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Encyclopedia > Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria
Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria

Born December 18, 1863(1863-12-18)
Graz, Austrian Empire
Died June 28, 1914 (aged 50)
Sarajevo, Austria-Hungary
Title Archduke of Austria-Este, Prince Imperial of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia
Spouse Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg
Children Princess Sophie von Hohenberg, Maximilian, Duke of Hohenberg, Prince Ernst von Hohenberg
Parents Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria and Princess Maria Annunciata of the Two Sicilies

Franz Ferdinand (December 18, 1863June 28, 1914) was an Archduke of Austria-Este, Prince Imperial of Austria and Royal Prince of Hungary and Bohemia, and from 1896 until his death, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne[1]. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia. This caused countries allied with Austria-Hungary (the Central Powers) and countries allied with Serbia (the Triple Entente Powers) to declare war on each other, starting World War I.[2][3][4] Franz Ferdinand may refer to: Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria Franz Ferdinand - a Scottish rock band, or Franz Ferdinand - their eponymous debut album. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1262x1544, 702 KB) Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria Source: The Library of Congress - American Memory Published in: The War of the Nations (New York), December 31, 1919 Newspaper Pictorials The war of the nations : portfolio in rotogravure etchings : compiled from the... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Grazer Schloßberg Clock Tower Graz [graːts] (Slovenian: Gradec IPA: /gra. ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German, Hungarian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Italian, Polish, Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded on a remnant of the Holy... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Sophie, the Duchess of Hohenberg Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, born Sophie Maria Josephine Albina Chotek, Countess of Chotkova and Wognin (March 1, 1868 - June 28, 1914) was the morganatic wife of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. ... HSH Princess Sophie of Hohenberg Her Serene Highness Princess Sophie of Hohenberg (24 July 1901 – 27 October 1990) was the only daughter of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his morganatic wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg. ... Maximilian von Hohenberg His Serene Highness Duke Maximilian von Hohenberg (29 September 1902 - 8 January 1962) was the eldest son of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Countess Sophie Chotek. ... HSH Prince Ernst von Hohenberg His Serene Highness Prince Ernst von Hohenberg (Ernst Alfons Franz Ignaz Joseph Maria Anton) (17 May 1904 - 5 March 1954) was the youngest son of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his morganatic wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg. ... Karl Ludwig, Archduke of Austria (30 July 1833 - 19 May 1896) was the father of Franz Ferdinand of Austria, whose shooting occasioned the start of World War I. He was born at Schönbrunn in Vienna, the son of Franz Karl Josef of Austria (1802-1878) and his wife Sophie... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Look up Archduke in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Austria-Este is now the surname, and a sort of title, which purports to continue the tradition of the extinguished Italian princely and feudal family of Este, as well as their Duchy of Modena. ... For other uses, see Bohemia (disambiguation). ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... A new plaque commemorating the exact location of the Sarajevo Assassination On June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were shot to death in Sarajevo, capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, by Gavrilo Princip, one of a... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs a declaration of war against the Empire of Japan on December 8, 1941, one day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... Look up Alliance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Red: Central Powers at their zenith. ... Map of the World showing the participants in World War I. Those fighting on the Allies side (at one point or another) are depicted in green, the Central Powers in orange, and neutral countries in gray. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


He was born in Graz, Austria, the eldest son of Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria (younger brother of Emperor Franz Joseph and Maximilian I of Mexico) and of his second wife, Princess Maria Annunciata of the Two Sicilies. When he was only twelve years old, his cousin Duke Francis V of Modena died, naming Franz Ferdinand his heir on condition that he add the name Este to his own. Franz Ferdinand thus became one of the wealthiest men in Austria. The Grazer Schloßberg Clock Tower Graz [graːts] (Slovenian: Gradec IPA: /gra. ... Karl Ludwig, Archduke of Austria (30 July 1833 - 19 May 1896) was the father of Franz Ferdinand of Austria, whose shooting occasioned the start of World War I. He was born at Schönbrunn in Vienna, the son of Franz Karl Josef of Austria (1802-1878) and his wife Sophie... Franz Joseph I (in Slovenian Franc Jožef I, in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in Croatian Franjo Josip I, in Czech František Josef I, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King... Maximilian I, Emperor of Mexico (Emperador Maximiliano I de México) (July 6, 1832 – June 19, 1867) (born Ferdinand Maximilian Joseph) was a member of Austrias Imperial Habsburg-Lorraine family. ... Maria Annunciata of the Two Sicilies was the 2nd wife of Franz Ferdinand Categories: | | | ... The obelisk erected to celebrate the marriage of the Duke with princess Adelgunde of Bavaria. ...


When he was born, there was no reason to think that Franz Ferdinand would ever be heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. He was given the normal strict education of an archduke with an emphasis on history and moral character. From 1876 to 1885 his tutor was the historian Onno Klopp. In 1883 Franz Ferdinand entered the army with the rank of third lieutenant. Onno Klopp (1822-1903), German historian, was born at Leer on the 9th of October 1822, and was educated at the universities of Bonn, Berlin and Göttingen. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ...


As a young man, Franz Ferdinand developed three great passions: hunting, travel, and jousting. It is estimated that he shot more than 5,000 deer in his lifetime. In 1883, he visited Italy for the first time in order to see the properties left to him by Duke Francis V of Modena. In 1885, he visited Egypt, Palestine, Syria, and Turkey. In 1889, he visited Germany. At age thirteen, he broke two of his ribs after falling off his horse while jousting. A 2003 satellite image of the region. ...


In 1889, Franz Ferdinand's life changed dramatically. His cousin Crown Prince Rudolf committed suicide at his hunting lodge in Mayerling,[5] leaving Franz Ferdinand's father, Archduke Karl Ludwig, as first in line to the throne. However his father renounced his succession rights a few days after the Crown Prince's death.[6] Henceforth, Franz Ferdinand was groomed to succeed. Despite this burden, he did manage to find time for travel and personal pursuits -- for example, the time he spent hunting kangaroos and emus in Australia in 1893, and the return trip to Austria in sailing across the Pacific on the RMS Empress of Canada from Yokohama to Vancouver.[7] This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Hunting lodge and Carmelites church at Mayerling The term Mayerling Incident refers to the series of events leading to the alleged suicide of Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria and Baroness Mary Vetsera. ... Species Macropus rufus Macropus giganteus Macropus fuliginosus Macropus antilopinus A kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae (macropods, meaning large foot). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, the Red Kangaroo, the Antilopine Kangaroo, and the Eastern and Western Grey Kangaroo... For other uses, see EMU. Binomial name (Latham, 1790) The Emu has been recorded in the areas shown in orange. ... For the town of Yokohama in Aomori Prefecture, see Yokohama, Aomori. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Marriage and family

Archduke Franz Ferdinand (right) with his family.
Archduke Franz Ferdinand (right) with his family.

In 1895 Franz Ferdinand met Countess Sophie Chotek at a ball in Prague. To be an eligible marriage partner for a member of the House of Habsburg, one had to be a member of one of the reigning or formerly reigning dynasties of Europe. The Choteks were not one of these families, although they did include among their ancestors, in the female line, princess of Baden, Hohenzollern-Hechingen, and Liechtenstein. {Ironically one of Sophia's direct ancestors was Count Albrecht IV of Hapsburg; she was descended from Elisabeth von Hapsburg a sister of King Rudolph I of Germany, while Franz Ferdinard was a descendant of King Rudolph I}. Sophie was a lady-in-waiting to Archduchess Isabella, wife of Archduke Friedrich, Duke of Teschen. Franz Ferdinand began to visit Archduke Friedrich's villa in Pressburg (now Bratislava). Sophie wrote to Franz Ferdinand during his convalescence from tuberculosis when he went to the island of Lošinj in the Adriatic. They kept their relationship a secret for more than two years. Archduke Ferdinand from http://raven. ... Archduke Ferdinand from http://raven. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sophie, the Duchess of Hohenberg Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, born Sophie Maria Josephine Albina Chotek, Countess of Chotkova and Wognin (March 1, 1868 - June 28, 1914) was the morganatic wife of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Matrimony redirects here. ... A partner is: a member of a loving couple, often used as a neutral term like significant other, that can apply to unmarried or homosexual couples a member of a partnership a participant in a Partner dance a member of a law firm or accounting firm which is formed as... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... For other uses, see Female (disambiguation). ... Baden is a historical state in the southwest of Germany, on the right bank of the Rhine. ... Hohenzollern-Hechingen is a branch of the senior Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern dynasty, less known however than the Franconian branch which became Burgraves of Nuremberg and later ruled Brandenburg, Prussia and ultimately Germany in the centuries to 1918. ... The brass of the tomb of Rudolph I in Speyer Rudolph I (Rudolph of Habsburg) (May 1, 1218 – July 15, 1291) was a German king, who played a vital role in raising the Habsburg family to a leading position among the royal dynasties of Germany. ... Lady in Waiting is an album by American southern rock band The Outlaws, released in 1976. ... For other uses, see Wife (disambiguation). ... Friedrich Maria Albrecht Wilhelm Karl, Archduke and Prince Imperial of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia, Duke of Teschen (In German: Erzherzog Friedrich Maria Albrecht Wilhelm Karl von Österreich-Toskana, Herzog von Teschen) - (4 June 1856, – 30 December 1936) was a member of the House of Habsburg and the... Friedrich of Austria-Teschen (HI & RH Friedrich Maria Albrecht Wilhelm Karl Archduke of Austria Prince of Hungary and Bohemia, Herzog von Teschen) (4 June 1856, Gross-Sellowitz – 30 December 1936, Altenburg) was the son of Karl Ferdinand of Austria (1818 - 1874) and his wife Elisabeth of Austria (1831 - 1903). ... , Nickname: Beauty on the Danube Country  Slovakia Region Districts Rivers Elevation 134 m (440 ft) Coordinates , Highest point Devínska Kobyla  - elevation 514 m (1,686 ft) Lowest point Danube River  - elevation 126 m (413 ft) Area 367. ... Sophie is the French form of Sophia. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... LoÅ¡inj (pronounced low-sheen) (Italian Lussino, Latin Apsorrus) is a Croatian island in the northern Adriatic Sea, in the Kvarner gulf. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ...


Archduchess Isabella assumed that Franz Ferdinand was enamored of one of her daughters. In 1898, however, he left his watch lying on a tennis court at her home. She opened the watch, expecting to find there a photograph of one of her daughters; instead, she found a photograph of Sophie. Sophie was immediately dismissed from her position.


Deeply in love, Franz Ferdinand refused to consider marrying anyone else. Pope Leo XIII, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, and the German Emperor Wilhelm II all made representations on Franz Ferdinand's behalf to the Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria, arguing that the disagreement between Franz Joseph and Franz Ferdinand was undermining the stability of the monarchy. Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810—July 20, 1903), born Count Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was the 256th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, reigning from 1878 to 1903, succeeding Pope Pius IX. Reigning until the age of 93, he was the oldest pope, and had the third longest... Nicholas II redirects here. ... German Emperor Wilhelm (born Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albrecht, Prince of Prussia 27 January 1859–4 June 1941), was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia (de: Deutscher Kaiser und König von Preußen), ruling from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. ... Franz Joseph I Franz Joseph I (in English also Francis Joseph) ( August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria and King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and King of Hungary from 1867 until 1916. ...


Finally, in 1899, the Emperor Franz Joseph agreed to permit Franz Ferdinand to marry Sophie, on condition that the marriage would be morganatic and that their descendants would not have succession rights to the throne.[5] Sophie would not share her husband's rank, title, precedence, or privileges; as such, she would not normally appear in public beside him. She would not be allowed to ride in the royal carriage, or sit in the royal box. A morganatic marriage is a type of marriage which can be contracted in certain countries, usually between persons of unequal social rank (unebenbürtig in German), which prevents the passage of the husbands titles and privileges to the wife and any children born of the marriage. ...


The wedding took place on July 1, 1900, at Reichstadt (now Zákupy) in Bohemia; Franz Joseph did not attend the affair, nor did any archduke including Franz Ferdinand's brothers.[5] The only members of the imperial family who were present were Franz Ferdinand's stepmother, Maria Theresia, and her two daughters. Upon the marriage, Sophie was given the title Princess of Hohenberg (Fürstin von Hohenberg) with the style Her Serene Highness (Ihre Durchlaucht). In 1909, she was given the more senior title Duchess of Hohenberg (Herzogin von Hohenberg) with the style Her Highness (Ihre Hoheit). This raised her status considerably, but she still yielded precedence at court to all the archduchesses. Whenever a function required the couple to gather with the other members of royalty, Sophie was forced to stand far down the line of importance, separated from her husband. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Zákupy (Reichstadt in German) is a town in the ÄŒeská Lípa District, Liberec Region of the Czech Republic. ... For other uses, see Bohemia (disambiguation). ...


Franz Ferdinand's children were:

HSH Princess Sophie of Hohenberg Her Serene Highness Princess Sophie of Hohenberg (24 July 1901 – 27 October 1990) was the only daughter of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his morganatic wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg. ... His Serene Highness, Maximilian, Duke of Hohenberg (29 September 1902 - 8 January 1962) was the eldest son of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and Hungary and his morganatic wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg. ... HSH Prince Ernst von Hohenberg His Serene Highness Prince Ernst von Hohenberg (Ernst Alfons Franz Ignaz Joseph Maria Anton) (17 May 1904 - 5 March 1954) was the youngest son of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his morganatic wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg. ...

Assassination

Main article: Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria
1911 Gräf & Stift Bois de Boulogne tourer in which Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife were riding at the time of their assassination.
1911 Gräf & Stift Bois de Boulogne tourer in which Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife were riding at the time of their assassination.

On June 28, 1914, at approximately 11:15 am, Franz Ferdinand and his wife were killed in Sarajevo, the capital of the Austro-Hungarian province of Bosnia and Herzegovina, by Gavrilo Princip, a member of Young Bosnia and one of a group of assassins organized by The Black Hand (Црна рука/Crna Ruka).[4] The event, known as the Assassination in Sarajevo, led to a chain of events that eventually triggered World War I. Ferdinand and Sophie had previously been attacked when a grenade was thrown at their car. It hit the hood of the car and detonated far behind them. The royal couple insisted on seeing all those injured at the hospital. While traveling there, Franz Ferdinand's car took a wrong turn onto a side street where Princip spotted them. As their car was backing up, Princip approached and shot both Sophie, striking her in the abdomen, and Franz, who was struck in the jugular and was still alive when witnesses arrived to render aid.[4] Princip had used the Browning .380 ACP cartridge, a relatively low power round, and a pocket-sized FN model 1910 pistol.[8] The archduke's aides attempted to undo his coat when they realized they needed scissors to cut the coat open, but it was too late; he died within minutes. Sophie also died while en route to the hospital. [9] The assassinations, along with the arms race, nationalism, imperialism, militarism, and the alliance system all contributed to the beginning of World War I, which began less than two months after Franz Ferdinand's death, with Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia.[10] Gräf & Stift was an Austrian automaker founded in 1902 by the brothers Franz, Heinrich and Karl Gräf, and the investor, Wilhelm Stift. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Gavrilo Princip (Serbian Cyrillic: Гаврило Принцип, IPA: ) (July 25, 1894) – April 28, 1918) was an ethnic Serb, but later proclaimed to be a Yugoslav Nationalist[1], with links to a group known as the Mlada Bosna, who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. ... Young Bosnia (Serbo-Croat: Млада Босна / Mlada Bosna) was a revolutionary youth organization in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the early 20th century. ... For other uses, see Black Hand (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Yugoslavian 9 mm Kratak (9 mm Short) cartridges, FMJ. The . ... The FN Model 1910 was a blowback-operated, semi-automatic pistol designed by John Browning and manufactured by Fabrique Nationale of Belgium. ... The term arms race in its original usage, describes a competition between two or more parties for military supremacy. ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolizing French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ... For the computer game, see Imperialism (computer game). ... Militarism or militarist ideology is the doctrinal view of a society as being best served (or more efficient) when it is governed or guided by concepts embodied in the culture, doctrine, system, or people of the military. ...


Franz Ferdinand is interred with his wife Sophie in Artstetten Castle, Austria. Artstetten Castle (German: Schloss Artstetten or Schloß Artstetten) is a castle near the Wachau valley in Lower Austria. ...


A detailed account of the shooting can be found in Sarajevo by Joachim Remak [11] Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ...

...one bullet pierced Franz Ferdinand's neck while the other pierced Sophie's abdomen.... As the car was reversing (to go back to the Governor's residence because the entourage thought the Imperial couple were unhurt) a thin streak of blood shot from the Archduke's mouth onto Count Harrach's right cheek (he was standing on the car's running board). Harrach drew out a handkerchief to still the gushing blood. The Duchess, seeing this, called: "For Heaven's sake! What happened to you?" and sank from her seat, her face falling between her husband's knees. The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe...


Harrach and Potoriek... thought she had fainted... only her husband seemed to have an instinct for what was happening. Turning to his wife despite the bullet in his neck, Franz Ferdinand pleaded: "Sopherl! Sopherl! Sterbe nicht! Bleibe am Leben fur unsere Kinder! - Sophie dear! Don't die! Stay alive for our children!". Having said this, he seemed to sag down himself. His plumed hat... fell off; many of its green feathers were found all over the car floor. Count Harrach seized the Archduke by the uniform collar to hold him up. He asked "Leiden Eure Kaiserliche Hoheit sehr? - Is Your Imperial Highness suffering very badly?" "Es ist nichts - It is nothing" said the Archduke in a weak but audible voice. He seemed to be losing consciousness, but, his voice growing steadily weaker, he repeated the phrase perhaps six or seven times more. He was losing consciousness during his last few minutes. Look up Imperial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Highness, often used with a personal possessive pronoun (His/Her/Your Highness, the first two abbreviated HH) is an attribute referring to the rank of the dynasty (such as Royal Highness, Imperial Highness) in an address. ... Six can refer to: 6 (number), a number Six (cricket), when a batsman in cricket hits the ball to or over the boundary without the ball touching the ground inside the boundary first Six, a character on the television series Blossom (television) Six (television) or Channel 6, a proposed satellite... 7 (seven) is the natural number following 6 and preceding 8. ...


A rattle began to issue from his throat, which subsided as the car drew in front of the Konak bersibin (Town Hall). (Despite several doctors' efforts, the Archduke died shortly after being carried into the building while his beloved wife was almost certainly dead from internal bleeding before the motorcade reached the Konak.) - Les Gillard. Look up Archduke in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

The Start of World War I

Monarchical styles of
Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Este
Reference style His Imperial and Royal Highness
Spoken style Your Imperial and Royal Highness
Alternative style Sir

Ironically, Franz Ferdinand was Serbia's strongest advocate in Vienna. He had announced plans to grant unprecedented autonomy to all ethnic groups in the Empire, and to address their grievances. [12] He repeatedly locked horns with Franz Conrad, Vienna's hard-line Chief of the General Staff, over Vienna's treatment of Serbia, warning that harsh treatment of Serbia would bring Austria-Hungary into open conflict with Russia, to the ruin of both Empires. Image File history File links Imperial Crown of Austria License:from German language version of Wikipedia. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Imperial and Royal Highness (in German:Kaiserliche und königliche Hoheit) is a style possessed by someone who either through birth or marriage holds two individual styles, Imperial Highness and Royal Highness. ...


Vienna's initial reaction to the assassination was muted. [13] Franz Ferdinand was not popular either at court or among the populace, and his death posed no threat to the continuation of the Habsburg dynasty. After all, two other monarchs had already been assassinated by members of the Black Hand: Alexander I of Serbia in Belgrade in 1903, and King George I of Greece 1913, just the year before. [14] Alexander of Serbia was the King of Serbia between 1842 and 1858. ...


Russia and the other Great Powers agreed that Vienna would have to deal with this affront in some way, but Conrad chose to declare war on Serbia. A strong ultimatum, intended to be unacceptable, was delivered to Belgrade on July 23. Serbia acceded to all demands but one: that Austro-Hungarian police be allowed to operate on Serbian territory to apprehend and interrogate conspirators. Vienna was not interested in compromise, and declared war on July 28, just one month after the assassination.


This started the chain of events that led to the outbreak of World War I. The Kaiser and the Tsar initially made strenuous efforts to contain the crisis, but once it became clear mobilization could not be stopped, the Kaiser's position hardened significantly. France and Germany mobilized simultaneously. Within a week all major powers had declared war. Fighting began on August 4 when German troops crossed the Belgian frontier.


From today's perspective it would appear that in 1914 all European nations were developing into modern, progressive nations whose social and political problems could be resolved through compromise and legislation. Many, such as Karl Kraus, a Viennese political commentator, warned about the massive social upheavals the war would create. [15]. Others, such as the Kaiser and Emperor Franz Joseph, saw them as inevitable; and still others, such as Hitler, Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin, saw them as desirable. Karl Kraus (April 28, 1874 - June 12, 1936) was an eminent Austrian writer and journalist, known as a satirist, essayist, aphorist, playwright and poet. ...


In Thunder At Twilight (Scriber's, 1989), Frederick Morton argues the assassination was the trigger for a sociological phenomenon that had been brewing for decades, perhaps since the French Revolution. Beneath Europe's' apparent prosperity lay a population seething with discontent. With rising productivity many European workers felt the fruits of their labors were unfairly going to new capitalists and old aristocracy. People whose families had lived off the land for generations felt their agrarian way of life being threatened by industrialization. Many seemed to share Hitler's view that war would remove barriers between men and make them brothers in arms. According to Morton, once it became clear that war was imminent, many socialists and even pacifists abandoned their antiwar stance and joined the conflict with enthusiasm. It may be that the Great War was an event whose time had come whether Franz Ferdinand was assassinated or not.


Ancestors

Leopold II (born Peter Leopold Joseph) (May 5, 1747 – March 1, 1792) was the penultimate Holy Roman Emperor from 1790 to 1792 and Grand Duke of Tuscany. ... Francis I in Austrian coronation regalia, 1832 Austrian thaler of Francis II, dated 1821. ... Not to be confused with Maria Louisa of Spain (1782-1824). ... Archduke Franz Karl Joseph of Austria (7 December 1802 – 8 March 1878) was father of two emperors (Austria and Mexico) and the grandfather of Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria, whose shooting was the occasion of the start of World War I. He was born in Vienna, the second son of... King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 - January 4, 1825). ... Maria Teresa of the Two Sicilies (Cascais, June 6, 1772 – April 13, 1807 in Vienna) was the eldest daughter of Fernando I, King of the Two Sicilies (1751-1825) and his wife, Archduchess Maria Carolina of Austria (1752-1814). ... HM Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily Her Majesty Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily née Her Imperial & Royal Highness Archduchess Marie Caroline of Austria (13 August 1752- 8 September 1814) was queen consort and de facto ruler of Naples from 1768 to 1799 and from 1799... Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria (30 July 1833 – 19 May 1896) was the father of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, whose shooting occasioned the start of World War I. He was born at Schönbrunn in Vienna, the son of Archduke Franz Karl of Austria (1802-1878) and his wife... Frederick Michael, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld (born Rappoltsweiler, February 27, 1724; died Schwetzingen, August 15, 1767) was a member of the Wittelsbach dynasty. ... This page refers to King Maximilian I of Bavaria. ... Maria Francisca, Countess Palatine of Sulzbach (Maria Franziska, Pfalzgräfin von Sulzbach) (1724Yndash;1794) was the daughter of Joseph Karl Emanuel August, Pfalzgraf von Sulzbach and Elizabeth Augusta Sophie, Pfalzgräfin von Neuburg. ... Sophie of Austria Sophie Friederike Dorothee Wilhelmine, Princess of Bavaria (27 January 1805 – 28 May 1872) was born to King Maximilian I of Bavaria and his second wife, Karoline of Baden. ... Charles Louis, Hereditary Prince of Baden (February 14, 1755 in Karlsruhe--December 16, 1801 in Arboga, Sweden) was heir-apparent of the Margraviate of Baden. ... Frederica Caroline Wilhelmina (German: ) of Baden was the eldest daughter and child of Margrave Charles Louis of Baden and his wife, Landgravine Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt. ... Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt (June 20, 1754, Prenzlau - June 21, 1832, Bruchsal) was the daughter of Ludwig IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt. ... King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 - January 4, 1825). ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... HM Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily Her Majesty Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily née Her Imperial & Royal Highness Archduchess Marie Caroline of Austria (13 August 1752- 8 September 1814) was queen consort and de facto ruler of Naples from 1768 to 1799 and from 1799... Ferdinand II (Ferdinando Carlo, January 12, 1810 – May 22, 1859) was the King of the Two Sicilies (Southern Italy) from 1830 until his death. ... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... Maria Louise of Parma (December 9, 1751-January 2, 1819) was queen of Spain and consort of King Charles IV of Spain. ... Leopold II (born Peter Leopold Joseph) (May 5, 1747 – March 1, 1792) was the penultimate Holy Roman Emperor from 1790 to 1792 and Grand Duke of Tuscany. ... Archduke Charles of Austria, Duke of Teschen (de: Erzherzog Karl von Österreich, Herzog von Teschen, also known as Karl von Österreich-Teschen) (September 5, 1771–April 30, 1847) was a son of Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor (1747–1792) and his wife Infanta Maria Luisa of Spain (1745–1792). ... Not to be confused with Maria Louisa of Spain (1782-1824). ... Maria Theresia Isabella, queen consort of Naples and Sicily Archduchess Maria Theresa (Isabella) of Austria (31 July 1816, Vienna - 8 August 1867, Albano) was the second Queen consort of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. ... Henrietta (Alexandrine Frederika Wilhelmine) of Nassau-Weilburg (30 October 1797 Palace Ermitage, near Bayreuth - 29 December 1829, Vienna) was the wife of Archduke Charles, Duke of Teschen. ...

In Today's Lives

The Castle of Artstetten commemorative coin
The Castle of Artstetten commemorative coin

Archduke Franz has left such a legacy behind that his Castle of Artstetten was selected as a main motive for a very recent commemorative coin: the 10 euro The Castle of Artstetten commemorative coin minted in October 13, 2004. The reverse shows the entrance to the crypt of the Hohenberg family. There are two portraits to the left, showing Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg. The rock band Franz Ferdinand takes its name from him. Artstetten Castle (German: Schloss Artstetten or Schloß Artstetten) is a castle near the Wachau valley in Lower Austria. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Franz Ferdinand is the name of: Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the presumptive heir to the throne of Austria. ...


References

  1. ^ Brook-Shepherd, Gordon(1987), "Royal Sunset", p.139
  2. ^ Marshall, S.L.A. (2001). World War I. Mariner Books, p.1. ISBN 0618056866. 
  3. ^ Keegan, John (2000). First World War. Vintage, p.48. ISBN 0375700455. 
  4. ^ a b c Lonnie Johnson (1989). Introducing Austria: A short history. Ariadne Press, 270 Goins Court, Riverside, CA 92507, pp.52-54. ISBN 0-929497-03-1. 
  5. ^ a b c Brook-Shepherd, Gordon (1997). The Austrians: A thousand-year odyssey. Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc.; 19 West 21st Street; New York, NY 10010, pp.107,125-126. ISBN 0-7867-0520-5. 
  6. ^ "The Crown Prince’s Successor", New York Times, 1889-02-02. 
  7. ^ Katalog Land in Sicht!("Land Ahoy: Austria on the Seven Seas"), p. 8. Exhibition of the Austrian Mint, August 17, 2005 - February 3, 2006. Münze Österreich (Austrian Mint).
  8. ^ Belfield, Richard. The Assassination Business: A History of State-Sponsored Murder, Carroll & Graf Publishers: New York. ISBN: 0786713437
  9. ^ THE LAST KAISER, p 351, by Giles MacDonogh
  10. ^ Lonnie Johnson 56
  11. ^ Remak, Joachim. "Sarajevo" (Wiedenfeld & Nicolson, 1959) (pp137 - 142)
  12. ^ Thunder At Twilight' by Frederick Morton, (1989, Scribner), p 191.
  13. ^ p. 183
  14. ^ ibid, p. 191
  15. ^ ibid, p136

Samuel Lyman Atwood Slam Marshall (July 18, 1900 – December 17, 1977) was a chief U.S. Army combat historian during World War II and the Korean War. ... Sir John Keegan OBE (born 1934) is a British military historian, lecturer and journalist. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria
Cadet branch of the House of Lorraine
Born: 18 December 1863 Died: 28 June 1914
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Francis V
Archduke of Austria-Este
1875-1914
Succeeded by
Archduke Charles
Titles in pretence
Preceded by
Francis V
— TITULAR —
Duke of Modena
1875-1914
Succeeded by
Archduke Charles
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Lorraine coat of arms location of the Lorraine province Lorraine (French: Lorraine; German: Lothringen) is a historical area in present-day northeast France. ... Francis V, Duke of Modena. ... ... Emperor Charles I of Austria The Blessed Charles I (Karl Franz Josef Ludwig Hubert Georg Maria von Habsburg-Lothringen) (17 August 1887 – 1 April 1922) (Hungarian: IV. Károly (Károly Ferenc József)) was (among other titles) the last Emperor of Austria, the last King of Hungary and Bohemia... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... Francis V, Duke of Modena. ... List of the Lords and Dukes of Ferrara and Modena In 1452 the Italian family of Este, Lords of Ferrara, were created Dukes of Modena and Reggio, becoming Dukes of Ferrara also in 1471. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Emperor Charles I of Austria The Blessed Charles I (Karl Franz Josef Ludwig Hubert Georg Maria von Habsburg-Lothringen) (17 August 1887 – 1 April 1922) (Hungarian: IV. Károly (Károly Ferenc József)) was (among other titles) the last Emperor of Austria, the last King of Hungary and Bohemia...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference for Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria - Search.com (1731 words)
Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este (December 18, 1863 – June 28, 1914) was an Archduke of Austria, Prince Imperial of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia, and from 1896 until his death, heir presumptive to the Austro-Hungarian throne.
Franz Ferdinand (Full Name: Franz Ferdinand Karl Belschwitz Ludwig Josef von Habsburg-Lothringen), was born in Graz, Austria, the eldest son of Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria (younger brother of Emperor Franz Joseph and Maximilian I of Mexico) and of his second wife, Princess Maria Annunciata of the Two Sicilies.
Pope Leo XIII, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, and the German Emperor Wilhelm II all made representations on Franz Ferdinand's behalf to the Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria, arguing that the disagreement between Franz Joseph and Franz Ferdinand was undermining the stability of the monarchy.
Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (955 words)
Francis Ferdinand (Franz Ferdinand) was born in Graz, Austria, the eldest son of Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria (younger brother of Emperor Franz Josef) and of his second wife, Princess Maria Annunciata of the Two Sicilies.
Pope Leo XIII, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, and the German Emperor Wilhelm II all made representations on Franz Ferdinand's behalf to the Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria, arguing that the disagreement between Franz Joseph and Franz Ferdinand was undermining the stability of the monarchy.
Franz Ferdinand is interred in Artstetten Castle, Austria.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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