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Encyclopedia > Arawn

In Welsh mythology, Arawn was the Lord of the Underworld, which was called Annwn. Welsh mythology, the remnants of the mythology of the pre-Christian Britons, has come down to us in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin and the Book of Taliesin. ... Annwn or Annwfn, ( under-world or un-world, sometimes inaccurately written Annwyn, Annwyfn or Annwfyn) was the Otherworld, the land of souls that had departed this world in Welsh mythology. ...


Some of the more prominent myths about Arawn include the incident in which Amaethon stole a dog, lapwing and a white roebuck from Arawn, leading to the Cad Goddeu (Battle of the Trees), which Arawn lost to Amaethon and his brother, Gwydion. In Welsh mythology, Amaethon was a god of agriculture, a son of the goddess Don. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is about the domestic dog. ... Genera Erthrogonys Vanellus Lapwings are medium-sized wading birds belonging to the subfamily Vanellinae of the family Charadriidae, which also includes the plovers and dotterels. ... Roe Deer Categories: Stub | Deer ... Cad Goddeu (Welsh: The Battle of the Trees) is a sixth-century Welsh poem from the Book of Taliesin. ... In Welsh mythology, Gwydion is a magician appearing prominently in the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogion and the ancient poem Cad Goddeu. ...


In the Mabinogion, Pwyll mistakenly set his hounds upon a stag, only to discover that Arawn had been hunting the same animal. To pay for the misdeed, Arawn asked Pwyll to trade places with him for a year and a day, and defeat Hafgan, Arawn's rival, at the end of this time, something Arawn had attempted to do, but had been unable to. Arawn, meanwhile, took Pwyll's place as lord of Dyfed. Arawn and Pwyll became good friends because, though Pwyll wore Arawn's shape, he slept chastely with Arawn's wife. The Mabinogion is a collection of prose stories from medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... This article is about the Welsh hero; for the impact crater on Europa, see Pwyll (crater). ... Hounds have been used for hunting since ancient times, as suggested by this statue of the goddess Diana hunting. ... Subfamilies Capreolinae Cervinae Hydropotinae Muntiacinae A deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. ... In Welsh mythology, Hafgan was a rival of Arawns for the position of the god of the underworld. ... Dyfed was one of the ancient kingdoms (or principalities) of Wales prior to the Norman Conquest. ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ...


In Welsh folklore, Arawn rides with his white, red-eared hounds (the Cŵn Annwn or Hounds of Annwn) through the skies in autumn, winter, and early spring. In Welsh mythology, the Cŵn Annwn (hounds of Annwn) were the white, red-eared ghostly hounds of Annwn, the land of the dead. ... OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXx Autumn (also fall in North American English) is one of the four temperate seasons, the transition from summer into winter. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... Spring is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ...


The baying of the hounds is identified with the crying of wild geese as they migrate, and the quarry of the hounds are the wandering Otherworld Spirits (possibly fairies), being chased back to Annwn (sometimes to the abode of the Brenin Llwyd or Grey King). Later the relevent mythology was altered to describe the "capturing of human souls and the chasing of "damned souls" to Annwn"; Annwn was inaccurately revised in some variants of Welsh mythology and described as being "Hell." The Brenin Llwyd (Welsh for Grey King) is a being believed by some to inhabit the mountains of Snowdonia in Wales. ...


Etymology

This theonym may be derived from Proto-Celtic *Arjo-man-es meaning "free-thinking masculine [spirit]:" c.f. Old Irish aire 'free' and Proto-Indo-European *men- 'to think' (q.v. [1], [2], [3]). Following accepted sound laws elucidating systematic diachronic phonological sound change in Celtic proto-linguistics (q.v. [4], [5], [6], [7]), the Romano-British form of this Proto-Celtic theonym is likely to have been *Arimanes, becoming *Ariamnes by metathesis and Arawn by subsequent sound change. Theonym is essentially classical Greek for the name of a god. ... The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the putative ancestor of all the known Celtic languages. ... Old Irish is the name given to the oldest form of the Irish language which can be more or less fully reconstructed from extant sources. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ... Diachronic study is the study of the development of a language over a period of time. ... Phonology (Greek phone = voice/sound and logos = word/speech) is a subfield of grammar (see also linguistics). ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ... Historical linguistics (also diachronic linguistics or comparative linguistics) is primarily the study of the ways in which languages change over time, by means of examining languages which are recognizably related through similarities such as vocabulary, word formation, and syntax, as well as the surviving records of ancient languages. ... The term Romano-British describes the romanised culture of Britannia under the rule of the Roman Empire, when Roman and Christian culture had extensively entered into the life of the native Brythonic and Pictish peoples of Britain. ... Metathesis is a sound change that alters the order of phonemes in a word. ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ...


The name may also be derived from a compound of two Proto-Indo-European elements *ari- ‘noble, high’ and *paus- ‘wild, unleashed.’ This root *paus- appears in extended form as *Pauson- (Pokorny: entry 1452), apparently the name of a deity, since it is found in expected forms in Sanskrit, and in Greek mythology as Pan, from Pre-Greek *Paon. This permits the reconstruction of a Proto-Celtic deity-name *Ari-φausno-s, conveying the notion of ‘noble, wild spirit,’ or ‘unfettered wildness.’ This would have given a Brittonic form *Arihausnos inherited into the Welsh language as Arawn. The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ... Sanskrit ( संस्कृतम्) is an Indo-European Classical language of India and a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. ... Greek mythology consists of a large collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... The acronym PAN can refer to: permanent account number, Indias national identification number Peroxyacyl nitrates, irritants found in smog Personal area network, a computer network used close to one person Polish Academy of Sciences (Polska Akademia Nauk), a state scientific institution Polyacrylonitrile, polymer Partai Amanat Nasional (National Mandate Party... The Brythonic languages (or Brittonic languages) form one of the two branches of the Insular Celtic language family. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


Arawn in fiction

In Lloyd Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain, a series of fantasy novels inspired by Welsh myths, Arawn is a prominent (albeit mostly unseen) character. The Arawn of the Chronicles, however, is unredeemably evil. Known as "Arawn Death-Lord," he rules the deathly kingdom of Annuvin, from which he commands his armies of undead Cauldron-Born warriors. Book cover of The High King Lloyd (Chudley) Alexander (born January 30, 1924 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is the author of a number of fantasy books for children and adolescents, as well as several adult novels. ... The Chronicles of Prydain is a five volume series of childrens fantasy novels by Lloyd Alexander. ... For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art, literature, film, television, and music that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of either plot, theme, setting, or all three. ... In Lloyd Alexanders series of fantasy books The Chronicles of Prydain, the Cauldron-Born are a race of deathless warriors in the service of Arawn, Death-Lord of Annuvin. ...


Arawn and the Cwn Annwn appear in Diana Wynne Jones's 1975 fantasy novel Dogsbody. Diana Wynne Jones (born London August 16, 1934) is a British writer, principally of fantasy novels for children and adults, as well as a small amount of non-fiction. ...


Arawn plays an important role in Mythic Entertainment's Dark Age Of Camelot, in which he is a patron god to the Inconnu race, as well as the Reaver, Heretic and Necromancer classes. Mythic Entertainment, Inc. ... Dark Age of Camelot is a 3D medieval fantasy MMORPG that revolves around the war between three realms at the end of King Arthurs rule: Arthurian-inspired Albion, Norse mythology inspired Midgard and Celtic Hibernia. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Arawn - definition of Arawn in Encyclopedia (286 words)
In Welsh folklore, Arawn rides with his white, red-eared hounds (the Cwn Annwn or Hounds of Annwn) through the skies in autumn, winter, and early spring.
The baying of the hounds is identified with the crying of wild geese as they migrate, and the quarry of the hounds are the souls of the damned, being chased back to Annwn (sometimes to the abode of the Brenin Llwyd or Grey King).
Arawn and the Cwn Annwn appear in Diana Wynne Jones's 1975 fantasy novel Dogsbody.
Arawn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (486 words)
Arawn and Pwyll became good friends because, though Pwyll wore Arawn's shape, he slept chastely with Arawn's wife.
In Welsh folklore, Arawn rides with his white, red-eared hounds (the Cŵn Annwn or Hounds of Annwn) through the skies in autumn, winter, and early spring.
Arawn plays an important role in Mythic Entertainment's Dark Age Of Camelot, in which he is a patron god to the Inconnu race, as well as the Reaver, Heretic and Necromancer classes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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