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Encyclopedia > Archbishop of Canterbury
Part of the series on
Anglicanism
Anglican Communion
Background

Christianity
English Reformation
Apostolic Succession
Catholicism
Episcopal polity
The term Anglican (from Medieval Latin ecclesia anglicana, meaning the English Church) is used to describe how the people, institutions and churches as well as the liturgical traditions and theological concepts developed by the state established Church of England, the Anglican Communion. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (647x800, 46 KB) Thomas Cranmer (1489-1556) im 57 Lebensjahr von Gerlach Flicke Öl auf Leinwand 1564 in National Portrit Gallery, London Der Erzbischof von Canterbury hält die Episteln des Paulus in der Hand. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... King Henry VIII of England. ... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor of the Church of the Apostles. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic - from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1] - is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... It has been suggested that episcopal be merged into this article or section. ...

People

Thomas Cranmer
Henry VIII
Richard Hooker
Elizabeth I
John Wesley
An oil painting of Thomas Cranmer by Gerlach Flicke (1545) - National Portrait Gallery, London Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books... Silver groat of Henry VIII, minted c. ... Richard Hooker (March 1554 - November 3, 1600) was an influential Anglican theologian. ... hi opooouyuyyyyvfjcxv Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England, Queen of France (in name only), and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... John Wesley (June 17, 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ...

Instruments of Unity

Archbishop of Canterbury
Lambeth Conferences
Anglican Consultative Council
Primates' Meeting
This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Anglican Consultative Council is one of the four Instruments of Unity of the Anglican Communion. ... The Anglican Communion Primates Meetings are regular meetings of the senior archbishops and bishops of the Anglican Communion. ...

Liturgy and Worship

Book of Common Prayer
High Church · Low Church
Broad Church
Oxford Movement
Thirty-Nine Articles
Book of Homilies
Doctrine
Ministry
Sacraments
Saints in Anglicanism For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England, initially designed to be pejorative. ... Broad church is a term referring to latitudinarian churches in the Church of England. ... The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans, most of them members of the University of Oxford, who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... The Thirty-Nine Articles are the defining statements of Anglican doctrine. ... During the Reformation in England, Thomas Cranmer and others saw the need for local congregations to be taught Reformed theology and practice. ... Look up doctrine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Like other churches in the Catholic tradition, the Anglican Communion recognises seven sacraments. ... The provinces of the Anglican Communion commemorate many of the same saints as those in the Roman Catholic calendar, often on the same days, but also commemorate various famous (often post-Reformation and/or English) Christians who have not been canonized. ...

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The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The present incumbent is Rowan Williams. Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... For the English boxer, see Rowan Anthony Williams. ...


Williams is the 104th in the list of Archbishops of Canterbury, a line stretching back more than 1400 years to Saint Augustine of Canterbury, who founded the see, the oldest in England, in the year 597. Along with the Church of England as a whole, these archbishops were Roman Catholic until the English Reformation, c. 1534, when the independence of the English church was established. The Church of England is among those churches which maintain the apostolic succession and so its bishops, including the Archbishops of Canterbury, can claim that tangible link to the twelve apostles. Coat of arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Augustine of Canterbury (birth unknown, died May 26, 604) was the first Archbishop of Canterbury, sent to Ethelbert of Kent, Bretwalda (ruler) of England by Pope Gregory the Great in 597. ... A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... King Henry VIII of England. ... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor of the Church of the Apostles. ... The Twelve Apostles (, apostolos, Liddell & Scott, Strongs G652, someone sent forth/sent out) were men that according to the Synoptic Gospels and Christian tradition, were chosen from among the disciples (students) of Jesus for a mission. ...

Contents

The Roman Catholic Claim

According the Catholic Encyclopedia the Anglican Church (Church of England) broke off their claim to apostolic succession during the early years of the Protestant Reformation, in the sixteen century, which also invalidates their claim to valid, apostolic Holy Orders. In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor of the Church of the Apostles. ... “Reformation” redirects here. ... Catholic deacon candidates prostrate before the altar of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles during a 2004 diaconate ordination liturgy Holy Orders in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, and Independent Catholic churches includes three orders: bishop, priest, and deacon. ...


This happened when King Henry the VIII (who had been seeking the Pope's approval of a divorce from his wife), in 1534, by Act of Parliament, was made the Supreme Head of the English Church (Church of England). The bishops, instead of swearing obedience to the Pope, were now forced to swear allegiance to the King. Blessed John Fisher (a canonized saint of the Catholic Church) was the only bishop who refused to denounce the prime authority of the Bishop of Rome (the Pope); the King's intolerance of Fisher's enduring claim led to Fisher being beheaded in 1535 (see also St. Thomas More, who met a very similar fate for the same reasons). For John Arbuthnot Fisher, British admiral, see Jackie Fisher, 1st Baron Fisher. ... There are also several institutions named Thomas More College. ...


In 1990, the Catholic US Bishops created a document titled "Anglican Orders: A Report on the Evolving Context of Their Evaluation in the Roman Catholic Church" that explains the latest dialgoue surrounding this the topic of Anglican orders.


Present roles and status

Today the archbishop fills four main roles:

  1. he is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury, which covers the east of the County of Kent and extreme north-east Surrey. Founded in 597, it is the oldest see in the English church.
  2. he is the metropolitan archbishop of the Province of Canterbury, which covers the southern two-thirds of England.
  3. as Primate of All England, he is the chief religious figure in the Church of England (the British sovereign is the "Supreme governor" of the church) and its primary leader. Along with his colleague the Archbishop of York he chairs the General Synod and sits or chairs many of the church's important boards and committees; power in the church is not highly centralised, however, so the two archbishops can often lead only through persuasion. The Archbishop of Canterbury plays a central part in national ceremonies such as coronations; thanks to his high public profile, his opinions are often in demand by the news media.
  4. as head of the Anglican Communion, the archbishop, although without legal authority outside England, is recognized by convention as primus inter pares ("first among equals") of all Anglican primates worldwide. Since 1867 he has convened more or less decennial meetings of worldwide Anglican bishops, the Lambeth Conferences.

In respect of the last two of these functions, he has an important ecumenical and interfaith role, speaking on behalf of Anglicans in England and worldwide. This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... This article is about the county in England. ... Not to be confused with Surry. ... Events Saint Augustine is created Archbishop of Canterbury. ... A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop (then more precisely called Metropolitan archbishop) of a metropolis; that is, the chief city of an old Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. ... The Province of Canterbury consists of the following dioceses of the Church of England: Their archbishop is the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ... The British Monarchy is a shared monarchy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The General Synod is the governing body of the Church of England, a church within the Anglican Communion. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... First among equals is a phrase which indicates that a person is the most senior of a group of people sharing the same rank or office. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The word ecumenical comes from a Greek word that means pertaining to the whole world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Archbishop's main residence is Lambeth Palace in the London Borough of Lambeth. He also has lodgings in the Old Palace, Canterbury, located beside Canterbury Cathedral, where his cathedra sits. Lambeth Palaces gatehouse. ... The London Borough of Lambeth is a London borough in South London, England and forms part of Inner London. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... The cathedra of the Pope in the apse of St. ...

Arms of the see of Canterbury
Arms of the see of Canterbury

As holder of one of the "five great sees" (along with those of York, London, Durham and Winchester), the Archbishop of Canterbury is ex officio one of the Lords Spiritual of the House of Lords. He is one of the highest-ranking men in England, ranking directly below the Royal Family. Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom, also called Spiritual Peers, consist of the twenty-six clergymen of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...


Since Henry VIII broke with Rome, the Archbishops of Canterbury have been selected by the English (latterly British) monarch. Today the choice is made in the name of the Sovereign by the prime minister, from a shortlist of two selected by an ad-hoc committee called the Crown Nominations Commission. As the current archbishop, the Most Reverend and Right Honourable Dr Rowan Douglas Williams, the 104th Lord Archbishop of Canterbury and Primate of All England was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 27 February 2003; he signs himself Rowan Cantuar. He was previously Archbishop of Wales and Bishop of Monmouth. Silver groat of Henry VIII, minted c. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... The Appointment of Church of England diocesan bishops follows a somewhat convoluted process, reflecting the churchs traditional tendency towards compromise and ad-hoc solutions, traditional ambiguity between heirarchy and democracy, and traditional role as a semi-autonomous state church. ... For the English boxer, see Rowan Anthony Williams. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Province of Wales in the Anglican Communion was created in 1920, as the Church in Wales, independent from the Church of England (of which the four Welsh dioceses had previously been part). ... The Diocese of Monmouth was created in 1921, when the Church in Wales was disestablished from the Church of England. ...


Additional roles

In addition to his religious roles, the Archbishop also holds a number of other positions ex officio. Amongst these are: This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ...

A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ... The University of Kent is a plate glass campus university in Kent, England. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...

Origins

Records suggest that the Roman Britons had three Archbishops, seated in London, York, and Caerleon, an ancient city of South Wales. However, in the fifth and sixth centuries the country was overrun by the pagan Anglo-Saxons. Of the kingdoms they set up there, Kent had the closest ties to European trade and culture[citation needed]. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... York is a city in North Yorkshire, England, at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss. ... Caerleon (Welsh: ) (grid reference ST323914, ) is a suburban village situated on the River Usk on the northern outskirts of the city of Newport. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... The Kingdom of Kent was a kingdom of Jutes in southeast England, one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the so-called Anglo-Saxon heptarchy. ...


The first Archbishop of Canterbury was Saint Augustine who arrived in Kent in 597, sent by Pope Gregory the Great on a mission to the English. He was accepted by King Ethelbert, on his conversion to Christianity, about the year 598. Since then the Archbishops of Canterbury have been referred to as occupying the Chair of St Augustine Augustine of Canterbury (birth unknown, died May 26, 604) was the first Archbishop of Canterbury, sent to Ethelbert of Kent, Bretwalda (ruler) of England by Pope Gregory the Great in 597. ... This article is about the county in England. ... Events Saint Augustine is created Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ... Saint Gregory I, or Gregory the Great (called the Dialogist in Eastern Orthodoxy) (circa 540 - March 12, 604) was pope of the Catholic Church from September 3, 590 until his death. ... Statue of Ethelbert. ... Events Aethelfrith of Northumbria possibly defeats the northern British in a major battle at Catraeth. ... Augustine of Canterbury (birth unknown, died May 26, 604) was the first Archbishop of Canterbury, sent to Ethelbert of Kent, Bretwalda (ruler) of England by Pope Gregory the Great in 597. ...


Before the break with Papal authority in the 16th Century, the Church of England was an integral part of the continental Western European Church. Since the break, the Church of England, an established national church, still considers itself part of the broader Western Catholic tradition as well as being the "mother church" of the worldwide Anglican Communion, though no longer in communion with the See of Rome. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


Province and Diocese

The Archbishop of Canterbury exercises metropolitical (or supervisory) jurisdiction over the Province of Canterbury, which encompasses thirty of the forty-four dioceses of the Church of England. (The remaining fourteen dioceses, in northern England, fall within the Province of York.) Formerly, the four dioceses of Wales were also under the Province of Canterbury; in 1920, however, the Welsh dioceses transferred from the established Church of England to the disestablished Church in Wales. The Province of Canterbury consists of the following dioceses of the Church of England: Their archbishop is the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ...

View of Canterbury Cathedral from the north west circa 1890-1900.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has a ceremonial provincial curia, or court, consisting of some of the senior bishops of his province[1]. The Bishop of London—the most senior cleric of the Church with the exception of the two Archbishops—serves as Canterbury's Provincial Dean, the Bishop of Winchester as Chancellor, the Bishop of Lincoln as Vice-Chancellor, the Bishop of Salisbury as Precentor, the Bishop of Worcestor as Chaplain and the Bishop of Rochester as Cross-Bearer. Image File history File links CanterburyCathedral. ... Image File history File links CanterburyCathedral. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... A Dean, in the Church of England and elsewhere in the Anglican Communion, is the senior clergyman in charge of a cathedral. ... In some Christian churches, the Chancellor of a diocese is a lawyer who represents the church in legal matters. ... Arms of the Bishop of Lincoln The Bishop of Lincoln heads the Anglican Diocese of Lincoln in the Province of Canterbury. ... Arms of the Bishop of Salisbury The Bishop of Salisbury is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Salisbury in the Province of Canterbury. ... A Precentor is a person, usually a clergy member, who is in charge of preparing worship services. ... The Bishop of Worcester controls the see of Worcester and has his seat in Worcester Cathedral. ... A chaplain is typically a member of the clergy serving a group of people who are not organized as a mission or church; lay chaplains are also found in some settings such as universities. ... The Bishop of Rochester is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Rochester in the Province of Canterbury. ... In some Christian churches (particularly the Anglican Communion), one server is appointed to carry the churchs cross during processions at the beginning and end of the service. ...


Along with primacy over the Archbishop of York, the Archbishop of Canterbury also has a precedence of honour over the other archbishops of the Anglican Communion. He is recognised as primus inter pares, or first amongst equals. The Archbishop of Canterbury, however, does not exercise any direct authority in the provinces outside England. // Within the Church of England, the primacy of Canterbury or primacy of England is the supremacy of the Archbishop of Canterbury (as Primate of All England) over the Archbishop of York. ...


The Archbishop at the present time has four suffragan bishops.

  1. the Suffragan Bishop of Dover, who is given the additional title of "Bishop in Canterbury" and empowered to act almost as if he were the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury, since the Archbishop is so frequently away fulfilling national and international duties.
  2. the Suffragan Bishop of Maidstone is a second assistant working in the diocese.
  3. the bishop of Ebbsfleet is a provincial episcopal visitor for the whole Province of Canterbury, licensed by the Archbishop as a "flying bishop" to visit parishes throughout the province who are uncomfortable with the ministrations of their local bishop who has participated in the ordination of women.
  4. the bishop of Richborough has the same role as Ebbsfleet.

A bishop is an ordained person who holds a specific position of authority in any of a number of Christian churches. ... Suffragan bishop in the Church of England Diocese of Canterbury. ... A bishop in charge of a diocese. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... In the Church of England, the Suffragan Bishop of Maidstone is a second assistant/suffragan bishop of the diocese of Canterbury, in a similar though subordinate role to that of the Bishop of Dover. ... In the Church of England, the bishop of Ebbsfleet is a provincial episcopal visitor for the whole Province of Canterbury, licensed by the Archbishop of Canterbury as a flying bishop to visit parishes throughout the province who are uncomfortable with the ministrations of their local bishop who has participated in... A provincial episcopal visitor (popularly known as a PEV or a flying bishop) in the Church of England (CofE) is a bishop assigned to minister to clergy, laity and parishes who do not in conscience accept the ministry of women priests. ... The Province of Canterbury consists of the following dioceses of the Church of England: Their archbishop is the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... In the Church of England, the bishop of Richborough is a provincial episcopal visitor for the whole Province of Canterbury, licensed by the Archbishop of Canterbury as a flying bishop to visit parishes throughout the province who are uncomfortable with the ministrations of their local bishop who has participated in...

Style and privileges

Both the Archbishops of Canterbury and York are styled "The Most Reverend"; retired Archbishops as "The Right Reverend". Archbishops are, by convention, appointed to the Privy Council, and may therefore also use "The Right Honourable" for life (unless they are later removed from the Council). In formal documents, the Archbishop of Canterbury is referred to as "The Most Reverend Father in God, Forenames, by Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of All England and Metropolitan". In debates in the House of Lords, the Archbishop is referred to as "The Most Reverend Primate, the Archbishop of Canterbury". "The Right Honourable" is not used in either instance. He may also be formally addressed as "Your Grace" - or, more often these days, simply as "Archbishop", "Father" or (in the current instance) "Dr Williams". Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt. ... Look up Appendix:Most popular given names by country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The surname of the Archbishop of Canterbury is not used in formal documents; only the forenames and see are mentioned. The Archbishop is legally permitted to sign his name as "Cantuar" (from the Latin for Canterbury). He shares the right to use only a title in the signature with the Archbishop of York, other bishops, and Peers of the Realm. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


In the order of precedence, the Archbishop of Canterbury is ranked above all individuals in the realm, with the exception of the Sovereign and members of the Royal Family. Immediately below him is the Lord Chancellor, and then the Archbishop of York. The Order of precedence in the United Kingdom is different for each region. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ...

The Archbishop of Canterbury's official London residence is Lambeth Palace, photographed looking east across the River Thames.
The Archbishop of Canterbury's official London residence is Lambeth Palace, photographed looking east across the River Thames.

The Archbishop of Canterbury's official residence in London is Lambeth Palace. Until the 19th century, the Archbishops also had major residences at Croydon Palace and Addington Palace. There are also the ruins of a Palace at Otford. Download high resolution version (1083x488, 55 KB)Lambeth Palace, London, Englandacross the River Thames from the north side. ... Download high resolution version (1083x488, 55 KB)Lambeth Palace, London, Englandacross the River Thames from the north side. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Lambeth Palaces gatehouse. ... The Thames (pronounced //) is a river flowing through southern England, in its lower reaches flowing through London into the sea. ... Lambeth Palaces gatehouse. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Croydon Palace was the summer residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury for over 500 years. ... Addington Palace is a largely 18th-century Palace in Addington near Croydon, south London. ... Otford is a village and civil parish in the Sevenoaks District of Kent. ...


See also

The Archbishops' also had a Palace in Maidstone Kent - now called the Archbishop's Palace Coat of arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... St Pauls Cathedral The United Kingdom is traditionally a Christian state, though of the four constituent countries, only England still has a state faith in the form of an established church. ... The signatures of William I and Maud (beside the first two large Xs) on the Accord of Winchester from 1072. ...


References and external links

  • Official web site
  1. ^ Order of Service from the Entrhonement of the 104th Archbishop in 2003PDF (251 KiB)
Anglican hierarchy in the United Kingdom and Ireland
Anglican Communion

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Archbishop of Canterbury (2354 words)
The Archbishop is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury.
The Archbishop is the chief ecclesiastical authority of the Church of England.
A Province in the Anglican Communion is the territory of one of the 38 national or regional Churches in communion with the Archbishop of Canterbury.
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