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Encyclopedia > Architect of the Capitol
United States Capitol
United States Capitol

The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States Botanic Garden, the Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building, the Capitol Power Plant, and other facilities. The Congressional office buildings include the Russell Senate Office Building, the Dirksen Senate Office Building, the Hart Senate Office Building, the Cannon House Office Building, the Longworth House Office Building, the Rayburn House Office Building, and the Ford House Office Building as well as the dormitories and schools for the Senate pages and U.S. House pages. The U.S. Capitol building in Washington, DC. From http://teachpol. ... The U.S. Capitol building in Washington, DC. From http://teachpol. ... Seal of the U.S. Congress. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the Congress of the United States, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... The Great Hall interior. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden run by the Congress of the United States. ... The Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building houses agencies that support the work of the United States Courts, including the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, the Federal Judicial Center, and the United States Sentencing Commission. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... The Ford House Office Building is one of the four office buildings containing U.S. House of Representatives staff on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. It is the only House Office Building that is not connected underground to either one of the other office buildings or to the Capitol itself. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


The Architect of the Capitol is one of three members of both the Capitol Police Board, which has jurisdiction over the U.S. Capitol Police, and the Capitol Guide Board, which has jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Guide Service. The other members of both boards are the Senate Sergeant-at-Arms and House Sergeant-at-Arms. The Capitol Police Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. ... The United States Capitol Police is a police force charged with protecting the legislative branch of the U.S. government. ... The Capitol Guide Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Guide Service. ... The United States Capitol Guide Service is a guide service charged by the United States Congress to provide guided tours of the interior of the United States Capitol Building for the education and enlightenment of the general public, without charge for such tours. ... The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate in is the law enforcer for the United States Senate. ... The United States House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. ...


Until 1989 the position of Architect of the Capitol was filled by appointment from the President of the United States for an indefinite term. Legislation enacted in 1989 provides that the Architect is to be appointed for a term of ten years by the President, with the advice and consent of the United States Senate, from a list of three candidates recommended by a congressional commission. Upon confirmation by the Senate, the Architect becomes an official of the Legislative Branch as an officer and agent of Congress; he is eligible for reappointment after completion of his term. The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ...


List of Architects of the Capital

This is a complete list of Architects of the Capital:

Architect of the Capital Term of Office Assistant Architect Appointing President Notes
William Thornton 1793 Washington Washington selected Thornton's original design for the U.S. Capital.
Benjamin Latrobe March 6, 1803
July 1, 1811



April 6, 1815
November 20, 1817 William Thornton (May 20, 1759 - 28 March 1828) was the original architect of the United States Capitol. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was the first President of the United States, from 1789 to 1797. ... Benjamin Henry Latrobe (May 1, 1764 - September 3, 1820) was an architect best known for his design of the United States Capitol. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Jefferson



Madison Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and an influential founder of the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States. ...

Latrobe was appointed twice. President Jefferson appointed him to take over work on the building in 1803 and construction was halted in 1811. During the War of 1812, the Capitol was burned by British troops, prompting President Madison to reappoint Latrobe as Architect of the Capitol and conduct repairs.
Charles Bulfinch January 8, 1818
June 25, 1829
Monroe
Thomas U. Walter
(Engineer-in-charge:
Montgomery C. Meigs)
June 11, 1851
May 26, 1865
Edward Clark Fillmore Walter and Meigs shared responsibility for the Capitol and the construction of its additions.
Edward Clark August 30, 1865
January 6, 1902
Elliot Woods A Johnson
Elliot Woods February 19, 1902
May 22, 1923
T Roosevelt
David Lynn August 22, 1923
September 30, 1954
Coolidge
J. George Stewart October 1, 1954
May 24, 1970
mike rules! Eisenhower
George M. White January 27, 1971
November 21, 1995
William L. Ensign Nixon Ensign acted as Architect after White's retirement until a replacement was appointed
Alan M. Hantman January 6, 1997
present
Michael G. Turnbull Clinton Hantman was the first Architect of the Capitol appointed under the legislation passed in 1989 providing for a fixed, renewable ten-year term for the Architects of the Capitol. On August 1, 2006, Hantman announced he will not seek a second term when his term expires in 2007.

--70.90.110.253 12:24, 25 October 2006 (UTC) The Massachusetts State House, designed by Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the Monroe Doctrine. ... Thomas U. Walter Portrait by Francisco Pausas, 1925, after a Mathew Brady photograph Thomas Ustick Walter (September 4, 1804 – October 30, 1887) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the dean of American architecture between the death of Benjamin Latrobe and the work of H.H. Richardson. ... Montgomery C. Meigs Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (IPA: ) (May 3, 1816 – January 2, 1892) was a career U.S. Army officer, civil engineer, construction engineer for a number of facilities in Washington, D.C., and Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army during and after the American Civil War. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Edward Clark was Architect of the Capitol from 1865 to 1902. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... Edward Clark was Architect of the Capitol from 1865 to 1902. ... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (243rd in leap years), with 123 days remaining. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the sixteenth Vice President (1865) and the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ... February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... James George Stewart (June 2, 1890 – May 24, 1970) was an American architect and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William L. Bill Ensign, FAIA is the Planning and Architectural Consultant for the Tax-Free Fund For Utah, one of the Aquila Group of Funds. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael G. Turnbull, FAIA (April 13, 1949 - ) is an architect who has spent much of his career in the public sector as a custodian of major public buildings, notably the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC as the Assistant Architect of the Capitol and as the Director of Design and... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

  • Architect of the Capitol
United States Congress(House of Representatives, Senate)
Members House: Current, Former, Districts | Senate: Current, Former, Current & Former by state
Groups African Americans, Asian Pacific Americans list, Caucuses, Committees, Demographics, Softball League
House: Committees  | Senate: Committees, Women list
Leaders House: Speaker, Party leaders, Party whips, Dem. caucus, Rep. conference, Dean
Senate: President pro tempore (list), Party leaders, Assistant party leaders, Dem. Caucus (Chair, Secretary, Policy comm. chair), Rep. Conference (Chair, Secretary, Policy comm. chair), Dean
Agencies, Employees & Offices Architect of the Capitol, Capitol guide service (board), Capitol police (board), Chiefs of Staff, Government Printing Office, Law Revision Counsel, Librarian of Congress, Poet laureate
House: Chaplain, Chief Administrative Officer, Clerk, Doorkeeper, Emergency Planning, Preparedness, and Operations, Historian, Page, Parliamentarian, Postmaster, Reading clerk, Recording Studio, Sergeant at Arms
Senate: Chaplain, Curator, Historian, Librarian, Page, Parliamentarian, Secretary, Sergeant at Arms
Politics & Procedure Act of Congress (list), Caucuses, Committees, Jefferson's Manual, Joint session, Oversight, Partisan mix of delegations, Rider
House: Committees, History, Procedures | Senate: Committees, Filibuster, History, Traditions, Vice Presidents' tie-breaking votes
Buildings Capitol Complex, Capitol, Botanic Garden

House: Cannon, Ford, Longworth, O'Neill, Rayburn | Senate: Dirksen, Hart, Russell Seal of the U.S. Congress. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The 109th United States Congress is the current meeting of the United States legislature, comprised of the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... This is an incomplete list of notable former members of the United States House of Representatives. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... 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The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (currently at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... A whip in the United States House of Representatives is a member of the party leadership who comes second in line after the partys floor leader, which in the house is the House Majority Leader or the House Minority Leader. ... The House Democratic Caucus, nominates and elects the Democratic Party leadership in the United States House of Representatives. ... The House Republican Conference, sometimes known as the House Republican Leadership Conference, is an organization for Republicans in the United States House of Representatives. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The seal for the President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... This is a complete List of Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators who are elected by the party conferences that hold the majority and the minority respectively. ... The Assistant Majority and Minority Leaders of the United States Senate (commonly called Senate Majority and Minority Whips) are the second-ranking members of their parties in the United States Senate. ... The Senate Democratic Caucus is the formal organization of the (currently) 44 Democratic Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Democratic caucus of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairman. ... The United States Senate Democratic Conference Secretary, also called the Caucus Secretary, is a ranking leadership position within the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Democratic members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ... The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 55 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Republican conference of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairperson. ... The United States Senate Republican Conferece Secretary is the third-ranking leadership position within the U.S. Republican Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Republican members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ... The Dean of the U.S. Senate is the longest-serving (in consecutive terms) member of the United States Senate, which is at present Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia. ... The United States Capitol Guide Service is a guide service charged by the United States Congress to provide guided tours of the interior of the United States Capitol Building for the education and enlightenment of the general public, without charge for such tours. ... The Capitol Guide Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Guide Service. ... The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a police force charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its terrirtories. ... The Capitol Police Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. ... A U.S. Congressional Chief of Staff is the top executive in the office of a member of the United States Congress after the member. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) prints and provides access to documents produced by and for all three branches of the federal government, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and... The Office of the Law Revision Counsel prepares and publishes the United States Code, which is a consolidation and codification by subject matter of the general and permanent laws of the United States. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... The election of William Linn as Chaplain of the House on May 1, 1789, continued the tradition established by the Continental Congresses of each days proceedings opening with a prayer by a chaplain. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives is an employee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Doorkeeper of the United States House of Representatives office was abolished during the 104th Congress. ... The Office of Emergency Planning, Preparedness and Operations (OEPPO) provides emergency planning and operational support to the United States House of Representatives. ... The Historian of the United States House of Representatives is an official appointed by that legislative body to study and document its past. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The office of the Parliamentarian of the United States House of Representatives is an office managed, supervised and administered by a non-partisan Parliamentarian appointed by the Speaker. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Reading Clerk of the United States House of Representatives reads bills, motions, and other papers before the House and keeps track of changes to legislation made on the floor. ... The House Recording Studio provides radio and television recording services to Members, Committees, and Officers of the United States House of Representatives. ... The United States House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. ... // Job description and selection Among his or her duties, the chaplains job is to open each session of the United States Senate with a prayer. ... The United States Senate Curator is an employee of the United States Senate who is responsible for developing and implementing the museum and preservation programs for the Senate Commission on Art. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with United States Senate Historical Office. ... The Senate Library is an administrative office that reports into the Secretary of the United States Senate. ... A United States Senate Page (Senate Page or simply Page) is a non-partisan federal employee serving the United States Senate in Washington, DC. In many ways, Senate Pages are similar to their House counterparts. ... The Parliamentarian of the United States Senate serves at the pleasure of the Senate Majority Leader, and functions under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate as a non-partisan employee of the Senate. ... The Secretary of the Senate, as an elected officer of the United States Senate, supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. ... The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate is the law enforcer for the United States Senate. ... An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is... This is a partial list of notable United States federal legislation, in chronological order. ... A Congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress which meets to pursue common legislative objectives. ... A Congressional committee in the parlance of the United States Congress and politics of the United States is a legislative sub-organization that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress, making necessary and proper laws). ... Jeffersons Manual of Parliamentary Practice is a book of parliamentary procedure and additional guidelines for the United States House of Representatives, written by Thomas Jefferson in 1801. ... Joint Sessions of the United States Congress are the gathering together of both House and Senate which occur on special occasions such as the State of the Union Address and Presidential Inauguration. ... Congress, in addition to its lawmaking duties, has oversight authority over the Executive Branch. ... House of Representatives Senate Map showing party membership in the 109th Senate. ... In legislative practice, a rider is an additional provision annexed to a bill under the consideration of a legislature, having little connection with the subject matter of the bill. ... Members of the Committee on Financial Services sit in the tiers of raised chairs (R), while those testifying and audience members sit below (L). ... George W. Bush delivered his annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on January 28, 2003, in the House chamber. ... The parliamentary procedure of the House of Representatives is determined internally. ... The Senate Committee on Budget (ca. ... In a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... Debate over Compromise of 1850 in the Old Senate Chamber. ... The United States Senate observes a number of traditions, some formal and some informal. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate and votes only to break a tie. ... Aerial view of the United States Capitol Complex from the northweat The United States Capitol Complex is group of about a dozen buildings and facilities in Washington D.C. that are used by the Federal government of the United States. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the Congress of the United States, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden run by the Congress of the United States. ... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The Ford House Office Building is one of the four office buildings containing U.S. House of Representatives staff on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. It is the only House Office Building that is not connected underground to either one of the other office buildings or to the Capitol itself. ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ... The ONeill House Office Building is the name of a former Congressional Office Building, located near the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. It was named after former Speaker of the House Thomas Tip ONeill (December 9, 1912 – January 5, 1994). ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ...

Research Biographical directory, Congressional Quarterly, Congressional Record, Congressional Research Service,
Federal depository library, Library of Congress, The Hill, Roll Call, THOMAS
Misc Power of enforcement, Scandals

  Results from FactBites:
 
Architect of the Capitol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (419 words)
Until 1989 the position of Architect of the Capitol was filled by appointment from the President of the United States for an indefinite term.
Legislation enacted in 1989 provides that the Architect is to be appointed for a term of ten years by the President, with the advice and consent of the United States Senate, from a list of three candidates recommended by a congressional commission.
During the War of 1812, the Capitol was burned by British troops, prompting President Madison to reappoint Latrobe as Architect of the Capitol and conduct repairs.
Architect of the Capitol - Capitol Flags (209 words)
Requests for Capitol flags rapidly outgrew the supply; hence, the Architect of the Capitol instituted a program of flying smaller flags that may be purchased through Members' offices.
The Architect of the Capitol fulfills all flag requests from Members of the United States Senate, and the House of Representatives.
Currently, the Architect of the Capitol fulfills on average more than 100,000 flag requests from Members of Congress annually, with the number of requests and the popularity of the Capitol Flag Program growing steadily each year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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