FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Archive" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Archive
Archive of the AMVC
For other uses, see Archive (disambiguation). For the Wikipedia coordination point on archived pages, see Wikipedia:Archive.

An archive refers to a collection of historical records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... AMVC The Archief en Museum voor het Vlaams Cultuurleven or AMVC (E: Archive and Museum for the Flemish Culture) is a Belgian non-profit organization located in Antwerp. ... Archive (word definition) — See Archive Archive (trip-hop band) — see Archive (band) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Archives are made up of records (AKA primary source documents) which have been accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime. For example, the archives of an individual may contain letters, papers, photographs, computer files, scrapbooks, financial records, diaries or any other kind of documentary materials created or collected by the individual--regardless of media or format. The archives of an organization (such as a corporation or government), on the other hand, tend to contain different types of records, such as administrative files, business records, memos, official correspondence, meeting minutes, and so on. In historical scholarship, a primary source is a document, or other source of information that was created at or near the time being studied, by an authoritative source, usually one with direct personal knowledge of the events being described. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ...


In general, archives of any individual or organization consist of records which have been especially selected for permanent or long-term preservation, due to their enduring research value. Archival records are normally unpublished and almost always unique, unlike books or magazines, in which many identical copies exist. This means that archives (the places) are quite distinct from libraries with regard to their functions and organization, although archival collections can often be found within library buildings. For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... Alternative meanings: Library (computer science), Library (biology) Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ...


Archives are sometimes described as information generated as the "by-product" of normal human activities, while libraries hold specifically authored information "products".[2]


A person who works in archives is called an archivist. The study and practice of organizing, preserving, and providing access to information and materials in archives is called archival science. An archivist surveying an unprocessed collection of materials. ... Archival science is the study of the safe storage, cataloguing and retrieval of documents and items. ...


Archivists tend to prefer the term 'archives' (with an S) as the correct terminology to serve as both the singular and plural, since 'archive,' as a noun or a verb, has meanings related to computer science. [3]

Contents

Archive Users and Institutions

Historians, genealogists, lawyers, demographers, and others conduct research at archives. [4] The research process at each archive is unique, and depends upon the institution in which the archive is housed. While there are many different kinds of archives, the most recent census of archivists in the United States identified five major types: academic, for profit (business), government, non profit, and other. [5] This article is about the occupation of studying history. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Map of countries by population Population growth showing projections for later this century Demography is the scientific study of human population dynamics. ... This article is about the concept. ...


Academic Archives

Archives existing in colleges, universities, or other educational facilities are usually grouped as academic archives. Academic archives typically exist within a library, and duties may be carried out by an archivist or a librarian. Occasionally, history professors may run a smaller academic archive.[6] Academic archives exist to celebrate and preserve the history of their school and academic community.[7] The inventory of an academic archive may contain items such as papers of former professors and presidents, memorabilia related to school organizations and activities, and items the academic library wishes to remain in a closed-stack setting, such as rare books or thesis copies. It is always a good idea to contact an academic archive before visiting, as the majority of these institutions are available by appointment only. Users of academic archives are often graduate students and those wishing to view rare or historical documents for research purposes. Many academic archives work closely with alumni relations to help raise funds for their library or school.[8] Because of their library setting, a degree certified by the American Library Association is preferred for employment in an academic archive. College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... An archivist surveying an unprocessed collection of materials. ... The Librarian, a 1556 painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo A librarian is an information professional trained in library science and information science: the organization and management of information and service to people with information needs. ... This article is about the thesis in academia. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ...


Business (For Profit) Archives

Archives located in for-profit institutions are usually those owned by a private business. Examples of prominent business archives in the United States include Coca-Cola (which also owns the separate museum World of Coca-Cola), Proctor and Gamble, and Levi Strauss & Co.. These corporate archives maintain historic documents and items related to the history of their companies.[9] Business archives serve the purpose of helping their corporations maintain control over their brand by retaining memories of the company's past. Especially in business archives, records management is separate from the historic aspect of archives. Workers in these types of archives may have any combination of training and degrees, from either a history or library background. These archives are typically not open to the public and only used by workers of the owner company, although some will allow approved visitors by appointment.[10] Business archives are concerned with maintaining the integrity of their parent company, and therefore selective of how their materials may be used.[11] In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... World of Coca-Cola rotating logo in front of the main building in downtown Atlanta (the other side says Coke). The World of Coca-Cola is a permanent exhibition featuring the history of Coca-Cola and its well-known advertising. ... Procter & Gamble Co. ... Levi Strauss & Co. ... For other uses, see Brand (disambiguation). ... Records Management is the practice of identifying, classifying, archiving, preserving, and destroying records. ... Ṛ This article is about the ethical concept. ...


Government Archives

The category of government archives includes those institutions run on a local and state level as well as those run by the national (federal) government. Anyone may use a government archive, and frequent users include reporters, genealogists, writers, historians, students, and anyone wanting more information on the history of their home or region. While it is a good idea to make an appointment before visiting government archives, at many government archives no appointment is required, as they are open to the public.[12] A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... Though anyone who creates a written work may be called a writer, the term is usually reserved for those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... This is a list of historians. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ...


In the United States, NARA archives exist not only in the District of Columbia, but regionally as well.[13] Some city or local governments may have repositories, but their organization and accessibility varies widely.[14] State or Province archives typically require at least a bachelor's degree in history for employment, although some ask for certification by test (government or association) as well. Nara can refer to: The city of Nara, Nara Prefecture, Japan The Nara Period of the History of Japan Nara prefecture, part of the Kansai region of central Honshu, Japan Nara is a major Manchu clan. ... ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... For other degrees, see Academic degree. ...


In the UK the National Archives [1], formerly known as the Public Record Office, is the government archive for England and Wales. The National Monuments Record [2]is the public archive of English Heritage. The National Archives of Scotland [3], located in Edinburgh, serve that country while the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland [4] in Belfast is the government archive for Northern Ireland. More than one country maintains a national archive: The Canadian Library and Archives Canada The New Zealand Archives New Zealand (formerly National Archives) The United States National Archives and Records Administration The United Kingdom National Archives This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The National Monuments Record is the public archive of English Heritage. ... The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... Based in Edinburgh, the National Archives of Scotland (NAS) claims to have one of the most varied collection of archives in the British Isles. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) is situated in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ...


A network of local authority-run record offices and archives exists throughout England, Wales and Scotland and holds many important collections, including local government, landed estates, church and business records. Many archives have contributed catalogues to the national Access 2 Archives programme and online searching across collections is possible [5].


In France, the Directorate of the Archives of France (Direction des Archives de France) in the Ministry of Culture manages the National Archives (Archives nationales) which possess 364 km. (226 miles) of archives as of 2004 (the total length of occupied shelves put next to each other), with original records going as far back as A.D. 625, as well as the departmental archives (archives départementales), located in the préfectures of each of the 100 départements of France, which possess 1,901 km. (1,181 miles) of archives (as of 2004), and also the local city archives, about 600 in total, which possess 449 km. (279 miles) of archives (as of 2004).[15] Put together, the total volume of archives under the supervision of the Directorate of the Archives of France is the largest in the world, a testimony to the very ancient nature of the French state which has been in existence for more than eleven centuries already. The Minister of Culture and Communications is, in the Government of France, the cabinet member in charge of national museums and monuments; promoting and protecting the arts (visual, plastic, theatrical, musical, dance, architectural, literary, televisual and cinematographic) in France and abroad; and managing the national archives and regional maisons de... The Archives nationales (in French; English: National archives), established in their present form in 1806, preserve the national archives of the French state, apart from the archives of the Ministère de la défense (Ministry of Defence) and the Ministère des affaires étrangères (Ministry of Foreign Affairs... Events October 27 - Pope Boniface V succeeded by Pope Honorius I. Births Adamnan, abbot of Iona Empress Wu Zetian of China Deaths Pope Boniface V Category: 625 ... In France, a préfecture is the administrative town of a département. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ...


Non-Profit Archives

Non-profit archives include those in historical societies, not-for-profit businesses such as hospitals, and the repositories within foundations. Non-profit archives are typically set up with private funds from donors to preserve the papers and history of specific persons or places. Often these institutions rely on grant funding from the government as well.[16] Depending on the funds available, non-profit archives may be as small as the historical society in a rural town to as big as a state historical society that rivals a government archives. Users of this type of archive may vary as much as the institutions that hold them. Employees of non-profit archives may be professional archivists, para-professionals, or volunteers, as the education required for a position at a non-profit archive varies with the demands of the collection's user base.[17] A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... This is a partial List of Historical Societies from around the world. ... A charitable foundation is a legal categorization of nonprofit organizations that either donate funds and support to other organizations, or provide the sole source of funding for their own activities. ... Look up Grant, grant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Special (other) Archives

Some archives defy categorization. There are tribal archives within the Native American nations in North America, and there are archives that exist within the papers of private individuals. Many museums keep archives in order to prove the provenance of their pi ajay eces. Any institution or persons wishing to keep their significant papers in an organized fashion that employs the most basic principles of archival science may have an archive. In the 2004 census of archivists taken in the United States, 2.7% of archivists were employed in institutions that defied categorization. This was a separate figure from the 1.3% that identified themselves as self-employed.[18] Native Americans redirects here. ... Provenance is the origin or source from which anything comes. ... Archival science is the study of the safe storage, cataloguing and retrieval of documents and items. ...


Etymology

Look up archive in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

The word archives (pronounced /'ɑː(ɹ}.kaɪvs/) is derived from the Greek arkhé meaning government or order (compare an-archy, mon-archy). The word originally developed from the Greek "arkheion" which refers to the home or dwelling of the Archon, in which important official state documents were filed and interpreted under the authority of the Archon. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Look up Archon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Archives in history

The word "archives" can refer to any organised body of records fixed on media. The management of archives is essential for effective day-to-day organisational decision making, and even for the survival of organisations. Archives were well developed by the ancient Chinese, the ancient Greeks, and ancient Romans. Modern archival thinking has many roots in the French Revolution. The French National Archives, who possess perhaps the largest archival collection in the world, with records going as far back as A.D. 625, were created in 1790 during the French Revolution from various government, religious, and private archives seized by the revolutionaries. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... One of the oldest records in the Archives nationales : parchment dated December 23, 695. ... Events October 27 - Pope Boniface V succeeded by Pope Honorius I. Births Adamnan, abbot of Iona Empress Wu Zetian of China Deaths Pope Boniface V Category: 625 ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Glossary of Library and Internet Terms. University of South Dakota Library. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  2. ^ A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  3. ^ definition of archive. Wiktionary. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  4. ^ What Are Archives?. National Museum of American History. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  5. ^ Walch, Victoria Irons (2006). "Archival Census and Education Needs Survey in the United States: Part 1: Introduction". The American Archivist 69 (2): 294-309. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. 
  6. ^ Maher, William J. (1992). The Management of College and University Archives.. Metuchen, New Jersey: Society of American Archivists & The Scarecrow Press, Inc.. 
  7. ^ Welcome to University Archives and Records Management. Kennesaw State University Archives. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  8. ^ Guidelines for College and University Archives. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  9. ^ Business Archives Council. Business Archives Council. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  10. ^ Directory of Corporate Archives. Hunter Information Management. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  11. ^ Business Archives in North America - Invest in your future: Understand your past. Society of American Archivists. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  12. ^ Directions for Change. Libraries and Archives Canada. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  13. ^ The National Archives. United States National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  14. ^ U.S. - State Level Records Repositories: State Libraries, Archives, Genealogical & Historical Societies. Cyndi's List of Genealogy Sites on the Internet. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  15. ^ (French) Les archives en France. Quid - 2007. Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  16. ^ Creigh, by Dorothy Weyer (1995). A Primer for Local Historical Societies: Revised and Expanded from the First Edition. AltaMira Press, 122. 
  17. ^ Whitehill, Walter Muir (1962). "Introduction", Independent Historical Societies: An Enquiry into Their Research and Publication Functions and Their Financial Future. Boston, Masssachusetts: The Boston Athenaeum, 311. 
  18. ^ Walch, Victoria Irons (2006). "A*Census: A Closer Look". The American Archivist 69 (2): 327-348. Retrieved on 2007-05-08. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Quid is a French encyclopedia, established in 1963. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

An archivist surveying an unprocessed collection of materials. ... Archival science is the study of the safe storage, cataloguing and retrieval of documents and items. ... A museum is distinguished a collection of often unique objects that forms the core of its activities for exhibitions, education, research, etc. ... The logo of Internet Archive The Internet Archive (IA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining an on-line library and archive of Web and multimedia resources. ... This list of archives contains many archives from around the world. ... Manuscript processing consists of arranging and describing the papers of an individual or the records of an organization. ... National Bureau of Standards preserving the U.S. Declaration of Independence in 1951 Decaying books at the library of Merton College, Oxford. ... Web archiving is the process of collecting the Web or particular portions of the Web and ensuring the collection is preserved in an archive, such as an archive site, for future researchers, historians, and the public. ... BS 5454, Recommendations for the storage and exhibition of archival documents is a British Standard for the preservation of archive materials. ... For other uses, see Knowledge base. ... Data proliferation refers to the unprecedented amount of data, structured and unstructured, that business and government continue to generate at an unprecedented rate and the usability problems that result from attempting to store and manage that data. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Transformation Stories Archive - encyclopedia article about Transformation Stories Archive. (1602 words)
In some, an unexpected but welcome transformation (especially various forms of lycanthropy) plays a thematic role similar to the plot device of the protagonist being a commoner who finds out they are actually royal, or have unsuspected magical talent, or have some other wonderful secret destiny.
The archive has a high proportion of transgender and furry wish-fulfillment stories because they were the most numerous at the time of its creation.
Archives refers to a collection of records with specific characteristics, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept.
Internet Archive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1056 words)
The Internet Archive (http://archive.org/), located at the Presidio in San Francisco, California, is dedicated to maintaining an archive of multimedia resources.
This archive includes "snapshots of the World Wide Web" (archived copies of pages, taken at various points in time), software, movies, books, and audio recordings (including recordings of live concerts from bands that allow it).
The Independent News collection includes sub-collections such as the Internet Archive's World At War competition from 2001, in which contestants created short films demonstrating "why access to history matters." Among their most-downloaded video files are eyewitness recordings of the devastating 2004 tsunami.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m