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Encyclopedia > Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery
The Earl of Rosebery


In office
5 March 1894 – 22 June 1895
Monarch Victoria
Preceded by William Ewart Gladstone
Succeeded by The Marquess of Salisbury

Born 7 May 1847(1847-05-07)
Berkeley Square, London
Died 21 May 1929 (aged 82)
Epsom, Surrey
Political party Liberal
Spouse Hannah de Rothschild
Alma mater Christ Church, Oxford

Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, KG, PC (7 May 184721 May 1929) was a British Liberal statesman and Prime Minister, also known as Archibald Primrose (1847–1851) and Lord Dalmeny (1851–1868). The title Earl of Rosebery was created in the Peerage of Scotland for Archibald Primrose, 1st Viscount of Rosebery. ... Image File history File links RoseberyMillais. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the day. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830 – 22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and Prime Minister on three occasions, for a total of over 13 years. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Berkeley Square in 1830. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Epsom is a town in the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey, England, to the south of Greater London. ... This article is about the English county. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Hannah, Countess of Rosebery. ... College name Christ Church Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 MCR or GCR President {{{MCR President}}} Graduates 154 Home page Boat Club Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house of Christ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Early life

1847–1860

Rosebery was born in his parents' house in Charles Street, London, on 7th May 1847. At the time of his birth he was styled Archibald Philip Primrose. His father was Lord Dalmeny, heir to The 4th Earl. Lord Dalmeny was MP for Stirling from 1832 to 1847 and served as First Lord of the Admiralty under Lord Melbourne. Rosebery's mother was Catherine, a daughter of The Earl Stanhope. His father died on 23rd January 1851 and from then on he was styled Lord Dalmeny. In 1854 his mother married The Duke of Cleveland. The relationship between mother and son was very poor. Dalmeny attended prepartory schools in Hertfordshire and Brighton. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For his great-grandson, see Archie Primrose, Lord Dalmeny. ... Sir Archibald John Primrose, 4th Earl of Rosebery KT, PC, FRS (14 October 1783 – 4 March 1868) was a British Member of Parliament. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... Arms of Lord Melbourne William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC (15 March 1779–24 November 1848) was a British Whig statesman who served as Home Secretary (1830-1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835-1841), and a mentor of Queen Victoria. ... Philip Henry Stanhope, 4th Earl Stanhope (December 7, 1781 – March 2, 1855), was an English aristocrat, famous for his shadowy role in the Kaspar Hauser case during the 1830s. ... Harry Powlett, 4th Duke of Cleveland, by Leslie Ward, 1877. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... Brighton is located on the south coast of England, and together with its immediate neighbour Hove forms the city of Brighton and Hove. ...


Eton

Dalmeny attended Eton between 1860 and 1865. Whilst there, he participated in debates and attracted the attention of William Johnson Cory, not just because of his remarkable intellect but in a sexual way also. The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... William Johnson Cory (1823 - 1892, born William Johnson) was a poet, born at Torrington, and educated at Eton, where he was afterwards a renowned master, nicknamed Tute (short for tutor) by his pupils. ...


Oxford

Dalmeny was educated at Christ Church, Oxford, from 1865 until 1869. College name Christ Church Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 MCR or GCR President {{{MCR President}}} Graduates 154 Home page Boat Club Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house of Christ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ...


This meant that for a quarter of a century, from 1880 until 1905, the four Prime Ministers of that period – Gladstone, Salisbury, Rosebery and Balfour – all went to both Eton and Christ Church. All in all, 19 Prime Ministers (38%) have gone to Eton, and 11 (22%) to Christ Church. William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–74, 1880–85, 1886 and 1892–94). ... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury (February 3, 1830–August 22, 1903). ... For the steel manufacturer, see Arthur Balfour, 1st Baron Riverdale. ...


A prominent figure on the turf for 40 years, Dalmeny bought a horse, Ladas, in 1868. A rule banned undergraduates from owning horses, and when he was found out, he was offered a choice: sell the horse or give up his studies. He chose the latter.


The 1870s

His grandfather having died in 1868, Dalmeny became Earl of Rosebery. This did not entitle him to sit in the House of Lords, as the title is part of the old Peerage of Scotland, from which 16 members (representative peers) were elected to sit in the Lords for each session of Parliament. However, in 1828 Rosebery's grandfather had been created 1st Baron Rosebery in the Peerage of the United Kingdom; this did entitle Rosebery to sit in the Lords like all peers of the United Kingdom. The title Earl of Rosebery was created in the Peerage of Scotland for Archibald Primrose, 1st Viscount of Rosebery. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Peerage of Scotland is the division of the British Peerage for those peers created in the Kingdom of Scotland before 1707. ... In the United Kingdom, representative peers were individuals elected by the members of the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of Ireland to represent them in the British House of Lords. ... The title Earl of Rosebery was created in the Peerage of Scotland for Archibald Primrose, 1st Viscount of Rosebery. ... The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Act of Union in 1801. ...


His three aims

Rosebery is reputed to have said that he had three aims in life: to win the Derby, to marry an heiress, and to become Prime Minister. He managed all three. Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ... Hannah, Countess of Rosebery. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


Personal life after 1878

Marriage

Hannah

In 1878, Rosebery married Hannah, only child of the Jewish banker Baron Mayer de Rothschild, and the greatest English heiress of her day. In 1874 her father died and she largely inherited his estate. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (423x695, 95 KB)Hannah de Rothschild (1851 - 1890) Painting possibly by Sir John Everett Millais 1829 -1896. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (423x695, 95 KB)Hannah de Rothschild (1851 - 1890) Painting possibly by Sir John Everett Millais 1829 -1896. ... Hannah, Countess of Rosebery. ... Baron Mayer Amschel de Rothschild (1818 – 1874) was the third son of Nathan Mayer Rothschild (1777 – 1836). ...


The couple were introduced by Mrs. Disraeli in 1875, at Newmarket Racecourse. This article is about the 1st Viscountess Beaconsfield. ... Newmarket Racecourse is located in Newmarket, England. ...


They were married in the Board of Guardians in Mount Street, London, on 20th March 1878, when he was 31 and she 27. Later that day, the marriage was blessed in a Christian ceremony in Christ Church, Down Street, Piccadilly. In January, Rosebery had said to a friend that he found Hannah "very simple, very unspoilt, very clever, very warm-hearted and very shy...I never knew such a beautiful character." Both Queen Victoria's son the Prince of Wales and her cousin, the army commander George, Duke of Cambridge attended the ceremony. Hannah's death in 1890 from typhoid, compounded by Bright's disease, left him distraught. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... ... This is about the disease typhoid fever. ... Brights disease is a historical classification of kidney diseases that would be described in modern medicine as acute or chronic nephritis. ...


It was also speculated that he was bisexual. Like Oscar Wilde, he was hounded by John Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry for his association with one of Queensberry's sons — Francis Douglas, Viscount Drumlanrig. Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Lord Queensberry in 1896 John Sholto Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry (20 July 1844 – 31 January 1900) was a Scottish nobleman, remembered for lending his name to the Marquess of Queensberry rules that formed the basis of modern boxing, and for his role in the downfall of author and playwright... Francis Archibald Douglas, Viscount Drumlanrig (3 February 1867–19 October 1894) was a Scottish nobleman and politician, the eldest son of the 9th Marquess of Queensberry. ...


Children

Rosebery had four children with Hannah:

  • Sybil Myra Caroline (1879–1955), married Sir Charles Grant (1877–1950).
  • Margaret, known as Peggy, (b. 1881), who in 1899 married The Marquess of Crewe (1858–1945). Such was her father's popularity that London came to a standstill for the wedding.
  • Harry Primrose, 6th Earl of Rosebery (Albert Edward Harry Meyer Archibald) (January 1882 – 1974), served as Scottish Secretary in 1945.
  • Neil James Archibald (December 1882 – 1917). Killed in action in Palestine. Married Lady Victoria Stanley; father of Ruth, Countess of Hailfax.

Margot Asquith said that Rosebery loved to play with his children. Lady Sybil Primrose (later Grant) (1879–1955) painted by Lord Frederick Leighton. ... Robert Offley Ashburton Crewe-Milnes, 1st and last Marquess of Crewe (12 January 1858–20 June 1945) was an English statesman and writer. ... Albert Edward Harry Meyer Archibald Primrose, 6th Earl of Rosebery (1882-1974), known by his third name of Harry, was a UK politician who briefly served as Secretary of State for Scotland in 1945. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... Captain Neil James Archibald Primrose, MC (14 December 1882 – 17 November 1917), British Liberal politician and soldier, was the second son of Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery and Hannah de Rothschild, and brother of the writer Lady Sybil Grant. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old Kingdoms of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi... Emma Alice Margaret (Margot) Asquith, Countess of Oxford & Asquith (neé Tennant) (February 2, 1864-July 28, 1945) was a British socialite, author and wit. ...


Homes

Dalmeny House was the ancestral seat of the Earls of Rosebery and the setting for Lord and Lady Rosebery's political houseparties.

Rosebery was the owner of twelve houses. By marriage, he acquired: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1067x800, 111 KB) Lightened version of this image here Image:Dalmenyhouse. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1067x800, 111 KB) Lightened version of this image here Image:Dalmenyhouse. ... Dalmeny House Dalmeny House is a large baronial mansion and estate in Dalmeny on the Firth of Forth in Scotland. ... The title Earl of Rosebery was created in the Peerage of Scotland for Archibald Primrose, 1st Viscount of Rosebery. ...

With his fortune, he bought: Mentmore in the 1990s Mentmore Towers is a large English country house in the village of Mentmore in Buckinghamshire. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Leedon redirects here. ... Bedfordshire (abbreviated Beds) is a county in England that forms part of the East of England region. ... Crafton is a hamlet in the ecclesiastic parish of Wing, in Buckinghamshire, England. ...

  • A shooting lodge at Carrington in Midlothian
  • A Georgian villa at Postwick in Norfolk
  • In 1897 he bought Villa Delahante in Posillipo, overlooking the Bay of Naples, currently residence of President of Italian Republic, still known as "Villa Rosebery".
  • 38 Berkeley Square, London.
  • The Durdans, Epsom, where he died in 1929.

As Earl of Rosebery, he was laird of: The central portions of the old province of Lothian in Scotland, centred around Edinburgh, became known as Midlothian, Scotland. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Epsom is a town in the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey, England, to the south of Greater London. ...

  • Dalmeny House on the banks of the Firth of Forth (pictured)
  • Barnbougle Castle in the grounds of Dalmeny Estate, used by Rosebery (an insomniac) for privacy.

He rented: Dalmeny House Dalmeny House is a large baronial mansion and estate in Dalmeny on the Firth of Forth in Scotland. ... The Firth of Forth from Calton Hill The Forth Bridges cross the Firth Satellite photo of the Firth and the surrounding area Map of the Firth Firth of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary or firth of Scotlands River Forth, where it flows into the North Sea...

For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Lansdowne House is a house in Berkeley Square, London. ...

Earlier political career

Early Whig leanings

At Eton, Rosebery notably attacked Charles I for his despotism, and went on to praise his Whig forebears (His ancestor, The 1st Earl Stanhope, was a minister to George I.) Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope (c. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ...


Disraeli pursues

Benjamin Disraeli often met with Rosebery in the 1870s to attract him to his party, but this proved futile. Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ...


Gladstone pursues

Disraeli's major rival, William Ewart Gladstone, also pursued Rosebery, with considerable success. William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ...


The Midlothian campaign

As part of the Liberal plan to get Gladstone to be MP for Midlothian, Rosebery sponsored and largely ran the Midlothian Campaign of 1879. He based this on seeing a presidential election in the USA. Gladstone spoke from open-deck trains, and gathered mass support. In 1880 he was duly elected Member for Midlothian and returned to the Premiership. Midlothian, Scotland, is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Midlothian campaign was a series of foreign policy speeches given by William Gladstone. ...


Foreign Secretary

First period in office (1886)

Rosebery helped Gladstone's perpetual Home Rule Bill in the House of Lords; nevertheless it failed.


Second period in office (1892–1894)

Rosebery's second period as Foreign Secretary predominantly involved quarrels with France over Uganda. To quote his hero Napoleon, Rosebery thought that "the Master of Egypt is the Master of India"; thus he pursued the policy of expansion in Africa. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


Prime Minister

Rosebery became a leader of the Liberal Imperialist faction of the Liberal Party, and in Gladstone's third (February to July 1886) and fourth (August 1892 to March 1894) administrations, Rosebery served as Foreign Secretary. When Gladstone retired in 1894, Rosebery became his successor as Prime Minister, much to the disgust of Sir William Harcourt, the Chancellor of the Exchequer and leader of the more left-wing Liberals. His selection was largely the consequence of Queen Victoria's dislike for most of the leading Liberals of the day. The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Sir William Harcourt Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon Harcourt (October 14, 1827 - October 1, 1904) was a British Liberal statesman. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ...


Rosebery's government was largely unsuccessful. His designs in foreign policy, such as expansion of the fleet, were defeated by disagreements within the Liberal Party, while the Unionist-dominated House of Lords stopped the whole of the Liberals' domestic legislation. On June 21, 1895, Rosebery resigned after a minor defeat in the House of Commons, and a Unionist government under Lord Salisbury took his place. The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830 – 22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and Prime Minister on three occasions, for a total of over 13 years. ...


Later life

Rosebery resigned as leader of the Liberal Party on October 8, 1896, to be succeeded by Harcourt, and gradually moved further and further from the mainstream of the party, supporting the Boer War and opposing Irish Home Rule, a position that prevented him from participating in the Liberal government that returned to power in 1905. In his later years, Rosebery turned to writing, including biographies of Lord Chatham, Pitt the Younger, Napoleon, and Lord Randolph Churchill. Another one of his passionate interests was the collecting of books. Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708–11 May 1778) was a British statesman who achieved his greatest fame as war minister during the Seven Years War and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 1849 – 24 January 1895) was a British statesman. ...


The last years of his political life saw Rosebery become a purely negative critic of the Liberal governments of Campbell-Bannerman and Asquith. His crusade "for freedom as against bureaucracy, for freedom as against democratic tyranny, for freedom as against class legislation, and … for freedom as against Socialism"[1] was a lonely one, conducted from the cross-benches in the Lords. He did join the die-hard unionist peers in attacking Lloyd George's redistributive People's Budget in 1909, but stopped short of voting against the measure for fear of bringing retribution upon the Lords. The crisis provoked by the Lords' rejection of the budget encouraged him to reintroduce his resolutions for Lords reform, but they were lost with the dissolution of parliament in December 1910. After assaulting the "ill-judged, revolutionary and partisan" terms of the 1911 Parliament Bill,[2] which proposed to curb the Lords' veto, he voted with the government in what proved to be his last appearance in the House of Lords. This was effectively the end of his public life, though he made several public appearances to support the war effort after 1914 and sponsored a "bantam battalion" in 1915. Though Lloyd George offered him "a high post not involving departmental labour" to augment his 1916 coalition, Rosebery declined to serve.[3] Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (7 September 1836 – 22 April 1908) , also known as Andie McDowell, was a British Liberal statesman who served as Prime Minister from December 5, 1905 until resigning due to ill health on April 3, 1908. ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who guided Britain and the British Empire through World War I and the postwar settlement as the Liberal Party Prime Minister, 1916-1922. ... The Peoples Budget was proposed by the Chancellor of the Exchequer David Lloyd George in 1909, and was a key issue of contention between the Liberal government and the House of Lords, ultimately leading to two general elections in 1910 and the enactment of the Parliament Act 1911. ... Passing of the Parliament Bill, 1911, from the drawing by S. Begg The Parliament Acts are two Acts of Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1911 and 1949. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The last year of the war was clouded by two personal tragedies—his son Neil's death in Palestine in November 1917 and Rosebery's own stroke a few days before the armistice. He regained his mental powers, but his movement, hearing, and sight remained impaired for the rest of his life. His sister, Constance, described his last years as a "life of weariness, of total inactivity, & at the last of almost blindness"; John Buchan remembered him in his last month of life, "crushed by bodily weakness" and "sunk in sad and silent meditations".[4] Rosebery died at The Durdans, Epsom, Surrey, on 21 May 1929, to the accompaniment—as he had requested—of a gramophone recording of the Eton boating song. Survived by three of his four children, he was buried in the small church at Dalmeny. Front page of the New York Times on Armistice Day, 11 November 1918 The armistice treaty between the Allies and Germany was signed in a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest on November 11, 1918, and marked the end of the First World War on the Western Front. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... Epsom is a town in the borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey, England, to the south of Greater London. ... This article is about the English county. ... Dalmeny Kirk Dalmeny is a village and parish in Scotland. ...


When Rosebery died in 1929 his estate was probated at £1,500,122 3s. 6d.; he was thus the richest Prime Minister ever, followed by Salisbury then by Palmerston.


Involvement in professional sport

Thoroughbred horse racing

As a result of his marriage to Hannah de Rothschild, Rosebery acquired Mentmore Towers and Mentmore stud near Leighton Buzzard that had been built by Mayer Amschel de Rothschild. Rosbery would build another stable and stud near Mentmore Towers at Crafton, Buckinghamshire, called Crafton Stud. Mentmore in the 1990s Mentmore Towers is a large English country house in the village of Mentmore in Buckinghamshire. ... Look up Stud in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Leedon redirects here. ... Baron Mayer Amschel de Rothschild (1818 – 1874) was the third son of Nathan Mayer Rothschild (1777 – 1836). ... Crafton is a hamlet in the ecclesiastic parish of Wing, in Buckinghamshire, England. ... King Tom by J E Boehm Founding stallion of the Mentmore and Crafton Studs Mentmore Stud and Crafton Stud were horse breeding operations that were part of the Mentmore Towers estate on the Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire borders, England. ...


Rosebery's horses won at least one of each of the five English Classic Races. Among the most famous were Ladas who won the 1894 Epsom Derby, Sir Visto who did it again in 1895, and Cicero in 1905. In horse racing in Great Britain, The Classics are a series of horse races run over the flat (i. ... Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ...


Football

Rosebery also developed a keen in interest in association football and was an early patron of the sport in Scotland. In 1882 he donated a trophy, the Rosebery Charity Cup, to be competed for by clubs under the jurisdiction of the East of Scotland FA. The competition lasted over 60 years and raised thousands of pounds for charities in the Edinburgh area. A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... The Rosebey Charity Cup was a football competition organised for senior clubs from the East of Scotland. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ...


Rosebery also became Honorary President of the national Scottish Football Association, with the representative Scotland national team occasionally forsaking their traditional dark blue shirts for his traditional racing colours of primrose and pink. This occurred 9 times during Rosebery's lifetime, most notably for the 1900 British Home Championship match against England, which the Scots won 4–1. The Scottish Football Association (SFA) is the governing body for the sport of football in Scotland. ... First international Scotland 0–0 England  (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Scotland 11–0 Ireland  (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 February 1901) Biggest defeat  Uruguay 7–0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... The British Home Championship (also known as the Home International Championship) was an annual football competition contested between the UKs four national teams, England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland (Northern Ireland after 1921-1922), from the 1883-1884 season until the 1983-1984 season. ... First international  Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win  Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat  Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in...


Lord Rosebery's government, March 1894 – June 1895

The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Farrer Herschell, 1st Baron Herschell (November 2, 1837 - March 1, 1899) was Lord Chancellor of Great Britain in 1886, and again from 1892 to 1895. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... Edward Marjoribanks, 2nd Baron Tweedmouth (8 July 1849 - 15 September 1909) was a British Liberal statesman who served in various capacities in the Liberal governments of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... The Right Honourable Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852–15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley (1826-1902), English statesman, was born on 7 January 1826, being the eldest son of the Hon. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... George Frederick Samuel Robinson, 1st Marquess of Ripon (24 October 1827 - 9 July 1909) was a British politician who served in every Liberal cabinet from 1861 until his death forty-eight years later. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman (7 September 1836 – 22 April 1908) , also known as Andie McDowell, was a British Liberal statesman who served as Prime Minister from December 5, 1905 until resigning due to ill health on April 3, 1908. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... Henry Hartley Fowler, 1st Viscount Wolverhampton (1830-1911), was born in Darlington. ... The office of Secretary of State for India or India Secretary was created in 1858 when India was brought under direct British rule (British Raj). ... Sir William Harcourt Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon Harcourt (October 14, 1827 - October 1, 1904) was a British Liberal statesman. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... John Poyntz Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer (1835 - 1910) (known as the Red Earl because of his distinctive long red beard) was a British Liberal Party politician under and close friend of British prime minister William Ewart Gladstone. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... Anthony John Mundella (1825—1897) was an English Liberal politician and reformer. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Arnold Morley (18 February 1849 – 16 January 1916) was a British Liberal politician. ... In the United Kingdom, the Postmaster General is a now defunct ministerial position. ... George John Shaw-Lefevre, 1st Baron Eversley PC (12 June 1831–19 April 1928) was a British Liberal politician. ... The President of the Local Government Board was a ministerial post, frequently a Cabinet position, in the United Kingdom, established in 1871. ... James Bryce, right, with Andrew Carnegie; Bryce served as a trustee of the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland James Bryce, 1st Viscount Bryce, OM, GCVO, FRS, PC (May 10, 1838 - January 22, 1922), was a British jurist, historian and politician. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... John Morley, 1st Viscount Morley of Blackburn (1838 - 1923), known for the first part of his life simply as John Morley, was an English statesman and writer. ... The Chief Secretary was the most important position for determining British policy in Ireland after the Lord Lieutenant, and was frequently a cabinet level position in the 19th and early twentieth centuries. ... Sir George Otto Trevelyan, Bt (20 July 1838 - 17 August 1928) was an English statesman and author and the only son of Sir Charles Trevelyan. ... The Secretary for Scotland was the former title of the chief minister in charge of the Scotland Office in the United Kingdom government. ... The Rt. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ...

Changes

  • May 1894: James Bryce succeeds A.J. Mundella at the Board of Trade. Lord Tweedmouth succeeds Bryce at the Duchy of Lancaster, remaining also Lord Privy Seal.

1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

See also

Hannah, Countess of Rosebery. ... Sir Edmund Trelawny Backhouse, 2nd Baronet (20 October 1873 – 8 January 1944) was a British oriental scholar, linguist and black sheep of the Backhouse family whose work was very influential for the Western view of the last decades of the Chinese Empire but is most remembered for having forged most...

Notes

  1. ^ The Times, 16 February 1910
  2. ^ R. R. James, Rosebery: a biography of Archibald Philip, fifth earl of Rosebery (1963), p. 469.
  3. ^ R. O. A. Crewe-Milnes, Lord Rosebery, (1931), vol. 2. p. 51.
  4. ^ Rhodes James, p. 485.

References

  • Rosebery: Statesman in Turmoil by Leo McKinstry ISBN 0-7195-5879-4

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery
  • Earl Of Rosebery 1847–1929 biography from the Liberal Democrat History Group
  • More about The Earl of Roseberry on the Downing street website.
Political offices
Preceded by
William Ewart Gladstone
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1894–1895
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Salisbury
Preceded by
George Lefevre
First Commissioner of Works
1885
Succeeded by
David Plunket
Preceded by
The Lord Carlingford
Lord Privy Seal
1885
Succeeded by
The Earl of Harrowby
Preceded by
The Marquess of Salisbury
Foreign Secretary
1886
Succeeded by
The Earl of Iddesleigh
Preceded by
The Marquess of Salisbury
Foreign Secretary
1892–1894
Succeeded by
The Earl of Kimberley
Preceded by
The Earl of Kimberley
Lord President of the Council
1894–1895
Succeeded by
The Duke of Devonshire
Leader of the House of Lords
1894–1895
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Salisbury
Preceded by
The Marquess of Salisbury
Leader of the Opposition
1895–1896
Succeeded by
Sir William Harcourt
Party political offices
Preceded by
William Ewart Gladstone
Leader of the British Liberal Party
1894–1896
Succeeded by
Sir William Harcourt
Academic offices
Preceded by
William Edward Forster
Rector of the University of Aberdeen
1878–1881
Succeeded by
Alexander Bain
Preceded by
The Marquess of Hartington
Rector of the University of Edinburgh
1880–1883
Succeeded by
Sir Stafford Northcote
Preceded by
Joseph Chamberlain
Rector of the University of Glasgow
1899–1902
Succeeded by
George Wyndham
Preceded by
The Lord Avebury
Rector of the University of St Andrews
1910–1913
Succeeded by
The Earl of Aberdeen
Preceded by
Earl of Kimberley
Chancellor of the University of London
1902–1929
Succeeded by
Earl Beauchamp
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
Archibald Primrose
Earl of Rosebery
1868–1929
Succeeded by
Harry Primrose
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
New Creation
Earl of Midlothian
1911–1929
Succeeded by
Harry Primrose

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harry Primrose, 6th Earl of Rosebery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (517 words)
Albert Edward Harry Meyer Archibald Primrose, 6th Earl of Rosebery (8 January 1882-31 May 1974), known by his third name of Harry, was a UK politician who briefly served as Secretary of State for Scotland in 1945.
His parents were Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, briefly Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1894 to 1895 and Hannah Primrose, Countess of Rosebery, a Rothschild, and a philanthropist
After the death of his father, Rosebery became a member of the House of Lords and was Lord Lieutenant of Midlothian 1929-1964.
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery (500 words)
Rosebery became a leader of the Liberal Imperialist faction of the Liberal Party, and in Gladstone's third (February - July 1886) and fourth (August 1892 to March 1894) administrations, Rosebery served as Foreign Secretary.
Rosebery's government was largely unsuccessful - his designs in foreign policy, such as expansion of the fleet, were defeated by disagreements within the Liberal Party, while the Tory dominated House of Lords stopped the whole of the Liberals' domestic legislation.
Rosebery resigned as leader of the Liberal Party on October 8, 1896, to be succeeded by Harcourt, and gradually moved further and further from the mainstream of the party, supporting the Boer War and opposing Irish Home Rule, a position which prevented him from participating in the Liberal government that returned to power in 1905.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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