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Encyclopedia > Apricot
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Apricot
Apricot fruits
Apricot fruits
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Subgenus: Prunus
Species: P. armeniaca
Binomial name
Prunus armeniaca
L.

The apricot (Prunus armeniaca or Armenian plum in Latin, syn. Armeniaca vulgaris, Armenian: Ծիրան, Chinese: 杏子, Czech: Meruňka) is a fruit-bearing tree, native to China and spread to Europe through Armenia. It is classified with the plum in the subgenus Prunus of the Prunus genus. Download high resolution version (1280x966, 237 KB)Apricots. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... It has been suggested that Angiospermae, and Anthophyta be merged into this article or section. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families Barbeyaceae Cannabaceae (hemp family) Dirachmaceae Elaeagnaceae Moraceae (mulberry family) Rosaceae (rose family) Rhamnaceae (buckthorn family) Ulmaceae (elm family) Urticaceae (nettle family) For the Philippine municipality, see Rosales, Pangasinan. ... Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ... Species Prunus alabamensis Prunus alleghaniensis Prunus americana Prunus andersonii Prunus angustifolia Prunus armeniaca Prunus avium Prunus caroliniana Prunus cerasifera Prunus cerasus Prunus domestica Prunus dulcis Prunus emarginata Prunus fasciculata Prunus fremontii Prunus fruticosa Prunus geniculata Prunus glandulosa Prunus gracilis Prunus grayana Prunus havardii Prunus hortulana Prunus ilicifolia Prunus japonica Prunus... It has been suggested that Prune (fruit) be merged into this article or section. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician, zoologist and gay rights campaigner[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Apricot can refer to: Apricot, the fruit Apricot (color), the color Apricot Computers Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Operational Technologies, annual Internet operations conferencesee Category: ... In scientific classification, synonymy is the existence of multiple systematic names to label the same organism. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... It has been suggested that Prune (fruit) be merged into this article or section. ... In biology, a subgenus is a taxonomic grade intermediate between genus and species. ... Species Prunus alabamensis Prunus alleghaniensis Prunus americana Prunus andersonii Prunus angustifolia Prunus armeniaca Prunus avium Prunus caroliniana Prunus cerasifera Prunus cerasus Prunus domestica Prunus dulcis Prunus emarginata Prunus fasciculata Prunus fremontii Prunus fruticosa Prunus geniculata Prunus glandulosa Prunus gracilis Prunus grayana Prunus havardii Prunus hortulana Prunus ilicifolia Prunus japonica Prunus...


It is a small- to medium-sized tree with a dense, spreading canopy 8–12 m tall; its leaves are shaped somewhat like a heart, with pointed tips, and about 8 cm long and 3–4 cm wide. Its flowers are white to pinkish in color. The fruit appears similar to a peach or nectarine, with a color ranging from yellow to orange and sometimes a red cast; its surface is smooth and nearly hairless. Apricots are stone fruit (drupes), so called because the lone seed is often called a "stone". “Foliage” redirects here. ... The traditional heart shape appears on a 1910 St. ... A Phalaenopsis flower Rudbeckia fulgida A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ... This article is about the color. ... PinkIt can be described as a light red, but it is more bright, undersaturated red. ... Binomial name Prunus persica (L.) Batsch Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Nectarine can mean: A kind of peach, see Peach A demoscene radio, see Nectarine (radio). ... A yellow Tulip. ... The orange, a fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... Red is any of a number of similar colors evoked by light consisting predominantly of the longest wavelengths of light discernible by the human eye, in the wavelength range of roughly 625–750 nm. ... The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit) In botany, a drupe is a type of fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp or skin and mesocarp or flesh) surrounds a shell (the pit or stone) of hardened endocarp with a seed inside. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ...


The name derives from "apricock" and "abrecox", through the French abricot, from the Spanish albaricoque, which was an adaptation of the Arabic al-burquk, itself a rendering of the late Greek πρεκοκκια or πραικοκιον, adapted from the Latin praecox or praecoquus, early, possibly referring to the fruit maturing much earlier in the summer than plums. However, in Argentina and Chile the word for "apricot" is "damasco" which probably indicates that to the Spanish settlers of Argentina the fruit was associated with Damascus in Syria. Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Damascus ( transliteration: , also commonly known as الشام ash-Shām) is the largest city of Syria and is also the capital. ...

Contents

Cultivation

Dried organic apricot, produced in Turkey. The colour is dark because it has not been treated with sulfur dioxide (E220).
Dried organic apricot, produced in Turkey. The colour is dark because it has not been treated with sulfur dioxide (E220).

The apricot is thought to have originated in northeastern China near the Russian border. In Armenia it was known from ancient times.[1] The Roman General Lucullus (106-57 B.C.) even exported some trees,- cherry, white heart cherry and apricot from Armenia to Europe. While English settlers brought the apricot to the English colonies in the New World, most of modern American production of apricots comes from the seedlings carried to the west coast by Spanish missionaries. Most U.S. production is in California with some in Oregon and Utah. Turkey is one of the leading dried-apricot producers.[2] In Armenia apricot is grown in Ararat Valley. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1936 × 1296 pixel, file size: 608 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Whole pitted dried organic apricot (Prunus armeniaca). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (1936 × 1296 pixel, file size: 608 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Whole pitted dried organic apricot (Prunus armeniaca). ... Sulfur dioxide (or Sulphur dioxide) has the chemical formula SO2. ... Lucius Licinius Lucullus (c. ... British colonization of the Americas (including colonization under the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union) began in the late 16th century, before reaching its peak after colonies were established in North, Central and South America and in the Caribbean, and a protectorate was established in Hawaii. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Area  Ranked 13th  - Total 84,876 sq mi (219,887 km²)  - Width 270 miles (435 km)  - Length 350 miles (565 km)  - % water 3. ... The Ararat plain, one of the largest of the Armenian Plateau, stretches west of the sevan basin, at the foothills of the Gegham mountains. ...


Although often thought of as a "subtropical" fruit, the Apricot is in fact native to a region with cold winters. The tree is slightly more cold-hardy than the peach, tolerating winter temperatures as cold as −30 °C or lower if healthy. The limiting factor in apricot culture is spring frosts: They tend to flower very early, around the time of the vernal equinox even in northern locations like the Great Lakes region, meaning spring frost often kills the flowers. The trees do need some winter cold (even if minimal) to bear and grow properly and do well in Mediterranean climate locations since spring frosts are less severe here but there is some cool winter weather to allow a proper dormancy. The dry climate of these areas is best for good fruit production. Hybridisation with the closely related Prunus sibirica (Siberian Apricot; hardy to −50°C but with less palatable fruit) offers options for breeding more cold-tolerant plants.[3] Binomial name Prunus persica (L.) Batsch Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Frost on black pipes Frost is a solid deposition of water vapor from saturated air. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... A Mediterranean climate is a climate that resembles the climate of the lands bordering the Mediterranean Sea. ... Dormancy is a arrested plant growth. ... // This article is about a biological term. ...


Apricot cultivars are most often grafted on plum or peach rootstocks. A cutting of an existing apricot plant provides the fruit characteristics such as flavor, size, etc., but the rootstock provides the growth characteristics of the plant. This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... Grafted apple tree Malus sp. ...


Many apricots are also cultivated in Australia, particularly South Australia where they are commonly grown in the region known as the Riverland and in a small town called Mypolonga in the Lower Murray region of the state. In states other than South Australia apricots are still grown, particularly in Tasmania and western Victoria and southwest New South Wales, but they are less common than in South Australia. Capital Adelaide [[Government of South Austra Fullname = State of South Australia|Government]] Constitutional monarchy [[Governor of South Austra Fullname = State of South Australia|Governor]] Marjorie Jackson-Nelson [[Premier of South Austra Fullname = State of South Australia|Premier]] Mike Rann (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 11  - Senate seats 12 Gross State... The Riverland is a tourism and wine region in South Australia. ... The Murray River, or River Murray, is Australias second-longest river in its own right (the longest being its tributary the Darling). ... Capital Hobart Government Const. ... Capital Melbourne Government Const. ... Capital Sydney Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Professor Marie Bashir Premier Morris Iemma (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 50  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $305,437 (1st)  - Product per capita  $45,153/person (4th) Population (End of March 2006)  - Population  6,817,100 (1st)  - Density  8. ...


Apricots are also cultivated in Egypt and are among the common fruits well known there. The season in which apricot is present in the market in Egypt is very short. There is even an Egyptian proverb that says "Fel meshmesh" (English "in the apricot") which is used to refer to something that will not happen because the apricot disappears from the market in Egypt so shortly after it has appeared. Egyptians usually dry apricot and sweeten it then use it to make a drink called "amar el deen".


Kernels

Main article: Apricot kernel

Seeds or kernels of the apricot grown in central Asia and around the Mediterranean are so sweet that they may be substituted for almonds. The Italian liqueur Amaretto and amaretti biscotti are flavoured with extract of apricot kernels rather than almonds. Oil pressed from these cultivars has been used as cooking oil. Apricot kernels are, like most nuts and seeds, very nutritious. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... Binomial name Prunus dulcis (Mill. ... The Amaretto Disaronno square bottle The term amaretto refers to a sweet liqueur made from a basic infusion of almonds or the almond-like kernels from the stones of drupe fruits, well as a related biscotto[1] (usually referred to in the plural, biscotti). ... A plate of biscotti Biscotti (plural of Italian biscotto, roughly meaning twice baked) are crisp Italian cookies often containing nuts or flavored with anise. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with cooking oil. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with vegetable oil. ...


Medicinal and non-food uses

Fresh or dried, apricots are an excellent health and beauty food. Three small fresh apricots contain more than 50% of the recommended daily intake (RDA) of beta-carotene, a potent antioxidant. Beta-carotene prevents the build-up of plaque deposits in the arteries, protects the eyes from sun damage and deactivates free radicals that, if left unchecked, accelerate the ageing process and increase the risk of cancer. In addition, the body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A, which is vital for good vision and for keeping the eyes lubricated. Those at risk of dry eyes, such as contact-lens wearers, should include plenty of apricots in their diet. Apricots contain significant levels of iron, essential for hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells. Iron deficiency leads to anaemia, pale skin, and thinning, undernourished hair. Carotene is responsible for the orange colour of the carrots and many other fruits and vegetables. ... Section of an artery For other uses, see Artery (disambiguation). ... In chemistry, radicals (often referred to as free radicals) are atomic or molecular species with unpaired electrons on an otherwise open shell configuration. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... Retinol, the animal form of vitamin A, is a yellow fat-soluble, antioxidant vitamin important in vision and bone growth. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... 3-dimensional structure of hemoglobin. ... Anemia (AmE) or anaemia (BrE), from the Greek () meaning without blood, is a deficiency of red blood cells (RBCs) and/or hemoglobin. ...


Cyanogenic glycosides (found in most stone fruit seeds, bark, and leaves) are found in high concentration in apricot seeds. Laetrile, a purported alternative treatment for cancer, is extracted from apricot seeds. As early as the year 502, apricot seeds were used to treat tumors, and in the 17th century apricot oil was used in England against tumors and ulcers. A cyanide is any chemical compound that contains the group C&#8801;N, with the carbon atom triple bonded to the nitrogen atom. ... A glycoside is a molecule where a sugar group is bonded through its anomeric carbon to a nonsugar group by either an oxygen or a nitrogen atom. ... The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit) In botany, a drupe is a type of fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp or skin and mesocarp or flesh) surrounds a shell (the pit or stone) of hardened endocarp with a seed inside. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of bark, see Bark (disambiguation). ... “Foliage” redirects here. ... Amygdalin (from the Greek amugdale, almond), C20H27NO11, is a glucoside isolated from bitter almonds by H. E. Robiquet and A. F. Boutron-Charlard in 1830, and subsequently investigated by Liebig and Wöhler, and others. ... Alternative medicine describes practices used in place of conventional medical treatments. ... Tumor or tumour literally means swelling, and is sometimes still used with that meaning. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Endoscopic images of a duodenal ulcer. ...


In Europe, apricots were long considered an aphrodisiac, and were used in this context in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and as an inducer of childbirth labor, as depicted in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi. World map showing the location of Europe. ... An aphrodisiac is an agent which increases sexual desire[1] or sexual arousal. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... John Webster (c. ... The Duchess of Malfi is a macabre, tragic play, written by the English dramatist John Webster and first performed in 1614 at the Globe Theatre in London, and published for the first time in 1623. ...


The IUD (intrauterine device) form of birth control, based on the premise that a foreign object within the uterus will prevent the implantation of an embryo, is linked to an old practice of camel herders and drivers who would place an apricot pit within the uterus of their female camels to prevent pregenancy and keep them working at carrying cargo rather than the work of mothering.[citation needed] This article is about contraceptive uterine devices that do not contain hormones. ...


Dried apricots can also be used as a potent laxative.[citation needed]


In culture

The Chinese associate the apricot with education and medicine. Chuang Tzu, a Chinese philosopher in 4th century BCE, had told a story that Confucius taught his students in a forum among the wood of apricot.[citation needed] thumb|Zhuang Zi by Japan Zhu&#257;ng Z&#464; (pinyin), Chuang Tzu (W-G), or Chuang Tse (Chinese &#33674;&#23376;, literally meaning Master Zhuang) was a famous philosopher in ancient China who lived around the 4th century BC during the Warring States Period, corresponding to the Hundred Schools of... (5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Invasion of the Celts into Ireland Kingdom of Macedon conquers Persian empire Romans build first aqueduct Chinese use bellows The Scythians are beginning to be absorbed into the Sarmatian... Confucius (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu, lit. ...


In the 2nd century, Tung Fung, a medical doctor, lived in Lushan. He asked his cured patients to plant apricots in his backyard instead of paying consultation and medical fees. Those cured of serious illness planted five, and the rest planted one. After some years, a hundred thousand apricot trees were planted and the wood become the symbol for doctors and medicine.[citation needed] The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Lushan is famous for its villas. ...


In The Wizard of Oz, the Cowardly Lion sings, "What puts the ape in the apricot? Courage!" This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


Among tank-driving soldiers, apricots are taboo, by superstition. Tankers will not eat apricots, allow apricots onto their vehicles, and often will not even say the word "apricot". This superstition stems from Sherman tank breakdowns purportedly happening in the presence of cans of apricots.[4]


Dreaming of apricots, in English folklore, is said to be good luck, though the Chinese believe the fruit is a symbol of cowardice..[citation needed]


References

  1. ^ VII Symposium on Apricot Culture and Decline
  2. ^ The tendencies of Apricot producers
  3. ^ Prunus sibirica - L.
  4. ^ Marines Magazine - Marine Corps superstitions

See also

Look up apricot in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (from wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... This article is a list of diseases of apricots (Prunus armeniaca). ... Apricot kernels are, like most nuts and seeds, very nutritious. ... A pluot (plü-ot) is a fruit developed in the late 20th century by Floyd Zaiger. ... Binomial name Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc. ... Chemical structure of Amygdalin Amygdalin (from Greek: , almond), C20H27NO11, is a glycoside isolated from bitter almonds by H. E. Robiquet and A. F. Boutron-Charlard in 1830, and subsequently investigated by Liebig and Wöhler, and others. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Apricot (2448 words)
In Europe, apricots were long considered an aphrodisiac, and is used in this context in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and as an inducer of labour, used in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi for this purpose.
Apricot seeds contain the highest amounts of these cyanide generating compounds, and the cancer drug laetrile is derived from this source.
Apricot culture is most successful in mild, Mediterranean climates where the danger of spring frost is limited, and disease pressure is reduced.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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