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Encyclopedia > Apple Inc
Apple Inc.
Type Public (NASDAQ: AAPL, LSE: ACP)
Founded United States California (April 1, 1976)
Headquarters Cupertino, California, United States
Key people Steve Jobs, Co-founder, CEO
Steve Wozniak, Co-founder
Timothy D. Cook, COO
Peter Oppenheimer, CFO
Philip W. Schiller, SVP Marketing
Jonathan Ive, SVP Industrial Design
Tony Fadell, SVP iPod Division
Ron Johnson, SVP Retail
Sina Tamaddon, SVP Applications
Bertrand Serlet, SVP Software Engineering
Industry Computer hardware and software
Products Apple Macintosh, Mac OS X, iPod, QuickTime, iLife, iWork, Final Cut Studio, Aperture, Logic Pro, Cinema Display, AirPort, Apple iPhone, Apple TV
Revenue US$19.3 billion (TTM 1Q2006)[1]
Operating income US$2.12 billion (TTM 1Q2006)
(12.27% operating margin)[1]
Net income US$1.73 billion (TTM 1Q2006)
(9.97% profit margin)[1]
Employees 17,787 full-time; 2,399 temporary (30 September 2006)[2]
Website Apple.com

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL, LSE: ACP) is an American technology corporation with worldwide annual sales in its fiscal year 2006 (ending 30 September 2006) of US$19.3 billion.[3] Headquartered in Cupertino, California (Coordinates:37°19′55″N, 122°01′47″W), Apple develops, sells, and supports a series of personal computers, portable media players, computer software, and computer hardware accessories. The company's best-known products include the Macintosh line of personal computers, the Mac OS X operating system, and the iPod line of portable music players. Apple also sells audiobooks, iPod games, music, music videos, TV shows, and movies on its online iTunes Store, and has announced a smartphone, the iPhone. Image File history File links Apple-logo. ... A public company is a company owned by the public rather than by relatively few individuals. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Location of Cupertino within Santa Clara County, California. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by an Irish economist named Richard Cantillon) is a person who undertakes and operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... A chief executive officer (CEO), or chief executive, is the highest-ranking corporate officer or executive officer of a corporation, or agency. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is an American computer engineer turned philanthropist. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by an Irish economist named Richard Cantillon) is a person who undertakes and operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... Timothy D. Cook. ... A Chief Operating Officer (COO) is a corporate officer responsible for managing the day-to-day activities of the corporation. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of a company is the corporate officer primarily responsible for managing the financial risks of a business. ... Philip Schiller Philip W. Schiller is Apple Computer’s senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing and reports to Apple CEO Steve Jobs. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Marketing is a social and managerial function that attempts to create, expand and maintain a collection of customers. ... Jonathan P. Ive CBE (born February 1967 in London) is Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple Computer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Anthony Fadell is Senior Vice President of Apple Computers iPod Division. ... The current iPod line. ... Ron Johnson Ron Johnson is the Senior Vice President of Retail Operations at Apple Computer. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ... Sina Tamaddon Sina Tamaddon is the Senior Vice President of Applications for Apple Computer. ... Application software is a defined subclass of computer software that employs the capabilities of a computer directly to a task that the user wishes to perform. ... Bertrand Serlet is senior vice president of software engineering at Apple Computer. ... Software Engineering (SE) is the design, development, and documentation of software by applying technologies and practices from computer science, project management, engineering, application domains, interface design, digital asset management and other fields. ... Computer hardware is the physical part of a computer, including the digital circuitry, as distinguished from the computer software that executes within the hardware. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac The Macintosh, or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... The current iPod line. ... QuickTime is a multimedia framework developed by Apple Computer, capable of handling various formats of digital video, media clips, sound, text, animation, music, and several types of interactive panoramic images. ... iLife 06 Box iLife is a collection of software products created by Apple, designed for Mac OS X, used to create, organize, view and manipulate digital content. ... iWork is a suite of applications created by Apple Computer, containing a word processing and layout application (Pages), and a presentation package (Keynote). ... Final Cut Studio is a video application suite for Mac OS X by Apple Computer. ... a big (1) and a small (2) aperture For other uses, see Aperture (disambiguation). ... Logic Pro is a MIDI sequencer and Digital Audio Workstation software application that runs on the Mac OS X platform. ... Dual 30 Apple Cinema HD Displays Previous-generation Apple Studio Display (the Cinema Display in an aspect ratio of 4:3 instead of 16:10) The Apple Cinema Display is a product line of flat panel monitors made by Apple Computer. ... For the line of Internet appliances, see iPhone (Linksys). ... The Apple TV prototype, pictured after the event. ... Revenue is a U.S. business term for the amount of money that a company earns from its activities in a given period, mostly from sales of products and/or services to customers. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... Image File history File links Green_Arrow_Up. ... In commerce, the trailing twelve months (TTM) is a moving measurement (for example, an average or a sum) over the 12 previous months. ... Earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), also known as operating income and operating profit, is a term used to describe a companys earnings. ... Image File history File links Green_Arrow_Up. ... In economics, operating margin is the ratio of operating income divided by sales revenue. ... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ... Image File history File links Green_Arrow_Up. ... Profit margin is a measure of profitability. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, typically common to a particular domain name or subdomain on the World Wide Web on the Internet. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a level of technological mastery sufficient to leave the surface of the planet for the first time and explore space. ... Corporate redirects here. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... Location of Cupertino within Santa Clara County, California. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Software, or program, enables a computer to perform specific tasks, as opposed to the physical components of the system (hardware). ... Computer hardware is the physical part of a computer, including the digital circuitry, as distinguished from the computer software that executes within the hardware. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac The Macintosh, or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... An operating system (OS) is a computer program that manages the hardware and software resources of a computer. ... The current iPod line. ... The iTunes Store (known as the iTunes Music Store before September 12, 2006) is an online music service run by Apple Computer, accessed through its iTunes application. ... A smartphone or sphone is any electronic handheld device that integrates the functionality of a mobile phone, personal digital assistant (PDA) or other information appliance. ... The correct title of this article is . ...


The company was known as Apple Computer, Inc. for its first 30 years of existence, but dropped "Computer" from its corporate name on January 9, 2007.[4] The name change, which followed Apple's announcement of its new iPhone smartphone and Apple TV digital video systems, is representative of the company's ongoing transition away from its traditional focus on personal computers, and into the consumer electronics market.[5] The company has over 20,000 permanent and temporary employees worldwide. January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... The Apple TV prototype, pictured after the event. ... Consumer electronics is electronic equipment intended for use by everyday people. ...


Apple operates 165 retail stores in the United States, Canada, Japan and the United Kingdom. The stores carry most of Apple's products as well as many third-party products and offer on-site support and repair for Apple hardware and software. The Apple store on the Magnificent Mile in Chicago The interior of an Apple store. ...


For a variety of reasons, ranging from its philosophy of comprehensive aesthetic design to its countercultural, even indie roots as a company that differentiates itself from the rest of the industry by “thinking different,” Apple has cultivated a customer base that is unusually devoted to the company and its brand.[citation needed] The Parthenons facade showing an interpretation of golden rectangles in its proportions. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Several different Think Different posters. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Apple Inc.

Apple has revolutionized personal computing since its founding in 1976. The Apple II microcomputer, introduced in 1977, was a hit with home users. In 1983, Apple introduced the Lisa, the first commercial personal computer to employ a graphical user interface (GUI), which was influenced in part by the Xerox Alto. Lisa was also the first personal computer to have the mouse. In 1984, the Macintosh was introduced, furthering the concept of a user-friendly graphical user interface. Apple's success with the Macintosh became a major influence in the development of graphical interfaces elsewhere, with major computer operating systems such as Commodore Amiga, and Atari ST, appearing on the market within two years of the introduction of the Macintosh. This article is about the History of Apple Inc. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... The Commodore 64 was one of the most popular microcomputers of its era, and is the best selling home computer of all time. ... The Apple Lisa was a revolutionary personal computer designed at Apple Computer during the early 1980s. ... A graphical user interface (or GUI, often pronounced gooey), is a particular case of user interface for interacting with a computer which employs graphical images and widgets in addition to text to represent the information and actions available to the user. ... A Xerox Alto Computer System The Xerox Alto, developed at Xerox PARC in 1973, was the first personal computer and the first computer to use the desktop metaphor and graphical user interface (GUI). ... A computer mouse. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... An operating system (OS) is a computer program that manages the hardware and software resources of a computer. ... Commodore is the commonly used name for Commodore International, was an American electronics company based in West Chester, Pennsylvania which was a vital player in the home/personal computer field in the 1980s. ... The original Amiga 1000 (1985) with Commodore 1080 monitor The Amiga is a family of home/personal computers originally developed by Amiga Corporation as an advanced home entertainment and productivity machine. ... The Atari 520ST Atari 1040STF with SC1224 color monitor The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ...


In 1991, Apple introduced the PowerBook line of portable computers. The 1990s also saw Apple's market share fall as competition from Microsoft Windows and the comparatively inexpensive IBM PC compatible computers that would eventually dominate the market. In the 2000s, Apple expanded its focus on software to include professional and prosumer video, music, and photo production solutions, with a view to promoting their products as a "digital hub". It also introduced the iPod, the most popular digital music player in the world. [6] The PowerBook is a line of Apple Macintosh laptop computers that was designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer from 1991 to 2006. ... A Portable computer is a computer that is designed to be moved from one place to another (in other words, it is a computer that is portable). ... The Columbia MPC was one of the many IBM PC compatibles that flooded the US market. ... Prosumer refers to one of two possible portmanteaus formed by contracting either the word producer or professional with the word consumer. ... The current iPod line. ...


1975 to 1980: The early years

The Apple I, Apple's first product, Sold as an assembled circuit board, it lacked basic features such as a keyboard, monitor and case. The owner of this unit added a keyboard and a wooden case.
The Apple I, Apple's first product, Sold as an assembled circuit board, it lacked basic features such as a keyboard, monitor and case. The owner of this unit added a keyboard and a wooden case.

Apple was founded on April 1, 1976 by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne[7] (and later incorporated January 3, 1977[8] without Wayne, who sold his share of the company back to Jobs and Wozniak) to sell the Apple I personal computer kit. They were hand-built in a garage of Jobs' parents,[9] and the Apple I was first shown to the public at the Homebrew Computer Club.[10] Eventually 200 computers were built. The Apple I was sold as a motherboard (with CPU, RAM, and basic textual-video chips) - not what is today considered a complete personal computer.[11] The user was required to provide two different AC input voltages (the manual recommended specific transformers), wire an ASCII keyboard (not provided with the computer) to a DIP connector (providing logic inverter and alpha lock chips in some cases), and to wire the video output pins to a monitor or to an RF modulator if a TV set was used.[12] Image File history File linksMetadata Apple_I.jpg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Apple Computer Apple I Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... Image File history File linksMetadata Apple_I.jpg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Apple Computer Apple I Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... The Apple I was an early personal computer, and the first to combine a keyboard with a microprocessor and a connection to a monitor. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is an American computer engineer turned philanthropist. ... Ronald Wayne from an old passport photograph. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The Apple I was an early personal computer, and the first to combine a keyboard with a microprocessor and a connection to a monitor. ... The Homebrew Computer Club was an early computer hobbyist club in Silicon Valley, which met (under that name) from March 1975 to roughly 1977. ...


Jobs approached a local computer store, The Byte Shop, which ordered fifty units and paid $500 for each unit after much persuasion from Jobs. Jobs then ordered components from Cramer Electronics, a national electronic parts distributor. Using a variety of methods, including borrowing space from friends and family and selling various items including a Volkswagen Type 2 bus, Jobs managed to secure the parts needed while Wozniak and Ronald Wayne assembled the Apple I.[citation needed] The Volkswagen Type 2 was the second automotive line introduced by German automobile manufacturer Volkswagen. ...


The Apple II was introduced on April 16, 1977 at the first West Coast Computer Faire. Despite a price higher than competitors, it quickly pulled away from its two main rivals, the TRS-80 and Commodore PET, to become the market leader (and the symbol of the personal computing phenomenon) in the late 70s due to its color graphics, high build quality, and open architecture. While early models used ordinary cassette tapes as storage devices, this was quickly superseded by the introduction of a 5 1/4 inch floppy disk drive and interface, the Disk II. The 1977 Apple II, complete with integrated keyboard, color graphics, sound, a plastic case, and eight expansion slots. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The West Coast Computer Faire was an annual computer faire held in San Francisco. ... TRS-80 Model I. TRS-80 was Tandy Corporations desktop microcomputer model line, and sold through Tandys RadioShack stores, in the late-1970s and 1980s. ... The PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) was a home-/personal computer produced by Commodore starting in the late 1970s. ... A typical vision of a computer architecture as a series of abstraction layers: hardware, firmware, assembler, kernel, operating system and applications (see also Tanenbaum 79). ... A floppy disk is a data storage device that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible (floppy) magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. ... Disk II drives. ...


Another key to success for Apple was software. The Apple II was chosen by programmers Dan Bricklin and Bob Frankston to be the desktop platform for the first "killer app" of the business world—the VisiCalc spreadsheet program. VisiCalc created a business market for the Apple II, and the corporate market attracted many more software and hardware developers to the machine, as well as giving home users an additional reason to buy one—compatibility with the office. (See the timeline for dates of Apple II family model releases—the 1977 Apple II and its younger siblings the II+, IIe, IIc, and IIGS.) Daniel S. Bricklin (born 16 July 1951) is the co-creator, with Bob Frankston, of the VisiCalc spreadsheet program. ... Robert (Bob) M. Frankston (born in 1949) is the co-creator with Dan Bricklin of the VisiCalc spreadsheet program and the co-founder of Software Arts, the company that developed it. ... A killer application (commonly shortened to killer app) is a computer program that is so useful or desirable that it proves the value of some underlying technology, such as a gaming console, operating system, or piece of computer hardware. ... VisiCalc was the first spreadsheet program available for personal computers. ... Screenshot of a spreadsheet made with OpenOffice. ...


By the end of the 1970s, Jobs and his partners had a staff of computer designers and a production line. The Apple II was succeeded by the Apple III in May 1980 as the company struggled to compete against IBM and Microsoft in the lucrative business and corporate computing market. The designers of the Apple III were forced to comply with Jobs' request to omit the cooling fan, and this ultimately resulted in thousands of recalled units due to overheating.[13] An updated version was introduced in 1983, but it was also a failure due to bad press and wary buyers. Nevertheless, the principals of the company persevered with further innovations and marketing. A method of production which embodies groups of workers repeating the same procedures of production along a line over which the product is moved and gradually completed. ... Apple III The Apple III, or Apple /// as it was sometimes styled, was the first completely new computer designed by Apple Computer, Inc. ... Big Blue redirects here. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ...


In the early 1980s, IBM and Microsoft continued to gain market share at Apple's expense in the personal computer industry. Using a fundamentally different business model, IBM marketed an open hardware standard created with the IBM PC, which was bundled with Microsoft's MS-DOS (MicroSoft-Disk Operating System). IBM PC (IBM 5150) with keyboard and green screen monochrome monitor (IBM 5151), running MS-DOS 5. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ...

Apple's sustained growth during the early eighties was in large part due to its leadership in schools around the world, particularly with its marketing of Apple Logo, developed by Logo Computer Systems Inc. (LCSI) of Montreal, Canada. The majority of the first computers entering schools around the world were Apple II's with Apple Logo. The drive into education was accentuated in California with the donation of one Apple II and one Apple Logo software package to each public school in the state. The deal concluded between Steve Jobs and Jim Baroux of LCSI, and having required the support of Sacramento, established a strong and pervasive presence for Apple in all schools throughout California. The initial conquest of education environments was critical to Apple's acceptance in the home where the earliest purchases of computers by parents was in support of children's continued learning experience. Image File history File links Circle-question-red. ...


Based on the marketing and technical savvy of Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, and the business expertise of Mike Markkula, Apple dominated the personal computer industry from 1977 to 1983. Harriv 09:43, 1 Feb 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


1981 to 1989: Lisa and Macintosh

Apple's 1984 ad, set in a dystopian future modeled after the Orwell novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, set the tone for the introduction of the Macintosh in one of the most famous ads ever aired on television.
Apple's 1984 ad, set in a dystopian future modeled after the Orwell novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, set the tone for the introduction of the Macintosh in one of the most famous ads ever aired on television.

Jobs and several other Apple employees including Jef Raskin visited Xerox PARC in December 1979 to see the Alto computer. Xerox granted Apple engineers three days of access to the PARC facilities in return for selling them US$1 million in pre-IPO Apple stock (approximately US$18 million net). Apples 1984 ad, which aired during the Superbowl This work is copyrighted. ... Apples 1984 ad, which aired during the Superbowl This work is copyrighted. ... A screenshot from the commercial. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... Nineteen Eighty-Four (commonly, 1984) is a dystopian novel by the English writer George Orwell, first published by Secker and Warburg in 1949. ... Jef Raskin outdoors, photographed by his son Aza Raskin. ... Bold text // Headline text Link title This article is about the computer research center. ... A Xerox Alto Computer System The Xerox Alto, developed at Xerox PARC in 1973, was the first personal computer and the first computer to use the desktop metaphor and graphical user interface (GUI). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Jobs was immediately convinced that all future computers would use a GUI, and decided to take over design of Apple's first project, the Apple Lisa, to produce such a machine. The Lisa was named after Jobs' daughter (however, a backronym, Local Integrated Software Architecture, was coined). He was eventually pushed from the group due to infighting, and instead took over Jef Raskin's low-cost computer project. Branding the new effort as the product that would "save Apple", an intense turf war broke out between the Lisa's "corporate shirts" and Jobs's Macintosh "pirates", both teams claiming they would ship first and be more successful. In 1983 the Lisa team won the race, and Apple introduced the first personal computer to be sold to the public with a GUI. However, the Lisa was a commercial failure as a result of its high price tag (9,995 USD) and limited software titles. GUI can refer to the following: GUI is short for graphical user interface, a term used to describe a type of interface in computing. ... The Apple Lisa was a revolutionary personal computer designed at Apple Computer during the early 1980s. ... A backronym or bacronym is a type of acronym that begins as an ordinary word, and is later interpreted as an acronym. ... Turf war is a term that describes a common problem in larger companies when two divisions fight for access to resources or capital. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac The Macintosh, or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple. ... This article is about sea pirates. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


In 1984, drawing upon its experience with the Lisa, Apple next launched the Macintosh. Its debut was announced by a single national broadcast of the now famous US$1.5 million television commercial, "1984", based on George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. The commercial was directed by Ridley Scott and aired during Super Bowl XVIII on January 22, 1984. Jobs' intention with the ad was to represent the IBM PC as Big Brother, and the Macintosh as a nameless female action hero portrayed by Anya Major. While the Macintosh initially sold well, follow-up sales were not particularly strong. The machine's fortunes changed with the introduction of the LaserWriter, the first laser printer to be offered at a reasonable price point, and PageMaker, an early desktop publishing (DTP) package. The Mac was particularly powerful in this market due to its advanced graphics capabilities, a side-effect of the GUI, and it can be said that the combination of these three products are responsible for the creation of the DTP market. As DTP became widespread, Apple's sales reached a series of new highs. A screenshot from the commercial. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... (Redirected from 1984 (novel)) Nineteen Eighty-Four (sometimes 1984) is a darkly satirical political novel by George Orwell. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, England) is an influential English film director and producer. ... Date January 22, 1984 Stadium Tampa Stadium City Tampa, Florida MVP Marcus Allen, Running back Favorite Redskins by 2 1/2 National anthem Barry Manilow Coin toss Bronko Nagurski Referee Gene Barth Halftime show Salute to Superstars of the Silver Screen with the University of Florida and Florida State University... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Big Brother as portrayed in the BBCs 1954 production of Nineteen Eighty-Four. ... Anya Major in the 1984 commercial. ... Personal LaserWriter LS The Apple LaserWriter was one of the first laser printers available to the mass market. ... 1993 Apple LaserWriter Pro 630 laser printer A laser printer is a common type of computer printer that rapidly produces high quality text and graphics on plain paper. ... PageMaker was the first desktop publishing program, introduced in 1985 by Aldus Corporation, initially for the Apple Macintosh but soon after also for the PC. It relies on Adobe Systems PostScript page description language. ... Apple Pages being used with one of the free templates Desktop publishing (also known as DTP) combines a personal computer and page layout software to create publication documents on a computer for either large scale publishing or small scale local economical multifunction peripheral output and distribution. ...


In anticipation of the Macintosh launch, Bill Gates, co-founder and chairman of Microsoft, was given several Macintosh prototypes in 1983 to develop software. While the company was indeed ready with its BASIC and the MultiPlan spreadsheet at the Macintosh's launch, in 1985 Microsoft launched Windows, its own GUI for IBM PCs, which in the 1990s became the most commonly-used desktop operating system. For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Screenshot of Atari BASIC, an early BASIC language for small computers. ... Categories: Computer stubs | Spreadsheets | Domain-specific programming languages | Numerical programming languages ...


An internal power struggle developed between Jobs and new CEO John Sculley in 1985. Apple's board of directors sided with Sculley, and Jobs was removed from his managerial duties. Jobs later resigned from Apple and founded NeXT Inc., a computer company that built machines with futuristic designs and ran the UNIX-derived NeXTStep operating system. Although powerful, NeXT computers never caught on with buyers, due in part to their high purchase price. John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was president of PepsiCo during the 1970s and early 1980s until he became CEO of Apple Computer on April 8, 1983. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer of the company charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ... NeXT Software, Inc. ... NEXTSTEP is the original object-oriented, multitasking operating system that NeXT Computer, Inc. ...


1989 to 1991: The Golden Age

The Macintosh Portable was Apple's first "portable" Macintosh computer, released in 1989.
The Macintosh Portable was Apple's first "portable" Macintosh computer, released in 1989.

Having learned several painful lessons after introducing the bulky Macintosh Portable in 1989, Apple turned to industrial designers and adopted a product strategy based in three portable devices. One portable was built by Sony, which had a strong reputation for designing small, durable and functional electronics devices. Sony took the specs of the Mac Portable, put in a smaller two-hour battery, a much smaller (physically) twenty megabyte hard drive and a smaller nine-inch passive matrix screen. Image details I am the photographer, and hereby dedicate this image to the public domain. ... Image details I am the photographer, and hereby dedicate this image to the public domain. ... The Macintosh Portable was Apple Computers first attempt at making a portable Macintosh personal computer that held the power of a desktop Macintosh and included the capabilities of a professional business Macintosh such as the Macintosh IIci. ... The Macintosh Portable was Apple Computers first attempt at making a portable Macintosh personal computer that held the power of a desktop Macintosh and included the capabilities of a professional business Macintosh such as the Macintosh IIci. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A megabyte is a unit of information or computer storage equal to approximately one million bytes. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... Reflective twisted nematic liquid crystal display. ...


Called the PowerBook 100, this landmark product was introduced in 1991 and established the modern form and ergonomic layout of the laptop computer.[citation needed] This solidified Apple's reputation as a quality manufacturer, both of desktop and now portable machines.[citation needed] The same year, Apple introduced a massive upgrade to the Mac OS, in the form of System 7. Although resource-hungry (for the era), System 7 dramatically improved the Macintosh experience, adding color to the interface, simplifying common operations, and introducing a number of powerful new networking capabilities. System 7 would be the basis for the Mac OS until 2001. The PowerBook is a line of Apple Macintosh laptop computers that was designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer from 1991 to 2006. ... Ergonomics (or human factors) is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data, and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance (definition adopted by the International... Laptop with touchpad. ... System 7 (codenamed Big Bang) was a version of Mac OS, the operating system of the Apple Macintosh computer. ...


The success of the PowerBook and several other Apple products during this period led to increasing revenue. The computer press listened to Apple press releases with rapt attention, and speculation was rife about what projects from Apple's famed Advanced Technology Group would next come to market. Apple merely had to mention a technology, Taligent for instance, for people to christen it the "new standard". For some time, it appeared that Apple could do no wrong, introducing new products that were the best on the market, and generating increasing profits in the process. The magazine MacAddict named the period between 1989 to 1991 the "first golden age" of the Macintosh. Taligent was the name of an object-oriented operating system and the company dedicated to producing it. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... MacAddict magazine (January 2001) MacAddict is a U.S. magazine, known for its enthusiastic reader base and irreverent wit, published by Future Network USA. MacAddict was the first North American magazine focused on the Apple Macintosh to include a CD-ROM with every issue. ...


The continuing development of Microsoft Windows eventually resulted in an interface that many people thought was superior to the Macintosh in terms of ease of use and overall look and feel. [citation needed] Combined with a huge base of low-cost computers and peripherals and an improving software suite, an increasing number of potential customers turned to the "Wintel" standard instead. Wintel is a term used to describe desktop computers and servers of the type commonly used in homes and businesses since the late 1980s (these are PC compatible computers running a version of Microsoft Windows). ...


Apple, relying on high profit margins to maintain their massive R&D budget, never developed a clear response. Instead they sued Microsoft for theft of intellectual property. The lawsuit dragged on for years before finally being thrown out of court. Worse, the lawsuit distracted management while a deep rot developed within the engineering ranks, which became increasingly unmanageable. At first there was little outward sign of the problem, but a series of major product flops and missed deadlines destroyed Apple's reputation of invincibility. Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Everyday instance of theft: the bike which fits on this wheel has disappeared. ... In law, intellectual property (IP) is an umbrella term for various legal entitlements which attach to certain types of information, ideas, or other intangibles in their expressed form. ...

A QuickTake 200 digital camera, released in 1997. The QuickTake line of cameras was not successful for Apple.
A QuickTake 200 digital camera, released in 1997. The QuickTake line of cameras was not successful for Apple.

At about the same time, Apple branched out into consumer electronics. One example of this product diversification was the Apple QuickTake digital camera, one of the first digital cameras brought to the consumer market. A more famous example was the Newton, coined a PDA by Sculley, that was introduced in 1993. Though it failed commercially, it defined and launched the new category of computing and was a forerunner and inspiration of devices such as Palm Pilot and PocketPC. Download high resolution version (800x694, 61 KB)Description: Photograph of the front of an Apple Quicktake 200 camera. ... Download high resolution version (800x694, 61 KB)Description: Photograph of the front of an Apple Quicktake 200 camera. ... Front of a QuickTake 200 Back of a QuickTake 200 The Apple QuickTake (codenamed Venus, Mars, Neptune) was one of the first consumer digital cameras. ... A SiPix digital camera next to a matchbox to show scale A Hasselblad 503CW with a digital camera back A digital camera is an electronic device used to capture and store photographs electronically instead of using photographic film like conventional cameras. ... Front of a QuickTake 200 Back of a QuickTake 200 The Apple QuickTake (codenamed Venus, Mars, Neptune) was one of the first consumer digital cameras. ... The Apple Newton MessagePad The Apple Newton, or simply Newton, is an early line of personal digital assistants developed, manufactured and marketed by Apple Computer from 1993 to 1998. ... In linguistics, a neologism is a recently coined word, or the act of inventing a word or phrase. ... palmOne Tungsten T5 Personal digital assistants (PDAs) are handheld computers that were originally designed as personal organizers, but became much more versatile over the years. ... An early model - the Pilot 5000 The Palm m130 was one of the first Palms with a colour screen Pilot was the name given to the first generation of personal digital assistants manufactured by Palm Computing in 1996 (then a division of U.S. Robotics and later 3Com). ... A Pocket PC is a computer in a handheld size that runs a variation of the operating system Windows CE. It has many capabilities of modern desktop PCs. ...


During the 1990s, Apple greatly expanded its computer lineup. It offered a multitude of models ("Quadra 840av", "Performa 6116"), but many felt Apple failed to adequately differentiate one model from another and the cost of supporting so many products adversely affected profitability. Apple lost market share to Microsoft Windows, particularly Windows 95 - a major turning point in the history of the rival Windows operating system. Quadra 800 Quadra was the name used by Apple Computer for most of its Macintosh computers built around the Motorola 68040 CPU. The product manager for the Quadra family was Frank Casanova who was also the Product Manager for the Macintosh IIfx. ... A Macintosh Performa 5200, an all-in-one desktop similar to the iMac. ... Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. ... Microsoft Windows is the name of several families of proprietary operating systems by Microsoft. ...


1994 to 1997: Attempts at reinvention

By the mid-90s, Apple realized that it had to reinvent the Macintosh in order to stay competitive in the market. The needs of both computer users and computer programs were becoming, for a variety of technical reasons, harder for the existing hardware and operating system to address. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1594 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Apple Computer Infinite Loop (street) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1594 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Apple Computer Infinite Loop (street) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Infinite Loop is a street encircling the buildings of Apple Computers headquarters in Cupertino, California. ... Cali Mill Plaza (Cupertino City Center) is located on the intersection of Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevards where the village of Westwood was established. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


In 1994 Apple surprised its loyalists by allying with its long-time competitor IBM and CPU maker Motorola in the so-called AIM alliance. This was a bid to create a new computing platform (the PowerPC Reference Platform or PReP), which would use IBM and Motorola hardware coupled with Apple's software. The AIM alliance hoped that PReP's performance and Apple's software would leave the PC far behind, thus countering Microsoft, which had become Apple's chief competitor. Motorola (NYSE: MOT) is an American international communications company based in Schaumburg, Illinois, a Chicago suburb. ... AIM was an alliance formed in 1991 between Apple Computer, IBM and Motorola to create a new computing standard based on the PowerPC architecture. ... PowerPC Reference Platform (PReP) was a PowerPC hardware reference design. ...


As the first step toward launching the PReP platform, Apple started the Power Macintosh line in 1994, using IBM's PowerPC processor. This processor utilized a RISC architecture, which differed substantially from the Motorola 68k series that had been used by all previous Macs. Apple's OS was rewritten so that most software for the older Macs could run on the PowerPC series (in emulation). Power Macintosh, or Power Mac, is the name of a line of Apple Macintosh personal computers based on various models of PowerPC microprocessors. ... IBM PowerPC 601 Microprocessor PowerPC is a RISC microprocessor architecture created by the 1991 Apple–IBM–Motorola alliance, known as AIM. Originally intended for personal computers, PowerPC CPUs have since become popular embedded and high-performance processors as well. ... Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC), is a microprocessor CPU design philosophy that favors a smaller and simpler set of instructions that all take about the same amount of time to execute. ... The Motorola 680x0/0x0/m68k/68k/68K family of CISC microprocessor CPU chips were 32-bit from the start, and were the primary competition for the Intel x86 family of chips. ... This article is about emulation in computer science. ...


Throughout the mid to late 1990s, Apple tried to improve its operating system's multitasking and memory management. After first attempting to modify its existing code, Apple realized that it would be better to start with an entirely new operating system and then modify it to fit the Macintosh interface. Apple did some preliminary work with IBM towards this goal with the Taligent project, but that project never produced a replacement operating system. A new internal effort, Copland, ran afoul of Apple's now uncontrollable engineering and became a massive failure. A new attempt was made with the Gershwin operating system. Copland was a project at Apple Computer to create an updated version of the Macintosh operating system. ... Gershin was the code name for Apple Computers next-generation operating system that was proposed to follow Apples failed Copland project for the Apple Macintosh platform. ...


They then investigated using Be's BeOS, NeXT's NeXTSTEP OS, and also Microsoft's Windows NT. NeXTSTEP was chosen, and this supplied the platform for the modern Mac OS X. On February 7, 1997, Apple completed its purchase of NeXT and its NeXTSTEP operating system, thus bringing Steve Jobs back into Apple.[14] On July 9, 1997, Gil Amelio was ousted as CEO of Apple by the board of directors after overseeing a 12-year record-low stock price and crippling financial losses. Jobs stepped in as the interim CEO and began a critical restructuring of the company's product line. Be, Incorporated was the company that developed the BeOS operating system and BeBox computer. ... BeOS is an operating system for personal computers which began development by Be Inc. ... NeXT Software, Inc. ... NEXTSTEP is the original object-oriented, multitasking operating system that NeXT Computer, Inc. ... Windows NT is a family of operating systems produced by Microsoft, the first version of which was released in July 1993. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gil Amelio Gilbert F. Amelio (born March 1, 1943 in New York City) is an American technology executive. ...


At the 1997 Macworld Expo, Steve Jobs announced that Apple would be entering into partnership with Microsoft. Included in this was a five-year commitment from Microsoft to release Microsoft Office for Macintosh as well a US$150 million investment in Apple. It was also announced that Internet Explorer would be shipped as the default browser on the Macintosh. Microsoft chairman Bill Gates appeared at the expo on-screen, further explaining Microsoft's plans for the software they were developing for Mac, and stating that he was very excited to be helping Apple return to success. After this, Steve Jobs said this to the audience at the expo: 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Produced by Boston-based IDG World Expo, Macworld Conference & Expo is a trade show dedicated to the Apple Macintosh platform with conference tracks occurring twice a year in the United States. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Microsoft Office is a suite of productivity programs created or purchased by Microsoft and developed for Microsoft Windows, and Apple Computers Mac OS and Mac OS X operating systems. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 3. ... Internet Explorer for Mac (also referred to as Internet Explorer:mac or Internet Explorer Macintosh Edition) was a proprietary and freely available web browser developed by Microsoft for the Macintosh platform. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ...

If we want to move forward and see Apple healthy and prospering again, we have to let go of a few things here. We have to let go of this notion that for Apple to win, Microsoft has to lose. We have to embrace a notion that for Apple to win, Apple needs to do a really good job. And if others are going to help us that's great, because we need all the help we can get, and if we screw up and don't do a good job, it's not somebody else's fault, it's our fault. So I think that is a very important perspective. If we want Microsoft Office on the Mac, we should treat the company that puts it out with a little bit of gratitude; we like their software.

So, the era of setting this thing up as a competition between Apple and Microsoft is over as far as I'm concerned. This is about getting Apple healthy, this is about Apple being able to make incredibly great contributions to the industry and to get healthy and prosper again.[15]

On November 10, 1997, Apple announced a new online retail store, based upon the WebObjects application server the company had acquired in its purchase of NeXT. The new direct sales outlet was also tied to a new build to order manufacturing strategy, and announced at the same time as new machines using the G3 PowerPC processor. November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Apple Online Store This page is about the online store. ... WebObjects is a Java Web application server by Apple Computer. ... NeXT Software, Inc. ... IBM PowerPC 601 Microprocessor PowerPC is a RISC microprocessor architecture created by the 1991 Apple–IBM–Motorola alliance, known as AIM. Originally intended for personal computers, PowerPC CPUs have since become popular embedded and high-performance processors as well. ...


1998 to 2005: New beginnings

Steve Jobs introducing the original iMac computer in 1998.
Steve Jobs introducing the original iMac computer in 1998.

On August 15, 1998, Apple introduced a new all-in-one Macintosh reminiscent of the original Macintosh 128K: the iMac. The iMac design team was led by Jonathan Ive, who later designed the iPod and the iPhone. While technically unimpressive, it featured an innovative new translucent plastic exterior, originally in Bondi Blue, but later many other colors. The iMac proved phenomenally successful, selling close to 800,000 units in its first five months and significantly boosting the company's revenue and profitability. Thanks in part to the iMac, fiscal 1998 was Apple's first profitable year since 1993. The iMac is now considered an industrial design icon of the late 90s. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3745x2533, 2047 KB) Summary Courtesy of Apple Computer, Inc. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3745x2533, 2047 KB) Summary Courtesy of Apple Computer, Inc. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ... The correct title of this article is . ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... For in-depth technical information, see Macintosh 128K technical details. ... The correct title of this article is . ... Jonathan P. Ive CBE (born February 1967 in London) is Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple Computer. ... The original iMac model Bondi blue is a name of a color coined by Apple Computer, Inc. ...


At the National Association of Broadcasters convention, Apple purchased the Final Cut software from Macromedia, beginning its entry into the digital video editing market, and signaling a return to application development after a decade long policy of delegating non-system software to its Claris subsidiary. iMovie was released in 1999 for consumers, and Final Cut Pro was released for professionals in the same year. Final Cut Pro has gone on to be a significant video-editing program. Similarly, in 2000 Apple bought Astarte's DVDirector software, which morphed into iDVD (for consumers) and DVD Studio Pro (for professionals) at the Macworld Conference and Expo of 2001. The National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) is the industry group representing the commercial radio stations and television stations of the United States. ... Macromedia was an American graphics and web development software house headquartered in San Francisco, California. ... Digital video is a type of video recording system that works by using a digital, rather than analog, representation of the video signal. ... Claris was a computer software company formed as a spin-off from Apple Computer in 1987. ... iMovie is video editing software, created by Apple Computer as part of their iLife suite of applications for the Macintosh, that allows users to edit their own home movies. ... Final Cut Pro is a non-linear editing system created by Apple Computer that allows users to edit video. ... Astarte on a car with four branches protruding from roof. ... iDVD is a DVD creation software application made by Apple Computer for Mac OS X. iDVD allows the user to add QuickTime Movies, MP3 music, and digital photos to a DVD that can then be played on a commercial DVD player. ... Apples DVD Studio Pro allow users to create DVD Masters to send out to production houses. ... Produced by Boston-based IDG World Expo, Macworld Conference & Expo is a trade show dedicated to the Apple Macintosh platform with conference tracks occurring twice a year in the United States. ...


In 2001, Apple introduced Mac OS X, the operating system based on NeXT's OPENSTEP and BSD Unix. Aimed at consumers and professionals alike, Mac OS X sought to marry the stability, reliability and security of the Unix operating system with the ease of use afforded by a completely overhauled user interface. To aid users in moving their applications from Mac OS 9, the new operating system allowed the use of OS 9 applications through Mac OS X's Classic environment. Apple's Carbon API also allowed developers to adapt their OS 9 software to use Mac OS X's features often with a simple recompile. Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... The OPENSTEP desktop. ... BSD redirects here; for other uses see BSD (disambiguation). ... Filiation of Unix and Unix-like systems Unix (officially trademarked as UNIXâ„¢) is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Sherlock 2 for Mac OS 9 with the new metallic appearance Mac OS 9, introduced by Apple Computer on 1999-10-23, is the last version of the Classic Macintosh Operating System (Mac OS) released before being succeeded by Mac OS X. Upon introduction, Mac OS 9 was advertised as... Classic, or Classic Environment, is a hardware and software abstraction layer in Mac OS X that allows applications compatible with Mac OS 9 to run on the OS X operating system. ... Carbon is the codename of Apple Computers API for the Macintosh operating system, which permits a good degree of forward and backward compatibility between source code written to run on the classic Mac OS, and the newer Mac OS X. The APIs are published and accessed in the form...

Company headquarters on Infinite Loop in Cupertino, California.
Company headquarters on Infinite Loop in Cupertino, California.

In May 2001, after much speculation, Apple announced the opening of the Apple retail stores, to be located in major U.S. consumer locations. These stores were designed for two purposes: to stem the tide of Apple's declining share of the computer market and to counter a poor record of marketing Apple products by third-party retail outlets. The company faced challenges to balance the deployment of its own retail stores with its dependence on, and the demands of, its existing channel partners and dealers. Image File history File links Apple Computer headquarters complex, Building 1, 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, California. ... Image File history File links Apple Computer headquarters complex, Building 1, 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, California. ... Infinite Loop is a street encircling the buildings of Apple Computers headquarters in Cupertino, California. ... Cali Mill Plaza (Cupertino City Center) is located on the intersection of Stevens Creek and De Anza Boulevards where the village of Westwood was established. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The Apple store on the Magnificent Mile in Chicago The interior of an Apple store. ...


On October 23, 2001 Apple introduced its first iPod portable digital audio player and released it on November 10 of that year, a product that has proven phenomenally successful. Nearly 100 million units have been sold even though it was not originally perceived to be a successful product.[16] Apple's iTunes Store was introduced soon after, offering online music downloads for US 99¢ a song and integration with the iPod. The service quickly became the market leader in online music services, with over 2 billion downloads by January 2007.[17] October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The current iPod line. ... An embedded hard drive-based player (Apple iPod) An MP3 CD player (Philips Expanium) A flash-based player (iBox Mediaman) A digital audio player (DAP) is a device that stores, organizes and plays digital music files. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... The iTunes Store (known as the iTunes Music Store before September 12, 2006) is an online music service run by Apple Computer, accessed through its iTunes application. ...


In 2002 Apple purchased Nothing Real and their advanced digital compositing application Shake, raising Apple's professional commitment even higher. In the same year they also acquired Emagic, and with it, obtained their professional-quality music productivity application Logic, which led to the development of their consumer-level GarageBand application. With iPhoto's release in 2002, this completed Apple's collection of consumer and professional level creativity software, with the consumer-level applications being collected together into the iLife suite. Nothing Real L.L.C, founded in October 1996 by Allen Edwards and Arnaud Hervas, developed high-end digital effects software for the feature film, broadcast and interactive gaming industries. ... Shake is an image compositing package used in the post-production industry. ... Emagic was a computer software company based in Rellingen, Germany. ... Logic Pro is a MIDI sequencer and Digital Audio Workstation software application that runs on the Mac OS X platform. ... This article is about the software application. ... iPhoto is a software application made by Apple Computer exclusively for their Mac OS X operating system. ... iLife 06 Box iLife is a collection of software products created by Apple, designed for Mac OS X, used to create, organize, view and manipulate digital content. ...


Apple progressively abandoned flashy colors in favor of white polycarbonate for consumer lines such as the iMac and iBook, as well as the educational eMac, and metal enclosures for the professional lines. This began with the 2001 release of the titanium PowerBook and was followed by the 2001 white iBook, the 2002 flat-panel iMac, the 2003 Power Mac G5 and the 2004 Apple Cinema Displays. Divergent to this consumer/professional identity, the low-cost Mac mini has an aluminum case while featuring the distinctive white polycarbonate top. Polycarbonates are a particular group of thermoplastic polyesters. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... General Name, Symbol, Number titanium, Ti, 22 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 4, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Atomic mass 47. ... Power Mac G5 The Power Mac G5 is Apple Computers name for models of the Power Mac which contain the PowerPC G5 CPU. The professional-grade computer is the most powerful in Apples lineup and is touted by Apple as one of the fastest personal computers ever built... The Mac mini is the smallest desktop computer marketed by Apple Computer. ...


2005 to 2007: The Intel partnership

Targeted at a professional audience, the MacBook Pro is Apple's first laptop with an Intel microprocessor. The less expensive MacBook caters to the consumer market.
Targeted at a professional audience, the MacBook Pro is Apple's first laptop with an Intel microprocessor. The less expensive MacBook caters to the consumer market.

In a keynote address on June 6, 2005, Steve Jobs officially announced that Apple would begin producing Intel-based Macintosh computers beginning in 2006.[18] Jobs confirmed rumors that the company had secretly been producing versions of its current operating system Mac OS X for both PowerPC and Intel processors for the previous five years, and that the transition to Intel processor systems would last until the end of 2006.[19][20] The Apple Intel transition was the process of changing the CPU of Macintosh computers from PowerPC processors to Intel x86 processors. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1595x1249, 271 KB) An Apple MacBook Pro. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1595x1249, 271 KB) An Apple MacBook Pro. ... The MacBook Pro is a line of Macintosh notebook computers developed by Apple Computer for the professional market. ... The MacBook is a line of Macintosh notebook computers developed and marketed by Apple Computer. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the community of Macintosh rumors. ...


On January 10, 2006, Apple released its first Intel chip computers, a new notebook computer known as the MacBook Pro (a 15.4 inch laptop which is purportedly up to 4 times faster than the PowerBook models it replaced) and a new (though cosmetically identical) iMac with again purportedly two to three times faster performance. Both used Intel's Core Duo chip technology. Later in February, Apple introduced the new Intel-based Mac mini, running up to four times faster and also featuring Front Row, available with a Core Duo or Core Solo (single core) processor. The Apple online store sold out of 17 inch iMac G5 computers in February 2006, Apple ended the life of its 15 inch PowerBook G4 on February 22, 2006, and the G4 Mac mini was removed from the Apple online store on February 28, 2006 and replaced with the Intel Core Mac mini. On March 10, 2006 Apple retired the iMac G5 and in late May, replaced the iBook G4 and the 12-inch PowerBook G4 with the MacBook. On August 7, 2006, the PowerMac was replaced with the Mac Pro, completing the transition of all Macintosh products, well in advance of their original prediction. On September 6, 2006, Apple updated its iMac line to include new Intel Core 2 Duo processors, and adding a model with a 24" screen to the line-up, as well as quietly bumping the speeds of their Mac mini. The XServe was transitioned in mid-November 2006. On October 24, the MacBook Pros were fitted with Intel Core 2 Duo processors as well, running up to 39% faster than the original Intel Core Duo MacBook Pros. The MacBooks were fitted with the Core 2 Duo processors on November 8, and run up to 25% faster than the Core Duo ones. January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Laptop with touchpad. ... The MacBook Pro is a line of Macintosh notebook computers developed by Apple Computer for the professional market. ... This article is about Intel processors branded as Intel Core, such as the 65 nanometre processor codenamed Yonah and its variants. ... Front Row Music menu screenshot Front Row is a software application for Apples Macintosh computers that acts as a front-end for QuickTime, DVD Player and the iTunes and iPhoto libraries and allows for users to browse media on their computers using the Apple Remote (which is based on... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The original Blueberry iBook The iBook was a line of laptop computers sold by Apple Computer between 1999 and 2006. ... The MacBook is a line of Macintosh notebook computers developed and marketed by Apple Computer. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Mac Pro is a Macintosh workstation manufactured by Apple Computer based on Intel Xeon microprocessors and a PCI Express architecture. ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The new Intel Core 2 Duo. ... The Mac mini is the smallest desktop computer marketed by Apple Computer. ... A small Xserve cluster with an Xserve RAID. Xserve is the name of Apple Computers Macintosh 1U rackmount line of server computers. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ...


Apple's current operating system, Mac OS X 10.4 "Tiger", runs natively on the new Intel machines, as do the Darwin open source underpinnings. Many applications, such as iLife '06, also run natively on Intel chips. Other applications, such as Microsoft Office and Adobe Photoshop, which have not been updated to run on the Intel architecture, run in emulation mode, using a technology known as Rosetta. Because Rosetta is a translation software that allows PowerPC programs to run on Intel processors, these PowerPC programs run slower than native applications. Programs compiled only for the PowerPC must be recompiled to run at full speed on the new Intel machines. Programs that have been designed to run on both PowerPC and Intel chips can be certified by Apple as "Universal".[21] The Intel-based machines also do not support Classic, which allows Mac OS X to run applications written for OS 9 and earlier, so applications that require this environment will not run on these machines. Apple currently has no plans to bring Classic support to the Intel platform. Mac OS X version 10. ... Hexley, the mascot of Darwin Darwin is a free, open source, Unix-like operating system first released by Apple Computer in 2000. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... Microsoft Office is a suite of productivity programs created or purchased by Microsoft and developed for Microsoft Windows, and Apple Computers Mac OS and Mac OS X operating systems. ... Adobe Photoshop, or simply Photoshop, is a highly overpriced graphics editor developed and published by Adobe Systems. ... Rosetta is a lightweight dynamic translation emulator for Mac OS X distributed by Apple. ...


The Intel chip also allows the new machines to run the Windows operating system. On March 16, 2006 a bootloader CD image and a how-to for getting XP on your MacBook Pro, iMac, or mini was released to the Internet as an entry into a US$13,000 contest. Many hackers attempted over three months to win the prize by becoming the first to run Windows natively on a new Intel Mac. The Intel-based Macintoshes are now the only computers officially capable of running both Mac OS and Windows (and Linux) without emulation (a pre-release version of Mac OS X for Intel was patched to run on non-Apple PCs through the OSx86 community, however such procedure is not permitted by the Apple EULA). Further, on 5 April 2006, Apple announced a new piece of software called Boot Camp that helps users install Windows XP on their Intel Mac alongside Mac OS X. Boot Camp will be included, as standard, in Apple's next OS release (10.5, “Leopard”). March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... OSx86 10. ... A software license is a type of proprietary or gratiuitious license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software — sometimes called an End User License Agreement (EULA) — that specifies the perimeters of the permission granted by the owner to the... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Boot Camp is a software assistant made available by Apple Computer that assists users in installing Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (both Home and Professional Editions) on Intel-based Macintosh computers. ...


The Apple/Intel partnership coined several catch phrases among Apple fanatics and parts of media. Some of the most widespread ones include "Mactel" and "Macintel", a response to the phrase "Wintel”, which is an informal moniker that describes all Intel-powered systems running the Microsoft Windows operating system. Another is "ICBM", for "Intel-chip-based Mac." However, Apple itself has not publicly used these terms. A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... Wintel is a term used to describe desktop computers and servers of the type commonly used in homes and businesses since the late 1980s (these are PC compatible computers running a version of Microsoft Windows). ... A moniker (or monicker) is a pseudonym, or cognomen, which one gives to oneself. ...


In a broader view, Apple’s announcement that it would partner with longtime rival Intel was a reaffirmation of the company’s unique aesthetic philosophy in relation to the end-user experience. “The soul of a Mac is its operating system”, as Jobs proclaimed during the keynote, and indeed the Intel switch demonstrated how little it matters what brand of chip lies beneath the polish. Apple’s gradual discovery of itself as a platform, experience-centric company was complete.[22]


Apple's success during this period, beginning in 1998, but accelerating between 2003 to 2005, was evident in its skyrocketing stock. Between early 2003 and January 2006, the price of a share of Apple's stock increased more than tenfold, from a little more than $6 per share (split-adjusted) to more than $80 per share. After peaking at $86 per share in January 2006, the stock declined to trade briefly as low as $50 per share before recovering to a range of approximately $75-$80 per share by October 2006.[23]


On January 13, 2006, Apple's market cap surpassed that of Dell,[24] whose CEO, Michael Dell, had said, "I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders", when asked, on October 6, 1997, what he would do if he owned Apple.[25] Jobs had started a war of words with Dell back then when he criticized Dell for making "un-innovative beige boxes". January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Market capitalization, often abbreviated to market cap, mkt. ... Dell Inc. ... Michael Saul Dell (born February 23, 1965 in Houston, Texas) is the founder of Dell, Inc. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On November 29, 2006, shares of Apple hit an all-time high of $93.63 a share. [26] On January 9, 2007, Steve Jobs announced at Macworld 2007 that Apple Computer Inc. would be known as Apple Inc. This Macworld also served as the venue to launch the new iPhone which will be available through Cingular in June of 2007 and the new Apple TV product which will begin shipping in February of 2007. The new iPhone has been a subject of speculation for some time in various media outlets. November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... The correct title of this article is . ... Cingular Wireless is the largest United States mobile phone company, with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The Apple TV prototype, pictured after the event. ... The correct title of this article is . ...


Current products

See also: List of products discontinued by Apple Computer

The following is a list of Apple Computer software and hardware products which have been superseded by improved versions, or discontinued, and are no longer manufactured. ...

Hardware

The iPod, shown here, is Apple's most successful product line. This is the most recent iPod model; it is currently available in 30 and 80 GB models and is capable of playing video files as well as audio files.
The iPod, shown here, is Apple's most successful product line. This is the most recent iPod model; it is currently available in 30 and 80 GB models and is capable of playing video files as well as audio files.
See also: Timeline of Apple Macintosh models, List of Macintosh models grouped by CPU, and List of Apple Macintosh models by case type
The Mac mini is Apple's lowest-cost desktop computer.
The Mac mini is Apple's lowest-cost desktop computer.

Apple introduced the Macintosh family in 1984 and today makes consumer, professional, and educational computers. The Mac mini is the company's consumer sub-desktop computer, introduced in January 2005 and designed to motivate Windows users to switch to the Macintosh platform. The iMac is a consumer desktop computer that was first introduced by Apple in 1998, and its popularity helped save the company. The iMac is similar in concept to the original Macintosh in that the monitor and computer are housed in a single unit. It is now in its third major design iteration, and has been upgraded by times (including a switch to Intel processors) using the same design. The Power Mac brand was replaced in 2006 with the Mac Pro, featuring two 64-bit dual-core Xeon "Woodcrest" processors, available in speeds of 2, 2.66 and 3 GHz. The Mac Pro is capable of supporting up to 2 terabytes of internal hard disk space (3 terabytes using 750 GB hard drives available from third parties) and has 8 DIMM slots for up to 16GB of RAM. On its promotional website, Apple says that the "Mac Pro not only completes the Mac transition to Intel processors but delivers advanced performance, workstation graphics, and up to 4.9 million possible configurations." Apple's server range includes the Xserve, a dual core, dual processor 1U server, and the Xserve RAID for server storage options. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1230x1585, 164 KB) This picture may have usage restrictions - iPod 5th Generation white Source:Own picture File links The following pages link to this file: Apple Computer ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1230x1585, 164 KB) This picture may have usage restrictions - iPod 5th Generation white Source:Own picture File links The following pages link to this file: Apple Computer ... A grayscale fourth-generation iPod with earphones. ... A gigabyte (derived from the SI prefix giga-) is a unit of information or computer storage equal to one billion (that is, a thousand million) bytes. ... This timeline of Macintosh models lists all major types of Macintosh computers produced by Apple Computer in order of introduction date. ... Apple Macintosh models grouped by CPU type. ... This list of Apple Macintosh models by case type contains all case designs used by Apple Computer for their Macintosh computers. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mac_mini_Intel_Core. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mac_mini_Intel_Core. ... The Mac mini is the smallest desktop computer marketed by Apple Computer. ... The correct title of this article is . ... The Mac Pro is a Macintosh workstation manufactured by Apple Computer based on Intel Xeon microprocessors and a PCI Express architecture. ... Diagram of an Intel Core 2 dual core processor, with CPU-local Level 1 caches, and a shared, on-die Level 2 cache. ... Xeon logo as of 2006. ... A gigahertz is a billion hertz or a thousand megahertz, a measure of frequency. ... A terabyte is a unit of measurement in computers. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... Two types of DIMMs: a 168-pin SDRAM module (top) and a 184-pin DDR SDRAM module (bottom). ... GB may stand for: Gb (digraph) GB Airways GB Glace, a Swedish ice cream company ABX Air (IATA airline code GB) Game Boy line Games behind, in sports scores Gigabit (Gb) Gigabyte (GB) Government and binding theory by Noam Chomsky Great Britain Griesedieck Brothers beer Guinea Bissau, a country in... A small Xserve cluster with an Xserve RAID. Xserve is the name of Apple Computers Macintosh 1U rackmount line of server computers. ... Xserve RAID is Apple Computers mass storage rack mounted device. ...


Apple introduced the iBook consumer portable computer as a companion to the iMac; it is Apple's lowest-cost portable computer. The iBook brand was replaced on May 16, 2006 with the MacBook featuring the Intel Core Duo processor, 13 inch widescreen, and available black color on the high-end model. The MacBook Pro is the professional portable computer alternative to the MacBook. The MacBook Pro is marketed as being intended for professional and creative users and replaced the PowerBook models, which was introduced in 1991. May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The MacBook is a line of Macintosh notebook computers developed and marketed by Apple Computer. ...


In 2001, Apple introduced the iPod digital music player and currently sells the iPod (with video), available in 30 and 80 GB models; the iPod nano, available in 2 GB, 4 GB, and 8 GB models; and the iPod shuffle, available in a 1 GB model. Apple also re-released the U2 Special Edition iPod in a 30 GB capacity on June 6, 2006 with a distinctive all black enclosure, a red clickwheel, and engraved band members autographs on the back. On July 13, 2006, Apple teamed up with Nike to introduce the Nike+iPod Sports Kit enabling runners to sync and monitor their runs with iTunes and the Nike+ website. The iPod nano is Apples fourth digital audio player combining features of both the iPod shuffle and iPod. ... iPod shuffle is an iPod digital audio player designed and marketed by Apple Computer. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... The current iPod line. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nike, Inc. ... The Nike+iPod Sports Kit is a wireless device kit that allows communication between a pair of Nike+ shoes and an iPod nano. ... iTunes is a digital media player application, introduced by Apple Computer on January 10, 2001 at Macworld Expo in San Francisco,[1] for playing and organizing digital music and video files. ...


At the Macworld Conference & Expo in January 2007, Steve Jobs revealed the long anticipated iPhone, a convergence of an Internet-enabled smartphone and video iPod. The iPhone combines a 2.5G quad band GSM and EDGE cellular phone with features found in hand held devices, running a scaled-down versions of Apple's Mac OS X, with various applications such as Safari Web browser, email and navigation. The initial iPhone features a 3.5 inch touch screen display, Bluetooth, WiFi (both "b" and "g") and comes in 4 GB and 8 GB models. The iPhone is scheduled to be available first for the Cingular Wireless network, in the United States, pending FCC approval. [27] Produced by Boston-based IDG World Expo, Macworld Conference & Expo is a trade show dedicated to the Apple Macintosh platform with conference tracks held annually in the United States, usually during the second week of January. ... The correct title of this article is . ... A smartphone or sphone is any electronic handheld device that integrates the functionality of a mobile phone, personal digital assistant (PDA) or other information appliance. ... Quad band literally means four (4) bands. ... The Global System for Mobile Communications, GSM (original acronym: Groupe Spécial Mobile) is the most popular standard for mobile phones in the world. ... Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution (EDGE) or Enhanced GPRS (EGPRS), is a digital mobile phone technology that allows for increased data transmission rate and improved data transmission reliability. ... Bluetooth logo Bluetooth is an industrial specification for wireless personal area networks (PANs). ... Wi-Fi (or Wi-fi, WiFi, Wifi, wifi), short for Wireless Fidelity, is a set of standards for wireless local area networks (WLAN) currently based on the IEEE 802. ... Cingular Wireless, LLC, headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, is an AT&T subsidiary and the largest mobile phone company in the United States and Puerto Rico, with more than 59. ...


Additionally at the conference, Jobs demonstrated the Apple TV, (previously known as the iTV), a set-top video device intended to bridge the sale of content from iTunes with high-definition televisions. The device links up to a user's TV and syncs, either via WiFi or a wired network, with up one computers' iTunes library and streams from an additional four. The Apple TV incorporates a 40GB hard drive for storage and includes outputs for HDMI and component video. The Apple TV prototype, pictured after the event. ... iTunes is a digital media player application, introduced by Apple Computer on January 10, 2001 at Macworld Expo in San Francisco,[1] for playing and organizing digital music and video files. ... The High-Definition Multi-media Interface (HDMI) is an industry-supported, uncompressed, all-digital audio/video interface. ... Three RCA cables are often used to carry analog component video Component video is a type of analog video information that is transmitted or stored as three separate signals. ...


Apple sells a variety of computer accessories for Macintosh computers including the AirPort wireless networking products; Apple Cinema HD Display and Apple Displays computer displays; Mighty Mouse and Apple Wireless Mouse computer mice; the Apple Wireless Keyboard computer keyboard and the Apple USB Modem. The Apple wireless mouse was replaced by the wireless Mighty Mouse. Dual 30 Apple Cinema HD Displays Previous-generation Apple Studio Display (the Cinema Display in an aspect ratio of 4:3 instead of 16:10) The Apple Cinema Display is a product line of flat panel monitors made by Apple Computer. ... Apple Computer currently sells only LCD computer displays; a wide variety of CRT computer displays have been sold in the past. ... Mighty Mouse The Mighty Mouse (code-named Houdini) is the first multi-button USB mouse ever manufactured and sold by Apple Computer. ... The Apple Wireless Mouse is a one button mouse built for Macintosh computers. ... The Apple Wireless Keyboard is a wireless keyboard built for Macintosh computers. ... The Apple USB modem was introduced after the 56k modem was dropped on the iMac G5 (October 12, 2005 Revision. ...


Environmental Issues

Apple's hardware has come under fire by Greenpeace since 2004 for not setting a timeline to remove PVC, which still exists in recent products such as the iPod nano and MacBook; and for not promoting a global end-of-life take back plan for Apple hardware (although it does within Europe and Japan where it is required by law); as well as for not having reusable components.[28] Greenpeace lists toxic substances used in Apple products in their Apple parodying ad, including: cadmium, beryllium, lead, brominated flame retardants, hexavalent chromium, mercury.[29] Apple's own web site lists most of these compounds as "restricted substances" and has further information.[30] Apple also claims its recycling programs have processed more than 21 million pounds (9500 tonnes) of electronic equipment since 1994.[31] As of December 2006, Greenpeace ranked Apple last out of ten electronics companies in dealing with toxic substances in their products, mostly due to a lack of relevant documentation and timelines.[1] Greenpeace is an international environmental organization founded in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 1971. ... Polyvinyl chloride Polyvinyl chloride, (IUPAC über Polychloroethene) commonly abbreviated PVC, is a widely used thermoplastic polymer. ... The iPod nano is Apples fourth digital audio player combining features of both the iPod shuffle and iPod. ... The MacBook is a line of Macintosh notebook computers developed and marketed by Apple Computer. ... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... General Name, Symbol, Number cadmium, Cd, 48 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 5, d Appearance silvery gray metallic Atomic mass 112. ... General Name, Symbol, Number beryllium, Be, 4 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 2, s Appearance white-gray metallic Atomic mass 9. ... For PB or pb as an abbreviation, see PB. General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish white Atomic mass 207. ... Brominated flame-retardants are produced synthetically in ca 70 variants with very varying chemical properties. ... Chromium hexavalent Cr(VI) compounds, often called hexavalent chromium, exist in several forms. ... General Name, Symbol, Number mercury, Hg, 80 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 6, d Appearance silvery Atomic mass 200. ... A tonne or metric ton (symbol t), sometimes referred to as a metric tonne, is a measurement of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms. ...


A study in January 2006 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found that Apple's hardware compares favorably with that of its major competitors on environmental friendliness.[32] EPA redirects here. ...


Software

Mac OS X "Tiger" is the newest version of one of Apple's major software products.
Mac OS X "Tiger" is the newest version of one of Apple's major software products.
See also: List of Apple software and List of Macintosh software

Apple develops its own operating system to run on the Macintosh, Mac OS X. Apple also independently develops computer software titles for its Mac OS X operating system. Much of the software Apple develops is bundled with its computers. An example of this is the consumer-oriented iLife software package which bundles iDVD, iMovie HD, iPhoto, iTunes, GarageBand, and iWeb. For presentation and page layout, iWork is available, which includes Keynote and Pages. Both iTunes and a feature-limited version of the QuickTime media player are available as free downloads for both Mac OS X and Windows. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1152x720, 498 KB) // Summary Screenshot of a Mac OS X 10. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1152x720, 498 KB) // Summary Screenshot of a Mac OS X 10. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... Mac OS X version 10. ... This is a list of software by Apple Computer. ... // This list of Macintosh software reveals prominent Mac OS computer programs. ... An operating system (OS) is a computer program that manages the hardware and software resources of a computer. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... iWeb is a software product made by Apple Computer. ... iWork is a suite of applications created by Apple Computer, containing a word processing and layout application (Pages), and a presentation package (Keynote). ... For the text editor called Keynote, see Keynote (Tranglos). ... For the Bering Strait album, see Pages (album). ... QuickTime is a multimedia framework developed by Apple Computer, capable of handling various formats of digital video, media clips, sound, text, animation, music, and several types of interactive panoramic images. ...


Apple also offers a range of professional software titles. Their range of server software includes the operating system Mac OS X Server; Apple Remote Desktop, a remote systems management application; WebObjects, Java Web application server; and Xsan, a Storage Area Network file system. For the professional creative market, there is Aperture for professional RAW-format photo processing; Final Cut Studio, a video software package, as well as Final Cut Express HD, a cut-down version, for SD and HD video editors; Logic Pro, a comprehensive music toolkit, and Logic Express, its prosumer cousin; and Shake, an advanced effects composition program. Mac OS X Server is the server-oriented version of Apple Computers modern operating system, Mac OS X. It is based on the BSD-Unix-based operating system that Apple Computer acquired from NeXT Computer and which formed the basis of the current Mac OS X. The regular version... Apple Remote Desktop (ARD) is a Macintosh application produced by Apple Computer, first released on March 14, 2002, that replaced a similar product called Apple Network Assistant. ... WebObjects is a Java Web application server by Apple Computer. ... Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition or Java EE (formerly also J2EE) is a programming platform – part of the Java platform – for developing and running distributed multi-tier architecture applications, based largely on modular components running on an application server. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (WWW or simply the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents that runs over the Internet. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A storage area network may involve a group of computers. ... In computing, a storage area network (SAN) is a network designed to attach computer storage devices such as disk array controllers and tape libraries to servers. ... Aperture is a software program for Mac OS X announced by Apple Computer on October 19th, 2005, designed to assist professional photographers in post-production work. ... A raw image file contains minimally processed data from the image sensor of a digital camera or image scanner. ... A photograph (often just called a photo) is an image (or a representation of that on e. ... Final Cut Studio is a video application suite for Mac OS X by Apple Computer. ... Final Cut Express is a non linear video editing software created by Apple Computer. ... Standard-definition television or SDTV refers to television systems that have a lower resolution than HDTV systems. ... Projection screen in a home theater, displaying a high-definition television image. ... Logic Pro is a MIDI sequencer and Digital Audio Workstation software application that runs on the Mac OS X platform. ... In computers, Logic Express 7 is a program for music production developed by Apple and based on Logic Pro 6. ... Prosumer refers to one of two possible portmanteaus formed by contracting either the word producer or professional with the word consumer. ... Shake is an image compositing package used in the post-production industry. ...


Apple also offers online services with .Mac which bundles .Mac HomePage, .Mac Mail, .Mac Groups social network service, .Mac iDisk, .Mac Backup, .Mac Sync, and Learning Center online tutorials. .Mac (pronounced Dot Mac) refers to a group of online services offered by Apple Computer mainly for its Mac OS X users, although a limited subset of features are available for other platforms. ... A screenshot of a web page. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... iDisk icon iDisk is a service offered by Apple to all . ... Backup is a simple Mac OS X-only software program made by Apple Computer for file backups. ... iSync 1. ...


Advertising

Since the introduction of the Macintosh in 1984 with the 1984 Super Bowl commercial, Apple has been recognized for its efforts towards effective advertising and marketing for its products. Apples latest iPod advertising campaign - iPod Remastered. ...


Logos

The original Apple logo featuring Isaac Newton under the fabled apple tree.
The original Apple logo featuring Isaac Newton under the fabled apple tree.
The rainbow Apple logo, used from late 1976 to early 1999.
The rainbow Apple logo, used from late 1976 to early 1999.
The current Apple logo. On products, a simple gray version of the Apple is used, without embellishing it as has been done to computerized images.
The current Apple logo. On products, a simple gray version of the Apple is used, without embellishing it as has been done to computerized images.
 Mac OS X Logo as it appears in the About screen on the latest Apple computers.
Mac OS X Logo as it appears in the About screen on the latest Apple computers.
See also: U+F8FF or , seen as the Apple logo in some fonts.

Apple’s first logo, designed by Jobs and Wayne, depicts Sir Isaac Newton sitting under an apple tree. Almost immediately, though, this was replaced by Rob Janoff’s “rainbow Apple,” the now-familiar rainbow-colored silhouette of an apple with a bite taken out of it, possibly as a tribute to Isaac Newton's discoveries of the gravity (the apple), and the separation of light by prisms (the colors). This was one of several designs Janoff presented to Jobs in 1976.[33] Apples absolute first logo, pre 1976. ... Apples absolute first logo, pre 1976. ... Sir Isaac Newton, (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, and natural philosopher, regarded by many as the greatest figure in the history of science. ... Image File history File links Apple_Computer_Logo. ... Image File history File links Apple_Computer_Logo. ... Image File history File links Apple-logo. ... Image File history File links Apple-logo. ... Image File history File links Macosx_logo. ... Image File history File links Macosx_logo. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Apple symbol (), created by holding alt-shift-k at the same time on an Apple Macintosh keyboard, is a symbol that represents Apple computers. ... Apple typography covers several topics concerning typefaces that Apple Computer has used in its marketing, operating systems and industrial design. ... Sir Isaac Newton in Knellers portrait of 1689. ... Rob Janoff is the creator of Apple Computers famous logo. ... Full featured rainbow in Wrangell-St. ... Sir Isaac Newton, (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, alchemist, and natural philosopher, regarded by many as the greatest figure in the history of science. ...


In her book Zeroes and Ones, author Sadie Plant speculates that the rainbow logo was a homage to Alan Turing, the father of modern computing, who suffered years of persecution for his homosexuality before committing suicide with a cyanide-laced apple. This account, while appealing for its entertainment value as an urban legend, is factually improbable; the Apple logo was designed two years before Gilbert Baker's rainbow pride flag, and did not in any case follow the same color pattern. Dr. Sadie Plant is a British author and philosopher, native of Birmingham, England. ... Alan Turing is often considered the father of modern computer science. ... Originally, the word computing was synonymous with counting and calculating, and a science and technology that deals with the original sense of computing mathematical calculations. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual and romantic attraction between two individuals of the same sex. ... The cyanide ion, CN−. From the top: 1. ... An urban legend is a kind of modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... Gilbert Baker, known as the gay Betsy Ross, is the creator of the Rainbow Flag. ... Six color rainbow gay pride flag flying over the Castro gay village in San Francisco, June 2005 Rainbow flags at Bucharests annual GayFest LGBT pride parade, 2005 A rainbow flag is a multi-colored flag consisting of stripes in the colors of the rainbow. ...


In 1999, Apple began enforcing the use of a strictly monochrome logo—supposedly at the insistence of a newly re-inaugurated Jobs—nearly identical in shape to its previous rainbow incarnation. No specific color is prescribed; for example, it is grey on the Power Mac G5, Mac Mini, and iMac, blue (by default) in Mac OS X, chrome on the 'About this Mac' panel and the boot screen in Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.4, red on many software packages, and white on the iBook, PowerBook G4, PowerBook G3 (late models), MacBook, and MacBook Pro. The logo's shape is one of the most recognized brand symbols in the world, and is featured quite prominently on all Apple products and retail stores, and notably included as stickers in nearly all Macintosh and iPod packages through the years. Protest sticker on the Manhattan Bridge in New York City A label is any kind of tag attached with adhesive to something so as to identify the object or its contents. ...


Corporate affairs

Critics of Apple commonly point to their vertically-integrated business model, where all the hardware and operating system software comes from one company; although the Apple II was very open, the Macintosh was originally closed and proprietary, and during the Mac's early history Apple generally refused to adopt prevailing industry standards for hardware, instead creating and implementing their own (for example, ADB and NuBus). Early ADB device Apple Desktop Bus (or ADB) is an obsolete bit-serial bus for connecting low-speed devices to computers. ... NuBus is a 32-bit parallel computer bus, originally developed at MIT as a part of the NuMachine workstation project, and eventually used by Apple Computer and NeXT Computer. ...


This trend was largely reversed in the late 1990s beginning with Apple's adoption of the PCI bus in the 7500/8500/9500 Power Macs. Apple has since adopted USB, AGP, HyperTransport, WiFi, and other industry standards in its computers and was in some cases a leader in the adoption of such standards. FireWire is an Apple-originated standard which has seen widespread industry adoption after it was standardized as IEEE 1394. For other meanings of PCI, see PCI (disambiguation). ... The Power Macintosh 7500 was one of the first PCI capable Macs manufactured by Apple Computer. ... The Power Macintosh 8500 (the 120 MHz model is also known as Power Macintosh 8515 in Europe and Japan) is a high-end Macintosh personal computer designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer from 1995 until 1997. ... The Power Macintosh 9500 (the 132 MHz model is also known as Power Macintosh 9515 in Europe and Japan) is a high-end Macintosh personal computer which was designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer from May 1995 until early 1997. ... Power Macintosh, or Power Mac, is the name of a line of Apple Macintosh personal computers based on various models of PowerPC microprocessors. ... Note: USB may also mean upper sideband in radio. ... this page has been deleted, by the inconspicuous Headline text booooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooobz Headline text ... HyperTransport logo HyperTransport (HT), formerly known as Lightning Data Transport (LDT), is a bidirectional serial/parallel high-bandwidth, low-latency computer bus that was introduced on April 2, 2001 [1]. The HyperTransport Technology Consortium is in charge of promoting and developing HyperTransport technology. ... Wi-Fi (or Wi-fi, WiFi, Wifi, wifi), short for Wireless Fidelity, is a set of standards for wireless local area networks (WLAN) currently based on the IEEE 802. ... The 6-pin and 4-pin FireWire Connectors FireWire is a proprietary name of Apple Computer for the IEEE 1394 interface. ... A 6-Pin Firewire 400 connector FireWire (also known as i. ...


However, the iPod remains a mostly closed and vertically-integrated platform. Although Apple provides documented interfaces for hardware accessories, developers have no supported way to add features to the software (such as decoding of additional formats), and although the iPod supports the mainstream MP3 and AAC formats, the iPod does not support other proprietary formats like Windows Media and Real Audio, and Apple refuses to license its FairPlay DRM to other online music vendors. Apple did add Windows PC support with their second generation iPod series. Windows Media Audio (WMA) is a proprietary compressed audio file format developed by Microsoft. ... RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks. ... FairPlay is a digital rights management (DRM) technology created by Apple Computer, built in to the QuickTime multimedia technology and used by the iPod, iTunes, and the iTunes Store. ... Digital Rights Management (generally abbreviated to DRM) is any of several technologies used by publishers (or copyright owners) to control access to and usage of digital data (such as software, music, movies) and hardware, handling usage restrictions associated with a specific instance of a digital work. ...


Ever since the first Apple store opened, Apple has wanted 3rd parties to sell their products and software inside the Apple store. This allows Nikon and Canon to sell their Macintosh-compatible digital cameras and camcorders inside the store. Adobe, the largest Apple software partner, also sells its Mac-compatible software inside the store along with Microsoft, who sells Microsoft Office for the Mac. An exception to this is IDG Publishing, whose line of popular books were banned from Apple stores because Steve Jobs disagreed with their editorial policy.[citation needed] IDG (International Data Group) is a publisher of magazines which focus on information technology. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ...


Apple originally used Motorola's 68000-series processors in their Macintosh computers. Apple then switched to using PowerPC processors manufactured in partnership with IBM and Motorola. In June of 2005, after IBM failed to meet previously stated performance goals for PowerPC-based CPUs, Steve Jobs announced that Apple Computer would switch to Intel processors.


Headquarters

Apple Inc.'s world corporate headquarters are located in the heart of Silicon Valley, at 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, California. This Apple campus has six buildings which total 850,000 sq ft. and was built in 1993 by Sobrato Development Cos.[34] Infinite Loop is a street encircling the buildings of Apple Computers headquarters in Cupertino, California. ... Location of Cupertino within Santa Clara County, California. ...


In 2006, Apple announced its intention to build a second campus on 50 acres assembled from various contiguous plots. The new campus, also in Cupertino, will be about one mile east of the current campus.[35]


Apple CEOs, 1977−present

Michael Scotty Scott (born 1943) was the first CEO of Apple Computer from February 1977 to March 1981. ... Harriv 09:43, 1 Feb 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... John Sculley (born April 6, 1939) was president of PepsiCo during the 1970s and early 1980s until he became CEO of Apple Computer on April 8, 1983. ... Michael Spindler (born 1942), nicknamed the Diesel for his reputed around the clock work habits, was president and CEO of Apple Computer from 1993 to 1996. ... Gil Amelio Gilbert F. Amelio (born March 1, 1943 in New York City) is an American technology executive. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ...

Current Apple board of directors

Bill Campbell is the current Chairman of the Board and former CEO of Intuit. ... Intuit Inc. ... Millard S. Drexler is a businessman, formerly CEO of Gap Inc, he joined the board of directors of Gap in November 1983 and left his position in October 2002. ... J.Crew is a preppy mens and womens clothing and accessories company in the United States. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ... The Walt Disney Company (most commonly known as Disney; NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... Arthur D. Levinson (born March 31, 1950 in Seattle, Washington) is President and Chief Executive Officer of Genentech. ... Genentech, Inc. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Google, Inc. ... Jerry York is an American businessman, he was the former CFO of IBM and Chrysler. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: No assertion that the firm is notable. ...

Current Apple executives

Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple Inc. ... A chief executive officer (CEO), or chief executive, is the highest-ranking corporate officer or executive officer of a corporation, or agency. ... Timothy D. Cook. ... A Chief Operating Officer (COO) is a corporate officer responsible for managing the day-to-day activities of the corporation. ... Anthony Fadell is Senior Vice President of Apple Computers iPod Division. ... Philip Schiller Philip W. Schiller is Apple Computer’s senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing and reports to Apple CEO Steve Jobs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Marketing. ... Bertrand Serlet is senior vice president of software engineering at Apple Computer. ... Software Engineering (SE) is the design, development, and documentation of software by applying technologies and practices from computer science, project management, engineering, application domains, interface design, digital asset management and other fields. ... Ron Johnson Ron Johnson is the Senior Vice President of Retail Operations at Apple Computer. ... Sina Tamaddon Sina Tamaddon is the Senior Vice President of Applications for Apple Computer. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of a company is the corporate officer primarily responsible for managing the financial risks of a business. ... Jonathan P. Ive CBE (born February 1967 in London) is Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple Computer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

Corporate culture

Apple has a long tradition of emphasizing the user experience, rather than the technology involved in delivering that experience. From this perspective, Apple’s philosophy of design is aligned with that of Nintendo (“We consider ourselves, above all else, a gaming company. We believe other companies see themselves primarily as technology companies”). This attitude is reflected in the casual manner the company switches the Mac from architecture to architecture every decade or so, presenting this to users and developers alike as an affair that changes not at all the essential character of the Mac, while industry observers and trade magazines become highly concerned over what they perceive as an enormous change in direction. Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ...


Apple was one of several highly successful companies founded in the 1970s that bucked the traditional notions of what a corporate culture should look like in terms of organizational hierarchy (flat versus tall, casual versus formal attire, et cetera). Other highly successful firms with similar cultural aspects from the same time period include Southwest Airlines and Microsoft, and the relative success of these firms (whether a result of their cultural differences or not) resulted in the widespread adoption of informal corporate culture within the technology industry.[citation needed] Originally, the company stood in opposition to staid competitors like IBM more or less by default, thanks to the influence of its founders; Steve Jobs often walked around the office barefoot even after Apple was a Fortune 500 company. By the time of the "1984" TV ad, this trait had become a key way the company differentiated itself from its competitors. Southwest Airlines, Inc. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... A screenshot from the commercial. ...


As the company has grown and been led by a series of chief executives, each with his own idea of what Apple should be, some of its original character has arguably been lost, but Apple still has a reputation for fostering individuality that reliably draws talented people into its employ. To recognize the best of its employees, Apple created the Apple Fellows program. Apple Fellows are those who have made extraordinary technical or leadership contributions to personal computing while at the company. The Apple Fellowship has so far been awarded to a few individuals including Bill Atkinson,[36] Rod Holt,[36] Alan Kay,[37][38] Guy Kawasaki,[37][39] Don Norman,[37] Rich Page,[36] and Steve Wozniak.[36] Bill Atkinson worked at Apple Computer in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Alan Kay during an interview. ... Guy Kawasaki (born 1954) was one of the original Apple Computer employees responsible for marketing of the Macintosh in 1984. ... Donald Norman is a professor emeritus of computer science at University of California, San Diego and a Professor of Computer Science at Northwestern University, but nowadays works mostly with cognitive science in the domain of usability engineering. ... Rich Page was the manager of the Lisa group at Apple Computer in the 1980s, and he later joined Steve Jobs at NeXT. External links Folklore. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is an American computer engineer turned philanthropist. ...


User culture

See also: Cult of Mac

According to surveys by J. D. Power, Apple has the highest brand and repurchase loyalty of any computer manufacturer. While this brand loyalty is considered unusual for any product, Apple appears not to have gone out of its way to create it. At one time, Apple evangelists were actively engaged by the company, but this was after the phenomenon was already firmly established. Apple evangelist Guy Kawasaki has called the brand fanaticism "something that was stumbled upon."[40] Apple Logo Tattoo The Cult of Mac is a popular term used to refer to the group of Apple Macintosh owners, those who aspire to become one, and those who admire the Macintosh lifestyle. It is also the title of a very popular blog authored by Leander Kahney and hosted... J.D. Power is a consumers information resource providing ratings on everything from cars to restaurants. ... An Apple evangelist, also known as Mac evangelist, Macintosh evangelist, and Mac advocate is a promoter of the Apple Macintosh platform. ... Guy Kawasaki (born 1954) was one of the original Apple Computer employees responsible for marketing of the Macintosh in 1984. ...


Macintosh users meet at the Apple Expo and MacWorld Expo trade shows where Apple introduces new products each year to the industry and public and Macintosh developers in turn gather at Worldwide Developers Conference. Many users show their loyalty and devotion by wearing Apple t-shirts. Apple Expo Paris 2005 The Apple Expo is a European annual sales conference and technology exposition held by Apple. ... Produced by Boston-based IDG World Expo, Macworld Conference & Expo is a trade show dedicated to the Apple Macintosh platform with conference tracks occurring twice a year in the United States. ... WWDC 2005, at Moscone Center The Worldwide Developers Conference, commonly abbreviated WWDC, is an annual trade show for Apple developers. ... T-Shirt A T-shirt (or tee shirt) is a shirt with short or long sleeves, a round neck, put on over the head, without pockets. ...


Apple Store openings can draw crowds of thousands, with some waiting in line as much as a day before the opening or flying in from other countries for the event.[41] The New York City Fifth Avenue "Cube" store had a line as long as half a mile; a few Mac fans took the opportunity of the setting to propose marriage.[42] The Ginza opening in Tokyo was estimated in the thousands with a line exceeding eight city blocks.[43] The Apple store on the Magnificent Mile in Chicago The interior of an Apple store. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ...


John Sculley told the Guardian newspaper in 1997: "People talk about technology, but Apple was a marketing company. It was the marketing company of the decade."[44]


Market research indicates that Apple draws its customer base from an unusually artistic, creative, and well-educated population, which may explain the platform’s visibility within certain youthful, avant-garde subcultures.[45] Furthermore, conventional wisdom holds that the platform appeals especially to the politically liberal-minded; even Steve Jobs speculates that “maybe a little less” than half of Apple’s customers are Republicans, “maybe more Dell than ours.” However conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh is a staunch Apple customer.[46] Accurate or not, this perception can only be reinforced by the company's pattern of political donations,[47] by Al Gore’s membership on its board,[48] and surely not least by Jobs’ own personal history.[49] Conventional wisdom is a term coined by the economist John Kenneth Galbraith, used to describe certain ideas or explanations that are generally accepted as true by the public. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... For other uses, see Republican Party (disambiguation) or GOP (disambiguation). ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Talk radio is a radio format which features discussion of topical issues. ... Rush Hudson Limbaugh III (born January 12, 1951) is an American radio talk show host. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ...


Litigation

Apple's earliest court action dates to 1978 when Apple Records, The Beatles-founded record label, filed suit against Apple Computer for trademark infringement. The suit settled in 1981 with an amount of US$80,000 being paid to Apple Corps. As a condition of the settlement, Apple Computer agreed to stay out of the music business. The case arose in 1989 again when Apple Corps sued over the Apple IIGS, which included a professional synthesizer chip, claiming violation of the 1981 settlement agreement. In 1991 another settlement of around US$26.5 million was reached.[50] In September 2003 Apple Computer was sued by Apple Corps again, this time for introducing the iTunes Music Store and the iPod, which Apple Corps believed was a violation of the previous agreement by Apple Computer not to distribute music.[51] The trial began on March 27, 2006 in the UK and ended on May 8, 2006 with victory for Apple Computer. The judge ruled the company's iTunes Music Store did not infringe on the trademark of Apple Corps and ordered Apple Corps to pay the legal costs.[52] At the present time The Beatles' songs are not available for download from any legal music download sites, including the iTunes Music Store. The announcement of a move into downloading TV and films on September 13, 2006 may well be seen as another cause for this litigation to continue. From the 1980s to the present Apple Inc. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... The Beatles were a highly influential English rock band from Liverpool. ... Between 1978 and 2006 there have been a number of legal disputes between Apple Corps (owned by The Beatles) and the computer manufacturer Apple Computer over competing trademark rights. ... A trademark, trade mark, ™ or ®[1] is a distinctive sign of some kind which is used by an organization to uniquely identify itself and its products and services to consumers, and to distinguish the organization and its products or services from those of other organizations. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1982 Apple filed a lawsuit against Franklin Computer Corp., alleging that Franklin's ACE 100 personal computer used illegal copies of Apple's operating system and ROM. Apple v. Franklin established the fundamental basis of copyright of computer software. When developing the Macintosh, Apple decided to embed a "smoking gun" in its firmware to make it easier to detect copying, and the original Macintosh shipped with an encrypted "Stolen from Apple" icon in ROM. Franklin Computer Corporation is an American computer manufacturer based in Burlington, New Jersey, founded in 1981. ... Read-only memory (ROM) is a class of storage media used in computers and other electronic devices. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... Copyright symbol Copyright is a set of exclusive rights regulating the use of a particular expression of an idea or information. ... The term smoking gun is a reference to an object or fact that serves as conclusive evidence or proof of a crime or similar act. ...


In 1988 Apple sued Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard on the grounds that they infringed Apple's copyrights on a GUI, particularly design elements such as the "Trash". The Apple Computer, Inc. v. Microsoft Corp. trial lasted for four years. The ruling was decided against Apple, on the grounds that Apple had actually (unintentionally) licensed the intellectual property to Microsoft as part of the agreement that gave Microsoft early access to the information necessary to develop Macintosh software, and the concept of a GUI was no longer the domain of Apple alone. The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ...


In the most recent previously unrelated lawsuit, Apple entered into a class action settlement,[53] upheld on December 20, 2005 following an appeal, regarding the battery life of iPod music players sold prior to May 2004. Eligible members of the class are entitled to extended warranties, store credit, cash compensation, or battery replacement. In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The current iPod line. ...


Creative also recently filed a patent dispute alleging that Apple infringed on one of Creative's patents for their Zen player with the iPod and iPod nano.[54] However, on August 23, 2006, Apple and Creative settled their patent disputes for $100 million. Creative Technology Limited (SGX: C76, NASDAQ: CREAF) is a listed manufacturer of computer multimedia products based in Singapore where the firm was initially founded by Sim Wong Hoo (born 1955) on July 1, 1981. ... Creative Zen Vision:M 30 GB audio/video player, released in 2005. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On January 10, 2007, Cisco sued Apple for the iPhone, since Cisco holds the trademark on the word "iPhone." Apparently, Apple and Cisco had been in talks for a while about use of the name, but Apple lawyers did not return the final agreement to them by January 9th. January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... Cisco may refer to: Cisco Systems, a computer networking company Cisco IOS, an internet router operating system CISCO Security Private Limited, a security company in Singapore Commercial and Industrial Security Corporation, a statutory board in Singapore Abbreviation for San Francisco, California Cisco (wine) The Cisco Kid, a fictional character created... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

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  2. ^ Apple Computer 2006 10-K, p. 20
  3. ^ Nasdaq Company Financials
  4. ^ SEC filing - Apple.com
  5. ^ Markoff, John. "New Mobile Phone Signals Apple’s Ambition", The New York Times, 2006-01-09. Retrieved on 2006-01-09.
  6. ^ Apple's remarkable comeback story
  7. ^ Apple History
  8. ^ Apple Computer Investor Relations FAQ
  9. ^ Stanford University commencement address by Steve Jobs (2005)
  10. ^ Homebrew and How the Apple Came to Be
  11. ^ Wired News, "Rebuilding an Apple From the Past", 19 November 2002
  12. ^ Original Apple I User's Manual
  13. ^ http://lowendmac.com/coventry/06/0901.html
  14. ^ Apple Computer (February 7, 1997). Apple Computer, Inc. Finalizes Acquisition of NeXT Software Inc.. Press release. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  15. ^ Macworld 1997: The Microsfot Deal. Google Video (February 7, 1997). Retrieved on 2007-01-04.
  16. ^ BBC News story on Apple's first quarter 2006 earnings report
  17. ^ http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa003&articleID=9AAD93328ED02110438566B1162F48B8
  18. ^ Apple press release Apple to Use Intel Microprocessors Beginning in 2006
  19. ^ News.com Apple-Intel transition article
  20. ^ New York Times Apple-Intel transition article
  21. ^ Software Licensing Agreements: Mac Logo Program. developer.apple.com. Retrieved on 2006-10-22.
  22. ^ http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1824695,00.asp
  23. ^ Yahoo Finance
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  25. ^ CNet
  26. ^ The Mac Observer, December 5, 2006
  27. ^ http://events.apple.com.edgesuite.net/j47d52oo/event/
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  29. ^ It's Green my Apple Showtime!. A greener Apple. Retrieved on 2006-11-05.
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  32. ^ EPA information should make GreenPeace red-faced over Apple targeting. Retrieved on 2007-01-08.
  33. ^ Wired News: Apple Doin' the Logo-Motion
  34. ^ http://sanjose.bizjournals.com/sanjose/stories/2005/10/03/story4.html
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  36. ^ a b c d Hertzfeld, Andy (January 1983). Credit Where Due. Folklore.org. Retrieved on 2006-05-26.
  37. ^ a b c Eisenhart, Mary. "Fighting Back For Mac", MicroTimes, 1997. Retrieved on 2006-05-26.
  38. ^ Hertzfeld, Andy (March 1984). Leave of Absence. Folklore.org. Retrieved on 2006-05-26.
  39. ^ Kawakami, John. "Apple Taps Guy Kawasaki For Apple Fellows Program", MacTech, September 1995. Retrieved on 2006-05-26.
  40. ^ The father of evangelism marketing by Ben McConnell and Jackie Huba
  41. ^ http://www.wired.com/news/culture/mac/0,61513-0.html
  42. ^ http://ifostore.cachefly.net/fifth_avenue/index.html
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  44. ^ Wired News: Apple: It's All About the Brand
  45. ^ Fried, Ian (July 12, 2002). Are Mac users smarter?. news.com. Retrieved on April 24, 2006.
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  48. ^ Apple Computer (March 19, 2003). Former Vice President Al Gore Joins Apple's Board of Directors. Press release. Retrieved on 2006-06-01.
  49. ^ Berkshire's Buffett, Apple's Jobs Join Kerry Advisers. Bloomberg L.P.. Retrieved on June 1, 2006.
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  51. ^ legalzoom.com: Apple v Apple: What is at the core of The Beatles’ Apple Records vs. Apple Ipod…
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  54. ^ http://www.appleinsider.com/article.php?id=1743

2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... MacTech is a monthly magazine about programming for the Apple Macintosh line of computers. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... Ian Fried is a staff writer for CNET Networks News. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... CNET Networks Inc. ... Walt Mossberg is a technology columnist for the Wall Street Journal. ... August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... Bloomberg L.P. is a financial news service founded by Michael Bloomberg in 1981. ... The main entrance The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a building in London, which houses the Court of Appeal and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ...

Further reading

  • Gil Amelio, William L. Simon (1999) In the Firing Line: My 500 days at Apple ISBN 0-88730-919-4
  • Jim Carlton, Apple: The Inside Story of Intrigue, Egomania and Business Blunders ISBN 0-88730-965-8
  • Paul Kunkel, AppleDesign: The Work of the Apple Industrial Design Group ISBN 1-888001-25-9
  • Owen Linzmayer (2004), Apple Confidential 2.0, No Starch Press ISBN 1-59327-010-0
  • Michael S. Malone (1999), Infinite Loop ISBN 0-385-48684-7
  • Steven Levy, Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything ISBN 0-14-029177-6
  • Andy Hertzfeld (2004), Revolution in the Valley, O'Reilly Books ISBN 0-596-00719-1
  • Frank Rose (1990), West of Eden: The End of Innocence at Apple Computer, Penguin Books ISBN 0-14-009372-9
  • Jeffrey S. Young (1988). Steve Jobs, The Journey is the Reward, Lynx Books, ISBN 1-55802-378-X

Gil Amelio Gilbert F. Amelio (born March 1, 1943 in New York City) is an American technology executive. ... Apple Confidential is a softback book documenting the history of Apple Computer, written by Owen Linzmayer. ... Steven Levy is an American journalist who has written several books on computers, technology, cryptography, the Internet, cyber security and privacy. ... Andy Hertzfeld (born April 6, 1953), was a key member of the original Apple Macintosh development team, and some would consider him a pioneer among software engineers. ... Penguin Books is a British publisher founded in 1935 by Allen Lane. ...

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