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Encyclopedia > Apotheosis
Look up Apotheosis in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
see Divinization for disambiguation.

Apotheosis means glorification, usually to a divine level, coming from the Greek word ἀποθεόω, "to deify". Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Divinization is the making divine of an earthly entity or activity. ... For other uses, see Divinity (disambiguation) and Divine (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Antiquity

Further information: imperial cult and divine king

Prior to the Hellenistic period, imperial cults were known in Ancient Egypt (pharaohs) and Mesopotamia (since Naram-Sin). From the New Kingdom, all deceased were deified as Osiris. An Imperial cult is a kind of religion in which an Emperor, or a dynasty of emperors (or rulers of another title), are worshipped as demigods or deities. ... A divine king is a monarch who is held in a special religious significance by his subjects, and serves as both head of state and a deity or head religious figure. ... An Imperial cult is a kind of religion in which an Emperor, or a dynasty of emperors (or rulers of another title), are worshipped as demigods or deities. ... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... ... The New Kingdom is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BCE and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. ... For other uses, see Osiris (disambiguation). ...


Hellenistic Greece

Main article: Hero cult

In the Greek and Hellenistic world, state leaders might be raised to the gods before (e.g., Alexander the Great) or after (e.g., the Ptolemaic dynasty) death. It was also an honour given to a few revered artists, such as Homer. [1] Hero cult was one of the most distinctive features of ancient Greek religion. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... cleopatra ruled seneca for 10 years before she ruled Egypt. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ...


Ancient Rome

Apotheosis in ancient Rome was a process whereby a deceased ruler was recognized to be divine by his successor, usually also by a decree of the Senate or popular consent. In addition to showing respect, often the successor deified his popular predecessor as a means to legitimize himself. The upper-class, in fact, did not always take part in the cult and some secretly ridiculed the apotheosis of inept and feeble emperors. The Imperial cult in Ancient Rome was the worship of the Roman Emperor as a god. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


At the height of imperial cult worship during the Roman Empire, sometimes the emperor's deceased loved ones--heirs, empresses, or lovers--were deified as well. Deified people were awarded posthumously with the prefix Divus (Diva if women) to their names to signify their divinity. Temples and columns were sometimes erected to provide a space for worships. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ...


Christology

Trinitarian Christian theology deifies Jesus as God the Son, and as Logos. The adjective trinitarian is used in several senses: Ideas or things pertaining to the Holy Trinity A person or group adhering to the doctrine of Trinitarianism, which holds God to subsist in the form of the Holy Trinity The Trinitarian Order is a Catholic monastic order founded in 1198 by... Christian doctrine redirects here. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This 11th-century portrait is one of many images of Jesus in which a halo with a cross is used. ... In Christology, the conception that Jesus is the Logos (a Greek word meaning word, wisdom, or reason) has been important in establishing the doctrine of Jesus divinity, as well as that of the Trinity, as set forth in the Chalcedonian Creed. ...


Modern

Apotheosis of French soldiers fallen in the liberation war, Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson, beginning of 19th century.
Apotheosis of French soldiers fallen in the liberation war, Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy-Trioson, beginning of 19th century.
Apotheosis of George Washington
Apotheosis of George Washington
Ingres, Apotheosis of Homer
Ingres, Apotheosis of Homer

Later artists have used the concept for motives ranging from real respect for the deceased (Constantino Brumidi's fresco "The Apotheosis of George Washington" on the dome of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.), to artistic comment (Salvador Dalí's or Ingres's Apotheosis of Homer), to comedic effect. Many modern leaders have also exploited the artistic imagery, if not the actual worship, of apotheosis. Examples include Rubens's depictions of James I of England at the Banqueting House (an expression of the Divine Right of Kings) or Henry IV of France, or Appiani's apotheosis of Napoleon. The term has been usued figuratively to refer to the elevation of a dead leader (often one who was assassinated and/or martyred) to a kind of superhuman charismatic figure and an effective erasing of all faults and controversies which were connected with his name in life - for example, Abraham Lincoln in the US and Yitzchak Rabin in Israel. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2107, 452 KB) Description: Title: de: Apotheose der während des Befreiungskrieges für das Vaterland gefallenen französischen Helden Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 192 × 182 cm Country of origin: de: Frankreich Current location (city): de: Paris Current... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2107, 452 KB) Description: Title: de: Apotheose der während des Befreiungskrieges für das Vaterland gefallenen französischen Helden Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 192 × 182 cm Country of origin: de: Frankreich Current location (city): de: Paris Current... Malvine, dying in the arms of Fingal, beginning of 19th century. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 1080 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 1080 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1547, 350 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Apotheosis ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1547, 350 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Apotheosis ... Constantino Brumidi Constantino Brumidi (July 26, 1805 in Rome, Italy-February 19, 1880, Washington, DC), was an Italian-American historical painter, best known and honored for his fresco work in the Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Parentage and early life Brumidis father was a native of Filiatra (in western... The Apotheosis of Washington The Apotheosis of Washington (also known as The Apotheosis of George Washington) is a fresco in the United States Capitol painted by Constantino Brumidi in 1865. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, Marquis of Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (pronounced (Ang, rhymes with bang, with a hint of the r, but the final es is not pronounced) (August 29, 1780 - January 14, 1867) was a French Neoclassical painter. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Banqueting House, Whitehall, London The Banqueting House at Whitehall is a famous London building, formerly part of the Palace of Whitehall, designed by architect Inigo Jones in 1619, and completed in 1622, with assistance from John Webb. ... The Divine Right of Kings is a European political and religious doctrine of political absolutism. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Yitzhak Rabin Yitzhak Rabin (יצחק רבין) (March 1, 1922–November 4, 1995) was an Israeli politician and military general. ...

Popular Culture

  • Apotheosis was a 1980s/1990s electronica rave/dance band that saw some controversy and much popularity due to their tracks of O Fortuna, which got them sued by the composer's estate.
  • In an episode of the animated series The Tick, the character Sewer Urchin refers to himself as "the apotheosis of cool."
  • There is also an episode of Babylon 5 called Falling Toward Apotheosis
  • At the beginning of Stephen King's The Gunslinger, the first in his Dark Tower series, it memorably describes the series' thematic desert setting as "the apotheosis of all deserts".
  • Joseph Campbell, in his book The Hero With a Thousand Faces, writes that the Universal Hero from monomyth must pass through a stage of Apotheosis. According to Campbell, apotheosis is the expansion of consciousness that the hero experiences after defeating his foe.
  • Alan Bennett: In his play The History Boys, the character of Irwin in speaking about the disolution of British monasteries refers to their Apotheosis and is criticised by his director for the use of the word. Irwin remarks "It is BBC 2".
  • Salvador Dali painted Apotheosis of the Dollar in 1965.
  • The strongest attack of the character Sagi from the video game Baten Kaitos Origins is called "The Apotheosis".
  • A weapon in The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion is called Apotheosis. It is a magical staff which causes 33 points of all elemental damage at once. It is considered to be one of the most powerful and most useful staves in the game.
  • Madness Combat 4 (a popular Flash series) is also called Apotheosis.

The Tick is the name of a series of comic books and an animated TV series created in 1986 by Ben Edlund, following the exploits of a blue-skinned muscular man named The Tick who fights crime in a place simply called The City. He is an absurdist spoof of... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Falling Toward Apotheosis is an episode from the fourth season of the science-fiction television series Babylon 5. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... The Gunslinger is a novel by American author Stephen King, and is the first volume in the Dark Tower series, which King considers to be his magnum opus. ... The Dark Tower can refer to one of several things: The Dark Tower (series) — a series of novels by Stephen King. ... For other uses, see Joseph Campbell (disambiguation). ... The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949) is a non-fiction book, and seminal work of comparative mythology by Joseph Campbell. ... The monomyth (often referred to as the heros journey) is a description of a basic pattern found in many narratives from around the world. ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... The History Boys is a six-time Tony Award winning play (and later movie) by English playwright Alan Bennett. ... Salvador Dalí as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten Salvador Domenec Felip Jacint Dalí Domenech (May 11, 1904 - January 23, 1989) was an important Catalan-Spanish painter, best known for his surrealist works. ... Baten Kaitos Origins (known as Baten Kaitos II in Japan) is a role-playing video game unveiled at the 2005 Tokyo Game Show by Namco and Monolith Soft. ... The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion is a game currently under development by Bethesda Softworks for the PC, Xbox 2, and Playstation 3. ...

References and further reading

  1. ^ [1]
  • Arthur E.R. Boak, "The Theoretical Basis of the Deification of Rulers

in Antiquity", in: Classical Journal vol. 11, 1916, pp. 293-297.

  • Franz Bömer, "Ahnenkult und Ahnenglaube im alten Rom", Leipzig 1943.
  • Walter Burkert, "Caesar und Romulus-Quirinus", in: Historia vol. 11,

1962, pp. 356-376.

  • Jean-Claude Richard, "Énée, Romulus, César et les funérailles

impériales", in: Mélanges de l'École Française de Rome vol. 78, 1966, pp. 67-78.

  • Bernadette Liou-Gille, "Divinisation des morts dans la Rome

ancienne", in: Revue Belge de Philologie vol. 71, 1993, pp. 107-115.

  • David Engels, "Postea dictus est inter deos receptus.

Wetterzauber und Königsmord: Zu den Hintergründen der Vergöttlichung frührömischer Könige", in: Gymnasium vol 114, 2007, pp. 103-130.


See also

The Sun goddess emerging out of a cave, bringing sunlight back to the universe. ... A cult of personality or personality cult arises when a countrys leader uses mass media to create a larger-than-life public image through unquestioning flattery and praise. ... In Paganism, Neo-Paganism, and Satanism, a Suitheist is person who believes himself to be a god, but does not deny the existence of other gods. ... Euhemerus (Ευήμερος) (working late 4th century BCE) was a Greek mythographer at the court of Cassander, the king of Macedonia. ... Sir James George Frazer (January 1, 1854, Glasgow, Scotland – May 7, 1941), was a Scottish social anthropologist influential in the early stages of the modern studies of mythology and comparative religion. ... The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion is a wide-ranging comparative study of mythology and religion, written by Scottish anthropologist Sir James George Frazer (1854–1941). ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... The author and poet Robert Graves study of the nature of poetic myth-making, The White Goddess, first published in 1948, and revised, amended and enlarged in 1966, represents a tangential approach to the study of mythology from a decidedly idiosyncratic perspective. ... An Imperial cult is a kind of religion in which an Emperor, or a dynasty of emperors (or rulers of another title), are worshipped as demigods or deities. ... Emperor Shōwa ) (April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) was the 124th emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from December 25, 1926 until his death in 1989. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... The term Roman religion may refer to: Ancient Roman religion Imperial cult (Ancient Rome), Sol Invictus Mithraism Roman Christianity Category: ... A sacred king, according to the systematic interpretation of mythology developed by Sir James George Frazer in his influential book The Golden Bough, was a king who represented a solar deity in a periodically re-enacted fertility rite. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Eastern Orthodox and... Edward Burnett Tylor. ...

External links

  • Seneca's Apocolocyntosis at Project Gutenberg
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Apotheosis

  Results from FactBites:
 
Apotheosis | Encyclopedia of Religion (437 words)
APOTHEOSIS is the conferring, through official, ritual, or iconographic means, of the status of a god upon a mortal person.
The case of the young Gnostic Epiphanes, adored as a god after his death for being the founder of the Carpocratian sect, exhibits the same process.
In dedicating funeral solemnities, of which some elements (particularly eagles) prefigure certain aspects of imperial Roman apotheosis, to the memory of his friend Hephaestion, Alexander established a cult for him, ordering that sacrifice be made to him "as to a god of the highest order" (Diodorus Siculus, 17.114–115).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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