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Encyclopedia > Archbishop of Uppsala
The Archbishop's Palace in Uppsala, designed in the 18th century by the architect Carl Hårleman, but built on older foundations.

The Archbishop of Uppsala (spelled Upsala until early 20th century) has been the primate in Sweden in an unbroken succession since 1164, first during the Catholic era, and from the 1530s and onward under the Lutheran church. Image File history File links PatriarchsCross. ... Image File history File links PatriarchsCross. ... Patriarchal cross Websters 1913 dictionary defines the patriarchial cross as a cross, the shaft of which is intersected by two transverse beams, the upper one being the smaller. ... Image File history File links Archbishops_palace_in_Uppsala. ... Image File history File links Archbishops_palace_in_Uppsala. ... Detail of the Consistory House, Uppsala. ... Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ... // Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ...


There have been bishops in Uppsala from the time of Swedish King Ingold the Elder in the 11th century. They were governed by the archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen until Uppsala was made an archbishopric in 1164. The archbishop in Lund (which at that time belonged to Denmark) was simultaniously declared primate of Sweden, meaning it was his right to select and ordain the Uppsala archbishop by handing him the pallium. But to gain independance, Folke Johansson Ängel in 1274 went to Rome and was ordained directly by the Pope. This practice was ever increasing, so that no Uppsala archbishop has been ordained in Lund after Olov Björnsson, in 1318. But not until 1457 was the archbishop Jöns Bengtsson (Oxenstierna) allowed to declare himself prima Suecia. Inge Stenkilsson (king 1079–1084 (?) and 1087–1105) ruled with his half-brother Haakon the Red, until Haakon died, in 1080. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... The Archbishopric of Bremen was an ecclesiastical state in the Holy Roman Empire. ... Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ... A Pallium The Pallium or Pall (derived, so far as the name is concerned, from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries past bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as... Folke Johansson Ängel (Latin Fulco Angelus) was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1267-1277. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... Jöns Bengtsson (Oxenstierna), (1417 – 1467) Swedish clergyman and regent of Sweden, under the Kalmar Union, in 1457, shared with Erik Axelsson (Tott), and alone 1465-1466. ...


At first, the city Uppsala with the archbishop was located a couple of kilometers to the north of the present city, in what is today known as Gamla Uppsala (which translates to Old Uppsala). In 1273, the archbishopric, together with the relics of king Eric the Saint, was moved to the trading center of Östra Aros, which from then on overtook the name Uppsala. Gamla Uppsala is an area rich in archaeological remains seen from the grave field whose larger mounds (left part) are close to the royal mounds. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... Coat of Arms of Stockholm, depicting Eric IX of Sweden Eric IX of Sweden (or Erik the Lawgiver or Eric the Saint. ... This article is about the modern city of Uppsala. ...


In 1531, Laurentius Petri was chosen by the King Gustav I of Sweden (Vasa) to be archbishop, taking that privilege from the Pope and in effect making Sweden protestantic. The archbishop was then declared primus inter pares -- the first among equals. Officially he is today primarily the bishop of his diocese and has no more authority than other Swedish bishops, although in effect his statements and opinions have a more widespread effect. Laurentius Petri Nericus (Örebro 1499 – October 27, 1573), originally Lars Persson, was a Swedish clergyman and the first Evangelical Lutheran Archbishop of Sweden. ... Gustav I of Sweden, commonly known as Gustav Vasa, but originally known as Gustav Eriksson (May 12, 1496 – September 29, 1560) was King of Sweden from 1523 until his death. ... First among equals is a phrase which indicates that a person is the most senior of a group of people sharing the same rank or office. ...

Contents


Notable archbishops

Birger Gregersson (1366-83; hymnist and author), Nils Ragvaldsson (1438- 48; early adherent of Old Norse mythology), Jöns Bengtsson (Oxenstierna) (1448-67; King of Sweden), Jakob Ulfsson (1470-1514; founder of Uppsala University), Gustav Trolle (1515-21; supporter of the Danish King), Johannes Magnus (1523-26: wrote an imaginative Scandianian Chronicle), Laurentius Petri (1531-73; main character behind the Swedish Lutheran reformation), Abraham Angermannus (1593-99; controversial critic of the King), Olaus Martini (1601- 09), Petrus Kenicius (1609-36), Laurentius Paulinus Gothus (1637-46; astronomer and philosopher of Ramus school), Johannes Canuti Lenaeus (1647-69; aristotelean and logician), Erik Benzelius the Elder (1700-09; highly knowledgeable), Haquin Spegel (1711-14; public educator), Mattias Steuchius (1714-30), Uno von Troil (1786- 1803; politician), Jakob Axelsson Lindblom (1805-19), Johan Olof Wallin (1837-39; beloved poet and hymnist), Karl Fredrik af Wingård (1839-51; politician), Henrik Reuterdahl (1856-70) Anton Niklas Sundberg (1870-1900; outspoken and controversial) and Nathan Söderblom (1914-1931; Nobel Prize winner). Birger Gregersson was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, from 1366 to his death 1388. ... Nils Ragvaldsson (latin Nicolaus Ragvaldi) was born in the beginning of the 1380s and died February 17, 1448. ... Jöns Bengtsson (Oxenstierna), (1417 – 1467) Swedish clergyman and regent of Sweden, under the Kalmar Union, in 1457, shared with Erik Axelsson (Tott), and alone 1465-1466. ... Jakob Ulvsson (died in the spring of 1521), Archbishop of Uppsala and the founder of Uppsala University. ... Gustav Eriksson Trolle (1488-1533) was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, in two sessions, and involved in the turbulent events at the break between Catholicism and Lutheranism in Scandinavia. ... Johannes Magnus, (before 1530 Johannes Magni, a Latin translation of his birth name Johannes Store) was born March 19, 1488 in Linköping, Sweden and died March 22, 1544 in Rome, and was the son of MÃ¥ns Petersson Store och Kristina Magnus. ... Laurentius Petri Nericus (Örebro 1499 – October 27, 1573), originally Lars Persson, was a Swedish clergyman and the first Evangelical Lutheran Archbishop of Sweden. ... Abraham Andersson, usually known under the Latin form of his name, Abrahamus Andreæ Angermannus or just Abraham Angermannus (dead in October 1607) was the fourth Lutheran Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1593 to 1599. ... Olof MÃ¥rtensson (born 1557) in Uppsala, Sweden, dead March 25, 1609), also known in the Latin form Olaus Martini, was Archbishop of Uppsala from 1601 to his death. ... Petrus Kenicius (1555 – February 3, 1636) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1609 to his death. ... Laurentius Paulinus Gothus (November 10, 1565 – November 29, 1646) was a Swedish theologian, astronomer and Archbishop of Uppsala 1637-1645. ... Petrus Ramus. ... Johannes Canuti Lenaeus (November 29, 1573 – April 23, 1669) was professor at Uppsala University and Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1657 to his death. ... Erik Benzelius (the Elder) (16 December 1632–17 February 1709) was a Swedish theologian and Archbishop of Uppsala. ... Haquin Spegel, engraving from 1715 HÃ¥kan Spegel (June 14, 1645 – April 17, 1714), also known in the Latin form Haqvin or Haquin Spegel, was a religious writer and Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1711 to his death. ... Uno von Troil (February 24, 1746 in Stockholm - 1803) was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1786-1803. ... Johan Olof Wallin, 1779-1839, was a Swedish minister, orator, poet and later Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden. ... Lars Olof Jonathan Söderblom, better known as Nathan Söderblom (January 15, 1866 - July 12, 1931), was a Swedish clergyman, and later Archbishop of the Church of Sweden and laureate of the Nobel Peace Prize. ...


Succinct chronological order


Archbishop before the Reformation

The insignia of the first archbishop, Stefan, found on the oldest pergament in Sweden.
The insignia of the first archbishop, Stefan, found on the oldest pergament in Sweden.

Image File history File links Archbishop_Stefan_Insignia. ... Image File history File links Archbishop_Stefan_Insignia. ...

12th century

Johannes was ordained by the Archbishop of Lund, Absalon by November 1185. In 1187, a ship from the pagan Estonia entered Mälaren, a lake close to Uppsala, on a plundering expedition. It sailed to Sigtuna, a prosperous city at that time, and plundered it. On its way back, barricades were set up the only exist point at Almarestäket to prevent the ship from escaping. Johannes was there also. As the ship struggled to pass through, Johannes were among those killed. // Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... Events April 25 - Genpei War - Naval battle of Dan-no-ura leads to Minamoto victory in Japan Templars settle in London and begin the building of New Temple Church End of the Heian Period and beginning of the Kamakura period in Japan. ... Stefan was the first Archbishop of Uppsala in the year 1164, a post he had until his death July 18, 1185. ... Events April 25 - Genpei War - Naval battle of Dan-no-ura leads to Minamoto victory in Japan Templars settle in London and begin the building of New Temple Church End of the Heian Period and beginning of the Kamakura period in Japan. ... // Events May 1 - Battle of Cresson - Saladin defeats the crusaders July 4 - Saladin defeats Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, at the Battle of Hattin. ... Lund â–¶(?) is a Scanian city in the SkÃ¥ne province of southernmost Sweden. ... Absalon (c. ... Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ... Sigtuna is a city in central Sweden in the metropolitan area of Stockholm. ... Almarestäket, or Stäket, is a strait at the inlet of lake Mälaren in midth-east Sweden. ...

He was ordained by Absalon. Sweden got a new king, Sverker II of Sweden in 1196, who was related to the Danish Royal Court, whereby Absalon extended his authority over Sweden. When Petrus in 1196 elected three bishops, Absalon requested the Pope to interact since the bishops were the sons of other priests, and this was not allowed according to a papal decree. He also mentioned that several Swedish bishops refused to travel to his synods. Absalon was an authoritative person whom the Pope entrusted and gave him right, but by the time the message reached Uppsala Petrus had already passed away. // Events May 1 - Battle of Cresson - Saladin defeats the crusaders July 4 - Saladin defeats Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, at the Battle of Hattin. ... Events Amalric II succeeds Henry II of Champagne as king of Jerusalem. ... Sverker the younger Karlsson or Sverker den yngre Karlsson in Swedish (born c. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ...


13th century

In 1200, the Pope demanded Church estate to be free from the King's taxes and that clerics should be judged only by bishops and prelates, and not to the government's courts and judges. This was a step to separation between worldy and spiritual matters, which the Swedish Church had not yet taken to itself. He also demanded Olov to dismiss the two bishops ordained by Petrus. Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Toba of Japan Emperor Tsuchimikado ascends to the throne of Japan January 8 - Pope Innocent III ascends Papal Throne Frederick II, infant son of German King Henry VI, crowned King of Sicily Births August 24 - Alexander II of Scotland (d. ... Events Temujin is proclaimed Genghis Khan of the Mongol people, founding the Mongol Empire Qutb ud-Din proclaims the Mameluk dynasty in India, the first dynasty of the Delhi Sultanate. ...


When Uppsala burnt in 1204, Olov's pallium was burnt and he sent a request to the Pope for a new to be made.

Valerius was not son of a peasant – most likely he was son of a church man – and since this was demanded by the current Pope, the Archbishop of Lund appealed the election to Rome. The Pope allowed a dispensation for Valerius on the grounds that there was no other suitable candidate and because Valierus was known as a learned man with good customs and virtues. Events Stephen Langton consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury June 17 by Pope Innocent III Births September 8 - King Sancho II of Portugal October 1 - King Henry III of England (d. ... // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the... Valerius was the Swedish Archbishop 1207-1219. ...


Valerius joined side with the king Sverker II of Sweden who belonged to the House of Sverker. The House of Sverker was one of the antagonists in a civil war that had been going on and off since 1130. In 1208 the opposing side, the House of Eric, sieged the capital Stockholm, and Sverker fled the country together with Valierus to Denmark. Sverker the younger Karlsson or Sverker den yngre Karlsson in Swedish (born c. ... The house of St Eric was one of the two noble families, dynastiesk, which rivalled for the kingship of Sweden between 1150 and 1220. ...


Sverker gathered a small army in Denmark and tried to conquer Sweden he but was killed. Valerius then decided to accepted the opposing King Eric X's authority. As a result he was allowed to return to Uppsala, where he crowned Eric X in 1210. The Pope Innocent III sent a letter to Valerius where he proclaimed the procedure to be unauthorized and unlawful, but it seems to have had little impact. Erik X (1180 - 1216) was a Swedish king between 1208 and 1216. ... Innocent III, né Lotario de Conti ( 1161–June 16, 1216), was Pope from January 8, 1198 until his death. ...

He was one of the first known Swedish students at the University of Paris. // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the... Events Foundation of the University of Naples Livonian Brothers of the Sword conquers Latgallians Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile - Ferdinand III, the Saint King of Castile and Leon (reigned from 1217 to 1252) Holy See... Events Canonization of Saint Dominic Collapse of the Jin Dynasty (1115-1234) Deaths Emperor Chukyo of Japan Emperor Go-Horikawa of Japan Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile - Ferdinand III, the Saint King of Castile and Leon (reigned... // Events May 6 - Roger of Wendover, Benedictine monk and chronicler of St Albanss Abbey dies. ... Events Königsberg was founded Births Emperor Albert I of Germany, in July Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1255 ... Jarler (Latin Jarlerius) was Archbishop of Sweden 1236-1255. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ...

Lars was recruited from the recently established Franciscan monastery in Enköping and was most likely a foreigner. The Pope expressed trust in the recently crowned Swedish government monarch Birger Jarl who, unlike his predecessors, had promised to support the Church by granting it free from taxes and establish missionairies to yet un-Christianized parts – or parts who had returned to paganim – specifically Finland and the Baltic states. Events Königsberg was founded Births Emperor Albert I of Germany, in July Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1255 ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Lars was the name of the Archbishop of Sweden 1255-1267. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Enköping is a Municipality in Uppsala County, in east central Sweden. ... Birger jarl â–¶(?) (English: Earl Birger), full name Birger Magnusson of Bjälbo (1210 – October 21, 1266), was a Swedish statesman and the founder of Stockholm. ... A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ... Baltic states and the Baltic Sea The Baltic states or the Baltic countries is a term which nowadays refers to three countries in Northern Europe: Estonia Latvia Lithuania Prior to World War II, Finland was sometimes considered, particularly by the Soviet Union, a fourth Baltic state. ...


But this was not realized because of the shaky situation is Sweden. There was an ongoing struggle for the power, which eventually forced the antagonists to tax Church estate to support their war.


Lars tried to enforce Clerical celibacy, which still had not been enforced in Sweden because the low population figures in Sweden required priests to marry and have children. Lars in 1258 sent the Pope a request about not having to excommunicate those who broke the celibacy vow, which indicates this was not uncommon. Also in 1258 the move of the archbishopric to its present location was decided, but it would not be realized for another decade. Clerical celibacy is the practice of various religious traditions in which clergy, monastics and those in religious orders (female or male) adopt a celibate life, refraining from marriage, sexual relationships including masturbation and impure thoughts (such as sexual visualisation and fantasies). ... Excommunication is religious censure which is used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ...

  • 1267-1277 Folke Johansson Ängel (Fulco Angelus).

Folke belonged to the influencial family Ängel, which used the Archangel Gabriel as a heraldic charge. For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Events The philosophical doctrine Averroism is banned from Paris by bishop Etienne Tempier Burmas Pagan empire begins to disintegrate after being defeated by Kublai Khan at Ngasaungsyan, near the Chinese border. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation. ...


He was, for unclear reason, not ordained until 1274. Civil distrubances may have have been a cause, but also reluctance from the chapter to be under the authority of Lund. In 1274, Folke ignored the primate of Lund by travelling to Rome and get ordained by the Pope himself


Folke's most important contribution was to commission the moving of the episcopal see from its old location to its present location. At his death he was one of the first to be buried in Uppsala Cathedral. [1] Gamla Uppsala is an area rich in archaeological remains seen from the grave field whose larger mounds (left part) are close to the royal mounds. ... See also Archbishop of Uppsala Categories: Sweden geography stubs | Buildings and structures stubs | Swedish churches | Cathedrals | Uppsala ...

Events The philosophical doctrine Averroism is banned from Paris by bishop Etienne Tempier Burmas Pagan empire begins to disintegrate after being defeated by Kublai Khan at Ngasaungsyan, near the Chinese border. ... Events February 22 - Martin IV becomes Pope August 15 - Kamikaze storm wipes out invading Mongol army in the coast of Japan The Ottoman Empire was founded as an autonomous state (Beylik) in present day Bilecik, Turkey, by Osman Bey. ... Events February 22 - Martin IV becomes Pope August 15 - Kamikaze storm wipes out invading Mongol army in the coast of Japan The Ottoman Empire was founded as an autonomous state (Beylik) in present day Bilecik, Turkey, by Osman Bey. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ...

14th century

He studied at the University of Paris in 1278. After returning to Sweden, he became deacon in Uppsala in 1286 and was elected Archbishop in 1292. As Nils Allesson was the son of a priest, the cathedral chapter in Lund, Denmark - the primate over Uppsala - appealed the election to the Pope in Rome. The Pope did after a while accept Nils as archbishop after all, because he was a fine man, but explained that the primate status still would none the less be respected. Nils had also travelled to Rome in 1295 to meet the Pope and defend his case. For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... Events August 5 - English troops capture William Wallace Wenceslas III becomes king of Bohemia The Papacy removed to France following riots in the Papal State. ... Nils Allesson (lat. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ...


Nils was known as a vigorous Archbishop. He founded and supervised institutions for safety and order around the archdiocese, for instance accommodations for travelers. [2]

  • 1308-1314 Nils Kettilsson. N/A
  • 1315-1332 Olov Björnsson (Olov the Wise; Olavus sapiens).

Under his time the chapter in Uppsala decided to not be inferior the city of Lund in Denmark, and thus Olov was the last archbishop to be ordained there.[3] Events Henry VII is elected as king of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Events August 13 - Louis X of France marries Clemence dAnjou. ... Events November 7 - Lucerne joins the Swiss Confederation with Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden. ... Lund ▶(?) is a Scanian city in the Skåne province of southernmost Sweden. ...

He came from a smaller town in Uppland, son of the knight Filip Finnvedson, one of the most important men in Uppland, the district were Uppsala is located. Petrus held various clerical offices until he was elected Archbishop. Following the election, he travelled to Avignon where the Pope John XXII was currently residing, to get ordained. Events November 7 - Lucerne joins the Swiss Confederation with Uri, Schwyz, and Unterwalden. ... Events Petrarch becomes famous Beginning of the Breton War of Succession over the control of the Duchy of Brittany Margarete Maultasch, Countess of Tyrol, expells her husband John Henry of Bohemia, to whom she had been married as a child. ... Petrus Filipsson (Latin Petrus Philippi) was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden 1332-1341. ... Uppland ( ▶) is a historical province or landskap on the eastern coast of Sweden. ... View over the Rhône River to North-East with Mt Ventoux at the rear Palais des papes Square below the Palace of the Popes Paul Vs coat-of-arms on the Palais des papes The Notre Dame des Doms cathedral is located in the heart of Avignon, near... Pope John XXII, né Jacques dEuse (1249 – December 4, 1334),was the son of a shoemaker in Cahors. ...


He had a strained relationship to the Franciscan order. On behalf of the Pope, Archbishop Paul of Nidaros (old name for Trondheim), Norway, was to make a judgement on the matter. It led to a settlement between the two parts in 1339. Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... Nidaros was the old name of Trondheim, Norway, in the middle ages. ...


In 1341 Petrus died and was buried in Sigtuna's Dominican order church today called Mariakyrkan. [4] Laudare, Benedicere, Praedicare Saint Dominic de Guzman saw the need for a new type of organization to address the needs of his time, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities, but...

At the death of Petrus, the Pope wished to occupy the archbishop's seat through commission, but following Hemmings election by the cathedral chapter, Hemming travelled to the Pope and persuaded him to ordain him, which he did. Events Petrarch becomes famous Beginning of the Breton War of Succession over the control of the Duchy of Brittany Margarete Maultasch, Countess of Tyrol, expells her husband John Henry of Bohemia, to whom she had been married as a child. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders May 1 Zürich joins the Swiss Confederation. ...


During his time, he helped in the political world, made a visitation through Norway and established Uppsala ecclesiastical records. His last will shows that he was also quite wealthy. [5] This article should be transwikied to wiktionary Ecclesiastical means pertaining to the Church (especially Christianity) as an organized body of believers and clergy, with a stress on its juridical and institutional structure. ...

The first mention of him is from 1320, when he was vicar in Färentuna. He was chancellor of the King Magnus II of Sweden in 1340 and continued to support him during through the 1360's when Sweden was in a civil war. Events End of the reign of Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders May 1 Zürich joins the Swiss Confederation. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Petrus Torkilsson (lat. ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Färentuna Hundred, or Färentuna härad, was a hundred of Uplandia in Sweden. ... Sigillum ad causas for Magnus II of Sweden Magnus II Ericson, Magnus VII of Norway, (1316 – December 1, 1377), King of Sweden, Norway, and Terra Scania, son of Duke Eric Magnusson of Sweden and Ingeborg, daughter of Haakon V of Norway. ...


In 1342 he was appointed Bishop of Linköping, where he assisted the building of the dome. He was assessor during King Magnus monetary transactions, among them the repayment of a loan Magnus hade made from the Church. After the new King Albert of Sweden took power, Petrus supported him as well. St Peters Basilica, Rome A dome is a common structural element of architecture that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. ... Albert of Sweden (or Albrecht von Mecklenburg in German or Albrekt av Mecklenburg in Swedish) was born in 1338 and became king of Sweden in 1363. ...

A supporter of the Swedish, highly revered, Saint Birgitta (1303-1373), he wrote a biography of her and hymns to her honor. Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Chokei of Japan Emperor Go-Kameyama ascends to the throne of Japan Births Pope Eugenius IV Deaths March 1 - Amadeus VI of Savoy, Count of Savoy (b. ... Birger Gregersson was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, from 1366 to his death 1388. ... Italic textSaint Birgitta, also known as St. ... // Events On the 20 April, Pope Boniface VIII founds the University of Rome La Sapienza Edward I of England reconquers Scotland (see also: William Wallace, Wars of Scottish Independence) The Khilji Dynasty conquers Chittor Births Saint Birgitta, Swedish saint (died 1373) Gegeen Khan, Mongol emperor of China (died 1323) Deaths... Events Bristol is made an independent county. ...

  • 1383-1408 Henrik Karlsson (Henricus Caroli).

Was also befriended with Saint Birgitta, in Rome, Italy. Took part in the important political descisions during his years as archbishop, such as the Kalmar Union in 1397. Events End of the reign of Emperor Chokei of Japan Emperor Go-Kameyama ascends to the throne of Japan Births Pope Eugenius IV Deaths March 1 - Amadeus VI of Savoy, Count of Savoy (b. ... Events December 13 - The Order of the Dragon is officially formated under King Sigismund of Hungary. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,823,807 almost 4,000,000 1... The royal lineages of Norway, Sweden and Denmark for the period around the formation of the Kalmar Union The Kalmar Union (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish: Kalmarunionen) was a series of personal unions (1397–1520) that united the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden under a single monarch. ...


Had a good economical skill, was a wealthy man, and acquired many farms for the Church. At his death, he left them to the chapter, but the Queen Margaret is said to have taken them in posesion instead, which marked the beginning of disputes between the chapter and the states in the union (which lasted until 1520). [6] Denmark has had two Queens named Margaret Margaret I- in the early 15th century Margaret II- the present queen ...


15th century

  • 1408-1421 Jöns Gerekesson (Johannes Gerechini)

Jöns originated the influential Danish family Lodehat. His uncle was bishop of Roskilde and a former chancellor of the Queen. Jöns himself became, thanks to his family's Royal connection, chancellor to the King of Scandinavia, Eric of Pomerania. Events December 13 - The Order of the Dragon is officially formated under King Sigismund of Hungary. ... Events March 21 - Battle of Beaugé. A small French force surprises and defeats an English force under Thomas, Duke of Clarence, a brother of Henry V of England, in Normandy. ... Jöns Gerekesson (as Archbishop latinized to Johannes Gerechini), died 1433, was a disliked archbishop of Uppsala Sweden 1408-1421, and a disliked Archbishop of Iceland 1426-1433. ... Roskilde (population 52,572) is an ancient city in Denmark, situated in the island of Zealand, 30 km west of Copenhagen. ... The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ... Eric of Pomerania Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern, Erik VII (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Eirik III) (Norwegian title) or Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title), was adopted by Margaret I of Denmark and became the hereditary king of Norway (1389 – 1440), elected king of Denmark (1412 – 1439...


At the death of the Archbishop Henrik, King Eric appointed Jöns, who had no connection to Uppsala, as new archbishop without regards to the candidates of the chapter.


During his time, Jöns paid little respect to the duties of archbishop. He embessled Church property and mistreated Church officials. Eventually, the chapter complained to the Pope, who conducted an investigation and dimissed Jöns Gereksson in 1421.

  • 1421-1432 Johan Håkansson (Johannes Haquini)
  • 1432-1438 Olov Larsson (Olaus Laurentii)
  • 1433-1434 Arnold of Bergen (unofficial) (Arend in Norwegian; died 1434) was bishop of Bergen, Norway, and was never ordained as archbishop.

When Olaus Laurentii was elected by the Chapter to become Archbishop of Uppsala and Sweden, the Swedish King Eric of Pomerania was displeased because he was not consulted and therefor decided that Arnold of Bergen should become archbishop in 1433 while Olaus Laurentii was in Rome to be ordained. Arnold moved into the archbishopseat in Uppsala despite protests from the chapter. Events March 21 - Battle of Beaugé. A small French force surprises and defeats an English force under Thomas, Duke of Clarence, a brother of Henry V of England, in Normandy. ... Events June 1 - Battle of San Romano - Florence defeats Siena foundation of Université de Caen In the end of the Hook and Cod wars, Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut and Holland is forced by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, to abdicate all her estates in his favour; end of Hainaut... Johan HÃ¥kansson (latinized to Johannes Haquini), dead 1432, was Archbishop of Uppsala 1421-1432. ... Events June 1 - Battle of San Romano - Florence defeats Siena foundation of Université de Caen In the end of the Hook and Cod wars, Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut and Holland is forced by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, to abdicate all her estates in his favour; end of Hainaut... Events Pachacuti who would later create Tahuantinsuyu, or Inca Empire became the ruler of Cuzco January 1 - Albert II of Habsburg becomes King of Hungary March 18 - Albert II of Habsburg becomes King of Germany Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway loses direct control of Sweden. ... Olaus Laurentii (d. ... Events Births June 23 - Francis II, Duke of Brittany Kettil Karlsson Vasa, later Regent of Sweden. ... Events May 30, Battle of Lipany in the Hussite Wars Jan van Eyck paints the wedding of Giovanni Arnoflini The Honorable Passing of Arms at the bridge of Obrigo The Portuguese reach Cape Bojador in Western Sahara. ... County Hordaland Landscape Midhordland Municipality NO-1201 Administrative centre Bergen Mayor (2004) Herman Friele (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 215 465 km² 445 km² 0. ... Eric of Pomerania Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern, Erik VII (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Eirik III) (Norwegian title) or Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title), was adopted by Margaret I of Denmark and became the hereditary king of Norway (1389 – 1440), elected king of Denmark (1412 – 1439...


The quarrels were resolved when Arnold died in 1434; then the king decided to accept Olaus Laurentii who had just returned from Rome. [7]

Events Pachacuti who would later create Tahuantinsuyu, or Inca Empire became the ruler of Cuzco January 1 - Albert II of Habsburg becomes King of Hungary March 18 - Albert II of Habsburg becomes King of Germany Eric of Pomerania, King of Sweden, Denmark and Norway loses direct control of Sweden. ... Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ... Nils Ragvaldsson (latin Nicolaus Ragvaldi) was born in the beginning of the 1380s and died February 17, 1448. ... Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ... Events October 29 - Battle of Brusthem: Charles the Bold defeats Liege Beginning of the Sengoku Period in Japan. ... Jöns Bengtsson (Oxenstierna), (1417 – 1467) Swedish clergyman and regent of Sweden, under the Kalmar Union, in 1457, shared with Erik Axelsson (Tott), and alone 1465-1466. ... Events Baeda Maryam succeeds his father Zara Yaqob as Emperor of Ethiopia Births February 29 - Pope Paul III (died 1549) Juan del Encina, Spanish poet, dramatist and composer William Lilye, English scholar (approximate date; died 1522) Charles I of Savoy John, Elector of Saxony (died 1532) Juan de Zumárraga... Events July 26 - Battle of Edgecote Moor October 17 - Prince Ferdinand of Aragon wed princess Isabella of Castile. ... Tord Pedersson (Bonde) (died May 1470) was the un-ordained Archbishop of Uppsala from 1468 to 1469. ... Events July 26 - Battle of Edgecote Moor October 17 - Prince Ferdinand of Aragon wed princess Isabella of Castile. ... // Events June - Invasion of Persia by Sultan Selim I of the Ottoman Empire. ... Jakob Ulvsson (died in the spring of 1521), Archbishop of Uppsala and the founder of Uppsala University. ... // Events June - Invasion of Persia by Sultan Selim I of the Ottoman Empire. ... Events January 22 - Battle of Ridanieh. ... Gustav Eriksson Trolle (1488-1533) was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, in two sessions, and involved in the turbulent events at the break between Catholicism and Lutheranism in Scandinavia. ... mary elline m. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... Events April 11 - Battle of Ceresole - French forces under the Comte dEnghien defeat Imperial forces under the Marques Del Vasto near Turin. ... Johannes Magnus, (before 1530 Johannes Magni, a Latin translation of his birth name Johannes Store) was born March 19, 1488 in Linköping, Sweden and died March 22, 1544 in Rome, and was the son of Måns Petersson Store och Kristina Magnus. ... Events April 11 - Battle of Ceresole - French forces under the Comte dEnghien defeat Imperial forces under the Marques Del Vasto near Turin. ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ... Olaus Magnus, or Magni (Magnus, Latin for the Swedish Stora -- great -- is the family name, and not a personal epithet), reported as born in October 1490 in Linköping, and died on August 1, 1557, was a Swedish ecclesiastic and writer, who did pioneering work for the interest of Nordic...

Archbishops after the Reformation

16th century

He and his brothers Olaus Petri where the main protestant reformers in Sweden; while his brother was more energetic, Laurentius's importance lays in his educational works which designates the foundation for the Christian Statute of Sweden consecrated at the Uppsala Council 1571. Events January 26 - Lisbon, Portugal is hit by an earthquake-- thousands die October 1 - Battle of Kappel - The forces of Zürich are defeated by the Catholic cantons. ... Events January - articles of Warsaw Confederation signed, sanctioning religious freedom in Poland. ... Laurentius Petri Nericus (Örebro 1499 – October 27, 1573), originally Lars Persson, was a Swedish clergyman and the first Evangelical Lutheran Archbishop of Sweden. ... Petri outside Storkyrkan, Stockholm Olof Persson (sometimes Petersson; born January 6, 1493 in Örebro, died April 19, 1552 in Stockholm), better known under the Latin form of his name, Olaus Petri, was a clergyman, writer and a main character of the Protestant reformation in Sweden. ...

He was not related to his predecessor. The 16th century in Sweden was marked by religious conflicts regarding Lutheran tenets. Before becoming archbishop, Gothus appears to have been inclined towards King Johan III of Sweden's more Catholic stands. He was for this reason ordained by the King in a Catholic ritual with all its apparatus, and wrote the introduction to the King's "red book". As the Jesuitic tendencies grew stronger in Sweden in the 1570's, he became more wary; he refused to support the views of the King any longer, and published Contra novas papistarum machinationes which, although gives proper respect to the Church fathers, polemizes against the foundation of Catholicism and the Jesuits. Events February 13 - Henry III of France is crowned at Reims February 14 - Henry III of France marries Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont June 28 - Oda Nobunaga defeats Takeda Katsuyori in the battle of Nagashino, which has been called Japans first modern battle. ... Events January 6 - The Union of Atrecht united the southern Netherlands under the Duke of Parma, governor in the name of king Philip II of Spain. ... Laurentius Petri Gothus (dead February 12, 1579) was the the second Swedish Lutheran Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1575-1579. ... John III of Sweden or Johan III of the Royal House of Vasa, was the king of Sweden (1568-1592). ... The Society of Jesus (Societas Iesu/Jesu (S.J.) in Latin) is a Christian religious order of the Roman Catholic Church in direct service to the Pope. ...

He was vicar in Gävle 1570 and is reported as one of the first priests to have used the King's "red book" in his sermons, which sparked the King's interest, and he subsequently appointed him archbishop after a four year vacancy. 1583 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... Events June - Capture of Zutphen by the Dutch under Maurice of Nassau. ... Andreas Laurentii Björnram (1520 – January 1, 1593) also known as Bothniensis Bereus which he called himself in honor of his mothers family, was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1583 to his death. ... Gävle [jÉ›vlÉ™] is a Swedish city in east central Sweden with 81,000 inhabitants, and the seat of Gävle Municipality (pop. ...


Björnram upset Church official by declaring that the liturgy of the King was in accordance with the Apostles' Creed and that he supported it. Surprisingly, he was none the less advocating the reading of Luther's works. The Apostles Creed (in Latin, Symbolum (Credo) Apostolicum), is an early statement of Christian belief, possibly from the first or second century, but more likely post-Nicene Creed in the early 4th Century AD. The theological specifics of the creed appear to be a refutation of Gnosticism, an early heresy. ...

Angermannus was born around 1540 in the province Angermannia, from where his nickname is derived. In the 1570's he made got recognized in Stockholm as a critic of King Johns's liturgy, and the King disposed him by eventually putting him in jail in Åbo, Finland. But he managed to escape back to Stockholm, where he had influential friends. Eventually he could no longer get their protection, and had to flee to Germany, where he lived for 11 years. He visisted the renowned universities there and wrote several book of Lutheran contents, directed to Swedish readers. In 1593 the cathedral chapter in Uppsala elected him archbishop, and he moved back to Sweden and took the seat. He was a harsh critic of Catholicism and the remains which were still in practice around Sweden. On an inspection tour through his diocese in 1596 he was so rashly removing the ritual items from provincial churches that he would have been attacked by the angry peasants had not his procession protected him. In 1599 the King had had enough of him, and tried him in a court he himself had commissioned for herecy and neglect of his duties. Angermannus was put in prison in Gripsholm, where he was forced to remain until his death in 1607. Events May 18 - Playwright Thomas Kyds accusations of heresy lead to an arrest warrant for Christopher Marlowe. ... Events Swedish King Sigismund III Vasa is replaced by his brother Charles IX of Sweden. ... Abraham Andersson, usually known under the Latin form of his name, Abrahamus Andreæ Angermannus or just Abraham Angermannus (dead in October 1607) was the fourth Lutheran Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1593 to 1599. ... Angermannia, or Ångermanland, is a historical Sweden. ... Location within Finland Turku (IPA: , Swedish: Ã…bo  listen?, Latin: Aboa) is a city in Finland, founded in the 13th century. ...

Events Swedish King Sigismund III Vasa is replaced by his brother Charles IX of Sweden. ... // Events January January 1 - Scotland adopts January 1st as being New Years Day February February 17 - Giordano Bruno burned at the stake for heresy in Rome July July 2 - Battle of Nieuwpoort: Dutch forces under Maurice of Nassau defeat Spanish forces under Archduke Albert in a battle on the... Media:Example. ...

17th century

Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... Olof Mårtensson (born 1557) in Uppsala, Sweden, dead March 25, 1609), also known in the Latin form Olaus Martini, was Archbishop of Uppsala from 1601 to his death. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... Petrus Kenicius (1555 – February 3, 1636) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1609 to his death. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... // Events The Westminster Confession of Faith Ongoing events English Civil War (1642-1649) Births February 4 - Hans Erasmus Aßmann, Freiherr von Abschatz, German statesman and poet (d. ... Laurentius Paulinus Gothus (November 10, 1565 – November 29, 1646) was a Swedish theologian, astronomer and Archbishop of Uppsala 1637-1645. ... // Events March 14 - Thirty Years War: Bavaria, Cologne, France and Sweden sign the Truce of Ulm. ... // Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ... Johannes Canuti Lenaeus (November 29, 1573 – April 23, 1669) was professor at Uppsala University and Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1657 to his death. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... Lars Stigzelius (October 27, 1598 – August 31, 1676) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1670 to his death. ... Events First performance of Racines tragedy, Phèdre Sarah Churchill marries John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough Battle of Cassel, Philippe I of Orléans defeats William of Orange Mary II of England marries William of Orange English Statute of frauds is passed into law Battle of Landskrona Elias... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... Johan Baazius the younger was born in Jönköping July 17, 1626 as the a son of a knowledgeable theologian and bishop of Växjö. He was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1677 to his death on May 12, 1681 He was himself known as... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Olov Svebilius was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1681-1700. ...

18th century

Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... Erik Benzelius (the Elder) (16 December 1632–17 February 1709) was a Swedish theologian and Archbishop of Uppsala. ... // Events February 24 - The London premiere of Rinaldo by George Friderich Handel, the first Italian opera written for the London stage. ... // Events August 1 - George, elector of Hanover becomes King George I of Great Britain. ... Haquin Spegel, engraving from 1715 Håkan Spegel (June 14, 1645 – April 17, 1714), also known in the Latin form Haqvin or Haquin Spegel, was a religious writer and Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1711 to his death. ... // Events August 1 - George, elector of Hanover becomes King George I of Great Britain. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... Mathias Steuchius (October 26, 1644 – August 2, 1730 was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Swedish Church from 1714 to his death. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... Johannes Steuchius (January 3, 1676 – June 21, 1742) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1730 to his death. ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... Erik Benzelius the younger (January 27, 1675 - September 23, 1743), was a priest, theologian, librarian, and Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1742-1743. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... // Events January 31 - The first venereal diseases clinic opens at London Dock Hospital April 9 - The Scottish Jacobite Lord Lovat was beheaded by axe on Tower Hill, London, for high treason; he was the last man to be executed in this way in Britain May 14 - First battle of Cape... Jakob Benzelius (February 25, 1683 – June 29, 1747) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1747 to his death. ... // Events January 31 - The first venereal diseases clinic opens at London Dock Hospital April 9 - The Scottish Jacobite Lord Lovat was beheaded by axe on Tower Hill, London, for high treason; he was the last man to be executed in this way in Britain May 14 - First battle of Cape... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Henrik Benzelius (August 7, 1689 – May 20, 1758) was Bishop of Lund 1744-1747 and Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1747 to his death. ... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Samuel Troilius (May 22, 1706 – January 18, 1764) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1758 to his death. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Magnus Olai Beronius (born October 18, 1692 in Uppsala, died 18 May 1775 in Uppsala) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1764 to his death. ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Karl Fredrik Mennander (or Carl Fredrik Mennander or sometimes just CF Mennander) (July 19, 1712 – May 22, 1786) was Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden from 1775 to his death. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Uno von Troil (February 24, 1746 in Stockholm - 1803) was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1786-1803. ...

19th century

(Uppsala May 13, 1736December 2, 1836) was a member of the Swedish Academy. He belonged to the influential noble families von Rosén and Rosenstein. 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jacob Axel Lindblom (also Jacob Axelsson Lindblom) (27 July 1746 – 15 February 1819) was a Swedish scholar who eventually became archbishop of Uppsala. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Uppsala (older spelling Upsala) 59°51′ N 17°38′ E is a Swedish City in central Sweden, located about 70 km north of Stockholm. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Swedish Academy or Svenska Akademien, founded in 1786 by King Gustav III, is one of the Royal Academies of Sweden. ...


He was knowledgeable in the classic languages, had an unusual knowledge in agriculture and was a member of all Swedish Academies at the time except the Art academy. These included Science and Literature (1807), Science (1808), Lit history (1810), Agriculture (1818), Swedish Academy (1819), Scientific society in Uppsala (1820) and Musical (1822). He was regarded as a generous and social person, friendly, good looking and cheerful. [8] The Swedish Academy or Svenska Akademien, founded in 1786 by King Gustav III, is one of the Royal Academies of Sweden. ...

After acquiring his Master of Arts in philosophy and theology and becoming assistent professor in Latin at Uppsala University, he moved to Strängnäs where he was eventually appointed bishop in 1839. He was also an influential politician in the Swedish Riksdag from 1828 to his death. 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Johan Olof Wallin, 1779-1839, was a Swedish minister, orator, poet and later Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Carl Fredrik af WingÃ¥rd (born 26 September 1781 in Stockholm dead 19 September 1851) was a Swedish politician and Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1839–1851. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in Leap years). ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (240th in leap years), with 126 days remaining. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Strängnäs is a Municipality in Södermanland County, in central Sweden, located by Lake Mälaren. ...


He was known as a soft and gently person, but very firm to his beliefs. [9]

Stemming from Malmö, he was early orphanaged and had to rely on others for his education and support. Despite this he managed to get a higher education at the Lund University in theology, philology and Church history, influenced by local academic dignities such as Erik Gustaf Geijer as well as the German Schleiermacher whose works had just become appreciated in Lund. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Henrik Reuterdahl (born September 11, 1795 in Malmö; died June 28, 1870 in Uppsala) was archbishop of Sweden from 1856 to his death. ... â–¶(?) IPA: [málmø:] is the third largest city in Sweden, situated in the southernmost province of SkÃ¥ne, near Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Lund University Lund University (Swedish: Lunds universitet) is a university in Lund in southernmost Sweden. ... Philology is the study of ancient texts and languages. ... Categories: Literature stubs | 1783 births | 1847 deaths | Members of the Swedish Academy | Swedish language writers ... Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher (November 21, 1768 - February 12, 1834) was a theologian and philosopher. ...


He later published a thourough history of the Church in Sweden, and was a member of the Swedish Academy from 1852. (Source: [10])

He acquired a philosophie doctor's degree in Uppsala, became dean and was ordained priest, and then undertook a travel through Europe in 1849-50. 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... Anton Niklas Sundberg (May 27, 1818 – February 2, 1900) was archbishop of Uppsala 1870–1900. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ...


He was known as a controversial person; very outspoken, no stranger to using strong language, despising hypocrisy, but he displayed a remarkable sense of wit and authority.


At a dinner party he once exclaimed "Second to chastity, small schnapps glasses are the worst I know!" which has become a somewhat familiar quotation in Sweden. (Source: [11])


20th century

Was philosophie doctor in Uppsala and subsequently professor of philosophy, dean; and bishop of Växjö. 1900 (MCM) is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Johan August Ekman (November 26, 1845-1913) was Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, 1900-1913. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Lars Olof Jonathan Söderblom, better known as Nathan Söderblom (January 15, 1866 - July 12, 1931), was a Swedish clergyman, and later Archbishop of the Church of Sweden and laureate of the Nobel Peace Prize. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Erling Eidem (Gothenburg 23 April 1880 – Vänersborg 14 April 1972 ) was a Swedish theologian who served as archbishop of Uppsala 1931–1950. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Uppsala (older spelling Upsala) 59°51′ N 17°38′ E is a Swedish City in central Sweden, located about 70 km north of Stockholm. ... Växjö [] (56°52′N 14°48′E) is a Swedish city in SmÃ¥land in southern Sweden. ...


He wrote many international historical and theological books. For his contribution to the history Anglican Church he was in 1942 awarded the Lambeth Cross, the highest award in the Anglican Church. The Anglican Communion is a world-wide organisation of Anglican Churches. ...


He used his deep historical knowledge when he as archbishop took measures concerning the organisation, liturgy and methods of preaching; he furthermore had an international interest and was chairman of the Faith and Order commision. (Source: [12] and Kyrkohistoriskt Personlexikon by Carl Henrik Martling) The World Council of Churches (WCC) is the principal international Christian ecumenical organization. ...

(Born February 19, 1902 in Eskilstuna, died February 13 , 1991 in Uppsala.) 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

(25 August 1907 in Svenljunga, Älvsborgs län; died March 19, 1972 in Uppsala. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Svenljunga is a Municipality in Västra Götaland County, in western Sweden. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ...

He wed the present King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia on June 19, 1976 in Storkyrkan in Stockholm. 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... His Majesty King Carl XVI Gustaf (Carl Gustaf Folke Hubertus), styled HM The King (born April 30, 1946), King of Sweden, is the son of Prince Gustaf Adolf (1906-1947) and Sibylla of Saxe_Coburg_Gotha (1908-1972), and the grandson of King Gustav VI Adolf. ... Her Majesty Queen Silvia of Sweden (Silvia Renate Bernadotte, née Sommerlath, born 23 December 1943) is the wife of King Carl XVI Gustaf, Swedens monarch, and the mother of the heir apparent to the throne, Crown Princess Victoria. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...

1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Karl Gustav Hammar (born February 18, 1943) has been Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden, since 1997. ...

See also

The history of Sweden dates back to 9000 BC. // Pre-historic age: 9,000–500 BC Main article Pre-history of Sweden Sweden, as well as the adjacent country Norway, has a high concentration of petroglyphs (ristningar or hällristningar in Swedish) throughout the country, with the highest concentration in... List of all archbishops of Uppsala, Sweden. ...

External links

  • Nordisk Familjebok, page 1271, article Uppsala ärkestift (1920) and page 1264 article Ärkebiskop (1922). Both in Swedish.

The Owl Edition Nordisk familjebok is a Swedish encyclopedia, published between 1876 and 1957. ...

References

  • Svea Rikes Ärkebiskopar, Uppsala, 1935
  • Owl Edition This article contains content from the Owl Edition of Nordisk familjebok, a Swedish encyclopedia published between 1904-1926 now in Public Domain.

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