FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > April Fools' Day

April Fools' Day or All Fools' Day is a holiday in its own right, a notable day celebrated in many countries on April 1. The day is marked by the commission of hoaxes and other practical jokes of varying sophistication on friends, enemies and neighbors, or sending them on fools' errands, the aim of which is to embarrass the gullible. April Fools Day may refer to: April Fools Day, a notable day celebrated on April 1 April Fools Day (novel), by Bryce Courtnay April Fools Day (film), a horror film directed by Fred Walton April Fools Day (2009 film), an upcoming remake of the Walton horror... For other uses, see Holiday (disambiguation). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... An office cubicle with all the contents covered in aluminum foil. ... Fools Errand redirects here. ...

Wikipedia's Main Page on April 1, 2007. The featured article write-up purposely confuses U.S. President George Washington with an inventor of the same name.

Contents

Other languages FAQs | Table free Welcome to Wikipedia, the free-content encyclopedia that anyone can edit. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... A pre-World War I ad introduced Washingtons coffee to the public. ...

Origin

The origins of this custom are complex and a matter of much debate. It is likely a relic of the once common festivities held on the vernal equinox, which began on 25 March, old New Year's Day, and ended on 2 April. Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Though 1 April appears to have been observed as a general festival in Great Britain in antiquity, it was apparently not until the beginning of the 18th century that the making of April-fools was a common custom. In Scotland the custom was known as "hunting the gawk," i.e. the cuckoo, and April-fools were "April-gawks," the cuckoo being a term of contempt, as it is in many countries. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country. ... Genera See text. ...


One of the earliest connections of the day with fools is Chaucer's story the Nun's Priest's Tale (c.1400), which concerns two fools and takes place "thirty dayes and two" from the beginning of March, which is April 1. The significance of this is difficult to determine. Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902 Chanticleer the rooster from an outdoor production of Chanticleer and the Fox at Ashby_de_la_Zouch castle Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. ... The tale of Chanticleer and the Fox is a beast fable popularized by the 14th century Middle English poet Geoffrey Chaucer. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Europe may have derived its April-fooling from the French.[1] French and Dutch references from 1508 and 1539 respectively describe April Fools' Day jokes and the custom of making them on the first of April. France was one of the first nations to make January 1 officially New Year's Day (which was already celebrated by many), by decree of Charles IX. This was in 1564, even before the 1582 adoption of the Gregorian calendar (See Julian start of the year). Thus the New Year's gifts and visits of felicitation which had been the feature of 1 April became associated with the first day of January, and those who disliked or did not hear about the change were fair game for those wits who amused themselves by sending mock presents and paying calls of pretended ceremony on 1 April. In France the person fooled is known as poisson d'avril (April fish). This has been explained as arising from the fact that in April the sun quits the zodiacal sign of the fish. The French traditionally celebrated this holiday by placing dead fish on the backs of friends. Today, real fish have been replaced with sticky, fish-shaped paper cut-outs that children try to sneak onto the back of their friends' shirts. Candy shops and bakeries also offer fish-shaped sweets for the holiday. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from 1560 until his death. ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... A Julian year is on average 365. ... For other uses, see New Year (disambiguation). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The term zodiac denotes an annual cycle of twelve stations along the ecliptic, the apparent path of the sun across the heavens through the constellations that divide the ecliptic into twelve equal zones of celestial longitude. ...


Some Dutch also celebrate the 1st of April for other reasons. In 1572, the Netherlands were ruled by Spain's King Philip II. Roaming the region were Dutch rebels who called themselves Geuzen, after the French "gueux," meaning beggars. On April 1, 1572, the Geuzen seized the small coastal town of Den Briel. This event was also the start of the general civil rising against the Spanish in other cities in the Netherlands. The Duke of Alba, commander of the Spanish army could not prevent the uprising. Bril is the Dutch word for glasses, so on April 1, 1572, "Alba lost his glasses." The Dutch commemorate this with humor on the first of April.[citation needed] The Dutch (Ethnonym: Nederlanders meaning Lowlanders) are the dominant ethnic group[1] of the Netherlands[2]. They are usually seen as a Germanic people. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... The Watergeuzen (or simply Geuzen) were a fleet of privateers during the Eighty Years War, the Low Countries (or Netherlands) rebellion against the Spanish occupation, which began during the reign of Philip II of Spain (in the 1550s). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... Brielle, also called Den Briel, (population: 15,948 in 2004) is a town in the western Netherlands, in the province of South Holland. ... Fernando Álvarez de Toledo, Duke of Alba. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ...


Well-known pranks

  • Alabama Changes the Value of Pi: The April 1998 newsletter of New Mexicans for Science and Reason contained an article written by physicist Mark Boslough claiming that the Alabama Legislature had voted to change the value of the mathematical constant pi to the "Biblical value" of 3.0. This claim originally appeared as a news story in the 1961 science fiction novel Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein.[2]
  • Spaghetti trees: The BBC television programme Panorama ran a famous hoax in 1957, showing the Swiss harvesting spaghetti from trees. They had claimed that the despised pest the spaghetti weevil had been eradicated. A large number of people contacted the BBC wanting to know how to cultivate their own spaghetti trees. It was in fact filmed in St Albans.[3]
  • Left Handed Whoppers: In 1998, Burger King ran an ad in USA Today, saying that people could get a Whopper for left-handed people whose condiments were designed to drip out of the right side.[4] Not only did customers order the new burgers, but some specifically requested the "old", right-handed burger.[5]
  • Taco Liberty Bell: In 1996, Taco Bell took out a full-page advertisement in The New York Times announcing that they had purchased the Liberty Bell to "reduce the country's debt" and renamed it the "Taco Liberty Bell." When asked about the sale, White House press secretary Mike McCurry replied tongue-in-cheek that the Lincoln Memorial had also been sold and would henceforth be known as the Ford Lincoln Mercury Memorial.[6]
  • San Serriffe: The Guardian printed a supplement in 1977 praising this fictional resort, its two main islands (Upper Caisse and Lower Caisse), its capital (Bodoni), and its leader (General Pica). Intrigued readers were later disappointed to learn that San Serriffe (sans serif) did not exist except as references to typeface terminology. (This comes from a Jorge Luis Borges story.)[7]
  • Metric time: Repeated several times in various countries, this hoax involves claiming that the time system will be changed to one in which units of time are based on powers of 10.[8]
  • Smell-o-vision: In 1965, the BBC purported to conduct a trial of a new technology allowing the transmission of odor over the airwaves to all viewers. Many viewers reportedly contacted the BBC to report the trial's success. This hoax was also conducted by the Seven Network in Australia in 2005.[9] In 2007, the BBC website repeated an online version of the hoax.[10]
  • Movie Guru's Gotcha: Starting in 1992 movie companies began to hold back all movies that came out on April Fool's day. Due to the fact that April Fool's in not always on Tuesday this has only occurred twice.[citation needed]
  • Tower of Pisa: The Dutch television news reported once in the 1950s that the Tower of Pisa had fallen over. Many shocked people contacted the station.[11]
  • Write Only Memory: Signetics advertised Write Only Memory IC databooks in 1972 through the late 1970s.[12]
  • The Canadian news site bourque.org announced in 2002 that Finance Minister Paul Martin had resigned "in order to breed prize Charolais cattle and handsome Fawn Runner ducks."[13]
  • Annual BMW Innovations see a new "cutting-edge invention" by BMW advertised across British newspapers every year, examples including:
    • Warning against counterfeit BMWs: the blue and white parts of the logo were reversed
    • The "Toot and Calm Horn" (after Tutankhamun), which calms rather than aggravates other drivers, so reducing the risk of road rage,
    • MINI cars being used in upcoming space missions to Mars,
    • IDS ("Insect Deflector Screen") Technology - using elastic solutions to bounce insects off the windscreen as you drive,
    • SHEF ("Satellite Hypersensitive Electromagnetic Foodration") Technology, which sees the car's GPS systems synchronise with home appliances to perfectly cook a meal for the instant you return home,
    • Marque-Wiper - mini-wipers for each exterior "BMW" logo coming as standard on all future models,
    • "Uninventing the wheel" to counter the "EU ban" on right-hand drive cars,
    • Zoom Impression Pixels ("ZIP") to counter new "Slow Cameras" and,
    • "BMW Instant Messaging" - using Reactive User Sound Electronic (RUSE) particles to display the driver's words to the car in front on the windscreen.
    • A compact disc available to all BMW owners, which when played over the audio system performed minor service and diagnostic checks; when flipped over it played soothing classical music (Australia).
  • Sheng Long - Electronic Gaming Monthly's infamous hoax of a secret character in Street Fighter II.

Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Reason (disambiguation). ... Mark Boslough is a physicist most famous for his April Fools Day joke involving Pi. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... When a circles diameter is 1, its circumference is Ï€. Pi or Ï€ is the ratio of a circles circumference to its diameter in Euclidean geometry, approximately 3. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... For other uses, see Stranger in a Strange Land (disambiguation). ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... A photo of a woman harvesting spaghetti in the BBC programme The Spaghetti tree is a fictitious tree; a joke designed to fool those who do not know how spaghetti is produced. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Panorama is a long-running current affairs documentary series on BBC television, launched on 11 November 1953 and focusing on investigative journalism. ... Swiss may be: Related to Switzerland: the Swiss Confederation Swiss people Swiss cheese Swiss corporations Switzerland-related topics Named Swiss: Swiss, Missouri Swiss, North Carolina Swiss, West Virginia Swiss, Wisconsin Swiss International Air Lines Swiss Re SWiSS is also used as a disparaging nickname for the Socialist Workers Student Society. ... For other uses, see Spaghetti (disambiguation). ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35km) north of central London. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The Taco Liberty Bell was an April Fools Day joke played by fast food restaurant chain Taco Bell. ... Taco Bell Corp. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article is about the bell. ... Mike McCurry conducts a White House press conference Mike McCurry (born 27 October 1954) is best known as the former press secretary for Bill Clintons administration. ... The Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ... San Serriffe is a fictional island nation created for April Fools Day. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Majuscules or capital letters (in the Roman alphabet: A, B, C, ...) are one type of case in a writing system. ... Minuscule, or lower case, is the smaller form (case) of letters (in the Roman alphabet: a, b, c, ...). Originally alphabets were written entirely in majuscule (capital) letters which were spaced between well-defined upper and lower bounds. ... Facsimile of lines from Dantes Vita Nuova first published with Bodoni types by the Officina Bodoni in 1925. ... A pica (pronounced PIKE-ah, SAMPA /paIk@/) is a unit of measure traditionally used in document layout. ... San Serriffe is a fictional island nation created for April Fools Day. ... In typography, a sans-serif (or sans serif, sans, sans-surryphs) typeface is one that does not have the small features called serifs at the end of strokes. ... Borges redirects here. ... Metric time is the measure of time interval using the metric system, which defines the second as the base unit of time, and multiple and submultiple units formed with metric prefixes, such as kiloseconds and milliseconds. ... Smell-o-vision is the name given to a type of film where the viewer can smell what is happening in the movie. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Aroma redirects here. ... The Seven Network is an Australian television network, owned by the Seven Media Group. ... The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italian: ) or simply The Tower of Pisa (La Torre di Pisa) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... “WOM” redirects here. ... Signetics, once a major player in semiconductor manufacturing, made a variety of devices which included integrated circuits, bipolar and MOS, the Dolby circuit, logic, memory and analog circuits and Motorola clone CPUs, some of which were included in the first Atari video games. ... Integrated circuit of Atmel Diopsis 740 System on Chip showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery Microchips with a transparent window, showing the integrated circuit inside. ... Bourque Newswatch is a Canadian news website, run by journalist Pierre Bourque. ... The Minister of Finance is one of the most important positions in the Cabinet of Canada. ... For other uses, see Paul Martin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see BMW (disambiguation). ... King Tut redirects here. ... For the new MINI, see MINI (BMW). ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Sheng Long Sheng Long is a nonexistent character in the Street Fighter series, created by Electronic Gaming Monthly as an April Fools gag. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ... A secret character (not to be confused with an unseen character) is usually a playable character (though not always) in a video game that can only be played (or in some cases fought) by completing some task in the game. ... Street Fighter II ) is a 1991 competitive fighting game by Capcom. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly magazine is famous for April Fools Day jokes. ... Chun-Li (春麗) is a video game character created by Capcom. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... This article is about the character. ... Miles Prower ), better known by his nickname Tails ), is a video game character in the Sonic the Hedgehog series of video games, comics, and animated cartoons released by Sega. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Super Smash Bros. ... The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (or Zeruda no Densetsu: Kaze no Takuto in Japan) is the ninth game in the well-known The Legend of Zelda series of video games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

By radio stations

  • Space Shuttle Landing (2008) Real Radio (100-101fm) anounced on its breakfast show that an American Space Shuttle called 'Endeavour' was diverted to Cumbernauld airport! It has just returned from a 16 day mission to the International Space Station to attach a 50ft inspection pole when it had a few problems and the only airport that could accept the aircraft was Cumbernauld![14]
  • In 1982, Dutch radio broadcaster TROS seemed to experience problems during its TROS Top 50 apparent signal interference from a new, English language satellite radio station from Switzerland. Hundreds of people called in, only to learn later that it was all a hoax to introduce a new DJ, Kas van Iersel.
  • BBC Radio 2 (2004): The Jeremy Vine Show reported that Germany had dropped the Euro but, as the German Mark was no longer in existence, they were in negotiations to adopt the British pound. Outraged listeners called by the hundreds to say that such a move would be an assault on British sovereignty.[citation needed]
  • BBC Radio 4 (2005): The Today Programme announced in the news that the long-running serial The Archers had changed their theme tune to an upbeat disco style.[15]
  • Kiss FM: In the early 1990s the London radio station announced the moon would come crashing to earth. Various experts refuted this along with many callers.
  • CBC Radio 1 (2001): The Sunday Edition's Michael Enright conducted a telephone interview with Jimmy Carter on the topic of the United States-Canada softwood lumber dispute. At one point Enright asked Carter (who was actually being played by a Canadian actor), "How did a washed up peanut farmer from Hicksville such as yourself get involved in such a sophisticated bilateral trade argument?" The interview went downhill from there and ended with "Carter" terminating the interview and hanging up.
  • Death of a mayor: In 1998, local WAAF shock jocks Opie and Anthony reported that Boston mayor Thomas Menino had been killed in a car accident. Menino happened to be on a flight at the time, lending credence to the prank as he could not be reached. The rumor spread quickly across the city, eventually causing news stations to issue alerts denying the hoax. The pair were fired shortly thereafter.[16]
  • Free concert: Radio station 98.1 KISS in Chattanooga, Tennessee falsely announced in 2003 that rapper Eminem would be doing a free show in a discount store parking lot. Several police were needed to deal with traffic gridlock and enraged listeners who threatened to harm the DJs responsible. Both DJs were later jailed for creating a public nuisance. Also, radio station WAAF 107.3 in Boston announced that Pearl Jam was having a free concert in a fictitious city in New Hampshire. A gas station in New Hampshire reported that several streams of car drivers stopped in asking for directions to the fictional town.
  • New format: Radio station KFOG in San Francisco, claiming new corporate ownership, switched to a new format - the best 15 seconds of every song. All morning they mixed in false calls from perky listeners calling with compliments. This hoax can also be considered a parody of late 1990s media consolidations.
  • Phone call: In 1998, UK presenter Nic Tuff of West Midlands radio station Kix 96 pretended to be the British Prime Minister Tony Blair when he called the then South African President Nelson Mandela for a chat. It was only at the end of the call when Nic asked Nelson what he was doing for April Fool's Day that the line went dead.[17]
  • New format: in 1998, radio station KITS in San Francisco played gay-themed songs and changed its call letters to "KGAY" for an hour.
  • Sydney Olympics (1): Australian radio station Triple J breakfast show co-host Adam Spencer announced in 1999 that he had a journalist on the line at the site of a secret IOC meeting and that Sydney had lost the 2000 Summer Olympics. New South Wales Premier Bob Carr was also in on the joke. Mainstream media (including Channel 9's Today Show) picked up the story.
  • Sydney Olympics (2): Australian radio station Triple M breakfast show The Cage announced in 2002 that Athens had lost the 2004 Summer Olympics because they couldn't be ready in time and that Sydney would have to host it again.
  • Jovian-Plutonian gravitational effect: In 1976, British astronomer Sir Patrick Moore told listeners of BBC Radio 2 that unique alignment of two planets would result in an upward gravitational pull making people lighter at precisely 9:47 a.m. that day. He invited his audience to jump in the air and experience "a strange floating sensation." Dozens of listeners phoned in to say the experiment had worked.
  • Shuttle landing: In 1993, a San Diego radio station fooled many listeners into believing that the space shuttle had been diverted from Edwards Air Force Base and was about to make an emergency landing at a small local airport.
  • Cancellation of the Howard Stern Show: The April 1st, 2004 show started off with an announcement by the station manager stating that due to increased pressure from the FCC, Viacom had cancelled The Howard Stern Show. The station played pop songs until 7:00 am, when Stern came back on.
  • Change of drinking age: On the Gold Coast, Australia's biggest tourist destination (particularly amongst schoolies), radio station Sea FM announced the drinking age would be changed from 18 to 21. This left a huge number of under-21s angry and frustrated, and incited protests. It was later announced at the Sea FM dance party that it was a hoax.
  • Second Audio Program (SAP): In 2005, Micky Dolenz told listeners WCBS-FM was broadcasting in foreign languages, and they could make use of the SAP Language control. Callers to the radio station were told that if you didn't have an SAP button, then twist the antenna a bit.
  • Tsunami warning and intense storm: In 2005, Estonian Radio's station, Vikerraadio, perpetrated a hoax during a broadcast of their morning program Vikerhommik, right after the 9 o'clock news. Station said that Finland had been put under a tsunami warning and that the waves were expected to be more than 5 meters high. They also said that Estonia was expecting heavy storms and that Finland might be subjected to hurricane force winds. Hosts also said that they were looking at real satellite imagery, and that it showed intense cyclones in Northern Europe. It was immediately proven to be hoax after a quick look at the weather maps.
  • Theft of a Locomotive: In 2006, a Cheyenne, Wyoming radio station reported to listeners that during the previous night, a Union Pacific 4-8-8-4 "Big Boy" steam locomotive was stolen from Holliday Park. Although the locomotive weighed more than 550 tons (500 tonnes) and had no tracks connecting it to any nearby railroad, thus making its theft near-impossible, several listeners fell for the joke and went to investigate. The road that overlooks the park was jammed for hours as people realized that it was a hoax, and the locomotive was still on display in the park.
  • "The Great Iceberg" On April 1, 1978 a barge appeared in Sydney Harbour towing a giant iceberg. Dick Smith, a local adventurer and millionaire businessman, had been loudly promoting his scheme to tow an iceberg from Antarctica for quite some time. Now he had apparently succeeded. He said that he was going to carve the berg into small ice cubes, which he would sell to the public for ten cents each. These well-traveled cubes, fresh from the pure waters of Antarctica, were promised to improve the flavor of any drink they cooled. Slowly the iceberg made its way into the harbor. Local radio stations provided excited blow-by-blow coverage of the scene. Only when the berg was well into the harbor was its secret revealed. It started to rain, and the firefighting foam and shaving cream that the berg was really made of washed away, uncovering the white plastic sheets beneath.
  • "National Public Radio" Every year National Public Radio in the United States does an extensive news story on April 1st. These usually start off more or less reasonably, and get more and more unusual. A recent example is the story on the "iBod" a portable body control device. It also runs false sponsor mentions, such as "Support for NPR comes from the Soylent Corporation, manufacturing protein-rich food products in a variety of colors. Soylent Green is People.”
  • "Michael Jackson moves to Birmingham" In 2007, West Midlands radio station 100.7 Heart FM reported that newspapers were claiming that Michael Jackson had moved to the region. A station employee posed as a caller into the radio station, claiming he'd seen Jackson walking through Birmingham, and filmed it. Presenters Ed James and Hellon Wheels directed listeners to the website to watch the video, only for it to show James doing a caricature-like impersonation of the singer. Meanwhile, angry listeners telephoned the station to register their disapproval of such a controversial figure moving to the Midlands.
  • 95.5 WBRU FM Becomes "Buddy FM": On March 31, 2006, WBRU claimed to be sold for two million dollars to Initech (a reference to the 1999 film Office Space) and changed the format of the station from alternative rock to "Buddy FM" - mainstream popular music. It was later found out to be an April fools joke, and, as of noon on April 1, 2006, WBRU had "regained" control of their radio station and began playing their normal playlist once again. Later that day, they confirmed that they were back to being WBRU, and that Buddy FM was no longer functioning.
  • "97.3FM" in Brisbane, Australia reported the polluted Brisbane River to be a shining blue on April 1st, 2005. This was said to have been caused by a rare movement of the moon, causing high tides and the sea water to run upstream to the river to give it clean blue water. Multiple personalities were in on the joke and interviewed through the morning, and calls were screened so that those living by the river didn't ruin the joke. Some listeners even called in reporting how beautiful it was to see the river unpolluted and clear!
  • The Doug & Kim Show on 94FM The Fish in Nashville, TN reported in 2008 that due to pending legal action, they were no longer allowed to refer to their show as "Doug & Kim." For the day, the show was referred to as "The Alexander & Renee Show" which replaced the hosts' middle names for their first names. The radio station went as far as to record new intros and seques for the show as well as creating a website for viewers to show their support.

In Greek mythology, King Tros of Dardania, son of Erichthonius from whom he inherited the throne and the father of three named sons: Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymedes. ... Jeremy Vine (born May 17, 1965, Epsom, Surrey) is an English current affairs presenter on BBC radio and television. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... This article refers to the BBC Today programme, for the NBC Today Show see The Today Show Today, commonly referred to as the Today programme in order to avoid ambiguity, is BBC Radio 4s long-running early morning news and current affairs programme, which is now broadcast from 6am... The Archers is a British radio soap opera broadcast on the BBCs main spoken-word channel, Radio 4. ... KISS-FM (99. ... Michael Enright is a Canadian radio broadcaster. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... The United States-Canada softwood lumber dispute is one of the most significant and enduring trade disputes in modern history. ... WAAF 107. ... A shock jock is a slang term used to describe a type of radio broadcaster (sometimes a disk jockey) who attracts attention using humor that a significant portion of the listening audience may find offensive. ... Opie (Gregg Hughes, b. ... Boston redirects here. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... “Chattanooga” redirects here. ... Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ... Nuisance is a common law tort. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the rock group. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... San Francisco redirects here. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Concentration of media ownership (also known as media consolidation or media convergence) is a commonly used term among media critics, policy makers, and others to characterize ownership structure of media industries. ... The West Midlands is an official Region of England, covering the western half of the Midlands. ... Touch FM is a radio station broadcasting to Coventry in the United Kingdom. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... For other people named Mandela, or other uses, see Mandela. ... KITS is a San Francisco, California, USA-based radio station broadcasting at 105. ... Double J redirects here. ... Adam Spencer is an Australian radio DJ and media personality. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ... A premier is an executive official of government. ... For other people of the same name, see Bob Carr (disambiguation). ... The Nine Network, or Channel Nine, is an Australian television network based in Willoughby, a suburb on the North Shore of Sydney. ... This article is about the radio station network. ... The Cage is the name of two different breakfast shows on Australian radio network Triple M, broadcasting in Melbourne and Brisbane. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... This article is about Patrick Moore, the astronomer. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and is by far the most popular station in the UK, reaching some 27% of the available audience in 2006[1]. It broadcasts throughout the UK on FM radio between 88 and 91 MHz from its studios in... Edwards Air Force Base (IATA: EDW, ICAO: KEDW) is a United States Air Force airbase located on the border of Kern County and Los Angeles County, California in the Antelope Valley, 7 miles (11 km) due east of Rosamond. ... FCC redirects here. ... Viacom (NYSE: VIA) (NYSE: VIAb) is an American media conglomerate with various worldwide interests in cable and satellite television networks (MTV Networks and BET), and movie production and distribution (the Paramount Pictures and DreamWorks movie studios). ... This article is about the radio show hosted by Howard Stern. ... Gold Coast redirects here. ... Schoolies or Schoolies week (known as Leavers or Leavers week in Western Australia) refers to the Australian tradition of high-school graduates (known as Schoolies or Leavers) having week-long holidays following the end of their final exams in late November and early December. ... George Michael Dolenz, Jr. ... Nickname: Location in Wyoming Coordinates: , Country State County Laramie Founded 1867 Government  - Mayor Jack R. Spiker Area  - Total 21. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Big Boy was the nickname given to the Union Pacific Railroads twenty-five 4000 class 4-8-8-4 steam locomotives built between 1941 and 1944 by Alco. ... The short ton is a unit of mass equal to 907. ... This article is about the metric tonne. ... This article is about the Australian entrepreneur. ... NPR redirects here. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Soylent Green is a classic 1973 science fiction movie starring Charlton Heston, Edward G. Robinson, Joseph Cotten and Chuck Connors. ... For the metal band, see Soilent Green. ... Michael Joseph Jackson (August 29, 1958), commonly known as MJ as well as the King of Pop, is an American musician, entertainer, and pop icon whose successful career and controversial personal life have been a part of pop culture for the last three decades. ... This article is about the British city. ... The West Midlands is an official Region of England, covering the western half of the Midlands. ... 100. ... Ed James is the host of Heart Breakfast with Ed James on West Midlands Radio Station 100. ... Hellon Wheels also known as Helen Kennedy (born Helen Meacham on 29 October 1973) is currently the co-host of of the Sunday morning Heart Breakfast with Ed James on 100. ... WBRU is a commercial radio station in Providence, Rhode Island that broadcasts on 95. ... Office Space is a 1999 comedy film written and directed by Mike Judge, partially based on his 1991 animated short films of the same name. ... Office Space is an American comedy film written and directed by Mike Judge. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...

By television stations

  • After 50 years, the 1957 BBC report of the purported bumper annual spaghetti harvest (see Spaghetti trees above) remains one of the most successful TV hoaxes of all time.
  • In April 2006, the "Best Damn Sports Show Period" staged a fight between Tom Arnold and Michael Strahan. On Friday March 31st the show went off the air as Tom Arnold was wrestling NY Giant's defensive end Michael Strahan to the ground over comments Tom made in a tell-all book. Strahan pretended to be very hurt by screaming and clutching his shoulder as the cameras cut to black. It fooled cast members Rodney Peete and Rob Dibble enough to have them intervene in the fight. Rodney Peete went so far as to give Tom rabbit punches while he broke up what he thought was a real fight. It also worked enough to fool the popular internet site "deadspin.com" into reporting it as a real event.
  • In 2005, TV 3 Estonia broadcasted a news story, where the station claimed that thanks to a new technology, they knew exactly how much they are being viewed at the moment. They also asked viewers to put a coin against their TV screens if they liked the running broadcast.
  • Swiss network TSR (Télévision Suisse Romande), broadcast a hoax report every year, usually at the end of the 19.30 news. For example, in 2005, they reported that instead of being helicoptered out when a person is injured while skiing, they are parachuted down the mountain. In 2006, it was that the town of Fribourg was planning to make people release their handbrakes in designated areas, so that if parking spaces were too tight, all people would have to do was to call for the police and they would push the car.
  • The night-time channel Adult Swim has had several pranks over the years.
    • There was no prank in 2005 because it fell on a Friday, but in 2004, mustaches were drawn on characters during the shows.
    • In 2006, the channel significantly changed its programming. InuYasha was replaced by the 1980s cartoon Karate Kommandos starring Chuck Norris, while Neon Genesis Evangelion was replaced by Boo Boo Runs Wild and Cowboy Bebop was replaced by Mister T. Full Metal Alchemist and Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C. 2nd GIG had their episodes edited so characters farted throughout the show, although they showed an unedited version of the Ghost in the Shell episode later in the night.
    • In 2007, which also fell on a Sunday, Adult Swim once again had a revised schedule. The station played only Perfect Hair Forever starting at midnight. The first episode shown was actually the premiere of the show's second season. After that, season 1 was rebroadcast in modified form, made to resemble old VHS fansubs,in one episode the subs oddly turned into a script from Aqua Teen Hunger Force.. Throughout the night the station also had short clips entitled "Fan Service Moments" in which they showed short shots of scantily clad anime girls. Adult Swim also ran commercials saying that Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters would air 10 PM on April 1st, almost two weeks before its scheduled theatrical release date. They actually did, in fact, play the movie, however it was in a box in the bottom-left corner of the screen during the channel's regular programming. The box the movie was played in was too small to be viewed and the sound was that of the regular show. However, the channel did play the opening scene of the movie on the full screen with sound.
    • In 2008, sneak previews of upcoming shows A Young Person's Guide to History, Delocated, Superjail and Fat Guy Stuck in Internet aired, along with new episodes of Metalocalypse, Venture Bros, Moral Orel, and Robot Chicken.
  • On April Fools' Day, 1997, Cartoon Network ran the 1944 Screwy Squirrel cartoon Happy-Go-Nutty repeatedly from 6 AM to 6 PM, suggesting that the cartoon character had taken over the network.
  • In 2002, Toonami showed 4 episodes of Batman: The Animated Series featuring The Joker, suggesting that the villain had taken over the block by using his Joker virus to infect the computer system on board the Absolution.
  • In 1989, Seattle area TV program Almost Live! set up a phony broadcast room and dressed up actors as TV anchors to pull an April Fools' joke explaining that the Space Needle had collapsed in a windstorm.
  • The BBC's Saturday lunchtime show Football Focus broadcast a piece centred on the upcoming change of the size of goals. Using West Ham United manager, Harry Redknapp, the report claimed that the size of the goals would increase by two feet in height and four feet in length. Redknapp was being 'interviewed' on the training ground where his goalkeepers were getting to grips with bigger goals. They told the truth on the following week's show, where outtakes of Redknapp messing up his lines were also shown. The BBC's Grandstand sports magazine programme once featured a dispute between two production staff that turned into a fight, while the presenter continued oblivious to the scuffle behind him.
  • In 1998, the Channel 4 morning show The Big Breakfast got into trouble with various authorities[citation needed] for pulling an April Fools stunt showing video footage of the Millennium Dome on fire.
  • In 2004, MTV's Total Request Live reported that the band Simple Plan was breaking up. Lead Singer Pierre Bouvier even called in and claimed that constant fighting had led to the break-up. "Things have been said and lines have been crossed. It's hard to forget things. For the moment now I just really can't stand being around those guys. I just need some time to relax," he told viewers. Throughout the show, VJs Damien Fahey and Quddus took calls from distraught fans about the band's break-up. However, at the end of the show, Bouvier called back to confess that it was all just an elaborate April Fool's Day prank. "So you're not breaking up?" asked Fahey. "Are you kidding me? No, man. How the hell could we break up? We couldn't do that. I love those guys," Bouvier replied. TRL carried out a similar prank on April Fool's Day of 2002 when Kevin Richardson of the Backstreet Boys was a guest host. He opened the show by saying that the group had decided to go their separate ways, at which point many of the girls in the audience began to cry. "Before we get started, though, I want to take a minute to clear up some things. There's been a lot of rumors going around about Backstreet and our future and what's going on. Since I'm hosting today, the rest of the guys thought it would be a good idea while I was on here that I cleared up all those rumours and allegations. Uhm, as of today, the fellas and I will no longer be performing together," Richardson said. "I'm joining a punk rock band and Nick's doing a solo album and, uh, we'll get into that a bit later," he went on to say before revealing it was just an April Fool's joke.
  • The 1977 British documentary Alternative 3 was originally intended as an April Fools' Day hoax and the date of April 1, 1977 is specifically given in the program's credits. This documentary detailed the discovery of a major cover-up involving the American and Soviet Space Agencies, who had been collaborating on plans to make the moon and Mars habitable in the event of a terminal environmental catastrophe on Earth. The program gave birth to a large number of conspiracy theories.
  • In 1979 the BBC programme That's Life!, which often featured talented pets, fooled many viewers with its story about an Old English sheepdog that could drive a car.
  • In 1962, all times most famous April joke in Sweden was performed. A well-known TV person in the SVT said with a fully serious voice that one could get colour images from a black-and-white TV set by covering the image with a nylon stocking. Thousands of people tried that.
  • In 1991, during the time block of the student comedy show Coo-Coo, the Bulgarian National Television airs breaking news that “...the situation in the nuclear power plant of Kolzoduj is fully under control.” This brings back memories of the communist censorship during the reporting of the Chernobyl disaster half a decade earlier. 90% of the viewers are convinced that reactor No.4 in Kozloduj has exploded. The authors of the comedy show are later accused of manipulating the public in order to destabilize the Bulgarian government.
  • NESN, a New England sports network, announced that Tom Brady, the quarterback for the New England Patriots, had resigned, and that he would become a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox.
  • South Park: April 1st, 1998 was advertised as being the premiere of the show's second season — and also the resolution of a cliffhanger where Eric Cartman was about to discover the identity of his father. Fans spent weeks speculating on the father's identity, but when they tuned in to watch it they were instead treated to Terrance and Phillip in Not Without My Anus, a half-hour of Terrance and Phillip fart jokes. The true resolution to the cliffhanger aired several weeks later. The show's creators, Trey Parker and Matt Stone claim during the DVD introduction to this episode that they received death threats over pulling the prank.
  • The Trouble with Tracy: In 2003, The Comedy Network in Canada announced that it would produce and air a remake of the 1970s Canadian sitcom The Trouble with Tracy. The original series is widely considered to be one of the worst sitcoms ever produced. Several media outlets fell for the hoax.[18]
  • When the movie Volcano, starring Tommy Lee Jones, came out, a TV station prepared scenes from the movie to run as if they were an actual news broadcast. At the end of the report stating that a volcano had erupted in the middle of Los Angeles and that the city was completely engulfed in flames, the announcer added that it was all an April Fools' prank.
  • Going Live!: In the 90's, Phillip Schofield did a section on a new type of music player that had every top 40 single loaded into it, that could play a song just by speaking the name of the song into it. He said it would be available to buy soon. He invited viewers to ring in and request a song, Then he would ask the machine to play it. The studio was of course inundated with calls, and Phillip revealed later that it was a prank and the machine didn't exist.
  • In 2008, the BBC reported on a newly discovered colony of flying penguins.[19]

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... A photo of a woman harvesting spaghetti in the BBC programme The Spaghetti tree is a fictitious tree; a joke designed to fool those who do not know how spaghetti is produced. ... The Best Damn Sports Show, Period is a sports talk show on Fox Sports Net. ... Thomas Arnold (born March 6, 1959) is an American actor and comedian. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rodney Peete (born March 16, 1966 in Mesa, Arizona) was an American Football quarterback from the University of Southern California. ... Rob Dibble pitching for the Cincinnati Reds in 1991 Robert Keith Dibble (born January 24, 1964 in Bridgeport, Connecticut) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Rodney Peete (born March 16, 1966 in Mesa, Arizona) was an American Football quarterback from the University of Southern California. ... A rabbit punch also known as a Coleman Punch is a punch to the neck or to the base of the skull. ... TSR 1 and TSR 2 are French-language TV channels in Switzerland, part of SRG SSR idée suisse. ... Fribourg (French), (German: or , often Fribourg) is the capital of the Swiss canton of Fribourg and the district of Sarine. ... Adult Swim is the name for an adult-oriented television programming network. ... A moustache (sometimes spelled mustache in the United States) is an outgrowth of hair above the upper lip. ... InuYasha, a Feudal Fairy Tale redirects here. ... Karate Kommandos is an American animated television series from the 80s. ... Carlos Ray Chuck Norris (born on 10 March 1940) is an American martial artist, action star, Hollywood actor, and recently, an internet phenomenon, who is best known for playing Cordell Walker on Walker, Texas Ranger. ... Original run October 4, 1995 – March 27, 1996 No. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Original run April 3, 1998 – April 23, 1999 Episodes 26 Movie: Knockin on Heavens Door (天国の扉) Director Shinichiro Watanabe Writer Keiko Nobumoto Studio Sunrise BONES Bandai Visual[2] Released September 1, 2001 Runtime 115 min. ... Mister T was a animated series aired on NBC in 1983 starring Mr. ... Fullmetal Alchemist DVD cover by FUNimation Fullmetal Alchemist (鋼の錬金術師, Hagane no Renkinjutsushi in the original Japanese) is a 51-episode anime TV series which ran in Japan from October 4, 2003 to October 2, 2004. ... Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C. 2nd GIG (japanese title: 攻殻機動隊 S.A.C. 2nd GIG) is the second season from Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex. ... This article is about the word fart itself. ... Perfect Hair Forever is an American comedy animated television series produced by Williams Street and airing on the Adult Swim television block. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Fansub - short for fan subtitled; a copy of a foreign movie or television show (most often anime) which has been subtitled by fans into their native language. ... Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters (aka Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters for DVD for the DVD release, Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie Film for Theaters Television for the April Fools Day television premiere, and abbreviated as ATHFCMFFT or ATHF:MFFT) is... Screwball Squirrel. ... For the former television channel in the United Kingdom of the same name, see Toonami (UK). ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Seattle redirects here. ... See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band European networks National In much of Europe television broadcasting has historically been state dominated, rather than commercially organised, although commercial stations have grown in number recently. ... Almost Live! was a local sketch comedy television show in Seattle, Washington, USA, produced and broadcast by NBC affiliate KING-TV from 1984 to 1999. ... A phony is a person who relies on a false persona, deceit, or putting on an act to achieve his or her goals, or ideal perception of self, as opposed to acting how one feels. ... Space Needle from Volunteer Park The Space Needle is a tower in Seattle, Washington. ... A windstorm is a severe weather condition indicated by high winds. ... Manish Bhasin, Alan Shearer, Les Ferdinand and Mark Lawrenson (from left to right). ... The West Ham United Crest West Ham United F.C are a professional English football club based in East London. ... Henry James Harry Redknapp (born March 2, 1947) is an English former footballer who has had a long career in football management and is the current manager of Portsmouth in the English Premier League. ... Grandstand is a British television sport programme, and is one of the BBCs longest running sports shows, alongside BBC Sports Personality of the Year. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Lockkeepers Cottages, in Old Ford Lock, used as the studio for The Big Breakfast The Big Breakfast was a British light entertainment television show shown on Channel 4 each weekday morning from 28 September 1992 until 29 March 2002. ... This article is about the Millennium Dome before its redevelopment and renaming to The O2 in 2005. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... TRL redirects here. ... This article is about the French Canadian rock band. ... Pierre Charles Bouvier (born May 9, 1979) is a Québécois musician, who is best known as the lead singer for the Canadian pop punk band Simple Plan. ... Damien Richard Fahey (born June 1, 1980) is an MTV VJ. Fahey grew up in Chicopee, Massachusetts, and moved to the town of Longmeadow, Massachusetts during the summer of 1992. ... Quddús was the name given to Mullá Muhammad Alí-i-Bárfurúsh by the Báb meaning The Most Holy. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Kevin Scott Richardson (born October 3, 1971 in Lexington, Kentucky) is a member of The Backstreet Boys. ... This article is about the band. ... Alternative 3 is a television programme, broadcast in the UK in 1977. ... Thats Life! was a television magazine-style series on BBC between 1973 and 1994, presented by Esther Rantzen throughout the entire run, with various changes of co-presenters. ... The Old English Sheepdog is a breed of dog used for herding livestock, and as a pet. ... Sveriges Television- Swedish Television Ford Special Vehicle Team Supraventricular tachycardia Samozaryadnaya Vintovka Tokareva, a WW2 semi-automatic rifle Categories: Disambiguation ... Bulgarian National Television is a Bulgarian language public television station founded in 1959 which began broadcast on December 26. ... This article is about the city of Chernobyl. ... Thomas Edward Brady, Jr. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... This article is about the TV series. ... Eric Theodore Cartman, commonly referred to by his family name, Cartman, is one of the five main characters in the animated series South Park (the others being Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, Kenny McCormick and Butters Stotch). ... Terrance and Phillip in Not Without My Anus is the 14th episode of Comedy Centrals animated series South Park. ... The Trouble with Tracy was a Canadian television series produced by CTV for the 1971–1972 television season. ... The Comedy Network (TCN) is a Canadian cable television specialty channel owned by CTV Television Inc. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Going Live! was a Saturday morning magazine show, broadcast on BBC1 between 1987 and 1993. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Modern genera Aptenodytes Eudyptes Eudyptula Megadyptes Pygoscelis Spheniscus For prehistoric genera, see Systematics Some penguins are curious. ...

By magazines, newspapers, and books

  • George Plimpton wrote a 1985 article in Sports Illustrated about a New York Mets prospect named Sidd Finch, who could throw a 168 mph (270 km/h) fastball with pinpoint accuracy. This kid, known as "Barefoot" Sidd[hartha] Finch, reportedly learned to pitch in a Buddhist monastery. The first letter of each word in the article subhead spelled out the fact of its being an April Fool joke.[20]
  • In April 1990, the British magazine Classic CD announced the discovery of the first recording ever made : Frederic Chopin himself interpreting his minute waltz. This event followed the discovery of 3 glass cylinders and a letter discovered buried in a garden next to Chopin’s house in Montfort l’Amaury (France). In that letter, an inventor wrote he had built a recording device in the year 1849 (several years before the phonograph was invented). The sound was inscribed into tracks by a stylus and a vibrating membrane on a lamp-blackened glass cylinder. He asked his neighbour Frederic Chopin to record some music for him. But since he could not play back the sound, he buried it in his garden and died anonymously. The magazine Classic CD offered a CD on which one could hear a dim and muffled music, dominated by a repeating grinding noise that sounded like Chopin playing. The next month the readers learned that the music was played in a room next to the recorder. The tempo was modified so that it would last just one minute, and the hypnotic grinding noise was made by scratching the microphone with a fingernail.
  • In 2005, the Maryville Daily Forum newspaper in Maryville, Mo., published an entirely fake front page on April 1. Stories detailed a plan to drain a local lake to find the city manager's lucky golf ball; the city's efforts to annex the entire town from Missouri into Iowa; and the arrest of the newspaper's publisher for smoking a cigar in a restaurant (only a few months after a city-wide no-smoking ban was put into effect). Page 2 of that day's newspaper proclaimed "APRIL FOOLS!" across the top of the page, followed by that day's real news stories. The newspaper received hundreds of phone calls that day from readers who thought the stories were real, and Maryville City Hall also received dozens of phone calls from citizens outraged that the city would drain a lake or annex into Iowa.
  • Lies to Get You Out of the House: In 1985, the L.A. Weekly printed an entire page of fake things to do on April Fools day, by which hundreds of people were fooled.[21]
  • Comic strip switcheroo: Cartoonists of popularly syndicated comic strips draw each others' strips. In some cases, the artist draws characters in the other strip's milieu, while in others, the artist draws in characters from other visiting characters from his own. Cartoonists have done this sort of "switcheroo" for several years. The 1997 switch was particularly widespread.[22]
  • Coldplay to back the Tories - On April 1 2006 the UK Guardian journalist "Olaf Priol" claimed that Chris Martin of rock band Coldplay had decided to publicly support the UK Conservative Party leader David Cameron due to his disillusionment with previous Labour Party prime minister Tony Blair,[23] even going so far as to produce a fake song, "Talk to David", that could be downloaded via the Guardian website.[24] Despite being an obvious hoax, the Labour Party's Media Monitoring Unit were concerned enough to circulate the story throughout "most of the government".[25]
  • Discover Magazine frequently runs one fake article in their April edition as an April Fool's joke. The articles are often so outrageous that they are hard to miss, yet the next month's issue frequently has angry letters from readers who feel misled or quote bad science. Examples have included the discovery of the "Bigon"[4] (a subatomic particle the size of a bowling ball) and of the "Hotheaded Naked Ice Borer" (an Antarctic predator resembling a Naked Mole Rat that burrows through ice).

George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, editor, and actor. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (current) (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major... Sidd Finch was the subject of a notorious article by George Plimpton in the April 1, 1985 issue of Sports Illustrated. ... For the American band of the same name, see Fastball (band). ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... This article is about the year. ... The L.A. Weekly is a weekly free paper in Los Angeles. ... The comic strip Dilbert as drawn by Family Circus Bil Keane on April Fools Day 1997. ... A cartoonist at work. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... This article is about the Coldplay musician. ... This article is about the genre. ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who perform instrumental or vocal music. ... Coldplay are an English rock band. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... For the Canadian ice hockey player, see Dave Cameron. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Discover Magazine is a science magazine that publishes articles about science. ... Hotheaded Naked Ice Borer The Hotheaded Naked Ice Borer is a fictional animal invented by Discover magazine as an April Fools Day joke. ... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... Binomial name Rüppell, 1842 Distribution of the Naked Mole Rat The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber), also known as the sand puppy, or desert mole rat, is a burrowing rodent native to parts of East Africa and the only species currently classified in genus Heterocephalus. ...

By game shows

  • As part of an April Fools' joke on April 1, 1997, Alex Trebek and Pat Sajak switched hosting duties. Pat hosted Jeopardy! that day and Alex hosted Wheel of Fortune where Sajak and Vanna White played as contestants. Jeopardy! announcer Johnny Gilbert did double duties that day.[26]
  • The Price is Right notoriously gave away April Fools' day themed showcases in the 1980s featuring assortments of gag prizes (such as trips to made up locations) or by staging the entire showcase to fall apart. However, once the deception was revealed, the real showcase the contestant was to bid on usually consisted of extravagant prizes, such as two new cars. This practice was revived in 2008.[27]
  • In 2003, Hollywood Squares producers played an April Fools joke on host Tom Bergeron and the stars by booking two of the most difficult contestants ever. The contestants were in fact actors.[2]
  • In a famous edition of the British version of The Weakest Link transmitted on April Fools' Day 2006 Anne Robinson surprised the contestants by being initially very pleasant to them. However, after a period she reverted to her usual haranguing self stating that "I can't be bothered with this anymore".

Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... Pat Sajak (born Patrick Leonard Sajdak on October 26, 1946), is an Emmy Award-winning television personality and one-time talk show host, best known as the host of the popular and long-running American television game show, Wheel of Fortune. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ... Wheel of Fortune is an American television game show originally devised by Merv Griffin, who also created Jeopardy!. The show debuted as a daytime program on NBC on January 6, 1975. ... Vanna White (born Vanna Marie Rosich on February 18, 1957 is a American television personality, best known as the hostess and puzzle board operator on the long-running game show Wheel of Fortune. ... Johnny Gilbert (born July 13, 1924 in Newport News, Virginia) is a prolific American television game show announcer, best known for his over 20-year association with TVs Jeopardy!. His other credits include Sports Challenge, Camouflage, Chain Reaction, Go, Blackout, Card Sharks, Family Feud, The $25,000 Pyramid, and... The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Weakest Link (known as Weakest Link in many countries) is a television game show which first appeared in the United Kingdom on BBC Two on 14 August 2000. ... This article is about the English television hostess. ...

By websites

The 2008 April Fools version of Wikipedia
The 2008 April Fools version of Wikipedia
  • Polar Bear Conservancy 2008 Grist reports a Seattle-based nonprofit is preparing to relocate polar bears to Antarctica to protect them from climate change.
  • StreetPrices 2008 released its entire product guide on paper, delivered every half hour.
  • Kremvax: In 1984, in one of the earliest on-line hoaxes, a message was circulated that Usenet had been opened to users in the Soviet Union.[28]
  • April Fools' Day RFC
  • Google's hoaxes
  • Dead fairy hoax: In 2007, an illusion designer for magicians posted on his website some images illustrating the corpse of an unknown eight-inch creation, which was claimed to be the mummified remains of a fairy. He later sold the fairy on eBay for £280.[29]
  • RISKS Digest publishes a special April 1st issue.
  • Slashdot unveiled a new pink "OMG PONIES" theme in 2006. [3]
  • NationStates runs an annual hoax on April 1st. In 2004, the hoax was that there was a population bug and all nations' populations would be reset to 5 million people. In 2005, there was a message (supposedly from the Department of Homeworld Security) that NationStates was illegal by US law. In 2006, 'NationDates' was created. It used a quiz similar to the one taken at the sign-up page, and matched that nation with a random country in the same region. In 2007, many users received "Regional moderator" icons with the promise that they would be able to "wield their awesome power" over other users. For April Fools' Day 2008, NationStates has created a new "World Assembly" in the place of the United Nations, which "has spectacularly imploded in a colossal fireball of extra-dimensional inanity".[30]
  • Neopets has performed numerous April Fools' jokes, including releasing 50 new pets, abolishing Neopoints completely, and charging Neopoints to use the site.
  • Water on Mars: In 2005 a news story was posted on the official NASA website purporting to have pictures of water on Mars. The picture actually was just a picture of a glass of water on a Mars Candy Bar.[31]
  • Homestar Runner creators, The Brothers Chaps, now regularly put up April Fools' jokes, such as the most recent one in which the entire site was flipped upside-down.
  • Microsoft Research Reclaims Value of Pi: In 2008, an executive with the Microsoft Institute for Advanced Technology in Governments posted on his personal blog an updated spoof of the 1998 Aprils Fool hoax claiming Alabama's state legislature had rounded the value of pi to the "Biblical value of 3." The 2008 hoax claimed that Microsoft Research had determined the true-up value of pi to be a definitive 3.141999, or as expressed in company literature, “Three easy payments of 1.047333.”[32]
  • Assassination of Bill Gates: In 2003, many Chinese and South Korean websites claimed that CNN reported Bill Gates, the founder of Microsoft, was assassinated, resulting in a 1.5% drop in the Korean stock market.[33]
  • Throughout production of the 2005 remake of King Kong, director Peter Jackson produced behind-the-scenes featurettes for the Internet providing updates on the project. On April 1, 2005, Jackson (aided by cast members, crew members, and even a studio representative) announced that King Kong would be followed by a sequel, Son of Kong, which would see Kong's offspring battling Nazis after being equipped with shoulder mounted machine guns. Jackson went so far as to have faux production drawings and computer animation test footage created for the film. The joke report was later included on the Peter Jackson's Production Diaries DVD set but was not identified as an April Fools' joke; it is incumbent upon the viewer to notice the date of the installment.
  • Rock band Tool publishes an April Fools' joke every year on their website [4]. For example, in 2005 Tool announced that their singer Maynard James Keenan had found religion and quit the music business. Also in 1997, a serious tour bus crash was reported to have taken place.
  • Andrew Carlssin was a hoax created by the Weekly World News about a time-traveling man, that was later printed on Yahoo News as an April Fools' Joke.
  • Maddox once pulled an infamous April Fools' Day joke on April 1, 2004, on his site, The Best Page In The Universe. The site had a completely different design, including imagery that represents everything he usually is against, and also misspelling several words and using chat-based acronyms such as "LOL" all throughout. However, each page's address featured an 'af' in it somewhere, indicating it was an April Fools' joke. Despite this small but obvious clue, several fans fell for the joke, some even claiming they will never visit the site again. Four days later on April 5, Maddox posted an article titled "How do you dumbasses manage to breathe?" The original April Fools' page can be seen here. The rebuttal article can be viewed here.
  • SARS Infects Hong Kong: In 2003 during the time when Hong Kong was seriously hit by SARS, it was rumored that many people in Hong Kong had become infected with SARS and become uncontrolled, that all immigration ports would be closed to quarantine the region, and that Tung Chee Hwa, the Chief Executive of Hong Kong at that time, had resigned. Hong Kong supermarkets were immediately overwhelmed by panicked shoppers. The Hong Kong government held a press conference to deny the rumor. The rumor, which was intended as an April Fools' prank, was started by a student by imitating the design of Ming Pao newspaper website. He was charged for this incident.[34]
  • Online Retailer ThinkGeek usually replace their main page with a page containing "Featured Items" that are a joke. The page looks, feels and functions just like their real one, however the items featured are hoax and do not exist. Such items have included "Inhalable Caffeine Sticks", a USB pregnancy test kit, and an alarm clock which wirelessly connects to your PC to log into your internet banking, and send funds to a charity. Adding any of these items to your shopping cart takes you to a page stating that the item is a hoax.
  • Facebook and the News-Feed: On April 1, 2007, Facebook posted fake updates on the News-feed page reading [5]:
    • "Introducing LivePoke! Facebook will dispatch a real live person today to poke a friend of your choice. (offer good for only the first 100 pokers in each network)"
    • "Harry and Voldemort have set their relationship status to 'Mortal Enemies.'"
    • "You are on Facebook, reading your News Feed."
    • "Meredith and McDreamy have changed their relationship status to 'It's Complicated' ... oh wait ... 'In a Relationship' ... oh wait ... 'It's Complicated' again."
    • "Two of your oxen drowned when you tried to ford the river."
    • "Bracket Buster: Ohio State and Florida have mutually agreed on a tie and will not play the championship game."
    • Changing the copyrights from "a Mark Zuckerberg production" to a random Facebook employees' name or the user's own.
  • In 2007, wordpress.com set up their main page so that when logged in, your latest post would appear as 'Blog Of The Minute'. This raised several questions on their support forums.
  • www.howstuffworks.com does an annual bogus article. In 2006, it was "How Animated Tattoos Work"; in 2007 "How Phone Cell Implants Work"; in 2008 "How the Air Force One Hybrid Works"..[35]
  • Motoshi Sakriboto: In 2007, the Square Enix fansite Square Haven reported that game music composers Motoi Sakuraba and Hitoshi Sakimoto had announced a merger. The resulting amalgamated life form was named Motoshi Sakriboto. The hoax played off the fact that when rival role-playing game developers Square and Enix merged on April 1, 2003, many believed the news to be an April Fools' joke.[36]
  • Club Penguin's April Fool's Day parties have always changed almost all of Club Penguin. In the 2008 one, the iceberg looked like a cup of ice water, and the dock was changed to an super fast ice rink, as well as the forest going completely upside down and the cove having various effects. Also, several buildings' graphics looked as if they had been drawn with crayons, pencils, or as if they had been rapidly made with Microsoft paint.
  • The popular gaming community,VIAclan, posted an announcement claiming that they would be closing in one month's time, and that all donations from the past few months would be refunded, LAN event was supposedly cancelled and the community would soon relocate to their rival-community, lagmasters. Originally there was suspicion that this was just a joke, but since the announcement was posted after 12 o'clock in the day, as in some countries there are regulations against jokes after 12 o'clock, it was claimed to be real.
  • The online forum Ninja Academy had it's forum shut down all day for april fools in 2007 and 2008. On 2007, the reason the forum was shut down was because the owner, Cntrstrk14, had claimed that he had run out of money and could no longer support the forum. For 2008, Cntrstrk14 stated that was going to leave the forum to be with his girlfriend. When the forum realized that this was indeed a prank, Cntrstrk14 closed the forum with this message. "To all of those who thought that it was a joke. How about you try paying for it and see how funny it is. I have removed my billing info from the site, if you want the site back up someone must contact me to put their information up instead. ~cntrstrk14"

Kremvax was originally a fictitious Usenet site at the Kremlin, named like the then large number of Usenet VAXen with names of the form foovax. ... Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, decentralized, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP architecture of the same name. ... Almost every April Fools Day (1 April) since 1989, the Internet Engineering Task Force has published one or more humorous RFC documents, following in the path blazed by the June 1973 RFC 527 entitled ARPAWOCKY. The following list also includes humorous RFCs published on other dates. ... Google has often adopted a light-hearted approach in a variety of circumstances. ... Dead fairy hoax is a well-known April Fools Day prank in 2007. ... Designer is a broad term for a person who designs any of a variety of things. ... Mummified cat from Ancient Egypt. ... by Sophie Anderson For other uses, see Fairy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the online auction center. ... The RISKS Digest or Forum On Risks to the Public in Computers and Related Systems is an online periodical published since 1985 by the Committee on Computers and Public Policy of the Association for Computing Machinery. ... Slashdot, often abbreviated as /.[1], is a science, science fiction, and technology-related news website owned by SourceForge, Inc. ... Created by Max Barry, Jennifer Government: NationStates is a game on the World Wide Web that is based on, and is a promotional tool for, his novel Jennifer Government. ... Cheyenne Mountains base Cheyenne Mountains entrance tunnel Cheyenne Mountains interior For more information on this series and its accompanying fictional universe, see Stargate SG-1. ... For the company of Neopets, see Neopets, Inc. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Homestar Runner is a Flash animated Internet cartoon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Microsoft Research (MSR) is a division of Microsoft created in 1991 for researching various computer science topics and issues. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... For Korea as a whole, see Korea. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... King Kong is a 2005 remake of the 1933 King Kong film about a fictional giant ape called Kong. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tool (disambiguation). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton on the cover of the Weekly World News. ... Maddox (real name George Ouzounian)[1] is an American writer, humorist, satirist, magazine columnist and internet personality of Armenian descent, who currently resides in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The Best Page in the Universe is a personal satirical humor website created by self-proclaimed pirate George Ouzounian, better known as Maddox, from Salt Lake City, Utah. ... SARS redirects here. ... The Honourable Tung Chee Hwa, GBM, D.S.Sc. ... Other Hong Kong topics Culture - Economy Education - Geography - History Hong Kong Portal The Chief Executive (traditional Chinese: ) of Hong Kong is the head of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China, and represents the region. ... Ming Pao (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Jyutping ming4 bou3; Hanyu Pinyin: míngbào), a Chinese language newspaper, is a publication by the Ming Pao Group in Hong Kong. ... ThinkGeek is an electronic commerce company based in Fairfax, VA as part of the Open Source Technology Group. ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... For other uses, see Alarm (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Clock (disambiguation). ... This article is about charitable organizations. ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto, CA Facebook is a social networking website, that was launched on February 4, 2004. ... Look up poke, Poke, POKE in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Lord Voldemort (born c. ... This article is about the Modern English personal pronoun. ... Meredith Grey is the name of a fictional character on the ABC television series Greys Anatomy. ... From left to right: Dr. Mark Sloan, Dr. Addison Forbes Montgomery, Dr. George OMalley, Dr. Meredith Grey, Dr. Miranda Bailey, Dr. Christina Yang, Dr. Isobel Stevens, Dr. Derek Shepherd, Dr. Preston Burke, Dr. Alex Karev, Dr. Richard Webber, Dr. Calliope Torres The following is a partial list of characters... The Oregon Trail is an educational computer game developed by Don Rawitsch, Bill Heinemann and Paul Dillenberger in 1971 and produced by MECC in 1974. ... Bracket buster, as a generic phrase, refers to an American college basketball team, usually from a so-called mid-major school, which upsets a highly-ranked team in the NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Mark Elliot Zuckerberg (born May 14, 1984) is an American computer programmer and entrepreneur. ... This article is about the self-hosted blog software. ... HowStuffWorks is a website created by Marshall Brain but now owned by the Convex Group. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Motoi Sakuraba (桜庭 çµ± Sakuraba Motoi, born August 5, 1965) has composed music for various Japanese video games, anime series, and TV dramas as well as independent progressive rock albums. ... Hitoshi Sakimoto ) is a video game music composer. ... Club Penguin is a massively multiplayer online game for children developed by New Horizon Interactive. ... Paint (formerly Paintbrush for Windows) is a simple graphics painting program that has been included with almost all versions of Microsoft Windows since its first release. ...

Lists of April Fool hoaxes

April 1, 1999 was an April Fools Day. ... April 1, 2000 was an April Fools Day falling on a Saturday. ... April 1, 2002 was an April Fools Day falling on a Monday. ... See also March 31, 2003 - April 2003 - April 2, 2003 Hong Kong movie and Cantopop star Leslie Cheung commits suicide at the age of 46. ... April 1, 2004 was an April Fools Day that fell on a Thursday. ... See also March 31, 2005 - April 2005 - April 2, 2005 Hamas and Islamic Jihad have declared, in principle, their intention to join the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO). ... April 1, 2006 was an April Fools Day falling on a Saturday. ... April 1, 2007 was an April Fools Day falling on a Sunday. ...

Real news on April Fools' Day

The frequency of April Fools' hoaxes sometimes makes people doubt real news stories released on 1 April. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Residents running from an approaching tsunami in Hilo, Hawaii.
Residents running from an approaching tsunami in Hilo, Hawaii.

The 1 April 1946 Aleutian Island earthquake tsunami that killed 165 people in Hawaii and Alaska resulted in the creation of a tsunami warning system (specifically the Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre), established in 1949 for Pacific Ocean countries. The tsunami in question is known in Hawaii as the "April Fools' Day Tsunami" due to people drowning because of the assumptions that the warnings were an April Fools' prank. Image File history File links Tsunami_large. ... Image File history File links Tsunami_large. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aleutian Island earthquake was an earthquake near the Aleutian Islands on April 1, 1946, and was followed by a Pacific-wide tsunami wave. ... For other uses, see Tsunami (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Low coasts mitigation be merged into this article or section. ... Tsunameter and buoys used by DART system The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), operated by NOAA in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, USA, is one of two tsunami warning centers in the United States. ...


The 2005 death of comedian Mitch Hedberg was originally dismissed as an April Fools' joke. The comedian's March 29, 2005 death was announced on March 31, but many newspapers didn't carry the story until April 1, 2005. Mitchell Lee Hedberg (February 24, 1968 – March 29, 2005) was an American stand-up comedian known for his surreal humour and unconventional comedic delivery. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Gmail's April 2004 launch was widely believed to be a prank, as Google traditionally perpetrates April Fool's Day hoaxes each April 1 (see Google's hoaxes.) Another Google-related event that turned out not to be a hoax occurred on April 1, 2007, when employees at Google's New York City office were alerted that a ball python kept in an engineer's cubicle had escaped and was on the loose. An internal e-mail acknowledged that "the timing…could not be more awkward" but that the snake's escape was in fact an actual occurrence and not a prank.[37] For other uses, see Gmail (disambiguation). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Google has often adopted a light-hearted approach in a variety of circumstances. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Binomial name (Shaw, 1802) The Ball python (Python regius), also known as the Royal python, is a ground-dwelling, nonvenomous snake native to the savannahs and rain forests of western and central Africa, ball pythons can be found from Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia on the west...


The merger of Square and its rival company, Enix, took place on April 1, 2003, and was originally thought to be a joke. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The announcement of the anime version of the Powerpuff Girls, Demashita! Powerpuff Girls Z, was on April Fools Day causing many to think it was a joke. Animé redirects here. ... The Powerpuff Girls is an Emmy-winning American animated television series about three little girls in kindergarten who have superpowers. ... Demashita! Powerpuff Girls Z , roughly Theyre Here! Powerpuff Girls Z) is the name for a Japanese television anime based upon the American animated television series The Powerpuff Girls. ...


The game Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games was announced only a couple days before April Fools Day so many thought that Mario and Sonic together for the very first time was a joke. Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games , lit. ...


British sprinter Dwain Chambers joined English rugby league team Castleford Tigers shortly before 1st April 2008. The athlete was attempting a return to top flight athletics at the time following a high profile drugs ban, and his apparent unfamiliarity with rugby led many people to assume this was an April Fools' Day prank. Dwain Chambers Dwain Anthony Chambers (born 5 April 1978 in London) is a former English sprinter, turned American football player, currently contracted to NFL Europa with the Hamburg Sea Devils. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Official website www. ...


Other prank days in the world

In Iran, people play jokes on each other on the 13th day of the Persian calendar new year (Norouz), which falls on April 1 or April 2. This day is called Sizdah Bedar and is considered to be the oldest prank-tradition in the world still alive today, which has led many to believe that the origins of the April Fools Day goes back to this tradition which is believed to have been celebrated by Persians as far back as 536 BC. This article is in need of attention. ... Persepolis all nations stair case. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Traditional Haft Sîn Sizdah-bedar (Persian سیزده بدر) is the Persian Festival of springs. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ...


The April 1 tradition in France includes poisson d'avril (literally "April's fish"), attempting to attach a paper fish to the victim's back without being noticed. This is also widespread in other nations, such as Italy (where the term pesce d'aprile (literally "April's fish") is also used to refer to any jokes done during the day). is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Spanish-speaking countries, similar pranks are practiced on December 28, the Day of the Holy Innocents. This custom also exists in certain areas of Belgium, including the province of Antwerp. The Flemish tradition is for children to lock out their parents or teachers, only letting them in if they promise to bring treats the same evening or the next day. is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Holy Innocents by Giotto di Bondone. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ...


In Poland, "prima aprilis" ("April 1" in Latin) is a day full of jokes - various hoaxes are prepared by people, media (which sometimes cooperate to make the 'information' more credible) and even public institutions. Serious activities are usually avoided. This conviction is so strong that the anti-Turkish alliance with Leopold I signed on April 1, 1683, was backdated to March 31. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor Silver coin of Leopold I, 3 Kreuzers, dated 1670. ...


In some countries, including the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand, the April 1 tradition requires jokes to be played before midday: if somebody pulls an April Fools' Trick after midday, then the person pulling the trick is actually considered the fool. The following rhyme may be chanted: is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

April Fool's has come and gone.
Who's the fool that carried on?

In Denmark the 1st of May is known as "Maj-kat", meaning quite simply "May-cat", and is identical to April Fools' day, though Danes also celebrate April Fools' day ("aprilsnar").


Some Jewish communities have a traditional event called a Purim spiel, which is similar in many ways to April Fools' Day. Fake newspaper articles are common. A Purim Spiel is what could be termed the Jewish equivalent of an April Fools Day joke. ...


April Fools' Day in media

  • The 1986 horror film April Fool's Day is themed around the holiday (akin to Halloween).
  • In the film The French Connection, the opening scenes take place on April 1 and show children in Marseille running around pinning poissons d'Avril (April fish) on each other.
  • The birthday of the mischievous twins, Fred and George Weasley from the Harry Potter series is April 1st.
  • O. Stock, C. Strapparava & A. Nijholt (eds.) The April Fools' Day Workshop on Computational Humour. Proc. Twente Workshop on Language Technology 20 (TWLT20), ISSN 0929-0672, ITC-IRST, Trento, Italy, April 2002, 146 pp

April Fools Day is a 1986 horror/comedy film released by Paramount Pictures. ... Halloween (also known as John Carpenters Halloween) is a 1978 American independent horror film set in the fictional Midwest town of Haddonfield, Illinois on Halloween. ... The French Connection is a 1971 Hollywood film directed by William Friedkin. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Frederick Fred and George Weasley are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ...

Quotes about April Fools' Day

April 1st: This is the day upon which we are reminded of what we are on the other three-hundred and sixty-four.
 

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ...

See also

April Fool is the codename for a spy who played a key role in the downfall of the Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. ... A double agent pretends to spy on a target organization on behalf of a controlling organization, but in fact is loyal to the target organization. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... The Holy Innocents by Giotto di Bondone. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pigasus Award is the name of an annual tongue-in-cheek honor recognized by noted skeptic James Randi. ... Sarcasm is the making of remarks intended to mock the person referred to (who is normally the person addressed), a situation or thing. ... The Traditional Haft Sîn Sizdah-bedar (Persian سیزده بدر) is the Persian Festival of springs. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ University of Kansas [1]
  2. ^ Museum of Hoaxes. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  3. ^ Still a good joke - 47 years on (BBC News, 1 April 2004)
  4. ^ Original press release. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  5. ^ Follow-up press release, revealing the joke. Retrieved on 2008-02-07.
  6. ^ Entry at Museum of Hoaxes. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  7. ^ Special Report: San Serriffe. The Guardian, 1 April 1977 (7pp)
  8. ^ April Fool's Day, 1993. Museum of Hoaxes. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  9. ^ April Fool's Day, 1965. Museum of Hoaxes. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  10. ^ BBC Smell-o-vision
  11. ^ Practical joking: The art of April Fools’. The Examiner. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  12. ^ The origin of the WOM - the "Write Only Memory". Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  13. ^ Traders have last laugh, drive down loonie in wake of April fool's prank. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  14. ^ http://scotland.realradiofm.com/Article.asp?PT=THE+REAL+BREAKFAST+SHOW&s=onair&id=262852
  15. ^ New Archers Theme Tune. BBC Radio 4. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  16. ^ http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?p_text_direct-0=0EADF91DBB78428F&p_field_direct-0=document_id
  17. ^ Millennium TimeLine - 1998 April. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  18. ^ Something fishy about finale. Toronto Star. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  19. ^ Flying penguins found by BBC programme - Telegraph
  20. ^ Fred Fedler, Media Hoaxes, Iowa State University Press, 1989, p.201.
  21. ^ Lies to Get You Out of the House. LA Weekly. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  22. ^ The story behind The Great Cartoon Switcheroonie. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  23. ^ Their wives met at yoga. Now Chris Martin plans to rock the vote for Cameron's Tories. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  24. ^ Song download (mp3)
  25. ^ Coldplay defection gives Labour a bad hair day. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  26. ^ Jeopardy! Episode Guide. TV.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  27. ^ Official Price is Right Q&A. CBS. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  28. ^ Raymond, E. S.: "The Jargon File", Kremvax entry, 2006
  29. ^ "April fool fairy sold on internet" from BBC News. Retrieved on July 31, 2007.
  30. ^ NationStates: The World Assembly. NationStates. Retrieved on 2008-04-01.
  31. ^ APOD: 2005 April 1 - Water on Mars. NASA. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  32. ^ Microsoft Research Reclaims Value of Pi. Retrieved on 2007-04-01.
  33. ^ Bill Gates hoax hits Korean market. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  34. ^ Announcement of Hong Kong Government denying this rumor. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  35. ^ How the Air Force One Hybrid Works. Retrieved on 2008-04-01.
  36. ^ Hitoshi Sakimoto and Motoi Sakuraba announce merger. Retrieved on 2007-06-28.
  37. ^ Rumormonger: Python on the loose at Google. Valleywag.

The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eric S. Raymond (FISL 6. ... The Jargon File is a glossary of hacker slang. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Notes

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

  • Museum of Hoaxes: Top 100 April Fool's Day hoaxes of all time
  • April Fools' Day On The Web: A long list of supposed April Fools from 2004 until the present
Wikinews has related news:
Wikipedia victim of onslaught of April Fool's jokes
Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Urban Legends Reference Pages: April Fools' Day Origins (1250 words)
Not all superstitions about the day are negative, though — fellas fooled by a pretty girl are said to be fated to end up married to her, or at least enjoy a healthy friendship with the
In Scotland, an April fool is called an April "gowk" — Scottish for cuckoo, an emblem of simpletons.
April Fools' pranking between students and teachers is an ongoing battle of wits, with kids favoring the timeworn standards of a tack on the chair, the "missing class" (kids hide under their desks when the teacher is momentarily called out of the room), or a springy fabric snake coiled in a can of nuts.
April Fool's Day -- History, Traditions, and Foolishness (671 words)
April Fool's Day thus developed into an international fun fest, so to speak, with different nationalities specializing in their own brand of humor at the expense of their friends and families.
The second day is devoted to pranks involving the posterior region of the body.
Originally, the day was a sad remembrance of the slaughter of the innocent children by King Herod.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m