas of Tarentum was a Greek mathematician, political leader and philosopher, active in the first half of the fourth century BC (i.e., during Plato's lifetime).
Archytas was drowned in the Adriatic Sea; his body lay unburied on the shore till a sailor humanely cast a handful of sand on it, otherwise he would have had to wander on this side the Styx for a hundred years, such the virtue of a little dust, munera pulveris, as Horace calls it.
Archytas (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) (13197 words)
Archytas' enharmonic tetrachord is composed of the intervals 5 : 4, 36 : 35 and 28 : 27 and his chromatic tetrachord of the intervals 32 : 27, 243 : 224, and 28 : 27.
Cassio, Albio Cesare, 1988, ‘Nicomachus of Gerasa and the Dialect of Archytas, Fr.
–––, 1990, ‘Plato and Archytas in the Seventh Letter’, Phronesis 35.2: 159-174.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m