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Encyclopedia > Arch Linux
Arch Linux

Arch Linux running the Xfce desktop environment
Website: archlinux.org
Company/
developer:
Judd Vinet et al
OS family: Linux
Source model: Open source
Latest stable release: 2007.08.2 (Don't Panic) / October 7, 2007
Supported platforms: i686 (x86-32, x86-64)
Kernel type: Monolithic kernel
License: Various
Working state: Current

Arch Linux is a Linux distribution inspired by CRUX and intended to be lightweight and simple for advanced users. It uses a BSD-style init framework and is largely based around binary packages. Packages are targeted for i686 and x86-64 microprocessors to assist performance on modern hardware. Arch Linux was founded by Judd Vinet, who led the project until 2007-10-01, when he stepped down due to lack of time. The project is currently led by Aaron Griffin.[1] Image File history File links Archlinux_logo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x640, 313 KB) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Xfce ([1]) is a free software desktop environment for Unix and other Unix-like platforms, such as Linux, Solaris and BSD. Its configuration is entirely mouse-driven and the configuration files are hidden from the casual user. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The term software company could be applied to: a) a company that produces software, distributes software from a third party, or provides services such as custom software development. ... For other uses, see Software developer (disambiguation). ... Judd Vinet is an open-source developer who currently resides in British Columbia, Canada. ... This article is about operating systems that use the Linux kernel. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... i686 is the name given to the similar instruction sets used by several Intel and Intel-compatible microprocessors. ... IA-32, sometimes generically called x86 or even x86-32. ... The AMD64 or x86-64 is a 64-bit processor architecture invented by AMD. It is a superset of the x86 architecture, which it natively supports. ... A kernel connects the application software to the hardware of a computer. ... It has been suggested that Monolithic system be merged into this article or section. ... A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... A Linux distribution, often simply distribution or distro, is a member of the Linux family of Unix-like operating systems comprising the Linux kernel, the non-kernel parts of the GNU operating system, and assorted other software. ... For other uses, see Crux (disambiguation). ... init (short for initialization) is the program on Unix and Unix-like systems that spawns all other processes. ... i686 is the name given to the similar instruction sets used by several Intel and Intel-compatible microprocessors. ... The AMD64 or x86-64 is a 64-bit processor architecture invented by AMD. It is a superset of the x86 architecture, which it natively supports. ... Microprocessors, including an Intel 80486DX2 and an Intel 80386 A microprocessor (abbreviated as µP or uP) is an electronic computer central processing unit (CPU) made from miniaturized transistors and other circuit elements on a single semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) (aka microchip or just chip). ... For other uses, see Hardware (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Arch Linux uses a "rolling release" system, with new packages provided daily. Its package management permits users to keep systems up-to-date easily. Rather than encouraging users to move between discrete releases, Arch Linux releases are simply snapshots of the current set of packages, sometimes with revised installation software. The first release, 0.1 (codenamed Homer), appeared on March 11, 2002, and the latest is 2007.08.1 (Don't Panic), released on August 5, 2007 In Software Development, a Rolling Release approach refers to a continuously evolving software system, where a released system artifact set and the system stability do not differ significantly from any unreleased set close to the release time. ... A package management system is a collection of tools to automate the process of installing, upgrading, configuring, and removing software packages from a computer. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...


The Arch in Arch Linux is usually pronounced [ɑːrtʃ] or [aːtʃ] (as in archer or parchment).[2]


Package management

Arch Linux is primarily based on binary packages. These packages are managed using the Pacman package manager, which handles package installations, upgrades, removal and database queries. The packages for Arch Linux are obtained from the Arch Linux package tree. Currently there exist four different repositories: core, which contains all the packages needed to set up a base Linux system; extra, which holds packages not required for the base system, mostly alternatives for packages in core; unstable, which has packages for programs in development and testing, with packages that have pending bug reports or may be unreliable. Until 16 September 2007 there were five categories: current, community, extra, unstable and testing.[3] The current and community repositories were shuffled generating the new core repository for the sake of eliminating blurry and confusion. In addition to these official repositories, a number of user-contributed repositories exist, often with customised or newer versions of the standard software packages. The pacman logo Pacman is a software package manager, developed as part of the Linux distribution Arch Linux. ... This article is about computing. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...


Packages are created using the Arch Build System (ABS). This ports-like package management system consists of repositories of shell scripts and other files which enable packages to be customised and built from source, including rebuilding the entire system using modified compiler flags. Ports collections (or ports trees, or just ports) are the sets of makefiles and patches provided by the BSD-based operating systems, FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD, as a simple method of installing software or creating binary packages. ... Illustration of a package management system being used to download new software. ... A repository is a central place where data is stored and maintained. ... A shell script is a script or computer program written for the shell (command interpreter) of an operating system. ... CFLAGS and CXXFLAGS are either the name of environment variables or of Makefile variables that can be set to specify additional switches to be passed to a compiler in the process of building computer software. ...

Free software Portal

Image File history File links Free_Software_Portal_Logo. ...

External links


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