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Encyclopedia > April 2004


2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16...

< April 2004 >
S M T W T F S
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30

Deaths in April

18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara
19 Norris McWhirter
22 Pat Tillman
24 Estée Lauder
Other recent deaths 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara (May 6, 1920 – April 18, 2004) is considered the founding father of the modern nation of Fiji. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Norris Dewar McWhirter, CBE (August 12, 1925 - April 19, 2004) was a writer, right wing political activist and television presenter. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... Pat Tillman was Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year as a senior at Arizona State University. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... Estée Lauder (July 1, 1906 – April 24, 2004) was the founder of Estée Lauder Inc. ... The following is a list of figures who died in 2005. ...

Ongoing events

EU Enlargement
Exploration of Mars: Rovers
Haiti Rebellion
Reconstruction of Iraq
Occupation & Resistance
Israeli-Palestinian conflict
Canada Liberal Party scandal
War on Terrorism
USA 9-11 Commission
Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse
Afghanistan timeline April 2004
The Enlargement of the European Union is the growth in size of the European Union, from the six founding member states in 1952, to the 25 current member states. ... Computer generated image of one of the two Mars Exploration Rovers which touched down on Mars in 2004. ... Artists Concept of Rover on Mars NASAs Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission (since 2003) is a unmanned Mars exploration mission that includes sending two Rovers (robots) to explore the Martian surface and geology. ... The 2004 Haiti rebellion was a conflict fought for several weeks in Haiti during February 2004 that resulted in the premature end of President Jean-Bertrand Aristides second term, and the installment of an interim government led by Gerard Latortue. ... Reconstruction of Iraq is the name used by the multinational forces who invaded Iraq in March 2003 for the period following the invasion. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The sponsorship scandal is an ongoing scandal that has affected the government of Canada, and particularly the ruling Liberal Party of Canada for a number of years, but rose to especially great prominence in 2004. ... The War on Terrorism or War on Terror (in US foreign policy circles, the global war on terrorism or GWOT ) was the term originally used by the United States government and its principal allies in its an ongoing campaign to kill individuals and destroy groups deemed to be terrorist and... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Timeline of Afghan history April 30, 2004 At least five Afghan National Army soldiers were killed in an attack by rebels in Panjwai district, Kandahar province, Afghanistan. ...

Election results in April

02 Sri Lanka (legisl.)
05 Indonesia (legisl.)
08 Algeria (president)
14 South Africa (general)
15 South Korea (legisl.)
17 Slovakia (president)
20 India (general)
24 Cyprus (referendum)
25 Austria (president)
28 FYROM (president) 2 April is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... Legislative elections were held in Sri Lanka on 2 April 2004. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... Legislative elections were held in Indonesia on April 5, 2004. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... Presidential elections were held in Algeria on April 8, 2004. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... Legislative elections were held in South Africa on Wednesday, 14 April 2004. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Legislative elections were held in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) on April 15, 2004. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... Presidential elections were held in Slovakia on April 3 (first round) and April 17 (second round) 2004. ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... Legislative elections were held in India, the worlds largest democracy, in four phases between April 20 and May 10, 2004. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... The two sectors of the divided island of Cyprus held a referendum on reunification on 24 April 2004. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... Presidential elections were held in Austria on 25 April 2004. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... Presidential elections were held in the Republic of Macedonia in two phases during April 2004. ...

Related pages

About this page
Year in...
Wikipedia Announcements The following is a list of articles devoted to events from 2004 in narrow subject areas: Culture 2004 in architecture 2004 in film 2004 in games 2004 in literature 2004 in music 2004 in television 2004 in video gaming 2004 in Art People Deaths in 2004 State leaders in 2004...

April 30, 2004

  • U.S. newscast Nightline is taken off the air by several stations owned by the Sinclair Broadcast Group because of its planned airing of a list of soldiers killed in Iraq. Sinclair claims it is a political ploy, while network ABC says it is meant as "an expression of respect which simply seeks to honor those who have laid down their lives for this country". (Washington Post)
  • President George W. Bush expresses his "disgust" at images of Iraqi prisoners being mistreated by U.S. soldiers: "Their treatment does not reflect the nature of the American people." (DefenseLink.Mil)
  • Macedonian officials admit that they staged a bogus gun-battle with "terrorists" in March 2002 and that they knew the seven men slain had no terrorist connections. Four members of the security forces face murder charges for their staged killing. (BBC)
  • Diego Maradona leaves hospital after 12 days of treatment for heart and breathing problems. (Glasgow Evening Times)
  • After 25 years, Bob Edwards hosts NPR's Morning Edition for the last time. (CNN) (South Florida Sun-Sentinel) (Salt Lake Tribune)

April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining, as the last day in April. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ted Koppel on Nightline in 1995. ... WLOS 13 is the ABC sffiliate for the Greenville/Spartanburg SC/Asheville NC television market. ... . The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is a television and radio network in the United States. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... ... Terrorism refers to the use of violence for the purpose of achieving a political, religious, or ideological goal. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... Maradona and the World Cup trophy Diego Armando Maradona (nicknamed El Diez, Pelusa, El Diego and Dios) (born October 30, 1960) is a former Argentine football (soccer) player. ... The heart and lungs (from an older edition of Grays Anatomy) The heart (Latin cor) is a hollow, muscular organ that pumps blood through the blood vessels by repeated, rhythmic contractions. ... For the play Breath by Samuel Beckett, see Breath (play). ... Bob Edwards (born May 15, 1947 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American radio broadcaster. ... NPR logo NPR redirects here. ... Morning Edition is an American radio news program produced and distributed by National Public Radio (NPR). ...

April 29, 2004

April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Google, Inc (NASDAQ: GOOG), is a U.S. public corporation, initially established as a privately-held corporation in 1998, that designed and manages the Internet Google search engine. ... In financial markets, an initial public offering (IPO) is the first sale of a companys common shares to public investors. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as Dick Cheney, is an American politician and businessman affiliated with the U.S. Republican Party. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003, signed into law by President Bush on December 16, 2003, establishes the first national standards for the sending of commercial e-mail and requires the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to enforce its provisions. ... Oldsmobile (or Olds) was a brand of automobile produced in the United States from 1897 to 2004. ... An automobile is a wheeled vehicle that carries its own motor. ... Capitol Building Lansing is the capital city of the U.S. state of Michigan, located mostly in Ingham County; a small portion extends into adjacent Eaton County. ... Tel-Aviv Coat of arms Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Saint Basils Cathedral and Spasskaya Tower of Moscow Kremlin at Red Square. ... The Euroleague is a high-caliber professional basketball league with teams from all over Europe. ...

April 28, 2004

  • ROC presidential election, 2004: The High Court schedules a vote recount for 10 May. (Bloomberg)
  • Iraq Occupation and resistance:
    • Intense fighting breaks out in Fallujah, as US forces respond to attacks on their positions by insurgents. Artillery and AC-130 gunships are used to bombard guerrilla positions, but the number of casualties is as yet unknown. (BBC)
    • According to a CNN/USA Today/Gallup poll, 71% of Iraqis see the U.S. troops in their country as "occupiers", only 19% as "liberators". Though, 61% say that despite any hardships they had suffered, it was worth ousting Saddam Hussein. Still, 57% would like U.S./British forces to leave immediately. (CNN) (USA Today)
  • Cable TV giant Comcast abandons its US$66bn bid to take over Disney, citing a lack of interest from the Disney board. (BBC)
  • More than 100 suspected Jemaah Islamiah militants die during their attacks on security outposts in Thailand's Muslim-dominated southern provinces of Pattani, Yala and Songkhla. (BBC)

April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... The term High Court could refer to one of the following institutions: High Court of England and Wales High Court of Australia The Four Courts of Ireland The High Court of Justiciary in Scotland And the 18 High Courts of India The High Court of Andhra Pradesh The High Court... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... The AC-130 Gunship is an armed variant of the Lockheed C-130 Hercules. ... Cable News Network (CNN) is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1] [2] (although the latter currently is not recognized in CNNs official history). ... The USA Today logo USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... A Gallup Poll is an opinion poll frequently used by the mass media for representing public opinion. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was the President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture by United States-led coalition forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Cable television or Community Antenna Television (CATV) (and often shortened to cable) is a system of providing television, FM radio programming and other services to consumers via radio waves transmitted directly to people’s televisions through fixed coaxial cables as opposed to the over-the-air method used in traditional... Comcast Corporation, (NASDAQ: CMCSA) based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is the largest cable company in the United States. ... The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... The Walt Disney Company (most commonly known as Disney) (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... Jemaah Islamiyah, sometimes rendered Jemaah Islamiah, is a militant Islamic separatist movement, suspected of killing hundreds of civilians, dedicated to the establishment of a fundamentalist Islamic state in Southeast Asia, in particular Indonesia, Singapore, Brunei, Malaysia, and the south of Thailand and the Philippines. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Pattani (Thai ปัตตานี) is one of the southern provinces (changwat) of Thailand. ... Yala (Thai ยะลา) is the southernmost province (changwat) of Thailand. ... Songkhla (Thai สงขลา) is the one of the southern provinces (changwat) of Thailand. ...

April 27, 2004

April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Najaf (Arabic: ) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... American troops man an anti-aircraft gun near the Algerian coastline in 1943 Anti-aircraft, or air defense, is any method of combating military aircraft from the ground. ... Damascus by night, pictured from Jabal Qasioun; the green spots are minarets Damascus (Arabic officially دمشق Dimashq, colloquially ash-Sham الشام) is the capital city of Syria and is the oldest inhabited city in the world. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... President Thabo Mbeki Thabo Mvuyelwa Mbeki (born June 18, 1942) is the President of the Republic of South Africa. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ...

April 26, 2004

April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Legislative elections were held in India, the worlds largest democracy, in four phases between April 20 and May 10, 2004. ... Uttar Pradesh (Hindi: उत्तर प्रदेश, Urdu: اتر پردیش), also popularly known by its acronym UP, is the fifth largest and the most populous state in India. ... Maharashtra (महाराष्ट्र) is Indias third largest state in terms of area and second largest in terms of population after Uttar Pradesh. ... Bihar (बिहार in Devanagri) is a state situated in the eastern part of India. ... 2004 Federal Reserve note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve note - Reverse The U.S. fifty dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Amman (Arabic عمان Ê¿Ammān), the capital of the Kingdom of Jordan, is a city of more than 1. ... ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... Ireland (Irish: Éire) is the third-largest island in Europe. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) is a militant and revolutionary guerrilla group established in 1964-1966 as the military wing of the Colombian Communist Party, and is Colombias... The Standing Committee of the National Peoples Congress (NPCSC; Chinese: 全国人民代表大会常务委员会, pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì Chángwù Wěiyuánhuì) is a committee of about 150 members of the National Peoples Congress (NPC) of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), which is convened between plenary sessions of the NPC... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Chinese: 香港特別行政區行政長官 pinyin (forMandarin Chinese pronounciation): XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng Zhangguān) is the head of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China, and represents the Region. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Legislative Council Building The Legislative Council of Hong Kong (立法會, abbreviated LegCo) is the legislature of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Leap year starting on Tuesday // Predicted events January-June January 15 - NASAs MESSENGER spacecraft makes the first of three flybys of Mercury. ... // Description A landslide is a geological phenomenon which includes a wide range of ground movement, such as rock falls, deep failure of slopes, and shallow debris flows, see flow. ... Red, green, and blue LEDs. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a research and educational institution located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is a world leader in science and technology, as well as in many other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... Many countries claim to have invented the chess game in some incipient form. ... Magnus Øen Carlsen (born November 30, 1990) is a Norwegian chess player who came to international attention after winning the C group of the Corus Chess Tournament in January 2004 at the age of thirteen. ... The five original grandmasters of chess, from left to right: Lasker (seated), Alekhine, Capablanca, Marshall, Tarrasch (seated) The title International Grandmaster is awarded to world-class chess masters by the world chess organization FIDE. Apart from World Champion, Grandmaster is the highest title a chess player can attain. ... Dubai or Dubayy (in Arabic: دبيّ, IPA , generally in English) refers to either one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Peninsula, or that emirates main city, sometimes called Dubai City to distinguish it from the emirate. ...

April 25, 2004

April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag of the League of Arab States The Arab League or League of Arab States (Arabic: جامعة الدول العربية), is an organization of Arab states - compare Arab world. ... Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; romanized: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... Alan Kay, born May 17, 1940, is an American computer scientist. ... Smalltalk is a dynamically typed object oriented programming language designed at Xerox PARC by Alan Kay, Dan Ingalls, Ted Kaehler, Adele Goldberg, and others during the 1970s. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... The United States dollar, or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States. ... Presidential elections were held in Austria on 25 April 2004. ... Heinz Fischer (born 9 October 1938) is the federal president of Austria. ... Benita Ferrero_Waldner Benita Ferrero_Waldner (born September 5, 1948) is an Austrian diplomat and politician. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, London Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are a football club from north London, and are one of the most successful clubs in English football. ... The issue of abortion in the United States is a highly charged issue with significant political and ethical debate. ... Washington, D.C., short for the District of Columbia (locals know the city as the District, DC,—or, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ...

April 24, 2004

April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Location of Basra Basra (also spelled Başrah or Basara; historically sometimes written Busra, Busrah, and the early form Bassorah; Arabic: , Al-Basrah) is the second largest city of Iraq with an estimated population of c. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Overhead view of Sadr City Sadr City (formerly known as Saddam City and Al Thawra) is a vast low-income neighbourhood in northeastern Baghdad, home to some two million Shia Muslims. ... ... Sunday is considered either the first or the seventh day of the week, between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... John Howard John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939), is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia, coming to office on 11 March 1996 and winning re-election in 1998, 2001 and 2004. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Georgi Sedefchov Purvanov Categories: 1957 births | Presidents of Bulgaria | People stubs ... Karbalā (Arabic: ; also transliterated as Kerbala or Kerbela) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... The two sectors of the divided island of Cyprus held a referendum on reunification on 24 April 2004. ... The Annan Plan was a United Nations proposal to bring about the reunification of the divided island nation of Cyprus as the United Cyprus Republic. ... Forgent Networks is a software company that specializes in meeting and scheduling programs. ... Software patents and patents on computer-implemented inventions (CII) are a class of patents and one of many legal aspects of computing. ... A photo of a flower compressed with successively higher compression ratios from left to right. ...

April 23, 2004

April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DaimlerChrysler AG (Xetra: DCX), NYSE: DCX, has its headquarter in Stuttgart, Germany and is a prominent automobile and truck manufacturer. ... Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (in Japanese: 三菱自動車工業, in romaji Mitsubishi Jidosha Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha) is a Japanese automobile company, manufacturing an extensive range of cars and trucks (see Fuso). ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Najaf (Arabic: ) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... A convoy is a group of vehicles or ships traveling together for mutual support. ... Bangkok from the Chao Phraya River at sunset, July 2004 The Modern Bangkok Skyline. ... The Ryongchŏn disaster was a train disaster that occurred in the town of Ryongchŏn, North Korea near the border with China on April 22, 2004. ... North Korea, officially the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK; Korean: Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk; Hangul: 조선민주주의인민공화국; Hanja: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國), is a country in eastern Asia, covering the northern half of the peninsula of Korea. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ...

April 22, 2004

April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ISS Statistics Crew: 2 As of August 21, 2005 Perigee: 352. ... Acrobatic bicycle is possible thanks to gyroscopic effects A gyroscope is a device which demonstrates the principle of conservation of angular momentum. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless on an untethered EVA Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is work done by an astronaut away from the Earth and outside of his or her spacecraft. ... Volkswagen (VW) is an automobile manufacturer based in Wolfsburg, Germany. ... ABN AMRO is the largest bank in the Netherlands and has operations all over the world, its history going back to 1824. ... US Army Seal The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... A ceasefire is a temporary stoppage of a war, or any armed conflict, where each side of the conflict agrees with the other to suspend aggressive actions. ... A rocket propelled grenade (RPG) is a man-portable, shoulder-launched weapon capable of firing an explosive device longer distances than an otherwise unassisted soldier could throw. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America or ELCA is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... // Sexual abuse in general Sexual abuse is a form of abuse that is made by means of the sexual behavior between an victim(s) and offender(s). ... The Old Harrison County Courthouse in Whetstone Square is the centerpiece of the Wonderland of Lights, one of the largest light festivals in the United States, and is lit with thousands of lights during the celebration. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The Oil-for-Food Programme was established by the United Nations in 1996 to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine and the like. ... The Ryongchŏn disaster was a train disaster that occurred in the town of Ryongchŏn, North Korea near the border with China on April 22, 2004. ... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Ryongchŏn is a city in North Korea. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al-Fatah faction. ... The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Sanctuary has multiple meanings. ... Mughtaribeen Circle in downtown Ramallah Ramallah (Arabic: رام الله) is a Palestinian city of approximately 57,000 residents. ...

April 21, 2004

  • A grand jury indicts Michael Jackson on charges of child molestation. (FoxNews)
  • Mordechai Vanunu, who leaked Israeli nuclear-weapons secrets in 1986, is released from prison after 18 years. (Guardian) (BBC)
  • Two car bombs explode outside the General Security headquarters of Saudi Arabia in Riyadh, killing nine and wounding 125. (AP) (CNN)
  • Iraq Occupation and Insurgency:
    • Three car bombs explode outside police stations in Basra, killing 68 people and wounding over 100 more. Iraqi officials blame suicide bombers for the terrorism. 23 of the casualties are school children. A fourth car bomb explodes in Zubeir, south of Basra, killing three and wounding four. British soldiers assisting the wounded are pelted with stones, injuring four, two seriously. (BBC) (NYT)
    • The Iraqi Governing Council chooses a tribunal of judges and prosecutors to try Saddam Hussein. Salem Chalabi, nephew of Ahmed Chalabi, will chair the tribunal. (Toronto Star)

April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the common law legal system, an indictment is a formal charge of having committed a serious criminal offense. ... Michael Jackson in 1987. ... // Sexual abuse in general Sexual abuse is a form of abuse that is made by means of the sexual behavior between an victim(s) and offender(s). ... Mordechai Vanunu in the garden of St. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Riyadh from space, April 1994 Ministry of the Interior Faisaliah Centre King Fahad Int. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Location of Basra Basra (also spelled Başrah or Basara; historically sometimes written Busra, Busrah, and the early form Bassorah; Arabic: , Al-Basrah) is the second largest city of Iraq with an estimated population of c. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... The Oxford English Dictionary defines terrorism as a policy intended to strike with terror those against whom it is adopted; the employment of methods of intimidation; the fact of terrorizing or condition of being terrorized. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīt, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was the President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture by United States-led coalition forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Ahmed Chalabi Ahmed Abdel Hadi Chalabi1 (Arabic: احمد الجلبي) (born October 30, 1944) is the interim minister for oil and a deputy prime minister in Iraq, as of April 28, 2005 [1]. He is also part of a three-man executive council for the umbrella Iraqi opposition group, the Iraqi National Congress...

April 20, 2004

April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Circle Line (CCL) is the fourth MRT line currently under construction in Singapore. ... Legislative elections were held in India, the worlds largest democracy, in four phases between April 20 and May 10, 2004. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Logo The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is made up of Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela; since 1965, its international headquarters have been in Vienna, Austria. ... Presidential election results map. ... Bob Woodward Robert Upshur Bob Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is one of the best-known journalists in the United States, thanks largely to his work in helping uncover the Watergate scandal of President Richard Nixon, in a historical journalistic partnership with Carl Bernstein, while working as a reporter for... Plan of Attack (ISBN 074325547X) is a 2004 book by Washington Post investigative reporter Bob Woodward billed as a behind-the-scenes account of how and why President Bush decided to go to war against Iraq [1] The books chief contention, which provides the rationale for its title, is... The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first military act of the Iraq War, and was launched by the United States and the United Kingdom on March 20, 2003, with support from some other governments, making up what was described as the coalition of the willing. After approximately three weeks... On April 20, 2004, the British Prime Minister Tony Blair announced in the House of Commons that Britain would hold a referendum on its ratification of the proposed Treaty establishing a constitution for Europe when it was agreed by the European Council. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Treaty establishing a constitution for Europe is a proposed constitutional treaty for the European Union. ... NASA Logo The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is a satellite-based mission to measure the stress-energy tensor (the distribution, and especially the motion, of matter) in and near Earth, and thus to test related models; in application of Einsteins general theory of relativity. ... Albert Einstein, by Yousuf Karsh Albert Einstein (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born Jewish theoretical physicist of Swiss and American citizenship, who is widely regarded as the greatest scientist of the 20th century. ... Two-dimensional visualization of space-time distortion. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Mortar has several meanings: A mortar is a vessel used to contain a substance which is then ground into a powder and/or mixed with a pestle. ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison or Abu Ghurayb prison is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km west of Baghdad. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ...

April 19, 2004

April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... North Africa is a region generally considered to include: Algeria Egypt Libya Mauritania Morocco Sudan Tunisia Western Sahara The Canary Islands, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Azores and Madeira are sometimes considered to be a part of North Africa, though they do not share a common culture with the countries listed above. ... The Terrorism Act 2000 is a current United Kingdom Act of Parliament - An Act to make provision about terrorism; and to make temporary provision for Northern Ireland about the prosecution and punishment of certain offences, the preservation of peace and the maintenance of order. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in England established in 1974 which covers an area roughly encompassing the conurbation of Manchester. ... Accountancy (British English) or accounting (American English) is the process of maintaining, auditing, and processing financial information for business purposes. ... Corporate governance is the method by which a corporation is directed, administered or controlled. ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... A Shell petrol station sign in the UK A Shell gas station in the U.S. A Shell gas station in Poland The Royal Dutch/Shell Group of Companies (called Shell Oil Company in the United States) is a major energy company, one of the top four oil/gas companies... Natural gas (commonly refered to as gas in many countries) is a gaseous fossil fuel consisting primarily of methane. ... The 100th running of the Boston Marathon, 1996 The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon sporting event hosted by the city of Boston, Massachusetts on Patriots Day, the third Monday of April each year. ... A world record is the best performance in a certain discipline, usually a sports event. ... Wheelchair seating A wheelchair is a device used for mobility by people for whom walking is difficult or impossible, due to illness or disability. ... The TV turnoff network is an organization that tries to encourage children and adults to watch less television and so have more time for a healthier life and more community participation. ... Argentina is a Spanish-speaking country in southern South America, situated between the Atlantic Ocean in the east. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Maradona and the World Cup trophy Diego Armando Maradona (nicknamed El Diez, Pelusa, El Diego and Dios) (born October 30, 1960) is a former Argentine football (soccer) player. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Buenos Aires (Good Airs in Spanish, originally meaning Fair Winds) is the capital of Argentina and its largest city and port, as well as one of the largest cities in South America. ... Intensive care medicine or critical care medicine is concerned with providing greater than ordinary medical care and observation to people in a critical or unstable condition. ...

April 18, 2004

April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... مجلس شورای اسلامی - The Majles; Irans Parliament. ... Behzad Nabavi, as acting Chairman of Majlis Behzad Nabavi (بهزاد نبوی in Persian) (born 1941) is an Iranian politician. ... Omar Bakri Muhammmad (born 1958 in Syria) is a Muslim cleric who claims to be a spokesman for Al-Qaeda, the terrorist network led by Osama bin Laden. ...   Islam? (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... The following is the list of those who have served as President of the Spanish government. ... José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero (born August 4, 1960) is the Prime Minister of Spain. ... El País (The country) is the most widely read Spanish newspaper with 2,098,000 readers, followed by El Mundo with 1,291,000 readers, according to the 2005s Estudio General de Medios (Media General Study). ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister who helps form the governmental foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... Miguel Ángel Moratinos, (born June 8, 1951) is a socialist Spanish politician, since April 18, 2004 the Minister of Foreign Affairs in the government of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero. ... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Kosovo (Albanian: Kosovë / Kosova, Serbian: Косово и Метохија / Kosovo i Metohija), in English most often called just Kosovo, is a province of Serbia. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Female symbol Female is the sex of an organism, or a part of an organism, which produces egg cells. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... Jamie S. Gorelick (born May 6, 1950) was the number two official in the U.S. Department of Justice during the Clinton administration. ... A car of the Devon and Cornwall Constabulary, England Police forces are government organisations charged with the responsibility of maintaining law and order. ... Military intelligence (abbreviated MI, int. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated attacks carried out against the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... For the band, see The Police. ... Tactics is the collective name for methods of winning a small-scale conflict, performing an optimization, etc. ...

April 17, 2004

April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tenzin Gyatso is the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama. ... The National League for Democracy is a Burmese political party. ... Yangôn, formerly Rangoon, population 4,504,000 (2001), is the capital of Myanmar. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Dr. Abdel Aziz al-Rantissi (in the Arabic script عبدالعزيز الرنتيسي) (October 23, 1947 - April 17, 2004) was the co-founder of the Palestinian resistance organization Hamas. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property carried out in a way deliberately calculated to cause the death of the perpetrator (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... The city of Gaza is the principal city in the Gaza Strip. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Socialist Party is the name of several different political parties around the world that are explicitly called Socialist though some are Social Democratic and some are not. ... José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero (born August 4, 1960) is the Prime Minister of Spain. ... The following is the list of those who have served as President of the Spanish government. ...

April 16, 2004

April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Nations Commission on Human Rights, a commission supervised by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, is composed of representatives from 53 member states, and meets each year in regular session in March/April for six weeks in Geneva. ... The situation of human rights in the Peoples Republic of China has been criticized by various sources, including other nations - particularly Western democracies - as well as international organizations, as being poor in many respects. ... Sher Bahadur Deuba (born June 13, 1946) was the prime minister of Nepal. ... This article is about the city. ... (Redirected from 2004 Parliamentary elections of South Korea) Legislative elections were held in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) on April 15, 2004. ... The Uri Party is a political party in South Korea. ... Roh Moo-hyun (born September 1 (August 6 in lunar calendar), 1946) has been the President of South Korea since February 25, 2003. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... US Army Seal The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... Najaf (Arabic: ) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Bob Woodward Robert Upshur Bob Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is one of the best-known journalists in the United States, thanks largely to his work in helping uncover the Watergate scandal of President Richard Nixon, in a historical journalistic partnership with Carl Bernstein, while working as a reporter for... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (الجزيرة), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula (whence also Algiers) is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... U.S. Army PFC Keith Maupin. ... Mia is a very old dice game and has probably survived due to its high entertainment value. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... // Overview Mexico has a free market economy with a mixture of modern and outmoded industry and agriculture, increasingly dominated by the private sector. ... Luis Ernesto Derbez Bautista (born April 1, 1947 in Mexico City) is a politician from Mexico in the government of President Vicente Fox. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Flag of Mercosur Mercosur or Mercosul (Spanish: Mercado Común del Sur, Portuguese: Mercado Comum do Sul, English: Southern Common Market) is a trading zone among Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay, founded in 1991 by the Treaty of Asuncion, which was later amended and updated by the 1995 Treaty of... The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a highly organized 501(c)(4) group for gun promotion in the United States. ... The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, part of the Bill of Rights, prevents the federal government from infringing on the right to keep and bear firearms. ... Eugene You-hsin Chien (簡又新; pinyin: Jiǎn Yòuxīn) (b. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister who helps form the governmental foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) serves as the de facto embassy of the United States in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Therese Shaheen (夏馨) was Director of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) from 2002 to 2004. ...

April 15, 2004

April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The War on Terrorism or War on Terror (in US foreign policy circles, the global war on terrorism or GWOT ) was the term originally used by the United States government and its principal allies in its an ongoing campaign to kill individuals and destroy groups deemed to be terrorist and... Osama bin Laden Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born March 10, 1957) (Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden, or Usama bin Laden, (Arabic: ), is usually considered to be the figurehead of al-Qaeda, a Sunni Islamist terrorist network that has been involved in attacks against... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... Islamic world - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Revenge or vengeance consists of retaliation against a person or group in response to perceived wrongdoing. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Sheikh Ahmed Ismail Yassin (Arabic: الشيخ أحمد يس ) (circa 1937 — March 22, 2004) was the leader of Hamas until he was killed by an Israeli helicopter gunship. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Romano Prodi (Scandiano, Reggio Emilia August 9, 1939) is an Italian politician and a former President of the European Commission. ... Negotiation is the process whereby interested parties resolve disputes, agree upon courses of action, bargain for individual or collective advantage, and/or attempt to craft outcomes which serve their mutual interests. ... Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... IAEA flag The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... The word nuclear means of or belonging to the nucleus of something. ... The Lachine Canal, in Montreal, is badly polluted Pollution is the release of harmful environmental contaminants, or the substances so released. ... A missile (British English: miss-isle; U.S. English: missl) is, in general, a projectile—that is, something thrown or otherwise propelled. ... These lollipops, above, were found to contain heroin when inspected by the DEA. Smuggling is illegal transport, in particular across a border. ... The international symbol for recycling. ... Categories: Stub | Waste ... A satellite is an object that orbits another object (known as its primary). ... A photograph (often just called a photo) is an image (or a representation of that on e. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first military act of the Iraq War, and was launched by the United States and the United Kingdom on March 20, 2003, with support from some other governments, making up what was described as the coalition of the willing. After approximately three weeks... IAEA flag The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... For other meanings of motive see motive (algebraic geometry) and (alternate spelling of) motif (music). ... Mediation is a process of alternative dispute resolution in which a (generally) neutral third party, the mediator, assists two or more parties to help them negotiate an agreement, with concrete effects, on a matter of common interest; generally speaking, it is any activity in which an agreement on any matter... A Military alliance is an agreement between two, or more, countries; related to wartime planning, commitments, and/or contingencies; such agreements can be both defensive and offensive. ... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... Members parade in Sadr City The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish al Mahdi (Arabic جيش المهدي) , is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... This article currently excludes conservatism in the United States where the term can be taken to mean something different. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Najaf (Arabic: ) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Fabrizio Quattrocchi was a 36-year-old Italian security guard taken hostage by Islamist militants in Iraq and murdered there on April 15, 2004. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... A homeland is the concept of the territory to which one belongs; usually, the country in which a particular nationality was born. ... A territory is a defined area (including land and waters), usually considered to be a possession of an animal, person, organization, or institution. ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Opposition may refer to a number of topics: astronomical opposition political opposition parliamentary opposition Opposition to a patent, see for instance Opposition procedure before the European Patent Office This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Categories: Linux stubs | Linux distributions ... Linspire, previously known as LindowsOS (also Lin---s, pronounced as Lindash), is a Linux distribution based on Debian. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company, with over 50,000 employees in various countries as of May 2004. ... The New Democratic Party (French: Nouveau Parti démocratique) is a left wing political party in Canada that advocates varying forms of socialism . ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Svend Robinson Svend Johannes Robinson (born March 4, 1952) is a Canadian politician and prominent activist for gay rights. ... ... For the suburb of Melbourne, Australia, see Research, Victoria. ... A red sunset panorama A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ... This article is about the navigational instrument. ... Migration occurs when living things move from one biome to another. ... A songbird is a bird belonging to the suborder Oscines of Passeriformes (ca. ... A planet in common parlance is a large object in orbit around a star that is not a star itself. ... Gravitational microlensing is an astronomical technique used to find planet-sized bodies indirectly by means of their gravitational interaction with light. ...

April 14, 2004

April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Legislative elections were held in South Africa on Wednesday, 14 April 2004. ... The African National Congress (ANC) is a center-left political party, and has been South Africas governing party (in a coalition) since the establishment of majority rule in May 1994. ... President Thabo Mbeki Thabo Mvuyelwa Mbeki (born June 18, 1942) is the President of the Republic of South Africa. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Presidential election results map. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Gulfport is a city located in Pinellas County, Florida. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Donald Rumsfeld Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) has been the Secretary of Defense of the United States since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... The Saint Petersburg Democratic Club is a small but active political organization in Saint Petersburg, Florida, advocating the United States Democratic Party. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Saeb Erakat (Sa’ib Muhammad Salih ‘Urayqat; born 1955) was the chief of the PLO Steering and Monitoring Committee, from which he negotiated with Israel regarding the Oslo Accords from 1995 until his resignation in protest from the Palestinian government, in May 2003. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (also known as the disengagement plan, תוכנית ההינתקות) is a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to remove all permanent Israeli presence in the Gaza Strip and northern Samaria (part of what is known as The West Bank to the Palestinians, the UN, and... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The 1949 Armistice Agreements are a set of agreements signed during 1949 between Israel and its neighbors Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of these attributes. ... Budapest (pronounced ) is the capital city of Hungary and the countrys principal political, industrial, commercial and transportation centre. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... The term ethnic cleansing refers to various policies of forcibly removing people of one ethnic group. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... William Jefferson Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... Jamie S. Gorelick (born May 6, 1950) was the number two official in the U.S. Department of Justice during the Clinton administration. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated attacks carried out against the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... Gender identity disorder as identified by psychologists and medical doctors is a condition where a person who has been assigned one gender (usually at birth on the basis of their sex, but compare intersexual) but identifies as belonging to another gender, or does not conform with the gender role their... Panjshir province is one of the thirty-four provinces of Afghanistan. ... The Taliban (Pashtun and Persian: طالبان; students), also transliterated as Taleban, is an Islamist and Pashtun nationalist movement which ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, despite having diplomatic recognition from only three countries: the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. ... Ahmed Shah Massoud Ahmed Shah Masood (احمد شاه مسعود) (c. ...

April 13, 2004

April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The entrance to Huay Kwang station The Bangkok Metro is Bangkoks underground metro system. ... Shanghai (Chinese: 上海; Pinyin: ; Shanghainese IPA: ), situated on the banks of the Yangtze River Delta, is Chinas largest city. ... The one-child policy is the current birth control policy of the Peoples Republic of China. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... Official FBI Seal The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The Oxford English Dictionary defines terrorism as a policy intended to strike with terror those against whom it is adopted; the employment of methods of intimidation; the fact of terrorizing or condition of being terrorized. ... Intelligence is the process and the result of gathering and analysing difficult to obtain or altogether secret information. ... You may be looking for information on: musical staff employees or volunteers in an organization quarterstaff or staff (stick) staff of office staff (building material) Leopold Staff (1878–1957), a Polish poet Bowstaff There is also the homophone staph, a bacterial infection. ... Resources comprise the base material for an activity or industry: See resource (economics) for the term as used in economics See human capital for human resources (HR) and innovation See natural resources for material matter See resource (computer science) for the computer science meaning of resources See resource (political) relating... Bureaucracy is a concept in sociology and political science. ... Cultural studies developed in the late 20th century, in part through the re-introduction of Marxist thought into sociology, and in part through the articulation of sociology and other academic disciplines such as literary criticism. ...

April 12, 2004

April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Lt. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... Néstor Carlos Kirchner (born 25 February 1950) is the current President of Argentina. ... I LOVE BIBI ... Javed Hashmi is an opposition politician in Pakistan. ... The Alliance for Restoration of Democracy (ARD) is a opposition group in Pakistan. ... Mutiny is the crime of conspiring to disobey orders that the mutineer is legally obliged to obey, for example by crew members of a ship. ... Sedition refers to a legal designation of non-overt conduct that is deemed by a legal authority as being acts of treason, and hence deserving of legal punishment. ... Armed forces are the military forces of a state. ... ... subfamilies Otariidae Phocidae Odobenidae Pinnipeds are large marine mammals belonging to the Pinnipedia, a family (sometimes a suborder or superfamily, depending on the classification scheme) of the order Carnivora. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. ...

April 11, 2004

April 11 is the 101st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (102nd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sanitation is a term for the hygienic disposal or recycling of waste materials, particularly human excrement. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Arjan Erkel (born March 9, 1970) is a Dutch medical aid worker and was head of the relief mission for Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Dagestan, a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Médecins Sans Frontières (abbreviated MSF; sometimes known as Doctors Without Borders in English-speaking countries) is a nonprofit private organisation created in 1971 by a small group of French doctors led by Bernard Kouchner. ... The Republic of Dagestan (Russian: ), older spelling Daghestan, is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The degree Celsius (°C or ℃ (Unicode 0x2103)) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... An ice sheet is a mass of glacier ice that covers surrounding terrain and is greater than 50,000 km² (19,305 mile²). The only current ice sheets are Antarctic and Greenland; during the last ice age at Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) the Laurentide ice sheet covered much of Canada... A coastal image featured on a United States postal stamp. ... The metre, or meter, is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units (SI: Système International dUnités). ... A foot (plural: feet) is a non-SI unit of distance or length, measuring around a third of a metre. ... Carbon dioxide is an atmospheric gas composed of one carbon and two oxygen atoms. ... The word emission generally means sending something out. ... NASA Logo The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... ISS Statistics Crew: 2 As of August 21, 2005 Perigee: 352. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... The Association of Muslim Scholars (Hayat Al-Ulama Al-Muslimin, sometimes called Association Of Muslim Clerics or Muslim Scholars Association), is a group of well-known Sunni religious leaders in Iraq, including Sheikh Harith Sulayman al-Dari (Chairman), Sheikh Abdel-Salam al-Kubaisi and Sheikh Abdel-Sattar Abdel-Jabbar. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... == T.R.U.C.E == Teachers Resisting Unhealthy Childrens Entertainment. ... // A gun is a mechanical device that fires projectiles at high velocity, using a propellant such as gun powder or compressed air. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Olivia Amador ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... Deadline can refer to several things: A deadline is a point in time at which something must be completed. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... A workshop is a room or building which provides both the area and tools (or machinery) that may be required for the manufacture or repair of goods. ... In law, an alien is a foreigner who is not a citizen of the land in which he lives. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Prayer is an effort to communicate with a God, or to some deity or deities, either to offer praise to the deity, to make a request of the deity, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions to the deity. ... ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... Violence is the causing of, or acting with the intent to cause, injury to people or animals. ... In military terminology, a battalion consists of two to six companies typically commanded by a lieutenant colonel. ... Communication is the process of exchanging information usually via a common system of symbols. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor sport where individual players or teams hit a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... Phil Mickelson after winning the 2005 PGA Championship. ... The Masters is one of four Grand Slam golf tournaments. ... This article is about the profession. ... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of mammary glands... In biology, a species is, loosely speaking, a group of related organisms that share a more or less distinctive form and are capable of interbreeding. ... Male symbol Male is the sex of an organism, or a part of an organism, which produces sperm. ... Earths polar regions are the areas of the globe surrounding the poles, north of the Arctic circle, or south of the Antarctic Circle. ... The equator is an imaginary circle drawn around a planet at a distance halfway between the poles. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... Security is being free from danger. ... Mac OS X is the latest version of the Mac OS, the operating system software for Macintosh computers. ... In computing, an operating system (OS) is the system software responsible for the direct control and management of hardware and basic system operations. ... The term Hackers can refer to several things: Hacker - a type of person interested in exploration, usually of a computer or electrical engineering background. ... The box for Mac OS X v10. ... In the context of computer software, a Trojan horse is a malicious program that is disguised as legitimate software. ... A virus is a small particle that infects cells in biological organisms. ...

April 10, 2004

April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was the President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture by United States-led coalition forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... Olivia Amador ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus of Nazareth. ... assassin, see Assassin (disambiguation) Jack Ruby assassinated Lee Harvey Oswald in a very public manner. ... Roman Catholic priest LCDR Allen R. Kuss (USN) aboard USS Enterprise A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... A church building is a building used in Christian worship. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Catholic Church. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The Kingdom of Nepal, situated in the Himalaya, is the worlds only Hindu kingdom. ... This article is about the city. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... The Presidents Daily Briefing (PDB) is a top secret document produced each morning for the President of the United States. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated attacks carried out against the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Aircraft hijacking (also known as Skyjacking) is the take-over of an aircraft, by a person or group, usually armed. ... Research is an active, diligent, and systematic process of inquiry in order to discover, interpret or revise facts, events, behaviours, or theories, or to make practical applications with theis also used to describe a collection of information about a particular subject. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Fixed-wing aircraft is a term used to refer to what are more commonly known as aeroplanes in Commonwealth English (excluding Canada) or airplanes in North American English. ...

April 9, 2004

April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Henry Chang-Yu Lee (Chinese: 李昌鈺, pinyin: Lǐ Chāngyù) (born November 22, 1938), is one of the worlds foremost forensic scientists. ... City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... On March 19, 2004, the day before the Republic of China presidential election, President Chen Shui-bian and Vice President Annette Lu were both shot while campaigning in Tainan, in what then appeared to be a political assassination attempt. ... Basketball is very popular in U.S. colleges. ... The Euroleague is a high-caliber professional basketball league with teams from all over Europe. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... The term Palestinian terrorism is commonly used to describe acts of political violence committed by Palestinian individuals or groups against Israelis, Jews, and nationals of other countries. ... Good Friday is a holy day celebrated by Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, in which the victim was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross (Latin: crux) and left to hang there until dead. ... San Pedro Cutud is a town in Pampanga province in the Philippines, approximately 70 kilometers north of Manila. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A death threat is a threat (often made anonymously) against a person threatening to kill them. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... The word citizen may refer to: A person with a citizenship Citizen Watch Co. ... A Military alliance is an agreement between two, or more, countries; related to wartime planning, commitments, and/or contingencies; such agreements can be both defensive and offensive. ... KÅ«t (كوت; also known as Kut-Al-Imara and Kut El Amara) is a city in eastern Iraq, on the left bank of the Tigris River, about 100 miles south east of Baghdad, at 32. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Humanitarianism is the view that all people should be treated with the respect and dignity they deserve as human beings, and that advancing the well-being of humanity is a noble goal. ... Negotiation is the process whereby interested parties resolve disputes, agree upon courses of action, bargain for individual or collective advantage, and/or attempt to craft outcomes which serve their mutual interests. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A large number of international organizations and other bodies have a Secretary General or Secretary-General as their chief administrative officers or in other administrative capacities. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... Violence is the causing of, or acting with the intent to cause, injury to people or animals. ... Security is being free from danger. ...

April 8, 2004

April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... Be That way!!!! ... -1... Condoleezza Condi Rice, (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... The Presidents Daily Briefing (PDB) is a top secret document produced each morning for the President of the United States. ... Osama bin Laden Usāmah bin Muhammad bin `Awad bin Lādin (born March 10, 1957) (Arabic: ), commonly known as Osama bin Laden, or Usama bin Laden, (Arabic: ), is usually considered to be the figurehead of al-Qaeda, a Sunni Islamist terrorist network that has been involved in attacks against... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... An alliance can be: an agreement between two parties, made in order to advance common goals and to secure common interests. ... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... Combat, or fighting, is purposeful conflict between one or more persons, often involving violence and intended to establish dominance over the opposition. ... KÅ«t (كوت; also known as Kut-Al-Imara and Kut El Amara) is a city in eastern Iraq, on the left bank of the Tigris River, about 100 miles south east of Baghdad, at 32. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Black is a color with several subtle differences in meaning. ... Members parade in Sadr City The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish al Mahdi (Arabic جيش المهدي) , is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... Tulip Mosque in Ufa, Russia. ... Kufa (الكوفة al-Kufa in Arabic) is a city in Iraq, about 170 km south of Baghdad, and 10 km northeast of Najaf. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ... Tulip Mosque in Ufa, Russia. ... National motto: 널리 인간을 이롭게 하라 Translation: Bring benefit to all people Official language Korean Capital Seoul Largest city Seoul President Roh Moo-hyun Prime Minister Lee Hae-chan Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 107th 99,274 km² 0. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... Al Jazeera (Arabic: ), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ... Bottom view of VHS videotape cassette with magnetic tape exposed Videotape is a means of recording television pictures and accompanying sound onto magnetic tape as opposed to movie film. ... A blindfold is a strip of cloth used to cover the eyes, rendering the user effectively (but temporarily) blind. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ... The modern skyline of Tokyo is highly decentralized. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Tulip Mosque in Ufa, Russia. ... A missile (British English: miss-isle; U.S. English: missl) is, in general, a projectile—that is, something thrown or otherwise propelled. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... General Abdul Rashid Dostum (also Abdurrashid Dostum, born 1954) is the Deputy Defense Minister of Afghanistan and an Uzbek warlord. ... Meymaneh (2004 population 75,900; 35° 55′ 17″ N 64° 47′ 1″ E, altitude 877 meters) is the capital of Faryab province, Afghanistan. ... The Middle East Forum, a think tank, works to define and promote the interests of the United States in the Middle East. ... Progressivism or political progressivism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ...   Islam? (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... An institute is a permanent organizational body created for a certain purpose. ... Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism, an adherent of the ideology espousing individual liberty and private property, meaning varies country to country American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Modern liberalism, in the USA, describes a political ideology that favors government intervention to promote equality Political progressivism, a political... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... NASA Logo The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... Artists Concept of Rover on Mars NASAs Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission (since 2003) is a unmanned Mars exploration mission that includes sending two Rovers (robots) to explore the Martian surface and geology. ... MER-A (Spirit) is the first of the two Mars Exploration Rover Missions. ... MER-B (Opportunity) is the second of the two rovers of NASAs Mars Exploration Rover Mission. ...

April 7, 2004

April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The magnetosphere shields the surface of the Earth from the charged particles of the solar wind. ... The equator is an imaginary circle drawn around a planet at a distance halfway between the poles. ... Latitude, denoted by the Greek letter φ, gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the Equator. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... ... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... The Chicago Police Department arrests a man An arrest is the action of police or other authority, or even in some circumstances a private civilian, to apprehend and take under guard a person who is suspected of committing a crime. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Firestone tire A tire (U.S. spelling) or tyre (UK spelling) is a roughly toroidal piece of material placed on the circumference of a wheel, either for the purpose of cushioning or to protect the wheel from wear and tear. ... A roadblock is a temporary installation set up to control or block traffic along a road. ... Jihad (ǧihād جهاد) is an Islamic term, from the Arabic root ǧhd (to exert utmost effort, to strive, struggle), which connotes a wide range of meanings: anything from an inward spiritual struggle to attain perfect faith to a political or military struggle to further the Islamic cause. ... The traditional definition of a sniper is an infantry soldier especially skilled in field craft and marksmanship who kills selected enemies from concealment with a rifle at large distances. ... For other meanings of home see home (disambiguation). ... Neighbourhood is also a term in topology. ... Dirty full-on sound from JAPAN. http://www. ... Overhead view of Sadr City Sadr City (formerly known as Saddam City and Al Thawra) is a vast low-income neighbourhood in northeastern Baghdad, home to some two million Shia Muslims. ... The Abdul-Aziz al-Samarrai mosque came to worldwide attention when militants holed up inside it directed small-arms fire and a rocket at US Marines. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Same-sex marriage, often referred to as gay marriage, indicates a marriage between two persons of the same sex. ... The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non-governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ... The New York Legislature is the U.S. state of New Yorks legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... Daniel J. ODonnell is a Democratic member of the New York state legislature. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... Marriage is a relationship and bond between individuals (termed spouses -- a male spouse is a husband and a female spouse, a wife) that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ...

April 6, 2004

April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Standing Committee of the National Peoples Congress (NPCSC; Chinese: 全国人民代表大会常务委员会, pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì Chángwù Wěiyuánhuì) is a committee of about 150 members of the National Peoples Congress (NPC) of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), which is convened between plenary sessions of the NPC... The Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China serves as the constitutional document of Hong Kong. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Zhao Ziyang (Simplified Chinese: 赵紫阳; Traditional Chinese: 趙紫陽; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Tzu-yang) (October 17, 1919–January 17, 2005) was a politician in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Seimas is the Lithuanian parliament. ... Early Lithuania The Grand Duchy of Lithuania Title: Kunigaikštis or Didysis Kunigaikštis (The Great Duke in Lithuanian) Mindaugas, 1238-1263 also crowned as a King Treniota, 1263-1264 Vaišvilkas (Vaišelga, Vaishyalga, Vaišalgas), 1264-1267 Švarnas (Svarnas, Shvarno), 1267-1269 Traidenis, 1269-1281 Daumantas, 1281-1285 Butigeidis, 1285-1291 Butvydas, 1291... Rolandas Paksas Rolandas Paksas (born 10 June 1956 in TelÅ¡iai, Lithuania) was the President of the Republic of Lithuania from January 2003 to April 2004. ... ArtÅ«ras Paulauskas ArtÅ«ras Paulauskas (born August 23, 1953) is a Lithuanian politician. ... Dressing the wounded during a gas attack by Austin O. Spare, 1918. ... The chemical compound osmium tetroxide (OsO4) is an oxide of the element osmium, in which it attains its highest oxidation number of 8. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... An official (from the Latin Officialis, person -or object- related to an officium, see that article) is, in the primary sense, someone who holds an office (i. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic: Munazzamat al-Tahrir al-Filastiniyyah منظمة التحرير الفلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state in the area historically known as Palestine. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, with an intent to destroy Israel. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... A warrior is a person habitually engaged in combat. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining, and the last day of June. ... Violence is the causing of, or acting with the intent to cause, injury to people or animals. ... Members parade in Sadr City The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish al Mahdi (Arabic جيش المهدي) , is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... The Iraqi resistance are the groups fighting against the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the U.S.-installed interim government of Iraq. ... Olivia Amador ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... Members parade in Sadr City The Mahdi Army, also known as the Mehdi Army or Jaish al Mahdi (Arabic جيش المهدي) , is a militia force created by the Iraqi radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr in June of 2003. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Urban warfare is warfare conducted in populated urban areas such as towns and cities. ... Sanctuary has multiple meanings. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ...   Islam? (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... Holiness means the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of a god or gods. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... A donation is a gift to a fund or cause, usually for charitable reasons. ... Worship usually refers to specific acts of religious praise, honour, or devotion, typically directed to a supernatural being such as a god or goddess. ... Tulip Mosque in Ufa, Russia. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... L. Paul Bremer Lewis Paul Bremer III, also known as Jerry Bremer, (born September 30, 1941) was named Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for post-war Iraq following the 2003 invasion of Iraq to replace Jay Garner on May 6, 2003. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) NYSE: IBM (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, NY, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... The SCO Group, Inc. ... For copyright issues in relation to Wikipedia itself, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. ... In law, the phrase without prejudice means that a claim, lawsuit, or proceeding has been brought to a temporary end but that no legal rights or privileges have been determined, waived, or lost by the result. ... University of Connecticut The University of Connecticut, commonly known as UConn, is the State of Connecticuts flagship land-grant university. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced NC-Double-A) is a voluntary and often controversial association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... The NCAA Womens Division I Championship is an annual basketball tournament for women. ... The word amateur has at least two connotations. ... Basketball is very popular in U.S. colleges. ... Three-peat is a portmanteau of the words three and repeat. ...

April 5, 2004

April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... L. Paul Bremer Lewis Paul Bremer III, also known as Jerry Bremer, (born September 30, 1941) was named Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for post-war Iraq following the 2003 invasion of Iraq to replace Jay Garner on May 6, 2003. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... Butch Cassidy, a famous Western American outlaw An outlaw, a person living the lifestyle of outlawry, meaning literally outside of the law. ... US Army Seal The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... The word operation can mean any of several things: The method, act, process, or effect of using a device or system. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... Security is being free from danger. ... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (born c. ... The Seal of the CPA in Iraq The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as a transitional government in Iraq following the invasion by the United States and the other members of the multinational coalition which was formed to oust the government of Saddam Hussein in 2003. ... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... A large number of international organizations and other bodies have a Secretary General or Secretary-General as their chief administrative officers or in other administrative capacities. ... Lakhdar Brahimi (born January 1, 1934 in Algeria) is the United Nations special representative for Afghanistan and Iraq. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), styled HM The Queen (born 21 April 1926) is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and... The Entente Cordiale (French for friendly understanding) is a series of agreements signed on April 8, 1904, between the United Kingdom and France. ... Eurostar logo Eurostar is a train service that connects London with Paris and Brussels. ... Channel Tunnel The English terminal at Cheriton, from the Pilgrims Way The Channel Tunnel, (French: le tunnel sous la Manche; once popularly nicknamed the Chunnel in English) is a 50-km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover, connecting Cheriton in Kent, England and Coquelles... The Senate (in French : le Sénat) is the upper house of the Parliament of France. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant City of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada location. ... Binomial name Gallus gallus (Linnaeus, 1758) A chicken (Gallus gallus) is a type of domesticated bird which is often raised as a type of poultry. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th) Land 925,186 km² Water 19,549 km² (2. ... Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. ... The Los Angeles Times (also LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the western United States. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, analyzing and presenting information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. ... The Pulitzer Prizes for 2004 were announced on April 5, 2004. ... Entrance to the emirs palace in Bukhara. ... Shaikh (شيخ, also rendered as Sheik, Shaykh or Sheikh) is a word in the Arabic language meaning an elder or a revered old man. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب Ê»arab) are an originally Arabian ethnicity widespread in the Middle East and North Africa. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calendar Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Mordechai Vanunu in the garden of St. ... An economist is someone who studies Economics. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is the eleventh-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans, Black Americans or blacks, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to West and Central Africa. ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon was created by singer/songwriter Paul Jabara AIDS is an acronym for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is defined as a collection of symptoms and infections... Bisexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by aesthetic attraction, romantic love and sexual desire for both males and females. ... The Uri Party is a political party in South Korea. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Minister of Unification of the Republic of Korea. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... The President is head of state of South Korea. ... Roh Moo-hyun (born September 1 (August 6 in lunar calendar), 1946) has been the President of South Korea since February 25, 2003. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... There are various types of trains designed for particular purposes, see rail transport operations. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... An arrest warrant is a warrant issued by a public officer which authorizes the arrest and detention of an individual. ... Ingvar Kamprad holding a lecture for a group of students at Växjö University in his native province of SmÃ¥land. ... Furniture is the collective term for the movable objects which support the human body (seating furniture and beds), provide storage, and hold objects on horizontal surfaces above the ground. ... In commerce, a retailer buys goods or products in large quantities from manufacturers or importers, either directly or through a wholesaler, and then sells individual items or small quantities to the general public or end user customers, usually in a shop, also called store. ... Chain stores are a range of retail outlets which share a brand and central management, usually with standardised business methods and practices. ... IKEA is a Swedish home furnishings retailer. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company, with over 50,000 employees in various countries as of May 2004. ... Bill Gates William Henry Gates III, KBE (born October 28, 1955), commonly known as Bill Gates, is an American businessman and a microcomputer pioneer. ... In physics, a potential is a scalar quantity that can be used to analyze the effects of complicated vectorial forces and similar quantities by means of simple conservation laws. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... The chemical compound ammonium nitrate, the nitrate of ammonia with chemical formula NH4NO3, is commonly used in agriculture as a high-nitrogen fertilizer. ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Duma (Ду́ма in Russian) is any of various representative assemblies in modern Russia and Russian history. ... United Russia (Russian Единая Россия - Yedinaya Rossiya) is a Russian political party, which usually labels itself centrist. ... A bill is a law introduced within a legislature to be read as part of procedure to become a law. ... Ban could be: ban, a decree that prohibits something, a form of censorship ban, a barring of access of resources on the Internet Ban, a king from Arthurian legend. ... Public is of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; opposed to private; as, the public treasury, a road or lake. ...

April 4, 2004

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Opened for signature July 1, 1968 at New York Entered into force March 5, 1970 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, and 40 other signatory states. ... NPT may stand for: Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty National Pipe Thread This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Thomas Kean Thomas Howard Kean (born April 21, 1935 in New York City) was the Republican Governor of New Jersey from 1982 to 1990. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated attacks carried out against the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This is a list of governors of New Jersey. ... Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Al-Qaeda (Arabic: - al-Qā‘idah, the foundation or the base) is the name given to an international campaign comprised of independent and collaborative cells that all profess the same cause of reducing outside influence upon Islamic affairs. ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Interior Minister is a member of a Cabinet in a Government. ... Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ... Security is being free from danger. ... Negotiation is the process whereby interested parties resolve disputes, agree upon courses of action, bargain for individual or collective advantage, and/or attempt to craft outcomes which serve their mutual interests. ... ... Shadow 200 UAV flying over Iraq. ... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ... The myriad political divisions of the United States include (but are not limited to) states, territories, counties, townships, cities, the federal district, possessions and insular areas, embassies and consulates, Indian reservations, military installations, conservation districts and non-municipal special-purpose districts like public authorities, school districts and utilities districts. ... Look up Alias in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term alias may refer to— an assumed name, or pseudonym. ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... In the parlance of criminal justice, a suspect is a term used to refer to a person, known or unknown, suspected of committing a crime. ... The scene of one of the Madrid bombings. ... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin using diatomaceous earth (Kieselguhr) as an absorbent. ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The word ton or tonne is derived from the Old English tunne, and ultimately from the Old French tonne, and referred originally to a large cask with a capacity of 252 wine gallons, which holds approximately 2100 pounds of water. ... The chemical compound ammonium nitrate, the nitrate of ammonia with chemical formula NH4NO3, is commonly used in agriculture as a high-nitrogen fertilizer. ... Fertilizers are chemicals given to plants with the intention of promoting growth; they are usually applied either via the soil or by foliar spraying. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English(100%), Welsh(20. ... Bales of hay on a farm near Ames, Iowa A farm is the basic unit in agriculture. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. ... South Wales is an area of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the East and South, and Mid Wales and West Wales to the North and West. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... A cleric is: A member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals; or A member of a character class in Dungeons & Dragons and similar fantasy role-playing games. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Muqtada al-Sadr Muqtada al-Sadr (Arabic: مقتدى الصدر, also transliterated as Moqtada Alsadr) (b. ... Najaf (Arabic: ) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Shooting is the act of causing a gun to fire at a target. ... Chief can refer to The chief engineer of a naval vessel or anyone with the rank Chief Warrant Officer in the Canadian Forces In heraldry, a chief is a band of colour or metal making up the top (usually the top third or slightly less) of a shield. ... Kufa (الكوفة al-Kufa in Arabic) is a city in Iraq, about 170 km south of Baghdad, and 10 km northeast of Najaf. ... A bodyguard is a person who protects someone (known as their principal) from personal assault, kidnapping, assassination, loss of confidential information, or other threats. ... Combat, or fighting, is purposeful conflict between one or more persons, often involving violence and intended to establish dominance over the opposition. ... Najaf (Arabic: ) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Southeast is the ordinal direction halfway between south and east. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... See also list of house types. ... A neighbourhood (in CmE) or neighborhood (in AmE) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ... The term shot may refer to: Shot (film) is part of a film between two cuts. ... This page describes uniform in the sense of clothing. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... A threat is an unwanted (deliberate or accidental) event that may result in harm to an asset. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... A plan is a proposed or intended method of getting from one set of circumstances to another. ... Binyamin Benny Elon (1954-) is a Member of Knesset. ... A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... When a scandal breaks, the discovery of an attempt to cover up the evidence of wrongdoing is often regarded as even more scandalous than the original deeds. ...

April 3, 2004

April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NASA Logo The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which was established in 1958, is the agency responsible for the public space program of the United States of America. ... Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is a satellite-based mission to measure the stress-energy tensor (the distribution, and especially the motion, of matter) in and near Earth, and thus to test related models; in application of Einsteins general theory of relativity. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Chicago Police Department arrests a man An arrest is the action of police or other authority, or even in some circumstances a private civilian, to apprehend and take under guard a person who is suspected of committing a crime. ... Vladimír Mečiar (born July 26, 1942) is the leader of the Peoples Party - Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (ĽS-HZDS) and a former Prime Minister of Slovakia. ... Presidential elections were held in Slovakia on April 3 (first round) and April 17 (second round) 2004. ... The scene of one of the Madrid bombings. ... Leganés streets Leganés is a town in central Spain. ... The Simpsons. ... A voice actor (or voice artist) is a person who provides voices for computer and video games, puppet shows, amusement rides, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, stop motion, and animation works (including cartoons, animated feature films, animated shorts), and radio and television commercials. ...   Berlin? (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ... Cologne skyline at night with river Rhine in the foreground and famous Cologne Cathedral on the right. ... Stuttgart, a city located in southern Germany, is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg with a population of approximately 600,000 as of May 2005. ... Research is an active, diligent, and systematic process of inquiry in order to discover, interpret or revise facts, events, behaviours, or theories, or to make practical applications with theis also used to describe a collection of information about a particular subject. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... A statistic (singular) is the result of applying a statistical algorithm to a set of data. ... An anomaly is a deviation from the common rule. ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... City lights from space. ... It has been suggested that Suburbia be merged into this article or section. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Chief can refer to The chief engineer of a naval vessel or anyone with the rank Chief Warrant Officer in the Canadian Forces In heraldry, a chief is a band of colour or metal making up the top (usually the top third or slightly less) of a shield. ... Audit can refer to: Telecommunication audit Financial audit Performance audit Completion of a course of study for which no assessment is completed or grade awarded; especially audit is awarded to those who have elected not to receive a letter grade for a course in which letter grades typically awarded. ... A felony, in many common law legal systems, is the term for a very serious crime; misdemeanors are considered to be less serious. ... Logic (from ancient Greek λόγος (logos), meaning reason) is the study of arguments. ... // United States In the United States, state police are a police body unique to each U.S. state, having statewide authority to conduct law enforcement activities and criminal investigations. ... Some U.S. states have laws which give a special status for criminals designated as sexually violent predators, which allows these offenders to be held in prison after their sentence is complete if they are considered to be a risk to the public. ... Megans Law is the colloquial term used to denote a number of state laws in the United States that require law enforcement authorities to identify what are generally called sex offenders to the public at large through various media, including in some cases the Internet. ...

April 2, 2004

2 April is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... VP also stands for Verb phrase. ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Lynne Cheney Lynne Ann Vincent Cheney (born August 14, 1941) is the wife of Vice President Richard B. Cheney. ... To publish is to make publicly known, and in reference to text and images, it can mean distributing paper copies to the public, or putting the content on a website. ... An erotic photo Erotica, from the Greek eros, “love”, are works of art, including literature, photography, film, sculpture and painting, that deal substantively with erotically stimulating or arousing descriptions. ... DeFoes Robinson Crusoe, Newspaper edition published in 1719 A novel (from French nouvelle, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Influenza A virus, the virus that causes Avian flu. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th) Land 925,186 km² Water 19,549 km² (2. ... The Canadian Food Inspection Agency, or CFIA, which was created in April 1997, brought together inspection and related services previously provided through the activities of four federal government departments – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Health Canada and Industry Canada. ... Abbotsford is a Canadian city, in the province of British Columbia. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In law a commission is a patent which allows a person to take possession of a state office and carry out official acts and duties. ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated attacks carried out against the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... William Jefferson Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... For the rock band Riot see Riot (the band) Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... Noon is the time exactly halfway through the day, written 12:00 in the 24-hour clock and 12:00 pm in the 12-hour clock. ... Prayer is an effort to communicate with God, or to some deity or deities, or another form of spiritual entity, or otherwise, either to offer praise, to make a request, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions. ... Western Wall by night The Western Wall (Hebrew: הכותל המערבי Kotel HaMaaravi), or simply The Kotel, is a retaining wall from the time of the Second Temple. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... For the rock band Riot see Riot (the band) Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... The Temple Mount (Hebrew: הַר הַבַּיִת, Har haBáyit) or Noble Sanctuary (Arabic: الحرم الشريف, al-Ḥaram aÅ¡-Å arÄ«f) is a hotly contested religious site in the Old City of Jerusalem. ... The Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem is not to be confused with the Dome of the Rock The Al-Aqsa Mosque (Arabic: المسجد الاقصى, Masjid Al-Aqsa, literally farthest mosque) is part of the complex of religious buildings in Jerusalem known as either the Majed Mount or Al-Haram ash... Holiness means the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of a god or gods. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... The concept of peace ranks among the most controversial in our time. ... This page is about protests. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism, the gathering and dissemination of information about current events, trends, issues and people. ... Hong Kong Journalists Association was established in 1968 for practicing journalists in Hong Kong with the stated goal to enhance press freedom and the integrity of news coverage. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public speech often through a state constitution for its citizens, and associations of individuals extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... The word pride refers to a sense of self-respect, a refusal to be humiliated as well as joy in the accomplishments of oneself or a person, group, or object that one identifies in. ... Combat, or fighting, is purposeful conflict between one or more persons, often involving violence and intended to establish dominance over the opposition. ... Shame is a social condition and a form of social control consisting of an emotional state and a set of behaviors, caused by the consciousness or awareness of having acted inappropriately. ... Mutilation is an act or injury that degrades the appearance or function of the (human) body, usually without causing death. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Tyco International Ltd. ... Sun Microsystems (Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... ... This article is about law in society. ... A technical is a fighting vehicle. ... Co-operation refers to the practice of people or greater entities working in common with commonly agreed-upon goals and possibly methods, instead of working separately in competition. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company, with over 50,000 employees in various countries as of May 2004. ... The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... // Overview The United States has the largest and the most technologically advanced national economy in the world, with a per capita GDP of $40,100. ... Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California during the Great Depression. ... The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is the unit of the United States Department of Labor which is the principal fact-finding agency for the U.S. government in the field of labor economics and statistics. ... The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re-employment services, and some economic statistics. ... Payroll is one of a series of accounting transactions dealing with the process of paying employees for services rendered, after processing of the various requirements for withholding of money from the employee for payment of payroll taxes, insurance premiums, employee benefits, garnishments and other deductions. ... A report is a type of document written by someone or a group of people. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... The European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia (EUMC) is an independent body of the European Union based in Vienna whose goal is to provide the EU with objective, reliable and comparable data at European level on the phenomena of racism and xenophobia in order to help them take measures... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Order is the opposite of anarchy and chaos. ... Cranes are essential in construction, as seen in this photo of the construction of a skyscraper Construction on the North Bytown Bridge in Ottawa, Canada. ... A reference to colonization, or the resulting communities. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... AVE train set for Madrid-Sevilla AVE, an acronym for Alta Velocidad Española (literally, Spanish High Speed but ave also meaning bird in Spanish) is a high speed train that can achieve speeds of up to 300 km/h on dedicated track. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... Seville (Spanish: Sevilla, see also different names) is the artistic, cultural, and financial capital of southern Spain, crossed by the river Guadalquivir (37°22′38″ N 5°59′13″ W). ... The façade of Toledo cathedral Toledo is a city located in central Spain, the capital of the province of Toledo and of the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. ... The scene of one of the Madrid bombings. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, with an intent to destroy Israel. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national publicly funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... Tourette syndrome — also called Tourettes syndrome, Tourette Spectrum (TS), Tourettes disorder, or Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurological or neurochemical disorder characterized by tics: involuntary, rapid, sudden movements or vocalizations that occur repeatedly in the same way. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national publicly funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... Michael Grade CBE (born March 8, 1943) is a British businessman and a distinctive figure in the field of broadcasting. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Gavyn Davies Gavyn Davies (born 27 November 1950) was the chairman of the BBC from 2001 until 2004, a former Goldman Sachs banker and a former economic advisor to the British Government. ... Lord Hutton led the inquiry that concluded that Dr. David Kelly had taken his own life. ... Legislative elections were held in Sri Lanka on 2 April 2004. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Adán Santos Sánchez Vallejo (April 14, 1984 in Torrance, California - March 27, 2004), was a popular Mexican singer, the son of corridista singer Marcelino Vallejo Sánchez. ... The City of Los Angeles (from Spanish Los Ángeles , meaning the angels), also known as L.A., is the second-largest city in the United States in terms of population, as well as one of the worlds most important economic, cultural, and entertainment centers. ...

April 1, 2004

Voting begins in South Korean parliamentary elections. April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Signing ceremony at the White House, April 1, 2004. ... Laci and Scott Peterson Laci Peterson, born Laci Denise Rocha (May 4, 1975 – December, 2002), was last seen alive on December 23, 2002 and became the subject of one of the most discussed missing person cases in recent U.S. history. ... The Interior Minister is a member of a Cabinet in a Government. ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An organization is a formal group of people with one or more shared goals. ... DHKP/C (Devrimci Halkŗn Kurtuluşu Partisi/Cephesi) (Revolutionary Peoples Liberation Party/Front) was originally formed in 1978 as Devrimci Sol(Dev Sol) (Revolutionary Right), a splinter faction of Dev Genç (Revolutionary Youth). ... // A gun is a mechanical device that fires projectiles at high velocity, using a propellant such as gun powder or compressed air. ... The Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The WHO flag: similar to the flag of the United Nations, augmented with the symbolic staff and serpent of Asklepios, Greek god of medicine and healing. ... The Church of the Nativity, a Bethlehem Landmark Bethlehem (Arabic بيت لحم Bayt Laḥm house of meat; Standard Hebrew בית לחם house of bread, Bet léḥem / Bet láḥem; Tiberian Hebrew Bêṯ léḥem / Bêṯ lāḥem) is a city on the West Bank and a hub of Palestinian cultural and tourism... A troop is a military unit, which can have different meanings depending on the country in which it is used. ... The Al_Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al_Fatah faction. ... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was co-founder and Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA... The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Chicago Police Department arrests a man An arrest is the action of police or other authority, or even in some circumstances a private civilian, to apprehend and take under guard a person who is suspected of committing a crime. ... An astronomer or spmething i cant inderstand is a scientist whose area of research is astronomy or astrophysics. ... Estimation is generally the calculation of an approximate or uncertain result, often based on approximate, uncertain, incomplete, or noisy data. ... Earth, also known as the Earth, Terra, and (mostly in the 19th century) Tellus, is the third-closest planet to the Sun. ... A planet in common parlance is a large object in orbit around a star that is not a star itself. ... The Pleiades star cluster A star is any massive gaseous body in outer space. ... L. Paul Bremer Lewis Paul Bremer III, also known as Jerry Bremer, (born September 30, 1941) was named Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for post-war Iraq following the 2003 invasion of Iraq to replace Jay Garner on May 6, 2003. ... JUSTICE is a human rights and law reform organisation based in the United Kingdom. ... A defense contractor (sometimes called a military contractor) is a business organization or individual that provides products or services to a defense department of a government. ... Mutilation is an act or injury that degrades the appearance or function of the (human) body, usually without causing death. ... Fallujah (Arabic: فلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Beverley Hughes (born 30 March British politician, and member of Parliament for Stretford and Urmston (in Greater Manchester). ... An entry visa valid in all Schengen treaty countries Visas for Laos, Thailand, and Sri Lanka A visa (short for the Latin carta visa, lit. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... General is a military rank used by nearly every country in the world. ... Payroll is one of a series of accounting transactions dealing with the process of paying employees for services rendered, after processing of the various requirements for withholding of money from the employee for payment of payroll taxes, insurance premiums, employee benefits, garnishments and other deductions. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Michael Hendricks (right) and René Leboeuf Michael Hendricks and René Leboeuf are Canadian gay rights advocates, known for their advocacy of same-sex marriage in Canada. ... Beginning in 1963, a terrorist group that became known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks on government offices and at least two murders by FLQ gunfire and three violent deaths by bombings. ... April 1, 2004 was an April Fools Day that fell on a Thursday. ... The University of Chicago is a private co-educational university located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Nature is one of the oldest and most reputable general-purpose scientific journals, first published on November 4, 1869. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Groups Conodonta Hyperoartia Petromyzontidae (lampreys) Pteraspidomorphi (early jawless fish) Thelodonti Anaspida Cephalaspidomorphi (early jawless fish) Galeaspida Pituriaspida Osteostraci Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates) Placodermi Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish) Acanthodii Osteichthyes (bony fish) Actinopterygii (ray-finned fish) Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish) Actinistia (coelacanths) Dipnoi (lungfish) A fish is a poikilothermic (cold-blooded)* water-dwelling...


Past events by month

2004: January February March
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
2004 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5335 words)
April 3 - A bomb explosion in a Madrid flat kills a Spanish policeman and five terrorists suspected of responsibility for the Madrid train bombings on March 11.
April 17 - Israeli helicopters fire missiles at a convoy of vehicles in the Gaza Strip, killing the Gaza leader of Hamas, Abdel Aziz al-Rantissi.
April 21 - Mordechai Vanunu, who revealed an Israeli nuclear weapons programme in the 1980s, is released from prison in Israel after an 18 year term for treason.
April 2004 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5216 words)
Ten U.S. soldiers are killed in three attacks in Iraq, raising the number of U.S. combat deaths in April to 126.
2004 South African legislative election: The African National Congress (ANC) of President Thabo Mbeki, which has been in power since the end of the apartheid system in 1994, is re-elected with an increased majority.
April 13th 2004 Press Conference of the President is held at 8:30 PM EST by George W. Bush in The East Room of the White House.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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