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Encyclopedia > Aphrodite

Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (pronounced /ˌæfrəˈdaɪti/; Ancient Greek: IPA[apʰɾoˈdiːtɛː], Modern Greek: [afɾoˈðiti]) is the classical Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexual reproduction. She was also called Kypris and Cytherea after the two places, Cyprus and Cythera, which claimed her birth. Her Roman equivalent is the goddess Venus. Myrtle, dove, sparrow, and swan are sacred to her. Image File history File linksMetadata Aphrodite_by_Boticelli. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aphrodite_by_Boticelli. ... The Birth of Venus is a painting by Sandro Botticelli. ... Botticelli redirects here. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Aphrodite is the Ancient Greek goddess of love and beauty. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The Birth of Venus, by Sandro Botticelli c. ... Beginning of Homers Odyssey The Ancient Greek language is the historical stage of the Greek language[1] as it existed during the Archaic (9th–6th centuries BC) and Classical (5th–4th centuries BC) periods in Ancient Greece. ... Main article: Greek language Modern Greek (Νέα Ελληνικά or Νεοελληνική, lit. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... A demon sating his lust in a 13th century manuscript Lust is any intense desire or craving for self gratification and excitement. ... For beauty as a characteristic of a persons appearance, see Physical attractiveness. ... Sexual reproduction is a union that results in increasing genetic diversity of the offspring. ... Kythira, also seen as Kythera, Cythera or Tsirigo, is an island, one of the Ionian Islands. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... The Birth of Venus, by Sandro Botticelli c. ... Species Myrtus communis L. Myrtus nivellei Batt. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Dove redirects here. ... For other uses, see Sparrow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Swan (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Origins

Aphrodite has numerous equivalents : Inanna (Sumerian counterpart), Astarte (Phoenician), Turan (Etruscan), and Venus (Roman). She has parallels to Indo-European dawn goddesses such as Ushas or Aurora. According to Pausanias, the first men to establish her cult were the Assyrians, after the Assyrians the Paphians of Cyprus and the Phoenicians who live at Ascalon in Palestine; the Phoenicians taught her worship to the people of Cythera.[1] It is said Aphrodite could make any man fall in love with her by them just laying eyes on her. The name Άφροδίτη was connected by popular etymology with Άφρός (Aphros) "foam", interpreting it as "risen from the foam" and embodying it in an etiological myth that was already known to Hesiod[2]. It has reflexes in Messapic and Etruscan (whence April), which were probably borrowed from Greek. Though Herodotus was aware of the Phoenician origins of Aphrodite,[3] linguistic attempts to derive the name Aphrodite from Semitic Aštoret, via undocumented Hittite transmission, remain inconclusive. A suggestion by Hammarström[4], rejected by Hjalmar Frisk, connects the name with πρύτανις, a loan into Greek from a cognate of Etruscan (e)pruni, "lord" or similar. An etymology from Indo-European abhor "very" + dhei "to shine" is offered by Mallory and Adams.[5]. Inanna (DINANNA ) is the Sumerian goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare. ... Sumer ( Sumerian: KI-EN-GIR, Land of the Lords of Brightness[1], or land of the Sumerian tongue[2][3], Akkadian: Å umeru; possibly Biblical Shinar ), located in southern Mesopotamia, is the earliest known civilization in the world. ... Astarte on a car with four branches protruding from roof. ... In Etruscan mythology, Turan was the goddess of love and vitality and patroness of Vulci (cur: Volci). ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... The Birth of Venus, by Sandro Botticelli c. ... Dawn in Peng Chau, Hong Kong. ... Ushas (उषः úṣas-), Sanskrit for dawn, is the chief goddess (sometimes imagined as several goddesses, Dawns) exalted in the Rigveda. ... Aurora e Titone: Aurora, goddess of the morning and Tithonus, Prince of Troy, painted by Francesco de Mura Aurora is the Latin word for dawn, the goddess of dawn in Roman mythology and Latin poetry. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... District Paphos Government  - Mayor Savvas Vergas Population (2001)  - City 47,300 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... The name Ascalon can refer to a number of possible topics: a middle-eastern city, more usually called Ashkelon the lance (or in some versions of the story, sword) that St George used to slay the dragon, named after the city Ashkelon the British WW2 aeroplane used by Winston Churchill... Kythira, also seen as Kythera, Cythera or Tsirigo, is an island, one of the Ionian Islands. ... A fake etymology is an invented explanation (etymology) for the origin of a word. ... This article is about the medical term. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Messapian (also known as Messapic) is an extinct Indo-European language of South-Eastern Italy, in the regions of Apulia and Calabria. ... Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“ródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (c. ... Phoenicia (nonstandardly, Phenicia; pronounced [1], Greek: : PhoiníkÄ“, Latin: ) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal regions of modern day Lebanon, Syria and Israel. ... Hjalmar Frisk (1900 - 1984) was a Swedish linguist in Indo-European studies and rector of Göteborg University 1951-1966. ... The prytaneis (literally presidents) of ancient Athens were members of the boule chosen to perform executive tasks during their term (a prytany), which lasted about two months and then was rotated to other members of the boule. ...

Greek deities series
Primordial deities
Titans (predecessor deities)
Greek sea gods (aquatic deities)
Chthonic deities
Muses (personified concepts)
Other deities
The Twelve Olympians
Zeus Hera
Poseidon Hermes
Hestia Demeter
Aphrodite Athena
Apollo Artemis
Ares Hephaestus

The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... For the rock band, see Muse (band). ... Asclepius (Greek , transliterated Asklēpiós; Latin Aesculapius) is the demigod of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. ... The Twelve Olympians by Monsiau, circa late 18th century. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, virginal Hestia,(Roman name, Vesta) daughter of Cronus and Rhea, (ancient Greek ) is the goddess of the hearth, of the right ordering of domesticity and the family, who received the first offering at every sacrifice in the household. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek god. ... Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek Hēphaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ...

Worship

The epithet Aphrodite Acidalia was occasionally added to her name, after the spring she used to bathe in, located in Boeotia (Virgil I, 720). She was also called Kypris or Cytherea after her alleged birth-places in Cyprus and Cythera, respectively. The island of Cythera was a center of her cult. She was associated with Hesperia and frequently accompanied by the Oreads, nymphs of the mountains. Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Kythira, also seen as Kythera, Cythera or Tsirigo, is an island, one of the Ionian Islands. ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... In Greek mythology, Oreads (ὄρος, mountain) were a type of nymph that lived in mountains, valleys, ravines, and differ from each other according to their dwelling. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ...


Aphrodite had a festival of her own, the Aphrodisiac (also referred to as Aphrodisia), which was celebrated all over Greece but particularly in Athens and Corinth. At the temple of Aphrodite on the summit of Acrocorinth (before the Roman destruction of the city in 146 BC) intercourse with her priestesses was considered a method of worshiping Aphrodite. This temple was not rebuilt when the city was reestablished under Roman rule in 44 BC, but it is likely that the fertility rituals continued in the main city near the agora. This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ...


Aphrodite was associated with, and often depicted with the sea, dolphins, doves, swans, pomegranates, apples, myrtle, rose and lime trees, clams, scallop shells and pearls, but the swine was prohibited. This article is about the body of water. ... For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Dove redirects here. ... For other uses, see Swan (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. The Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 5–8 m tall. ... For other uses, see Apple (disambiguation). ... Species Myrtus communis L. Myrtus nivellei Batt. ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Citrus X aurantifolia {{{author}}} Limes cut in half Lime (Citrus X aurantifolia) is a citrus tree originating from the Malay Achipelago. ...

Aphrodite Ourania, draped rather than nude, and with one of her bare feet resting on a tortoise (Musée du Louvre)
Aphrodite Ourania, draped rather than nude, and with one of her bare feet resting on a tortoise (Musée du Louvre)

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,336 × 3,504 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,336 × 3,504 pixels, file size: 1. ... A baby wearing many items of winter clothing: headband, cap, fur-lined coat, shawl and sweater. ... Nude redirects here. ... Walking barefoot Going barefoot means not wearing shoes, socks, or other foot covering. ... For other uses, see Tortoise (disambiguation). ... This article is about the museum. ...

Aphrodite Ourania and Aphrodite Pandemos

By the late 5th century BC, philosophers might separate Aphrodite into two separate goddesses, not individuated in cult: Aphrodite Ourania, born from the sea foam after Cronus castrated Ouranos, and Aphrodite Pandemos, the common Aphrodite "of all the folk", born from Zeus and Dione.[6] Among the neo-Platonists and eventually their Christian interpreters, Aphrodite Ourania figures as the celestial Aphrodite, representing the love of body and soul, while Aphrodite Pandemos is associated with mere physical love. The representation of Aphrodite Ouranos, with a foot resting on a tortoise, was read later as emblematic of discretion in conjugal love; the image is credited to Phidias, in a chryselephantine sculpture made for Elis, of which we have only a passing remark by Pausanias[7] Dione in Greek mythology is a vague goddess presence who has her most concrete form in Book V of Homers Iliad as the mother of Aphrodite: Aphrodite journeys to Diones side after she has been wounded in battle while protecting her favorite son Aeneas. ... Neoplatonism (also Neo-Platonism) is an ancient school of philosophy beginning in the 3rd century A.D. It was based on the teachings of Plato and Platonists; but it interpreted Plato in many new ways, such that Neoplatonism was quite different from what Plato taught, though not many Neoplatonists would... Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema Phidias (or Pheidias) (in ancient Greek, ) (c. ... Chryselephantine (from Greek χρυσος (chrysos), “gold,” and ελεφαντινος (elephantinos), “ivory”), the architectural term given to statues which were built up on a wooden core, with ivory representing the flesh and gold the drapery. ... Elis, or Eleia (Greek, Modern: Ήλιδα Ilida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Ήλις, also Ilis, Doric: Άλις) is an ancient district within the modern prefecture of Ilia. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...

Aphrodite of Soli, probably Roman ca. 100BC, Archeological Museum, Nicosia, Cyprus.
Aphrodite of Soli, probably Roman ca. 100BC, Archeological Museum, Nicosia, Cyprus.

Thus, according to Plato[8] Aphrodite is two goddesses, one older the other younger. The older, Urania, is the daughter of Ouranos; the younger is named Pandemos, and is the daughter of Zeus and Dione. Pandemos is the common Aphrodite. The speech of Pausanias distinguishes two manifestations of Aphrodite, represented by the two stories: Aphrodite Ourania ("heavenly" Aphrodite), and Aphrodite Pandemos ("Common" Aphrodite). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1365 pixel, file size: 89 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1365 pixel, file size: 89 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Soli is an ancient city on the island of Cyprus, located west of Kyrenia. ... District Nicosia District Government  - Mayor Eleni Mavrou Population (2004)  - City 270,000 (Greek part) 85,000 (Turkish part) 355,000 (Total) Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: www. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Pausanias is the name of several ancient people: Pausanias was a Spartan general of the 5th century BC. Pausanias of Sparta was King of Sparta from 409 BC-395 BC. Pausanias was the servant/lover who assassinated Philip II of Macedon in 336 BC Pausanias, Greek traveller and geographer of...


Ritual prostitution

A universal aspect of the cult of Aphrodite and her precedents that Thomas Bulfinch's much-reprinted The Age of Fable; or Stories of Gods and Heroes (1855 etc.) elided[9] is the practice of ritual prostitution in her shrines and temples. The euphemism in Greek is hierodule, "sacred servant". The practice was an inherent part of the rituals owed to Aphrodite's Near Eastern forebears, Sumerian Inanna and Akkadian Ishtar, whose temple harlots were the "women of Ishtar", ishtaritum.[10] The practice has been documented in Babylon, Syria and Palestine, in Phoenician cities and the Tyrian colony Carthage, and for Hellenic Aphrodite in Cyprus, the center of her cult, Cythera, Corinth and in Sicily (Marcovich 1996:49). Aphrodite is everywhere the patroness of the hetaira and courtesan. In Ionia on the coast of Asia Minor, hierodules served in the temple of Artemis. In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings (scriptures), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety. ... Thomas Bulfinch (July 15, 1796 - May 27, 1867) was an American writer, born in Newton, Massachusetts to a highly-educated but not rich Bostonian merchant family. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Inanna (DINANNA ) is the Sumerian goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare. ... For other uses, see Ishtar (disambiguation). ... Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ... Kythira, also seen as Kythera, Cythera or Tsirigo, is an island, one of the Ionian Islands. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... In ancient Greece, Hetaerae were courtesans, that is to say, sophisticated companions and prostitutes. ... Location of Ionia Ionia (Greek Ιωνία; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was an ancient region of southwestern coastal Anatolia (in present-day Turkey, the region nearest İzmir,) on the Aegean Sea. ... The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey. ...

Petra tou Romiou ("The rock of the Greek"), Aphrodite's legendary birthplace in Paphos, Cyprus.
Petra tou Romiou ("The rock of the Greek"), Aphrodite's legendary birthplace in Paphos, Cyprus.

Image File history File links Aphrodites_Rock. ... Image File history File links Aphrodites_Rock. ... Petra Tou Romiou The Petra Tou Romiou (Rock of the Greek), or the Rock Of Aphrodite (as known in English), is a scenic place, located off the old Pafos-Lemesos road. ... District Paphos Government  - Mayor Savvas Vergas Population (2001)  - City 47,300 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ...

Birth, rising from the sea

"Foam-arisen" Aphrodite was born of the sea foam near Paphos, Cyprus after Cronus cut off Ouranos' genitals and threw them behind him into the sea, while the Erinyes emerged from the drops of blood. Hesiod's Theogony described that the genitals "were carried over the sea a long time, and white foam arose from the immortal flesh; with it a girl grew" to become Aphrodite. This fully grown up myth of Venus (the Roman name for Aphrodite), Venus Anadyomene[11] ("Venus Rising From the Sea") was one of the iconic representations of Aphrodite, made famous in a much-admired painting by Apelles, now lost, but described in Pliny the Elder Natural History. District Paphos Government  - Mayor Savvas Vergas Population (2001)  - City 47,300 Time zone EET (UTC+2) Website: http://www. ... Not to be confused with Chronos, the personification of time. ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ... Two Furies, from an ancient vase. ... Theogony is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins of the gods of ancient Greek religion. ... Venus Anadyomene, by Titian, ca. ... Another Apelles was the founder of a Gnostic sect in the 2nd century; Apelles (gnostic). ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Naturalis Historia, 1669 edition, title page. ...


Thus Aphrodite is of an older generation than Zeus. Iliad (Book V) expresses another version of her origin, by which she was considered a daughter of Dione, who was the original oracular goddess ("Dione" being simply "the goddess, the feminine form of Δíος, "Dios", the genitive of Zeus) at Dodona. In Homer, Aphrodite, venturing into battle to protect her son, Aeneas, is wounded by Diomedes and returns to her mother, to sink down at her knee and be comforted. "Dione" seems to be an equivalent of Rhea, the Earth Mother, whom Homer has relocated to Olympus, and refers back to a hypothesized original Proto-Indo-European pantheon, with the chief male god (Di-) represented by the sky and thunder, and the chief female god (feminine form of Di-) represented as the earth or fertile soil. Aphrodite herself was sometimes referred to as "Dione". Once the worship of Zeus had usurped the oak-grove oracle at Dodona, some poets made him out to be the father of Aphrodite. For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Dione may refer to, Dione (mythology), in Greek mythology, Titan and the mother of Aphrodite by Zeus Dione (moon), moon of Saturn 106 Dione, asteroid Dione (chemistry), a molecule with two ketone functional groups Dione (DJ), Dutch Hardcore DJ See also, Dion This is a disambiguation page: a list of... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... For other uses, see Dodona (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... DiomÄ“dÄ“s or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning or advised by Zeus) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... The Earth Mother is a motif that appears in many mythologies. ... The Proto-Indo-Europeans are the hypothetical speakers of the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European language, a prehistoric people of the Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age. ...

The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli, 1485
The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli, 1485

Aphrodite's chief center of worship remained at Paphos, on the south-western coast of Cyprus, where the goddess of desire had long been worshipped as Ishtar and Ashtaroth. It is said that she first tentatively came ashore at Cytherea, a stopping place for trade and culture between Crete and the Peloponesus. Thus perhaps we have hints of the track of Aphrodite's original cult from the Levant to mainland Greece. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1276x750, 192 KB) Other version: Image:Sandro Botticelli 046. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1276x750, 192 KB) Other version: Image:Sandro Botticelli 046. ... The Birth of Venus is a painting by Sandro Botticelli. ... For other uses, see Ishtar (disambiguation). ... ‘Ashtart, commonly known as Astarte (also Hebrew or Phoenician עשתרת, Ugaritic ‘ttrt (also ‘Attart or ‘Athtart), Akkadian dAs_tar_tú (also Astartu), Greek Αστάρτη (Astártê)), was a major northwest_Semitic goddess, cognate in name, origin, and functions with the east-Semitic goddess Ishtar. ... Cytherea can be: Another name for the goddess Aphrodite of Greek mythology, A synonym of the orchid genus Calypso. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... The Levant The Levant (IPA: ) is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ...


Alternatively, Aphrodite was a daughter of Thalassa (for she was born of the Sea) and Zeus. Thalassa, personification of the Mediterranean sea. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ...


Adulthood

Fountain of Aphrodite in Mexico City.
Fountain of Aphrodite in Mexico City.

Aphrodite had no childhood: in every image and each reference she is born adult, nubile, and infinitely desirable. Aphrodite, in many of the late anecdotal myths involving her, is characterized as vain, ill-tempered and easily offended. Though she is one of the few gods of the Greek Pantheon to be actually married, she is frequently unfaithful to her husband. Hephaestus is one of the most even-tempered of the Hellenic deities; in the narrative embedded in the Odyssey Aphrodite seems to prefer Ares, the volatile god of war. She is one of a few characters who played a major part in the original cause of the Trojan War itself: not only did she offer Helen of Sparta to Paris, but the abduction was accomplished when Paris, seeing Helen for the first time, was inflamed with desire to have her—which is Aphrodite's realm. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (586x1015, 94 KB) Fountain of Aphrodite, Mexico City. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (586x1015, 94 KB) Fountain of Aphrodite, Mexico City. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... // Greek mythological characters (Most of the gods and goddesses had Roman equivalents. ... Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek HÄ“phaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ... This article is about the ancient Greek god. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ...


Due to her immense beauty Zeus was frightened that she would be the cause of violence between the other gods. He married her off to Hephaestus, the dour, humorless god of smithing. In another version of this story, Hera, Hephaestus' mother, had cast him off Olympus; deeming him ugly and deformed. His revenge was to trap her in a magic throne, and then to demand Aphrodite's hand in return for Hera's release. Hephaestus was overjoyed at being married to the goddess of beauty and forged her beautiful jewelry, including the cestus, a girdle that made her even more irresistible to men. Her unhappiness with her marriage caused Aphrodite to seek out companionship from others, most frequently Ares, but also Adonis. Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek HÄ“phaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ... Youths boxing in a Minoan fresco on the Greek island of Santorini The word girdle originally meant a belt (or metaphorically speaking, something which confines or encloses, as in Tolkiens Girdle of Melian). ... This article is about the ancient Greek god. ... For other uses of the name Adonis, see Adonis (disambiguation). ...


Aphrodite and Psyche

Main article: Eros and Psyche

Aphrodite figures as a secondary character in the Tale of Eros and Psyche, which first appeared as a digressionary story told by an old woman in Lucius Apuleius' novel, The Golden Ass, written in the second century A.D.. In it Aphrodite was jealous of the beauty of a mortal woman named Psyche. She asked Eros to use his golden arrows to cause Psyche to fall in love with the ugliest man on earth. Eros agreed but then fell in love with Psyche on his own, by accidentally pricking himself with a golden arrow. Meanwhile, Psyche's parents were anxious that their daughter remained unmarried. They consulted an oracle who told them she was destined for no mortal lover, but a creature that lived on top of a particular mountain, that even the gods themselves feared. Eros had arranged for the oracle to say this. Psyche was resigned to her fate and climbed to the top of the mountain. She told the townfolk that followed her to leave and let her face her fate on her own. There, Zephyrus, the west wind, gently floated her downwards. She entered a cave on the appointed mountain, surprised to find it full of jewelry and finery. Eros visited her every night in the cave and they made passionate love; he demanded only that she never light any lamps because he did not want her to know who he was (having wings made him distinctive). Her two sisters, jealous of Psyche, convinced her that her husband, (Eros)was a monster and she should strike him with a dagger. So one night she lit a lamp, but recognizing Eros instantly,she dropped her dagger.The sound awoke Eros, and he fled. The Abduction of Psyche by William-Adolphe Bouguereau The tale of Eros and Psyche first appeared as a digressionary story told by an old woman in Lucius Apuleius novel, The Golden Ass, written in the second century CE. Apuleius probably used an earlier tale as the basis for his story... Lucius Apuleius (ca 123/5 CE - ca 180 CE), an utterly Romanized Berber who described himself as half-Numidian half-Gaetulian, is remembered most for his bawdy picaresque Latin novel the Metamorphoses, better known as The Golden Ass. ... The Metamorphoses of Lucius Apuleius, which according to St. ... The Abduction of Psyche by William Bouguereau The tale of Cupid and Psyche first appeared as a digressionary story told by an old woman in Lucius Apuleius novel, The Golden Ass, written in the second century AD. Apuleius probably used an earlier folk-tale as the basis for his story... This article is about the Greek god Eros. ... This article is about prophetic oracles in various cultures. ... This article is about prophetic oracles in various cultures. ... Zephyr and Hyakinth; Attic red figure cup from Tarquinia, circa 480 BCE. Boston Museum of Fine Arts. ...


When Psyche told her two jealous elder sisters what had happened, they rejoiced secretly and each separately walked to the top of the mountain and did as Psyche described her entry to the cave, hoping Eros would pick them instead. Eros was still heart broken and did not pick them and they fell to their deaths at the base of the mountain.


Psyche searched for her love across much of Greece, finally stumbling into a temple to Demeter, where the floor was covered with piles of mixed grains. She started sorting the grains into organized piles and, when she finished, Demeter spoke to her, telling her that the best way to find Eros was to find his mother, Aphrodite, and earn her blessing. Psyche found a temple to Aphrodite and entered it. Aphrodite assigned her a similar task to Demeter's temple, but gave her an impossible deadline to finish it by. Eros intervened, for he still loved her, and caused some ants to organize the grains for her. Aphrodite was outraged at her success and told her to go to a field where deadly golden sheep grazed and get some golden wool. Psyche went to the field and saw the sheep but was stopped by a river-god, whose river she had to cross to enter the field. He told her the sheep were mean and vicious and would kill her, but if she waited until noontime, the sheep would go into the shade on the other side of the field and sleep; she could pick the wool that stuck to the branches and bark of the trees. Psyche did so and Aphrodite was even more outraged at her survival and success. Finally, Aphrodite claimed that the stress of caring for her son, depressed and ill as a result of Psyche's unfaithfulness, had caused her to lose some of her beauty. Psyche was to go to Hades and ask Persephone, the queen of the underworld, for a bit of her beauty in a black box that Aphrodite gave to Psyche. Psyche walked to a tower, deciding that the quickest way to the underworld would be to die. A voice stopped her at the last moment and told her a route that would allow her to enter and return still living, as well as telling her how to pass Cerberus, Charon and the other dangers of the route. She was to not lend a hand to anyone in need. She baked two barley cakes for Cerberus, and took two coins for Charon. She pacified Cerberus, the three-headed dog, with the barley cake and paid Charon to take her to Hades. On the way there, she saw hands reaching out of the water. A voice told her to toss a barley cake to them. She refused. Once there, Persephone said she would be glad to do Aphrodite a favor. She once more paid Charon, and gave the other barley cake to Cerberus. This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... This article is about the mythical three-headed dog. ... Michelangelos rendition of Charon. ...


Psyche left the underworld and decided to open the box and take a little bit of the beauty for herself, thinking that if she did so Eros would surely love her. Inside was a "Stygian sleep" which overtook her. Eros, who had forgiven her, flew to her body and wiped the sleep from her eyes, then begged Zeus and Aphrodite for their consent to his wedding of Psyche. They agreed and Zeus made her immortal. Aphrodite danced at the wedding of Eros and Psyche and their subsequent child was named Pleasure, or (in the Roman mythology) Voluptas. Voluptas, is the daughter borne from the legendary union of Cupid and Psyche. ...

National Archaeological Museum of Athens
National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (495 × 660 pixel, file size: 122 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (495 × 660 pixel, file size: 122 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Adonis

Aphrodite was Adonis' lover and a surrogate mother to him. Cinyras, the King of Cyprus, had an intoxicatingly beautiful daughter named Myrrha. When Myrrha's mother commits Hubris against Aphrodite by claiming her daughter is more beautiful than the famed goddess, Myrrha is punished with a neverending lust for her own father. Cinyras is repulsed by this, but Myrrha disguises herself as a prostitute, and secretly sleeps with her father at night. Eventually, Myrrha becomes pregnant and is discovered by Cinyras. In a rage, he chases her out of the house with a knife. Myrrha flees from him, praying to the gods for mercy as she runs. The gods hear her plea, and change her into a Myrrh tree so her father cannot kill her. Eventually, Cinyras takes his own life in an attempt to restore the family's honor. For other uses of the name Adonis, see Adonis (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, King Cinyras of Cyprus was a son of Apollo and husband of Metharme. ... In Greek mythology, Myrrha was the daughter of Theias, the King of Assyria, and mother of Adonis by him. ... For the supervillain, see Barry Hubris. ...


Myrrha gives birth to a baby boy named Adonis. Aphrodite happens by the Myrrh tree and, seeing him, takes pity on the infant. She places Adonis in a box, and takes him down to Hades so that Persephone can care for him. Adonis grows into a strikingly handsome young man, and Aphrodite eventually returns for him. Persephone, however, is loath to give him up, and wishes Adonis would stay with her in the underworld. The two goddesses begin such a quarrel that Zeus is forced to intercede. He decrees that Adonis will spend a third of the year with Aphrodite, a third of the year with Persephone, and a third of the year with whomever he wishes. Adonis, of course, chooses Aphrodite. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ...


Adonis begins his year on the earth with Aphrodite. One of his greatest passions is hunting, and although Aphrodite is not naturally a hunter, she takes up the sport just so she can be with Adonis. They spend every waking hour with one another, and Aphrodite is enraptured with him. However, her anxiety begins to grow over her neglected duties, and she is forced to leave him for a short time. Before she leaves, she gives Adonis one warning: do not attack an animal who shows no fear. Adonis agrees to her advice, but, secretly doubting her skills as a huntress, quickly forgets her warning.


Not long after Aphrodite leaves, Adonis comes across an enormous wild boar, much larger than any he has ever seen. It is suggested that the boar is the god Ares, one of Aphrodite's lovers made jealous through her constant doting on Adonis. Although boars are dangerous and will charge a hunter if provoked, Adonis disregards Aphrodite's warning and pursues the giant creature. Soon, however, Adonis is the one being pursued; he is no match for the giant boar. In the attack, Adonis is castrated by the boar, and dies from a loss of blood. Aphrodite rushes back to his side, but she is too late to save him and can only mourn over his body. Wherever Adonis' blood falls, Aphrodite causes anemones to grow in his memory. She vows that on the anniversary of his death, every year there will be a festival held in his honor. Castration, gelding, neutering, orchiectomy or orchidectomy is any action, surgical or otherwise, by which a biological male loses use of the testes. ... Species see text Anemone (Anemone) (from the Gr. ...


On his death, Adonis goes back to the underworld, and Persephone is delighted to see him again. Eventually, Aphrodite realizes that he is there, and rushes back to retrieve him. Again, she and Persephone bicker over who is allowed to keep Adonis until Zeus intervenes. This time, he says that Adonis must spend six months with Aphrodite and six months with Persephone, the way it should have been in the first place.


Adonis, as a Dying God Archetype, represents the cycle of vegetation. His birth is like the birth of new plants; his maturation like the ripening of the plant. Once the crop is harvested, it dies--like Adonis returning to the underworld. The new seeds are then placed again in the ground, where they grow into new life, like Adonis returning to the earth to be with Aphrodite.


The Judgement of Paris

Main article: Judgement of Paris

The gods and goddesses as well as various mortals were invited to the marriage of Peleus and Thetis (the eventual parents of Achilles). Only the goddess Eris (Discord) was not invited, but she arrived with a golden apple inscribed with the word kallistēi ("to the fairest one") which she threw among the goddesses. Aphrodite, Hera and Athena all claimed to be the fairest, and thus the rightful owner of the apple. The goddesses chose to place the matter before Zeus, who, not wanting to favor one of the goddesses, put the choice into the hands of Paris, of Troy. Hera tried to bribe Paris with Asia Minor, while Athena offered wisdom, fame and glory in battle, but Aphrodite whispered to Paris that if he were to choose her as the fairest he would have the most beautiful mortal woman in the world as a wife, and he accordingly chose her. This woman was Helen. The other goddesses were enraged by this and through Helen's abduction by Paris they brought about the Trojan War. The Judgment of Paris, Peter Paul Rubens, ca 1636 (National Gallery, London) For the wine-tasting event known as The Judgment of Paris, see Paris Wine Tasting of 1976 The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, in which the legendary roots of the Trojan War can be... Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... Eris (ca. ... An apple of discord is a reference to the Golden Apple of Discord which, according to Greek mythology, the goddess Eris (Gr. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ...


Pygmalion and Galatea

Pygmalion was a sculptor who had never found a woman worthy of his love. Aphrodite took pity on him and decided to show him the wonders of love. One day, Pygmalion was inspired by a dream of Aphrodite to make a woman out of ivory resembling her image, and he called her Galatea. He fell in love with the statue and decided he could not live without her. He prayed to Aphrodite, who carried out the final phase of her plan and brought the exquisite sculpture to life. Pygmalion loved Galatea and they were soon married. Étienne Maurice Falconet: Pygmalion et Galatée (1763) Pygmalion is a legendary figure of Cyprus. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pygmalion and Galatea (1890) by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904) Galatea (she who is milk-white)[1] was the name of three figures in Greek mythology, the best-known being the wife of Pygmalion. ...


Another version of this myth tells that the women of the village in which Pygmalion lived grew angry that he had not married. They all asked Aphrodite to force him to marry. Aphrodite accepted and went that very night to Pygmalion, and asked him to pick a woman to marry. She told him that if he did not pick one, she would do so for him. Not wanting to be married, he begged her for more time, asking that he be allowed to make a sculpture of Aphrodite before he had to choose his bride. Flattered, she accepted.


Pygmalion spent a lot of time making small clay sculptures of the Goddess, claiming it was needed so he could pick the right pose. As he started making the actual sculpture he was shocked to discover he actually wanted to finish, even though he knew he would have to marry someone when he finished. The reason he wanted to finish it was that he had fallen in love with the sculpture. The more he worked on it, the more it changed, until it no longer resembled Aphrodite at all.


At the very moment Pygmalion stepped away from the finished sculpture Aphrodite appeared and told him to choose his bride. Pygmalion chose the statue. Aphrodite told him that could not be, and asked him again to pick a bride. Pygmalion put his arms around the statue, and asked Aphrodite to turn him into a statue so he could be with her. Aphrodite took pity on him and brought the statue to life instead.

Aphrodite riding a swan: Attic white-ground red-figured kylix, ca. 460, found at Kameiros (Rhodes)
Aphrodite riding a swan: Attic white-ground red-figured kylix, ca. 460, found at Kameiros (Rhodes)

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 540 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 2333 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 540 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 2333 pixel, file size: 3. ... Kylix may mean: Kylix (drinking cup), a type of drinking cup used in ancient Greece Kylix programming tool This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Other stories

In one version of the story of Hippolytus, Aphrodite was the catalyst for his death. He scorned the worship of Aphrodite for Artemis and, in revenge, Aphrodite caused his stepmother, Phaedra, to fall in love with him, knowing Hippolytus would reject her. In the most popular version of the story, the play Hippolytus by Euripides, Phaedra seeks revenge against Hippolytus by killing herself and, in her suicide note, telling Theseus, her husband and Hippolytus' father, that Hippolytus had raped her. Hippolytus was oath-bound not to mention Phaedra's love for him and nobly refused to defend himself despite the consequences. Theseus then cursed his son, a curse that Poseidon was bound to fulfil and so Hippolytus was laid low by a bull from the sea that caused his chariot-team to panic and wreck his vehicle. This is, interestingly enough not quite how Aphrodite envisaged his death in the play, as in the prologue she says she expects Hippolytus to submit to lust with Phaedra and for Theseus to catch the pair in the act. Hippolytus forgives his father before he dies and Artemis reveals the truth to Theseus before vowing to kill one Aphrodite loves (Adonis) for revenge. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... Alexandre Cabanels painting Phaedra (1880) In Greek mythology, Phaedra is the daughter of Minos, wife of Theseus and the mother of Demophon and Acamas. ... Hippolytus (also known as Hippolytos) is an Ancient Greek tragedy by Euripides, based on the myth of Hippolytus, son of Theseus. ... A statue of Euripides. ... Alexandre Cabanels painting Phaedra (1880) In Greek mythology, Phaedra is the daughter of Minos, wife of Theseus and the mother of Demophon and Acamas. ... A suicide note is a message left by someone who later attempts or commits suicide. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... Alexandre Cabanels painting Phaedra (1880) In Greek mythology, Phaedra is the daughter of Minos, wife of Theseus and the mother of Demophon and Acamas. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Alexandre Cabanels painting Phaedra (1880) In Greek mythology, Phaedra is the daughter of Minos, wife of Theseus and the mother of Demophon and Acamas. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the name Adonis, see Adonis (disambiguation). ...


Glaucus of Corinth angered Aphrodite and she made her horses angry during the funeral games of King Pelias. They tore him apart. His ghost supposedly frightened horses during the Isthmian Games. In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny, bright or bluish-green) was the name of several different figures, including one God. ... King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... The Isthmian Games were one of the Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece, and were held at Corinth every two years. ...


Aphrodite was often accompanied by the Charites. For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ...


Aphrodite was one of the goddesses to be mocked by Momus, which resulted in his expulsion from Olympus. For the Scottish artist and singer see Momus (artist) Momus or Momos (μῶμος), in Greek mythology the god of satire, mockery, writers, poets, a spirit of evil-spirited blame and unfair criticism. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude...


In book III of Homer's Iliad, Aphrodite saves Paris, when he is about to be killed by Menelaos. This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... This article is about Menelaus the king of Sparta. ...


Aphrodite was very protective of her son, Aeneas, who fought in the Trojan War. Diomedes almost killed Aeneas in battle but Aphrodite saved him. Diomedes wounded Aphrodite and she dropped her son, fleeing to Mt. Olympus. Aeneas was then enveloped in a cloud by Apollo, who took him to Pergamos, a sacred spot in Troy. Artemis healed Aeneas there. Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Diomēdēs or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning or advised by Zeus) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ...


She turned Abas to stone for his pride. Abas may refer to: Abas (sophist), a Greek sophist and rhetorician An old Persian measurement for pearls, about 0,1458 gram Several figures in Greek mythology share the name Abas, including: Abas, son of Poseidon and Arethusa. ...


She turned Anaxarete to stone for reacting so dispassionately to Iphis' pleas to love him, even after his suicide. In Greek mythology, Anaxarete was a Cypriot maiden who refused the advances of a shepherd named Iphis. ... Isis changing the sex of Iphis. ...


Aphrodite helps Hippomenes to win a footrace against Atalanta to win Atalanta's hand in marriage, giving him three golden apples to distract her with. However, when the couple fails to thank Aphrodite, she turns them into lions. Atalanta and Hippomenes, Guido Reni, c. ... For other meanings, see Atalanta (disambiguation). ...


Consorts and children

This list of deities aims at giving information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... This article is about the ancient Greek god. ... For the 3rd century pope, see Pope Anterus. ... In Greek mythology, Harmonia is the goddess of harmony and concord. ... In Greek mythology, Himerus was the personification of lust and sexual desire, son of Aphrodite and Ares. ... This article is about the Greek god Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Deimos (dread) was the personification of dread. ... In Greek mythology, Phobos (fright) was the personification of fear and horror. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ... Aglaea is the name of five figures in Greek mythology // The youngest of the Charites, Aglaea or Aglaia (splendor, brilliant, shining one) was Hephaestus wife and Asclepius daughter in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Euphrosyne (IPA pronunciation: ) was one of the Charites, known in English also as the Three Graces. Her best remembered representation in English is in Miltons poem of the active, joyful life, LAllegro. She is also the Goddess of Joy. ... Nicolas Poussin, Hymenaios Disguised as a Woman During an Offering to Priapus, 1634, São Paulo Museum of Art In Greek mythology, Hymenaios (also Hymenaeus, Hymenaues, or Hymen; Ancient Greek: ) was a god of marriage ceremonies and later also the god of membranes, inspiring feasts and song. ... Fresco of Priapus, House of the Vettii, Pompeii. ... Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek Hēphaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... Eunomia may refer to: One of the Horae, goddesses of Greek mythology Eunomia (moth), a moth genus The asteroid 15 Eunomia Categories: | | | ... Salmacis and Hermaphroditus by Bartholomeus Spranger (c. ... In Greek mythology, Peitho (persuasion) was the personification of persuasion and seduction. ... Fresco of Priapus, House of the Vettii, Pompeii. ... Tyche on the reverse of this coin by Gordian III. In Greek mythology, Tyche (Roman equivalent: Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. ... For other uses of the name Adonis, see Adonis (disambiguation). ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Greek mythology, the name Butes referred to four different people. ... ERYX Type anti-tank Nationality France Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA Date of design Production period 1989 Service duration 1994 Operators Canadian, French, Norwegian armies Variants Number built Specifications Type Diameter 0. ...

Surnames and titles

  • Acidalia, of the Acidalia spring
  • Anadyomene (Ἀναδυομένη), the emerging as in Aphrodite Anadyomene, a painting by Apelles
  • Cytherea (Κυθήρεια), of Cythera
  • Despoina (Δέσποινα), the mistress
  • Kypris (Κύπρις), of Cyprus
  • Hetaira (Ἑταίρα), the courtesan
  • Aphrodite Porne (Πόρνη), the prostitute, Goddess of lust[12]
  • Kalligloutos (Καλλίγλουτος), of the beautiful thighs
  • Morpho (Μορφώ), the shapely, she of the various shapes
  • Ambologera, she who postpones old age
  • Aphrodite en kepois (Ἀφροδίτη ἐν Κήποις), of the gardens
  • Genetyllis, of motherhood
  • Epitragidia, she upon the buck (young male goat)
  • Enoplios (Ἐνόπλιος), the armed one
  • Melaina (Μέλαινα), the black one (similar to Epitymbidia and Melainis)
  • Melainis (Μελαινίς), the young black one (similar to Epitymbidia and Melaina)
  • Skotia (Σκοτία), the dark
  • Anosia (Ἀνόσια), the unholy
  • Androphonos (Ἀνδροφόνος), the killer of men
  • Tymborychos (Τυμβωρύχος), the gravedigger
  • Epitymbidia, she upon the graves (similar to Melaina and Melainis)
  • Basilis (Βασιλίς), the queen
  • Persephaessa (Περσεφάεσσα), the queen of the underworld
  • Praxis (Πράξις), of (sexual) action
  • Kallipygos (Καλλίπυγος), of the beautiful buttocks
  • Pandemos (Πάνδημος), common to all, a form worshipped near the agora in Athens
  • Urania (Οὐράνια), the heavenly one

A natural spring on Mackinac Island in Michigan. ... Venus Anadyomene, by Titian, ca. ... Another Apelles was the founder of a Gnostic sect in the 2nd century; Apelles (gnostic). ... Cytherea can be: Another name for the goddess Aphrodite of Greek mythology, A synonym of the orchid genus Calypso. ... Kythira, also seen as Kythera, Cythera or Tsirigo, is an island, one of the Ionian Islands. ... A demon sating his lust in a 13th century manuscript Lust is any intense desire or craving for self gratification and excitement. ... Buck may refer to any of the following: Look up Buck in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the domestic species. ... Praxis may refer to: Praxis (process), the process of putting theoretical knowledge into practice Praxis (Eastern Orthodoxy), the practice of faith, especially worship Praxis (band), a Bill Laswell musical project Praxis (moon), a planetary body in the Star Trek universe Praxis Care Group, a Northern Ireland based mental health charity. ... The Callipygian Venus or Venus Kallipygos, (In Greek, Aphrodite Kallipygos: Aphrodite of the Beautiful Buttocks), is a type of nude female statue of the Hellenistic era. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ...

See also

This article is about the Roman god. ... The Birth of Venus, by Sandro Botticelli c. ... The Callipygian Venus or Venus Kallipygos, (In Greek, Aphrodite Kallipygos: Aphrodite of the Beautiful Buttocks), is a type of nude female statue of the Hellenistic era. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iliad. ... The Aphrodite of Cnidus was one of the most famous works of the Attic sculptor Praxiteles (4th century BC). ... Knidos or Cnidus (modern-day Tekir in Turkey) is an ancient Greek city in Asia Minor, once part of the country of Caria. ... Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, XIV.7
  2. ^ Hesiod, Theogony, 176ff.
  3. ^ Herodotus, Histories, I.105 and .131. The traditional resistance of nineteenth-century Hellenists to Eastern sources of Greek culture is expressed by A. Enmann, Kypros und der Ursprung des Aphroditekultes (1881), among others; the series of waves of resistance in favour of a "pure, classical Greece in splendid isolation" (Burkert) is discussed by Walter Burkert in his introduction to The Orientalizing Revolution: Near Eastern Influence on Greek Culture in the Early Archaic Age (1992), especially in pp 1-6.
  4. ^ Glotta 11, 21 5f.
  5. ^ Mallory, J.P. and D.Q. Adams. Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture. London: Fitzroy Dearborn Publishing, 1997.
  6. ^ E.g. Plato, Symposium 181a-d.
  7. ^ Pausanias, Periegesis vi.25.1; Aphrodite Pandemos was represented in the same temple riding on a goat, symbol of purely carnal rut: "The meaning of the tortoise and of the he-goat I leave to those who care to guess," Pausanias remarks. The image was taken up again after the Renaissance: see Andrea Alciato, Emblemata / Les emblemes (1584).
  8. ^ Plato, Symposium 180e.
  9. ^ "Our work is not for the learned, nor for the theologian, nor for the philosopher, but for the reader of English literature, of either sex, who wishes to comprehend the allusions so frequently made by public speakers, lecturers, essayists, and poets, and those which occur in polite conversation." Bulfinch's obituary in the Boston Evening Standard noted that the contents were "expurgated of all that would be offensive".
  10. ^ Miroslav Marcovich, "From Ishtar to Aphrodite" Journal of Aesthetic Education 30.2, Special Issue: Distinguished Humanities Lectures II (Summer 1996) p 49.
  11. ^ Αναδυόμενη (Anadyómenē), "rising up".
  12. ^ David R. Kinsley, The Goddesses' Mirror: Visions of the Divine from East and West p.207, 1989, SUNY Press, ISBN 0887068359

Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, theogonia = the birth of God(s)) is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins and genealogies of the gods of the ancient Greeks, composed circa 700 BC. The title of the work comes from the Greek words for god and seed. // Hesiods Theogony is a large-scale... The term Hellenistic, established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen, is used to refer to the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of various ethnicities, and from the political dominance of the city-state to that of larger monarchies. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... The Symposium is a philosophical dialogue written by Plato sometime after 385 BC. It is a discussion on the nature of love, taking the form of a series of speeches, both satirical and serious, given by a group of men at a symposium or drinking party at the house of... The Symposium is a philosophical dialogue written by Plato sometime after 385 BC. It is a discussion on the nature of love, taking the form of a series of speeches, both satirical and serious, given by a group of men at a symposium or drinking party at the house of...

References

  • C. Kerényi (1951). The Gods of the Greeks.
  • Walter Burkert (1985). Greek Religion (Harvard University Press), especially sectionIII.2.7 "Aphrodite"

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Aphrodite
Greek deities series
Primordial deities | Titans | Aquatic deities | Chthonic deities
Twelve Olympians
Zeus | Hera | Poseidon | Hestia | Demeter | Aphrodite
Athena | Apollo | Artemis | Ares | Hephaestus | Hermes

The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... The Twelve Olympians by Monsiau, circa late 18th century. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... In Greek mythology, virginal Hestia,(Roman name, Vesta) daughter of Cronus and Rhea, (ancient Greek ) is the goddess of the hearth, of the right ordering of domesticity and the family, who received the first offering at every sacrifice in the household. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek god. ... Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek HÄ“phaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ...


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Aphrodite - MSN Encarta (266 words)
Aphrodite (born Gavin King), also known as A Zone or DJ Aphro, is a UK jungle and drum'n'bass DJ / producer commonly referred to as the 'Godfather of Jungle', who works along with...
Paris declared Aphrodite the fairest and chose as his prize Helen of Troy, the wife of the Greek king Menelaus.
Probably of Near Eastern origin, Aphrodite was identified in early Greek religious belief with the Phoenician goddess Astarte and was known under a variety of cult titles, including Aphrodite Urania, queen of the heavens, and Aphrodite Pandemos, goddess of the whole people.
Aphrodite - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3021 words)
Aphrodite was associated with, and often depicted with dolphins, doves, swans, pomegranates, apples, myrtle, rose and lime trees.
Alternatively, Aphrodite was a daughter of Thalassa (for she was born of the Sea) and Zeus.
Aphrodite was one of the gods to be mocked by Momus, which resulted in his expulsion from Olympus.
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