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Encyclopedia > Aramis

René d'Herblay 'Aramis' is a fictional character in the novels The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas, père. He and the other two musketeers Athos and Porthos are friends of the novel's protagonist, d'Artagnan. Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... For other uses, see The Three Musketeers (disambiguation). ... Twenty Years After (Vingt ans après) is a novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... The Vicomte de Bragelonne: Ten Years Later (Le Vicomte de Bragelonne ou Dix ans plus tard) is a novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Alexandre Dumas, père, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie (July 24, 1802 – December 5, 1870) was a French writer, best known for his numerous historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... Athos is a fictional character in the novels The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After, and The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Porthos is a fictional character in the novels The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas. ... The statue of dArtagnan in Auch Statue of dArtagnan in Maastricht Charles de Batz-Castelmore, Comte dArtagnan (c. ...


Aramis is quite an exception among the musketeers since his given name is mentioned twice by Dumas: he is christened René. We hear this name when d'Artagnan stumbles upon him and his mistress in the second book (in the chapter : Les Deux Gaspard), and again when Bazin is talking about Aramis in the third. In Twenty Years After he is a Jesuit known as the Abbé d'Herblay as well as Chevalier d'Herblay. In The Vicomte de Bragelonne he is known as the Bishop of Vannes, a title given to him by Nicolas Fouquet and later he became the Superior General of the Jesuits. When he comes back from exile, he is a Spanish noble and known as Duke of Alameda. Look up Appendix:Most popular given names by country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... Abbots coat of arms The word abbot, meaning father, has been used as a Christian clerical title in various, mainly monastic, meanings. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Portrait by Édouard Lacretelle. ... Saint Ignatius of Loyola served as the first Superior General. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ...


Aramis loves intrigues and women, which fits well with the opinions of the time regarding Jesuits and abbots (before the French Revolution, abbots benefited from the incomes of an abbey, but were not required to follow the monastery rules — which Aramis understands well). As a musketeer, his great ambition was to become an abbé; as an abbé he wishes for the life of the soldier. Aramis seems to be followed by luck, but it is never enough; every step forward must be used to climb to even greater power. This characteristic leads to his nomination as Superior General of the Jesuits, which is precisely what saves his life, at the end of Le Vicomte De Bragelonne, after he is betrayed by Fouquet. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


Despite being even more Machiavellian than Milady was herself, Aramis holds very firmly to the sacred concept of friendship. In fact, the only wrong moves Aramis has ever made were done when he refused to harm a friend (or a friend's feelings). In Twenty Years After, he followed Athos's pleas to spare Mordaunt, while he was holding him at gunpoint and, in Le Vicomte De Bragelonne, he refused to suppress d'Artagnan, when he discovered the truth about Belle-Ile-En-Mer, and he let Fouquet betray him, instead of assassinating him. Aramis even tells the truth to Porthos about the man in the iron mask's real identity, despite fearing that Porthos would kill him. Friendship is so important to Aramis that it is strongly implied, at the end of Le Vicomte De Bragelonne, that he cried (for the first time in his entire life) when one of his friends died. Later, he explicitely told someone that he considered him a true friend.


The fictional Aramis is loosely based on the historical musketeer Henri d'Aramitz whose name comes from the French village now named Aramits. For other uses of this term, see Musketeer (disambiguation). ... Village in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques, France History Home to Henri dAramitz, Aramis in the novels The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas. ...


Film and television

Actors who have played Aramis on screen include:

  • Harold M. Shaw, in The Three Musketeers: Parts I and II (1911)
  • C.N. Mortensen, in The Three Musketeers (1916)
  • Pierre de Guingand, in Les trois mousquetaires (1921)
  • Eugene Pallette, in The Three Musketeers (1921)
  • Gino Corrado, in The Iron Mask (1929)
  • Jean-Louis Allibert, in Les Trois Mousquetaires (1933)
  • Onslow Stevens, in The Three Musketeers (1935)
  • John ‘Dusty’ King, in The Three Musketeers (1939)
  • Robert Coote, in The Three Musketeers (1948)
  • Keith Richards, in The Three Musketeers (1950)
  • Judd Holdren, in Lady in the Iron Mask (1952)
  • Jacques François, in Les Trois Mousquetaires (1953)
  • Paul Hansard, in The Three Musketeers (1954)
  • Paul Campbell, in The Three Musketeers (1956) and Le Avventure dei tre moschettieri (1957)
  • Tim O'Connor, in The Three Musketeers (TV movie) (1960)
  • Jaques Toja, in Les Trois Mousquetaires: La Vengeance de Milady (1961) and Les Trois Mousquetaires: Les Ferrets de la Reine (1961)
  • Roberto Risso, in D’Artagnan contro i tre moschettieri (1963)
  • Gary Watson, in The Three Musketeers (1966)
  • John Woodvine, in The Further Adventures of the Three Musketeers (1967)
  • Roger Sterckx, in Die Drie Musketiers (1968)
  • Colin Fox, in The Three Musketeers (1969)
  • Georges Mansart, in Les Quatre Charlots Mousquetaires (1971)
  • Richard Chamberlain, in The Three Musketeers (1973), The Four Musketeers (1974), and The Return of the Musketeers (1989)
  • Igor Starygin, in D'Artanyan i Tri Mushketyora (1978), Mushketyory 20 let spustya (1992), and Tayna Korolevy Anny ili Mushketyory 30 Let Spustya (1993)
  • Lloyd Bridges, in The Fifth Musketeer (1979)
  • Eiko Yamada, in Anime San Jushi (1987)
  • Charlie Sheen, in The Three Musketeers (1993)
  • Sami Frey, in Revenge of the Musketeers (1994)
  • Jeremy Irons, in The Man in the Iron Mask (1998)
  • Thomas Beckett, in Three Musketeers (1999)
  • Callum Blue, in Young Blades (2001)
  • Nick Moran, in The Musketeer (2001)
  • Allan Corduner, in La Femme Musketeer (TV miniseries) (2003)
  • Grégori Derangère, in D'Artagnan et les trois mousquetaires (2005)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aramis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (303 words)
René Aramis is a fictional character in the novels The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas.
Aramis is quite an exception among the musketeers since his given name is mentioned twice by Dumas: he is christened René.
Aramis loves intrigues and women, which fits well with prejudices of the time regarding Jesuits and abbots (before the French Revolution, abbots benefited the incomes of an abbey, but were not required to follow the monastery rules - which Aramis understands well).
Aramis (2568 words)
Aramis, with Hauoli standing by, then headed for the spot the submarine last had been seen and, during the next quarter hour dropped her four Mark I depth charges, one by one.
Aramis' subsequent movements appear to have elicited considerable interest within the 3d and 4th Naval Districts, since at one point nobody knew for sure where she was.
Aramis blew one whistle signal and maintained her course and speed, but the steamer did not show any intention of slowing down and bore down on the yacht.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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