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Encyclopedia > Aosta
Ville d'Aoste
Comune di Aosta

Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Aosta Valley
Province none
Mayor Guido Grimod
Elevation 583 m
Area 21 km²
Population
 - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 34,270
 - Density 1,616/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 45°44′N, 7°19′E
Gentilic Aostani (Aostains)
Dialing code 0165
Postal code 11100
Frazioni Arpuilles, Cache, Champailler, Entrebin, Excenex, Laravoire, Porossan, Seyssinod, Signayes, Vignole, Cossan
Patron St. Gratus
 - Day September 7
Website: www.comune.aosta.it
Porta Praetoria.
Porta Praetoria.

Aosta (French: Aoste) is the principal city of the bilingual Aosta Valley in the Italian Alps, 110km north-northwest of Turin. It is situated near the Italian entrance of the Mont Blanc Tunnel, at the confluence of the Buthier and the Dora Baltea, and at the junction of the Great and Little St. Bernard routes. Aosta is not the capital of the province, as these functions are shared by the region and the communes. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle dAosta, French: Vallée dAoste, Arpitan: Val dOuta) is a mountainous Region in north-western Italy. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Saint Gratus of Aosta ( San Grato di Aosta) (d. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 743 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (945 × 763 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Aosta Aosta Cathedral ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 743 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (945 × 763 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Aosta Aosta Cathedral ... Aosta Cathedral Aosta Cathedral is a cathedral in Aosta in north-west Italy built in the 4th century. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle dAosta, French: Vallée dAoste, Arpitan: Val dOuta) is a mountainous Region in north-western Italy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... “Torino” redirects here. ... Sculpture in France at the tunnels northwestern exit. ... Dora Baltea is an Italian river. ... Great St Bernard Pass (Fr. ... The Little St Bernard Pass (French: Col du Petit Saint-Bernard, Italian: Colle del Piccolo San Bernardo) is a mountain pass in the Alps at . ...

Aosta.
Aosta.
Arches of the Roman Theatre.
Arches of the Roman Theatre.

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 728 KB) Created by my mother Tinelot Wittermans at 14-08-2004 09:10, released into GFDL File links The following pages link to this file: Aosta ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 728 KB) Created by my mother Tinelot Wittermans at 14-08-2004 09:10, released into GFDL File links The following pages link to this file: Aosta ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 581 pixelsFull resolution (2044 × 1484 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture of the Roman Theatre in Aosta, Italy – View of the arcades of the right side of the theatre) File links The following pages on the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 581 pixelsFull resolution (2044 × 1484 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture of the Roman Theatre in Aosta, Italy – View of the arcades of the right side of the theatre) File links The following pages on the...

History

Aosta was settled in proto-historic times and later became a Celtic-Ligurian city of the Salassi. Terentius Varro captured it in 25 BC and founded the Roman colony of Augusta Praetoria. After 11 BC Aosta became the capital of the Alpes Graies ("Grey Alps") province of the Empire. This article is about the European people. ... Ligurian may mean one of several things: Pertaining to the ancient Ligures Pertaining to modern Liguria Ligurian language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC - 20s BC - 10s BC 0s 10s 20s 30s Years: 30 BC 29 BC 28 BC 27 BC 26 BC 25 BC 24 BC 23 BC 22 BC 21 BC 20... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC - 10s BC - 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s Years: 16 BC 15 BC 14 BC 13 BC 12 BC 11 BC 10 BC 9 BC 8 BC 7 BC 6 BC... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ...


After the fall of the Western Empire, the city was conquered by the Burgundians, the Ostrogoths, the Byzantines. The Lombards, who had annexed it to their Italian kingdom, were expelled by the Franks of Pepin the Younger. Under Charlemagne Aosta acquired importance as a post on the Via Francigena, leading from Aachen to Italy. After 888 it was part of the renewed Kingdom of Italy under Arduin of Ivrea and Berengar of Friuli. The Western Roman Empire is the western half of the Roman Empire after its division by Diocletian in 286. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Map of Ostrogothic Kingdom The Ostrogoths (Greuthung, Gleaming Goths or Eastern Goths), along with the Visigoths (Noble Goths or Western Goths) were branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe that played a major role in the political events of the late Roman Empire. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Frankish Empire was the territory of the Franks, from the 5th to the 10th centuries, from 481 ruled by Clovis I of the Merovingian Dynasty, the first king of all the Franks. ... Pepin the Younger Pepin the Short or Pippin[1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known as Pepin the Younger or Pepin III, was the King of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Route of the Via Francigena The Via Francigena is an ancient road to Rome for those coming from France. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... Events January 13: With the death of Charles the Fat, the Frankish kingdom is split again, and this time permanently. ... Arduin of Ivrea (b. ... Berengar of Friuli (? - 16 April 924) was a Margrave of Friuli, King of Italy (from 888 on) and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire from 915 on. ...


In the 10th century Aosta became part of the Kingdom of Burgundy. After the fall of the latter in 1032, it entered the lands of Umberto I Biancamano of the House of Savoy . After the creation of the county of Savoy, with its capital in Chambéry, Aosta followed its history, as well as the later Kingdom of Sardinia and unified Italy. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The following is a list of the Kings of Burgundy // Kings of the Burgundians The Burgundians had left Bornholm, ca 300, and settled near the Vistula. ... Events February 2 - Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, becomes King of Burgundy. ... Humbert as he appears in a much later (fanciful) engraving. ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... The Counts of Savoy (Italian Savoia, French Savoie) emerged, along with the free communes of Switzerland, from the collapse of the Frankish Kingdom of Burgundy. ... Chambéry is the capital of the department of Savoie, France. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont with Savoy, Nice, and Sardinia in the inset. ...


Under the House of Savoy, Aosta was granted a special status that it maintained when the new Italian Republic was proclaimed in 1948. 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...


Main sights

The main monuments of the city include:

  • The Arch of Augustus, erected in 35 BC to celebrate the victory of the Roman troops led by consul Varro Murene over the local Salassi.
  • The Porta Praetoria (1st century AD), once the eastern gate to the city, which has preserved its original forms apart from the marble covering. It is formed by two series of arches enclosing a small square.
  • The Roman theatre, of which the southern façade remains today, 22 m tall. The structure, dating from the late reign of Augustus, occupied an area of 81 x 64 m: it could contain up to 4,000 spectators. In the nearby was the amphitheatre, built under Claudius.
  • The Cathedral of Aosta, built in the 4th century and replaced in the 11th century by a new edifice dedicate to the Madonna. It is annexed to the Roman Forum.
  • The Romanesque-Gothic Sant'Orso (Saint-Ours). Its most evocative feature is the ancient cloister, which can be entered through a hall on the left of the façade. It is dedicated to Ursus of Aosta.
  • The Saint-Bénin College, built about 1000 by the Benedictines. It is now an exhibition site.
  • Of the 20 towers of the Roman walls the following are well preserved:
    • Tour du lépreux, which has been given this name after a leper was jailed there in the late 17th century. Le lépreux de la cité d'Aoste, a novel by Xavier de Maistre, was named after this tower.
    • Tour Neuve (13th century).
    • Tour du Pailleron.
    • Tower (Castle) of Bramafan, built in the 11th century over a Roman bastion. It was the residence of the Savoy viscounts. The Franco-Provençal term Bramafan is translated as "He who screams for hunger".
    • Tour du Baillage.
    • Tour Fromage ("Cheese tower").

Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC - 30s BC - 20s BC 10s BC 0s 10s 20s Years: 40 BC 39 BC 38 BC 37 BC 36 BC 35 BC 34 BC 33 BC 32 BC 31 BC... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Claudius, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... Aosta Cathedral Aosta Cathedral is a cathedral in Aosta in north-west Italy built in the 4th century. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Saint Ursus (Orso, Ours) of Aosta is an Italian saint of the 6th century. ... Munichs city symbol celebrates its founding by Benedictine monks—the origin of its name A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Xavier de Maistre (1763–1852) was a French military man. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Franco-Provençal (Francoprovençal) or Arpitan (in vernacular: patouès) (in Italian: francoprovenzale, provenzale alpina, arpitano, patois; French: francoprovençal, arpitan, patois) is a Romance language with several dialects in a linguistic sub-group separate from Langue dOïl and Langue dOc. ...

See also

In the mid-13th century the Hohenstaufen Emperor Frederick II made the County of Aosta (the Valle dAosta) a duchy, and its arms were carried in the Savoia arms until the reunification of Italy, 1870. ... Franco-Provençal (Francoprovençal) or Arpitan (in vernacular: patouès) (in Italian: francoprovenzale, provenzale alpina, arpitano, patois; French: francoprovençal, arpitan, patois) is a Romance language with several dialects in a linguistic sub-group separate from Langue dOïl and Langue dOc. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Aostan French (French: français dAoste) is the dialect of French spoken in the Aosta region of Italy, where there is a significant French population. ... Italian ( , or lingua italiana) is a Romance language spoken by about 63 million people,[1] primarily in Italy and Switzerland. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

External links

  • Mao, virtual museum of Aosta city
  • Places of interest in Aosta city

  Results from FactBites:
 
ITALIA - Planning Your Trip - Italy by Regions - Aosta Valley (318 words)
Aosta is the capital of the region, which is ruled by a special statute, where the Italian and the French languages are officially recognized.
Important traces of the Roman Age can be found in Aosta: the city walls, the theater, Augustus’s Arch, the Pretorian Gate.
Many are the fortified castles in the Aosta Valley; moist of them are in perfect conditions and open to visitors; many have become museums of local history.
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