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Encyclopedia > Apostolic United Brethren

The Apostolic United Brethren (hereafter AUB) is a polygamous fundamentalist sect not affiliated with the well-known The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The group has had a temple in Ozumba, Mexico since the 1990s or earlier, and an Endowment house in Utah since sometime in the 1980s. This is the current Mormon collaboration of the month! Please help improve it to meet the Featured Article standard. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The title "Apostolic United Brethren" is not generally used by members, who prefer to call it: the work; the priesthood; or the group. Those outside the faith once called it the "Allred" group, because two of its leaders had that surname. It should be noted the church does not have any ties to other Churches of the Brethren and associated groups.

Contents

Membership

There are between 5000-8000 members of the AUB, most in Utah and Mexico. Its headquarters is in Bluffdale, Utah, where it has a chapel, school, archives, and sports field. Bluffdale is a city located in Salt Lake County, Utah. ...


It has United Order communities in Rocky Ridge, Utah, Harvest Haven (in Eagle Mountain, Utah), Cedar City, Utah, Motoqua, and Granite, Utah. As well as communities and congregations in Pinesdale, Montana; Lovell, Wyoming; Mesa, Arizona; Humansville, Missouri; and Ozumba, Mexico. It operates at least 3 private schools (many families also homeschool or send their children to public schools). Rocky Ridge is a town located in Juab County, Utah. ... Eagle Mountain is a city in Utah County, Utah, United States. ... Cedar City is a city located in Iron County, Utah, 250 miles South of Salt Lake City on Interstate 15. ... Granite is a census-designated place located in Salt Lake County, Utah located to the east of Sandy. ... Pinesdale is a town located in Ravalli County, Montana. ... Lovell is a town located in Big Horn County, Wyoming. ... Mesa is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona and part of the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale Metropolitan Area. ... Humansville is a city located in Polk County, Missouri. ...


Some members remain active [citation needed] in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (hereafter LDS Church), but keep their affiliation secret, as the support of ongoing plural marriage is grounds for excommunication from the LDS Church. This is the current Mormon collaboration of the month! Please help improve it to meet the Featured Article standard. ... Plural marriage (also sometimes called celestial marriage or The Patriarchal Order of marriage) is a type of polygamy that was allegedly practiced by Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


Organization

The AUB is headed by a President of the Priesthood, next in authority is a Priesthood Council (of which he is a part). Below this are Presidents of the Seventy, High Priests, Elders, Aaronic Priesthood, Relief Society, Sunday School, Young Women's, Boy Scouts, and Primary organizations (which may be different according to region). On a local level there are Bishops, Priesthood Council representatives, and Patriarchs.


Meetings

General Sacrament and Sunday School Meetings (as well as many private family Sunday Schools) take place on a Sunday, as do some Priesthood classes.


Relief Society (a women's organization), Young Women's, Primary and Scouting take place throughout the week. The Relief Society is the womens organization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. ...


At meetinghouses dances, firesides, musical events, plays, and classes often take place.


Doctrines & Practices

The AUB accept the Articles of Faith, written by Joseph Smith to summarize LDS beliefs. They believe the LDS Church is still fulfilling a divine role in its spreading the Book of Mormon and doing genealogy work. In Mormonism, the Articles of Faith are a creed composed by Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


The AUB is however best known for their belief in Plural Marriage, the United Order, the Adam-God doctrine, and what is commonly called the 1886 meeting (see History section). Child and spouse abuse and incest are considered serious sins, and those members who perpetrate such crimes are excommunicated and the victims are free to report such incidents to the police. The Adam-God theory (also called the Adam-God doctrine) is a teaching by Brigham Young, that Adam is our Father and our God, and the only God with whom we have to do. ...


History

The AUB's claims to authority are based around the accounts of John Wickersham Woolley and Lorin Calvin Woolley and others of a meeting in September 1886 between LDS Church President John Taylor, the Woolleys and others. Prior to the meeting President Taylor is said to have met with the Church founder, Joseph Smith, Jr. and Jesus Christ, and to have received a revelation commanding that Plural marriage should not cease, but be kept alive by a separate group from the church, who would preserve the doctrine on earth. The following day the Woolleys, as well as Taylor's counsellor George Q. Cannon and others, were set apart to keep "the principle" alive. John Wickersham Woolley was born to Edwin D. and Mary W. Woolley (the first of Edwins seven wives) in Newlin, Columbia, Pennsylvania on December 30, 1831. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Taylor (November 1, 1808 – July 25, 1887) was the third President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1880 to 1887. ... Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Plural marriage (also sometimes called celestial marriage or The Patriarchal Order of marriage) is a type of polygamy that was allegedly practiced by Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


Members see their history as going back to Joseph Smith and to the beliefs he espoused and practices he established. As - they believe - the LDS Church has made changes to doctrines and ordinances, they see it as their responsibility to keep them alive in the form they were originally given and to live all the laws God has commanded.


Up until the 1950s Fundamentalists were largely one group, but with the ordination in 1951 of Rulon C. Allred by Joseph W. Musser, who then presided over the Fundamentalists, those Fundamentalists in Short Creek (now Colorado City), Arizona, became more distant and within a few years formed their own group - now called the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The FLDS Temple near Eldorado, Texas The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS) is a separatist group of Mormon fundamentalists, and may be Americas largest polygamous group. ...


The shooting of Rulon C. Allred by Rena Chynoweth in 1977 (under the direction of Ervil LeBaron) brought the AUB into the spotlight. He was succeeded by his brother, Owen Allred, who died in 2005 and was replaced by his appointed successor, J. LaMoine Jenson. Ervil Morrell LeBaron (1925 to August 16, 1981) was the leader of a polygamous Mormon fundamentalist group who ordered the killings of many of his opponents. ...


External links

  • www.mormonfundamentalism.org (seems to be the unofficial AUBĀ“s website)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Apostolic United Brethren - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (707 words)
The Apostolic United Brethren (hereafter AUB) is a polygamous fundamentalist sect not affiliated with the well-known The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
The AUB is headed by a President of the Priesthood, next in authority is a Priesthood Council (of which he is a part).
The AUB's claims to authority are based around the accounts of John Wickersham Woolley and Lorin Calvin Woolley and others of a meeting in September 1886 between LDS Church President John Taylor, the Woolleys and others.
Religious Movements Homepage: The Brethren (3729 words)
The Brethren, officially known as the German Baptists throughout the nineteenth century (Melton, 441), mixed pietism with the Anabaptist tradition, blending a renewed emphasis on spirituality with the Anabaptist emphasis on outward expression of faith.
As the Brethren Church grew and expanded, moving them beyond their traditional agricultural communities, and as industrialization made more "worldly" products available to everyone, they became increasingly more mainstream, and less recognizable as a distinct body.
They follow traditional Brethren beliefs and practices: women are expected to have long hair and to wear a head covering, men are to have short hair, no musical instruments are accepted in the worship time, and of course divorce and remarriage is not allowed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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