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Encyclopedia > Antwerp
Antwerp
Antwerpen (Dutch)
The Cathedral and the Scheldt in Antwerp.
Antwerp municipality in the province of Antwerp
Geography
Country Belgium
Community Flemish Community of Belgium flag Flemish Community
Region Flemish Region flag Flemish Region
Province Antwerp
Arrondissement Antwerp
Coordinates 51°13′N 04°24′E / 51.217, 4.4Coordinates: 51°13′N 04°24′E / 51.217, 4.4
Area 204.51 km²
Population (Source: NIS)
Population
– Males
– Females
- Density
461,496 (January 1, 2006)
49.03%
50.97%
2257 inhab./km²
Age distribution
0–19 years
20–64 years
65+ years
(01/01/2006)
22.32%
58.47%
19.21%
Foreigners 12.41% (01/07/2005)
Economy
Unemployment rate 16.72% (January 1, 2006)
Mean annual income 12,474 €/pers. (2003)
Government
Mayor (list) Patrick Janssens (SP.A)
Governing parties SP.A, CD&V, VLD
Other information
Postal codes 2000-2660
Area codes 03
Web address www.antwerpen.be
Grote Markt  (main square): open air cafés, City Hall and guildhouses in background.
Grote Markt  (main square): open air cafés, City Hall and guildhouses in background.
The Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal (Cathedral of our Lady) and the Scheldt river.
The Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal (Cathedral of our Lady) and the Scheldt river.
Grote Markt
Grote Markt

Antwerp (Dutch: Antwerpen , French: Anvers) is a city and municipality in Belgium and the capital of the Antwerp province in Flanders, one of Belgium's three regions. Antwerp's total population is ca. 461,496 (as of January 2006) and its total area is 204.51 km² with a population density of 2,257 inhabitants per km². Antwerp (Antwerpen in Dutch) is the name of a city, a district and a province in Flanders, one of the three regions of Belgium: Antwerp (city) Antwerp (district) Antwerp (province) Antwerp is also the name of a number of places in the United States: Antwerp, Ohio Antwerp Township, Michigan Antwerp... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Antwerp. ... Image File history File links RedDot. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Antwerp_City. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Flanders. ... the Flemish community has jurisdiction over Flanders and over the Dutch language institutions in Brussels. ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Flanders. ... The Flemish region is one of the three official regions of the Kingdom of Belgium (alongside the Walloon Region and the Brussels-Capital Region). ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Antwerp. ... Antwerp is the northernmost province of Flanders and of Belgium. ... This is a list of Belgian administrative arrondissements or districts. ... The Arrondissement of Antwerp (Dutch: ; French: ) is one of the three administrative arrondissements in the Province of Antwerp, Belgium. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Statistics Belgium is the main official statistical institution in Belgian offering a large choice of figures. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This distribution is named for the pyramidal shape of its graph. ... Immigration is the movement of people into one place from another. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mayors of Antwerp, Belgium: 1800s 1811-1814: Jan Baptist de Cornelissen de Weynsbroeck 1914-1817: Filip Jozef Vermoelen 1817-1828: Florent Van Ertborn 1828-1830: Willem Andries De Caters 1830: Frans A. Verdussen 1830: Antoon Dhanis van Cannart 1830-1831: Alexis Gleizes 1831-1848: Graaf Gerard Legrelle 1848-1863: Jan... Patrick Janssens Patrick Janssens is a Belgian politician, born on 19 September 1956. ... Socialist Party - Different or Social Progressive Alternative (Dutch: Socialistische Partij - Anders or Sociaal Progressief Alternatief (sp. ... A coalition is an alliance among entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... Socialist Party - Different or Social Progressive Alternative (Dutch: Socialistische Partij - Anders or Sociaal Progressief Alternatief (sp. ... Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams (CD&V) (Christian Democratic and Flemish) is a political party in Belgium, formerly called Christelijke Volkspartij (CVP) (Christian Peoples Party). ... The Vlaamse Liberalen en Democraten or VLD (Flemish Liberals and Democrats) is a Flemish liberal party, created in 1992 from the former PVV and a few other politicians from other parties. ... This is a list of postal codes for Belgium. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 775 KB) Summary Open air cafes in Grote Markt (Antwerpen). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 775 KB) Summary Open air cafes in Grote Markt (Antwerpen). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 450 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 450 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp Metadata This... Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, the cathedral of Antwerp, was completed in 1521. ... The Scheldt (Dutch: Schelde, French Escaut) is a 350 km[1] long river in northern France, western Belgium and the southwestern part of the Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 277 pixelsFull resolution (8358 × 2890 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 277 pixelsFull resolution (8358 × 2890 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Be-nl_Antwerpen. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... Antwerp is the northernmost province of Flanders and of Belgium. ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ...


Antwerp has long been an important city in the nations of the Benelux both economically and culturally. It is located on the right bank of the river Scheldt, which is linked to the North Sea by the Westerschelde. Antwerp's seaport, one of the world's largest and after the port of Rotterdam the second largest in Europe, has a high level of cargo shipping and oil refineries traffic. Families of the large Hasidic Jewish community have traditionally controlled Antwerp's global centre of the diamond trading industry, although the last two decades have seen Indian and Armenian traders become increasingly important. It has been suggested that Regents: Low Countries be merged into this article or section. ... Location of Benelux in Europe Official languages Dutch and French Membership  Belgium  Netherlands  Luxembourg Website http://www. ... The Scheldt (Dutch: Schelde, French Escaut) is a 350 km[1] long river in northern France, western Belgium and the southwestern part of the Netherlands. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... Satellite image of the Scheldt delta showing the Western Scheldt (b) The Western Scheldt (Westerschelde) in the province Zeeland in the southwestern Netherlands, is an estuary of the Scheldt river. ... The port of Antwerp is a capesize port in the heart of Europe. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province South Holland Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - City 319 km²  (123. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about transported goods. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... View of Shell Oil Refinery in Martinez, California. ... Hollandse Synagogue in Antwerp The Jewish community of Antwerp consists of around 18,000 Orthodox Jews, concentrated in the area next to the diamond district. ... This article is about the mineral. ...

Contents

History

Origin of name

According to folklore, and as celebrated by the statue in front of the town hall, the city got its name from a legend involving a mythical giant called Antigoon that lived near the river Scheldt, exacting a toll from those crossing the river. On refusal, the giant severed one of their hands and threw them into the Scheldt. Eventually, the giant was slain by a young hero named Brabo, who cut off the giant's hand and threw it into the river. Hence the name Antwerpen from Dutch hand werpen (akin to Old English hand and wearpan (= to throw), that has changed to today's warp).[1] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ... Druon Antigoon was a mythical giant who lived in Antwerp and who was killed by a Roman soldier called Silvius Brabo. ... The Scheldt (Dutch: Schelde, French Escaut) is a 350 km[1] long river in northern France, western Belgium and the southwestern part of the Netherlands. ... Silvius Brabo is a mythical Roman soldier who is said to have killed a giant, and by this would have created the name Brabant Later this story was also used to explain the name Antwerp (meaning Throw a hand). ...


To support this folkloric derivation, it is pointed out that hand-cutting was practised in Europe, when the right hand of a man who died without heir was cut off and sent to the feudal lord as proof of main-morte. However, Motley argues that Antwerp's name derives from an 't werf (on the wharf).[2] For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... John Lothrop Motley (April 15, 1814 - May 29, 1877), was an American historian. ...


The currently most prevailing theory is that the name originated in the Gallo-Roman period and comes from the Latin antverpia. Antverpia would come from Ante(against) Verpia(deposition, sedimentation), indicating the land that forms by depossition in the inner curb of a river. Note that the river Scheldt, before a transition period between the years 600 to 750, followed a different track. This must have coincided roughly with the current ringway south of the city, situating the city indeed in an inner curb of the river.[3]


Pre-1500

The historical Antwerp had its origins in a Gallo-Roman vicus civilization. Excavations carried out in the oldest section near the Scheldt, 1952-1961 (ref. Princeton), pottery shards and fragments of glass from mid-second century to the end of the third century. In the history of the Roman empire, a vicus (pl. ...


In the 4th century, Antwerp was first named, having been settled by the Germanic Franks.[4] The name was reputed to have been derived from "anda" (at) and "werpum" (wharf).[2] As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ...


The Merovingian Antwerp, now fortified, was evangelized by Saint Amand in the seventh century. At the end of the tenth century, the Scheldt became the boundary of the Holy Roman Empire. Antwerp became a margraviate, a border province facing the County of Flanders. In the eleventh century Godfrey of Bouillon was for some years best known as marquis of Antwerp. In the 12th century, Norbert of Xanten established a community of his Premonstratensian canons at St. Michael’s Abbey at Caloes. Antwerp was the headquarters of Edward III during his early negotiations with Jacob van Artevelde, and his son Lionel, the earl of Cambridge, was born there in 1338. For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Saint Amand (ca. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count or an earl. ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Flanders (or a lion rampant sable, armed and langued gules). ... Godfrey of Bouillon, from a tapestry painted in 1420 Godfrey of Bouillon (c. ... Marquis has many different meanings: The French spelling of the title known in English as Marquess and Margrave. ... Saint Norbert of Xanten Saint Norbert of Xanten (c. ... The Norbertines, also known as the Premonstratensians (OPraem) and in England, as the White Canons (from the colour of their habit), are a Christian religious order of Augustinian canons founded at Prémontré near Laon in 1120 by Saint Norbert, afterwards archbishop of Magdeburg. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Jacob van Artevelde (± 1295 - 1345), known as the Wise Man, Flemish statesman and political leader, was born in Ghent of a wealthy commercial family. ... The title of Earl of Cambridge was created several times in the Peerage of England, and since 1362 the title has been closely associated with the Royal Family (see also Duke of Cambridge, Marquess of Cambridge). ... Events Ashikaga Takauji granted title of Shogun by the emperor of Japan. ...


16th century

After the closing of the Zwin and the consequent decline of Bruges, the city of Antwerp, then part of the Duchy of Brabant, became of importance. At the end of the 15th century the foreign trading houses were transferred from Bruges to Antwerp, and the building assigned to the English nation is specifically mentioned in 1510. Sea lavender blossoms in august-september The Zwin is a natural reserve with an area of 1. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ... Brabant is a former duchy in the Low Countries, and a former province of Belgium. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ... Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Fernand Braudel states that Antwerp became "the center of the entire international economy—something Bruges had never been even at its height." (Braudel 1985 p. 143.) Antwerp's "Golden Age" is tightly linked to the "Age of Exploration". Over the first half of the 16th century Antwerp grew to become the second largest European city north of the Alps by 1560. Many foreign merchants were resident in the city. Guicciardini, the Venetian envoy, stated that hundreds of ships would pass in a day, and 2000 carts entered the city each week. Portuguese ships laden with pepper and cinnamon would unload their cargo. Fernand Braudel (August 24, 1902–November 27, 1985) was a French historian. ... The so-called Age of Exploration was a period from the early 15th century and continuing into the early 17th century, during which European ships were traveled around the world to search for new trading routes and partners to feed burgeoning capitalism in Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Guicciardini Francesco Guicciardini (March 6, 1483 - May 22, 1540), Italian historian and statesman. ... Binomial name L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ...


Without a long-distance merchant fleet, and governed by an oligarchy of banker-aristocrats forbidden to engage in trade, the economy of Antwerp was foreigner-controlled, which made the city very international, with merchants and traders from Venice, Ragusa, Spain and Portugal. Antwerp had a policy of toleration, which attracted a large orthodox Jewish community. Antwerp was not a "free" city though, since it had been reabsorbed into the duchy of Brabant in 1406 and was controlled from Brussels. For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Ragusa Ragusa is a city in southern Italy. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Brabant is a former duchy in the Low Countries, and a former province of Belgium. ... Events Construction of Forbidden City begins in Beijing. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ...


Antwerp experienced three booms during its century, the first based on the pepper market, a second launched by American silver coming from Seville (ending with the bankruptcy of Spain in 1557), and a third boom, after the stabilising Treaty of Cateau-Cambresis, in 1559, based on the textiles industry. The boom-and-bust cycles and inflationary cost-of-living squeezed less-skilled workers. The Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis is an agreement reached between Elizabeth I of England and Henry II of France on April 2 and between Henry II and Philip II of Spain on April 3, 1559, at Cateau-Cambrésis, around fifty kilometres south-east of Cambrai, that ended the... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ...


The religious revolution of the Reformation erupted in violent riots in August 1566, as in other parts of the Netherlands. The regent Margaret, duchess of Parma was swept aside when Philip II sent the Duke of Alba at the head of an army the following summer. When the Eighty Years' War broke out in 1572, commercial trading between Antwerp and the Spanish port of Bilbao was not possible. On November 4, 1576, the Spanish soldiers plundered the city. During the Spanish Fury 6000 citizens were massacred, 800 houses were burnt down, and over two millions sterling of damage was done. The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Margaret of Parma (28 December 1522 - 18 January 1586), duchess of Parma and regent of the Netherlands from 1559 to 1567, was the illegitimate daughter of Charles V. Her mother, Johanna Maria van der Gheynst, a servant of Charles de Lalaing, Seigneur de Montigny, was a Fleming. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the... Fernando Álvarez de Toledo, Duke of Alba. ... Combatants Dutch rebels Spanish Empire The Eighty Years War, or Dutch Revolt (1568[1]–1648), was the revolt of the Seventeen Provinces in the Netherlands against the Spanish (Habsburg) Empire. ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... La Muy Noble y Muy Leal e Invicta (The most noble and most loyal and undefeated) Location Location of Bilbao in Spain and Biscay Coordinates : , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Bilbao (Basque) Spanish name Bilbao Nickname El Botxo (the hole) Founded 15... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 5 - Peace of Beaulieu or Peace of Monsieur (after Monsieur, the Duc dAnjou, brother of the King, who negotiated it). ... The sack of Antwerp during the Eighty Years War is known as the Spanish Fury. ...


Antwerp became the capital of the Dutch revolt. In 1585, Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma and Piacenza captured it after a long siege and sent its Protestant citizens into exile. Antwerp's banking was controlled for a generation by Genoa and Amsterdam became the new trading centre. Combatants Dutch rebels Spanish Empire The Dutch Revolt, Eighty Years War or The Revolt of the Netherlands (1568[1]–1648), was the revolt of the Seventeen Provinces in the Low Countries against the Spanish (Habsburg) Empire. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma and Piacenza (1545 - 1592) was the son of Duke Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma and Margaret, the illegitimate daughter of the Habsburg Emperor Charles V. Thus Alessandro was the nephew of Philip II of Spain and of Don John of Austria. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ...


17th-19th centuries

The recognition of the independence of the United Provinces by the Treaty of Munster in 1648 stipulated that the Scheldt should be closed to navigation, which destroyed Antwerp's trading activities. This impediment remained in force until 1863, although the provisions were relaxed during French rule from 1795 to 1814, and also during the time Belgium formed part of the kingdom of the Netherlands (1815 to 1830). Antwerp had reached the lowest point of its fortunes in 1800, and its population had sunk under 40,000, when Napoleon, realizing its strategic importance, assigned two millions for the construction of two docks and a mole. In 1830, the city was captured by the Belgian insurgents, but the citadel continued to be held by a Dutch garrison under General David Hendrik Chassé. For a time this officer subjected the town to a periodic bombardment which inflicted much damage, and at the end of 1832 the citadel itself was besieged by a French army. During this attack the town was further injured. In December 1832, after a gallant defence, Chassé made an honourable surrender. Map of Dutch Republic by Joannes Janssonius United Netherlands redirects here. ... The Ratification of the Treaty of Münster by Gerard Terborch (1648) The Peace of Westphalia, also known as the treaties of Münster and Osnabrück, is the series of treaties that ended the Thirty Years War and officially recognized the United Provinces and Swiss Confederation. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Baron David Hendrik Chassé (March 18, 1765–May 2, 1849) was a Dutch soldier who fought both for and against Napoleon. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


20th century

Antwerp was the first city to host the World Gymnastics Championships, in 1903. During World War I, the city became the fallback point of the Belgian Army after the defeat at Liège. It was taken after heavy fighting by the German Army, and the Belgians were forced to retreat westward. The World Gymnastics Championships are held every year. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Geography Country Belgium Community French Community Region Walloon Region Province Liège Arrondissement Liège Coordinates , , Area 69. ...


Antwerp hosted the 1920 Summer Olympics. During World War II the city was occupied by Germany in May 1940 and was liberated when the British 11th Armoured Division entered the city on September 4, 1944. After this, the Germans attempted to destroy the Port of Antwerp, which was used by the Allies to bring new material ashore. Thousands of V-1 and V-2 missiles battered the city. The city was hit by more V-2s than any other target during the entire war, but the attack did not succeed in destroying the port since many of the missiles fell upon other parts of the city. As a result, the city itself was severely damaged and rebuilt after the war in a modern style. After the war, Antwerp, which had already had a sizable Jewish population before the war, once again became a major European center of Haredi (and particularly Hasidic) Orthodox Judaism. The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... British 11th Armoured Division: The Black Bull. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The port of Antwerp is a capesize port in the heart of Europe. ... The V-1 (German: Vergeltungswaffe 1) was the first guided missile used in war and the forerunner of todays cruise missile. ... For other uses, see V2. ... Haredi Judaism, also called ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Judaism. ... Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ...


Municipality

Districts of Antwerp.

The municipality comprises the city of Antwerp proper and several towns. It's divided into nine entities (districts): Image File history File links AntwerpDistricts. ... Image File history File links AntwerpDistricts. ...

  1. Antwerp (district)
  2. Berchem
  3. Berendrecht-Zandvliet-Lillo
  4. Borgerhout
  5. Deurne
  6. Ekeren
  7. Hoboken
  8. Merksem
  9. Wilrijk

Antwerp District coincides with the old city of Antwerp. ... Antwerp in Belgium Berchem in Greater Antwerp Berchem is the southern part of the city of Antwerp in the Flemish region of Belgium. ... The Cathedral of our Lady (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp) in the Handschoenmarkt, in the old quarter of Antwerp is the largest cathedral in the Low Countries and home to a number of triptychs by Renaissance Belgian painter Rubens. ... Borgerhout is a district in Antwerp, Belgium with 41. ... Deurne is the second largest district of the municipality of Antwerp, Belgium, (right after the Antwerp town district) and has 69. ... Ekeren in Antwerp Ekeren is a northern district of the municipality of Antwerp in the Flemish Region of Belgium. ... Hoboken is a district of the municipality of Antwerp, Belgium. ... A district of the city of Antwerp. ... Wilrijk is a suburb of the city Antwerp, in Belgium. ...

Historical population

This is the population of the city of Antwerp only, not of the larger current municipality of the same name.

  • 1374: 18,000[5]
  • 1486: 40,000[6]
  • 1500: around 44/49,000 inhabitants[7]
  • 1526: 50,000[8]
  • 1567: 105,000 (90,000 inhabitants and 15,000 strangers)[8]
  • 1575: around 100,000 (after the Inquisition)
  • 1584: 84,000 (after the Spanish Fury, the French Fury[9] and the calvinistic republic)
  • 1586 (May): 60,000 (after siege)
  • 1586 (October): 50,000
  • 1591: 46,000
  • 1612: 54,000[10]
  • 1620: 66,000 (Twelve Years' Truce)
  • 1640: 54,000 (after the Black Death epidemics)
  • 1700: 66,000[11]
  • 1765: 40,000
  • 1784: 51,000
  • 1800: 45,500
  • 1815: 54,000[12]
  • 1830: 73,500
  • 1856: 111,700
  • 1880: 179,000
  • 1900: 275,100
  • 1925: 308,000
  • 1959: 260,000[13]
Antwerp City Hall at the Grote Markt (Main Square).
16th-century Guildhouses at the Grote Markt.
The Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal (Cathedral of our Lady) at the Groenplaats is the highest cathedral in the Low Countries and home to several triptychs by Baroque painter Rubens. It remains the tallest building in the city.
The Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal (Cathedral of our Lady) at the Groenplaats is the highest cathedral in the Low Countries and home to several triptychs by Baroque painter Rubens. It remains the tallest building in the city.

This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ... The sack of Antwerp during the Eighty Years War is known as the Spanish Fury. ... A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ... A cease fire made at the end of the Dutch revolt war that lasted for twelve years. ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 395 pixel Image in higher resolution (3512 × 1734 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 395 pixel Image in higher resolution (3512 × 1734 pixel, file size: 1. ... Antwerp City Hall The City Hall (Dutch: Stadhuis) of Antwerp, Belgium, stands on the western side of Antwerps Grote Markt (Great Market Square). ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... A guild is an association of craftspeople in a particular trade. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kathedraal. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kathedraal. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Regents: Low Countries be merged into this article or section. ... The Raising of the Cross, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp A triptych (from the Greek tri- three + ptychē fold) is a work of art (usually a panel painting) which is divided into three sections, or three carved panels which are hinged together. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ...

Buildings and facilities

In the 16th century, Antwerp was noted for the wealth of its citizens ("Antwerpia nummis"); the houses of these wealthy merchants and manufacturers have been preserved throughout the city. However fire has destroyed several old buildings, such as the house of the Hanseatic League on the northern quays in 1891. The city also suffered considerable war damage by V-bombs, and in recent years other noteworthy buildings were demolished for new developments. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ... Vergeltungswaffe (German for retaliation weapon, reprisal weapon or vengeance weapon) was a term assigned during World War II by the Nazis to a number of revolutionary superweapons, the V1 flying bomb, the V2 rocket and the V3 long range gun. ...

  • The Antwerp Zoo was founded in 1843, and home to more than 4,000 animals
  • Central Station is a railway station designed by Louis Delacenserie that was completed in 1905. It has two monumental neo-baroque facades, a large metal and glass dome (60m/197ft) and a gilt and marble interior
  • Cathedral of Our Lady. This church was begun in the 14th century and finished in 1518. The church has three works by Rubens, viz. "The Descent from the Cross", "The Elevation of the Cross" and "The Assumption"
  • The church, named for St James, is more ornate than the cathedral. It contains the tomb of Rubens
  • The church of St Paul, has a beautiful baroque interior. It is a few hundred yards north of the Grote Markt
  • The Plantin-Moretus Museum preserves the house of the printer Christoffel Plantijn and his successor Jan Moretus
  • The Boerentoren (Farmers' Tower) or KBC Tower, a 26-storey building built in 1932, is the oldest skyscraper in Europe[14]
  • The Royal Museum of Fine Arts, close to the southern quays, has a collection of old masters (Rubens, Van Dyck, Titian) and the leading Dutch masters
  • The law courts, designed by the Richard Rogers Partnership, Arup and VK Studio, and opened by King Albert in April 2006. This building is the antithesis of the heavy, dark court building designed by Joseph Poelaert that dominates the skyline of Brussels. The courtrooms sit on top of six fingers that radiate from an airy central hall, and are surmounted by spires which provide north light and resemble oast houses or the sails of barges on the nearby River Scheldt. It is built on the site of the old Zuid ("South") station, at the end of a magnificent 1.5 km perspective at the southern end of Amerikalei. The road neatly disappears into an underpass under oval Bolivarplaats to join the motorway ring. This leaves peaceful surface access by foot, bicycle or tram (routes 8 & 12). The building's highest 'sail' is 51 m high, has a floor area of 77,000 m², and cost €130m.

Antwerp Zoo is a zoo in the centre of Antwerp, Belgium located right next to the train station. ... Inside the station The railway tunnel running through Antwerpen-Centraal station Antwerpen-Centraal (Antwerp Central) is the name of the main railway station in the Belgian city of Antwerp. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A gilded Tibetan Vajrasattva Gilding is the art of applying metal leaf (most commonly gold or silver leaf) to a surface. ... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, the Cathedral of Our Lady, Antwerp, was started in 1351 and completed in 1521. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Descent from the Cross A painting made by Rubens. ... Peter Paul Rubens. ... A painting made by Rubens ... This church in Antwerp, Belgium contains the grave of Rubens. ... Saint James can refer to the following: Several men mentioned in the New Testament, whose various epithets and euphemisms cause some uncertainties: James, son of Zebedee, an apostle, brother of John the Apostle; also called Saint James the Great. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Museum in Antwerp, Belgium honoring the famous printers Christoffel Plantijn and Jan Moretus. ... Christophe Plantin by Peter Paul Rubens Christoffel Plantijn (in French Christophe Plantin) (ca. ... Jan Moretus(1543-1610), married the second daughter of the famous Antwerp publisher Christoffel Plantijn in 1570. ... The Boerentoren seen from the Meir The Boerentoren (aka farmers tower) is the second tallest building of Antwerp, it measures 97 meters and was the first skyscraper of the European continent. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... The Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp (Dutch: Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten van Antwerpen), founded in 1810, houses a collection of paintings, sculptures and drawings from the fourteenth to the twentieth centuries. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Antoon) van Dyck (*March 22, 1599 - December 9, 1641) was a Flemish painter — mainly of portraits — who became the leading court painter in England. ... Also see: Titian (disambiguation). ... A court is an official, public forum which a public power establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... The Law Courts of Brussels The Law Courts of Brussels (Dutch: Justitiepaleis van Brussel, French: Palais de Justice de Bruxelles) is the most important Court building in Belgium and is a notable landmark of Brussels. ... Joseph Poelaert (21 March 1817 – 3 November 1879) was a Belgian architect. ... For other uses, see Skyline (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ... Oast House in Tudeley, Kent, now in residential use An oast house is an example of vernacular architecture in England, especially Kent and Sussex. ... A sail is a surface intended to generate thrust by being placed in a wind; basically it is a vertically oriented wing. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone Note that Barge is the NATO reporting name for the Soviet Tupolev Tu-85 bomber. ... An underground pedestrian tunnel between buildings at MIT. Note the utility pipes running along the ceiling. ... This oval, with only one axis of symmetry, resembles a chicken egg. ... Motorway symbol in UK, France and Ireland. ... For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ...

Commerce

In 1863, Antwerp was opened again to international trade by the purchase of the Dutch right to levy tolls. Eight principal basins or docks already existed in 1908. With the completion of the new maritime lock, ships drawing 30 feet of water would be able to enter these new docks and also the Lefebvre and America docks. The quays flanking the Scheldt are 3-½ miles in length, constructed of granite. The exchange or Bourse, one of the early institutions in Europe with that title, was built in 1872. Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Transportation

The Boerentoren ('Farmers' tower'), nickname of – nowadays – the KBC Bank building in Antwerp.
The Boerentoren ('Farmers' tower'), nickname of – nowadays – the KBC Bank building in Antwerp.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 1254 KB) [edit] Beschreibung [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp KBC Bank ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 1254 KB) [edit] Beschreibung [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp KBC Bank ... KBC Bank Logo The KBC Bank building in Antwerp. ...

Road

Highways lead to Brussels, Hasselt, Liège, Breda (Netherlands), Ghent and Bruges. They are led around the city by the Ring. Both banks of the Scheldt are connected to each other by 3 tunnels; the oldest of which is the Waasland tunnel (1934). On the Ring the Kennedy tunnel connects the left with the right bank and in the North, between the docks in the port, there is the Liefkenshoek tunnel. Currently a fourth car tunnel is being planned on the northern part of the Ring which should be completed in 2012. For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... Hasselt municipality and district in the province Limburg Hasselt is a Belgian city and municipality, and capital of the Flemish province of Limburg. ... Liege or Liège has several meanings: A liege is the person or entity to which one has pledged allegiance. ... Grote Kerk (main church) or Onze Lieve Vrouwe Kerk (Church of Our Lady). ... This article is about the Belgian city. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ... An underground pedestrian tunnel between buildings at MIT. Note the utility pipes running along the ceiling. ...


Rail

Antwerp has two major railway stations: Central, which is a monument in itself, and Berchem. Central Station is a terminal, except for trains to the Netherlands. A through underground connection under Central Station to the north has been completed in 2007 and allows international trains (Brussels-Amsterdam) to call at Central Station without reversing. Before, trains to the Netherlands stopped only at Berchem Station, 2 km to the south of Central, or had to reverse in and out of Central Station and go back to Berchem to follow a railway-line around the city to the north. Further there are international trains to Paris and Lille and national trains going directly to Ghent, Bruges, Ostend, Brussels, Charleroi, Hasselt, Liège and Turnhout. Inside the station The railway tunnel running through Antwerpen-Centraal station Antwerpen-Centraal (Antwerp Central) is the name of the main railway station in the Belgian city of Antwerp. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Lille (disambiguation). ... The esplanade with the Thermae Palace, the former Royal Residence and the casino For other uses, see Ostend (disambiguation). ... Charleroi (Walloon: TchÃ¥lerwè) is the first city and municipality of Wallonia in population. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province Antwerp Arrondissement Turnhout Coordinates Area 56. ...


City transportation

The city has a web of tram and bus lines operated by De Lijn and providing access to the city centre, suburbs and the Left Bank. The tram network has 11 lines, of which the underground section is called the "premetro" and includes a tunnel under the river. De Lijn is a company run by the Flemish government in Belgium to provide public transportation, similar to the way in which Belgian railroads or the postal system is run. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... Tram on Line 15 to Mortsel at Meir pre-metro station Ticket vending machine The Antwerp Premetro is a network, consisting of lines 2, 3, 5 and 15 of the Antwerp tram system. ...


Air

Antwerp International Airport is located in the district of Deurne. VLM Airlines flies to London (City Airport) and Manchester in England. VLM is the only airline with scheduled air services to and from Antwerp International Airport. The airport is connected by bus to the city center. Antwerpen International Airport (Deurne) (IATA: ANR, ICAO: EBAW) is located 2 km from the City of Antwerp, Belgium. ... Deurne is the second largest district of the municipality of Antwerp, Belgium, (right after the Antwerp town district) and has 69. ... VLM Airlines Fokker F50 VLM Airlines (short for Vlaamse Luchttransportmaatschappij - Flemish Air Transport Company) is a Belgian business airline. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ...


Fortifications

Het Steen (literally: 'The Stone').
Het Steen (literally: 'The Stone').

Although Antwerp was formerly a fortified city, nothing remains of the former enceinte or of the old citadel defended by General Chassé in 1832, except for the Steen, which has been restored. Modern Antwerp's broad avenues mark the position of the original fortifications. After the establishment of Belgian independence, Antwerp was defended by the citadel and an enceinte around the city. In 1859, seventeen of the twenty-two fortresses constructed under Wellington's supervision in 1815-1818 were dismantled and the old citadel and enceinte were removed. A new enceinte 8 miles long was constructed, and the villages of Berchem and Borgerhout, now parishes of Antwerp, were absorbed within the city. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1054 KB) [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp Het Steen Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1054 KB) [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp Het Steen Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Enceinte (Lat. ... This article is about a type of fortification. ... Baron David Hendrik Chassé (March 18, 1765–May 2, 1849) was a Dutch soldier who fought both for and against Napoleon. ... Het Steen, Antwerp, Belgium Het Steen is a historic medieval castle in the old city center of Antwerp, Belgium, one of Europes biggest ports. ... For the first Duke of Wellington, see Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... Antwerp in Belgium Berchem in Greater Antwerp Berchem is the southern part of the city of Antwerp in the Flemish region of Belgium. ... Borgerhout is a district in Antwerp, Belgium with 41. ...


This enceinte is protected by a broad wet ditch, and in the caponiers are the magazines and store chambers of the fortress. The enceinte has nineteen openings or gateways, but of these seven are not used by the public. As soon as the enceinte was finished eight detached forts from 2 to 2-½ miles from the enceinte were constructed. They begin on the north near Wijnegem and the zone of inundation, and terminate on the south at Hoboken. In 1870 Fort Merksem and the redoubts of Berendrecht and Oorderen were built for the defence of the area to be inundated north of Antwerp. A Caponier is a type of fortification structure. ... Wijnegem is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Antwerp. ... Hoboken is a district of the municipality of Antwerp, Belgium. ... A district of the city of Antwerp. ... Berendrecht is a village in Antwerp province in Belgium. ... Oorderen was a small Belgian village near the city of Antwerp until 1965. ...


In the 1870s, the fortifications of Antwerp were deemed to be out of date, given the increased range and power of artillery and explosives. Antwerp was transformed into a fortified position by constructing an outer line of forts and batteries 6 to 9 miles from the enceinte. // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ...


Culture

Antwerp had an artistic reputation in the 17th century, based on its school of painting, which included Rubens, Van Dyck, Jordaens, the two Teniers and many others. Informally, most Antverpians (in Dutch Antwerpenaren, people from Antwerp) daily speak Antverpian, a dialect that Dutch-speakers know as distinctive from other Brabantic dialects through its typical vowel pronunciations: approximating the vowel sound in 'bore'— for one of its 'a'-sounds while other 'a's are very sharp. The Echt Antwaarps Teater ('Authentic Antverpian Theatre') brings the dialect on stage. Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Antoon) van Dyck (*March 22, 1599 - December 9, 1641) was a Flemish painter — mainly of portraits — who became the leading court painter in England. ... Self-Portrait with Parents, Brothers, and Sisters by Jacob Jordaens (c. ... Teniers was a family of celebrated Flemish painters that included: David Teniers the Elder (1582-1649) David Teniers the Younger (1610-1690) David Teniers III (1638-1685) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Brabantian is a dialect of the Dutch language spoken in Noord-Brabant and in the Belgian provinces of Antwerpen and Vlaams-Brabant. ...


Fashion

Antwerp is a rising fashion city, and has produced some famous designers such as the Antwerp Six. The city has a rather a cult status in the fashion world, largely due to the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, one of the most important fashion academies in Europe. It has served as the learning centre for a large number of well-known Belgian fashion designers. The Antwerp Six refers to a group of influential fashion designers from Antwerps Royal Academy of Fine Arts that emerged in the 1980s and presented a distinct vision for fashion that established Antwerp as a notable location for fashion design. ... The Koninklijke Academie voor Schone Kunsten van Antwerpen (the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts) is one of the oldest of its kind in Europe. ...


Miscellaneous

The major football clubs are K.F.C. Germinal Beerschot and R. Antwerp F.C.. Since the 1980s, several graduates of the Belgian Royal Academy of Fine Arts have become internationally successful fashion designers in Antwerp. Antwerp hosted the 50th anniversary celebrations of The Tall Ships' Races in the summer of 2006. Antwerp was the opening city in the Guy Ritchie movie, Snatch. It is where the 86 carat (17.2 g) diamond is first stolen from. A football team is the collective name given to a number of players who play together in a football game, be it association football (soccer), rugby, Australian football, American football, Gaelic football, or other version of football. ... K.F.C. Germinal Beerschot is a Belgian football club. ... R. Antwerp F.C. is a Belgian football club, from the city of Antwerp in Antwerp (province). ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Fashion design is the applied art dedicated to the design of clothing and lifestyle accessories created within the cultural and social influences of a specific time. ... Tall Ships Races, formerly known as the Cutty Sark Tall Ships Races, are long-distance races for sailing ships. ... Guy Ritchie (born 10th September 1968 in Hatfield, Hertfordshire[1]) is an English writer-director. ... Snatch is a 2000 film by British writer-director Guy Ritchie. ... The carat is a unit of mass used for gems, and equals 200 milligrams or 3. ...


Orthodox Jewish population

After the Holocaust, Antwerp once again became a major center for Orthodox Jews. At present, about 20,000 Haredi Jews, mostly Hasidic, live in Antwerp. They have an extensive network of synagogues, shops, schools and organizations, within the Machsike Hadas community. Significant Hasidic movements in Antwerp include Pshevorsk, based in Antwerp, as well as branches of Satmar, Belz, Bobov, Ger, Skver, Klausenburg, Lubavitch and several others. Rabbi Chaim Kreiswirth, chief rabbi of the Machsike Hadas community, who died in 2003, was arguably one of the better known personalities to have been based in Antwerp, though attempts to have a street named after him were not successful. Hollandse Synagogue in Antwerp The Jewish community of Antwerp consists of around 18,000 Orthodox Jews, concentrated in the area next to the diamond district. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Haredi Judaism, also called ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Judaism. ... Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Satmar is the largest Hasidic group in existence today. ... The third Belzer Rebbe, Yissachar Dov Rokeach Belz (חסידות בעלז) is a Hasidic dynasty named after the town of Belz, a small town originally located in eastern Poland, presently in Ukraine. ... Bobov, (or Bobover Hasidism) (חסידות באבוב) is a Hasidic group within Haredi Judaism originating in Bobowa, Galicia in Southern Poland and now headquartered in the neighborhood of Borough Park in Brooklyn, New York. ... Ger, or Gur (or Gerrer when used as an adjective) is a large Hasidic dynasty originating from Gur, the Yiddish name of Góra Kalwaria, a small town in Poland. ... Skver (also Skvir or Square) is a Hasidic group that originated in the Ukrainian city of Skvira. ... The Sanz-Klausenburg Logo This article below discusses the Klausenburger Hasidim, specifically the Sanz-Klausenburger dynasty that began with Rabbi Yekusiel Yehudah Halberstam and presently the two movements in Israel and America. ... Chabad Lubavitch, also known as Lubavitch Chabad, is a large branch of Hasidic Judaism. ... Rav Kreiswirths sermon at the laying of the foundation stone of the old-age home in 1955 Rav Kreiswirth in later life A fraction of the mourners at the Ravs funeral in Israel HaGaon Harav Chaim Kreiswirth (1918-2001) served as the longtime Chief Rabbi of Antwerp and...


Missions to seafarers

A number of Christian missions to seafarers are based in Antwerp, notably on the Italiëlei. These include the British & International Sailors’ Society, the Finnish Seamen's Mission, the Norwegian Sjømannskirken and the Apostleship of the Sea. They provide cafeterias, cultural and social activities as well as religious services. The British & International Sailors’ Society is an inter-denominational Christian organisation providing pastoral care to seafarers. ... The Finnish Seamens Mission - in Finnish: Suomen Merimieskirkko ry - was established in 1875. ... Sjømannskirken, The Norwegian Church Abroad The Norwegian seamen’s churches is a religious organisation serving Norwegians and other Scandinavians travelling abroad. ... The Apostleship of the Sea is an agency of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Sister cities

The following places are sister cities to Antwerp: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Within the context of development cooperation, Antwerp is also linked to: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Mulhouse (French: Mulhouse, pronounced ; Alsatian: Milhüsa; German: Mülhausen) is a town and commune in eastern France close to Swiss and German border. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... For other uses, see Saint Petersburg (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Motto: Within your walls be concordance and public welfare Rostock (pronounced // from Polabian Roz toc, literally to flow apart) is the largest city in the north German state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Akhisar (pronounced: ah-kee-sahr; or Tepe Mezarligi) is a district and a town center of Manisa Province in the Aegean region of Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Hebrew חֵיפָה Arabic حَيْفَا Founded in 3rd century CE Government City District Haifa Population 267,000 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... Nickname: Motto: Spes Bona (Latin for Good Hope) Location of the City of Cape Town in Western Cape Province Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality Founded 1652 Government [1]  - Type City council  - Mayor Helen Zille  - City manager Achmat Ebrahim Area  - City 2,499 km²  (964. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Map of Germany showing Ludwigshafen am Rhein Ludwigshafen am Rhein is a city in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, with about 166,000 inhabitants. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Suriname. ... Paramaribo (nicknamed Parbo) is the capital of Suriname, located in the Paramaribo district, with a population of roughly 250,000 people. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... Map of South Africa showing Durbans location. ...

Notable people from Antwerp

This is a list of Notable people from Antwerp, who were either born in Antwerp, or spent part of their life there. ...

Born in Antwerp

Abraham Ortelius.
Abraham Ortelius.
Hendrik Conscience
Hendrik Conscience

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 393 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1500 × 2286 pixel, file size: 984 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp Abraham Ortelius... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 393 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1500 × 2286 pixel, file size: 984 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antwerp Abraham Ortelius... Image File history File links Hendrik_Conscience. ... Image File history File links Hendrik_Conscience. ... Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, (November 29, 1338 – October 7, 1368) was the second son of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Head of a Woman by Frans Floris (1554) Oil on wood, 45 x 32,5 cm The Hermitage, St. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Abraham Ortelius. ... Cartography is the study of map making and cartographers are map makers. ... A geographer is a crazy psycho whose area of study is geocrap, the pseudoscientific study of Earths physical environment and human habitat and the study of boring students to death. ... Late 16th century and early 17th century Netherlandish painter of forest landscapes. ... Salmacis and Hermaphroditus by Bartholomeus Spranger (c. ... For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... Etching is an intaglio method of printmaking in which the image is incised into the surface of a metal plate using an acid. ... Paul (1554-1626) and Mattheus (1550-1583) Brill (or Bril) were brothers, both born in Antwerp, who were landscape painters who worked in Rome after earning papal favor. ... Scaldis and Antwerpia, 1609 Abraham Janssens (or Jansens) van Nuyssen (ca. ... Don Rodrigo Calderón, Count of Oliva, Marquis de las Siete Iglesias (es: Don Rodrigo Calderón, conde de Oliva, marqués de las Siete Iglesias), (d. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Franz Snyders (1579 - 1657 ) Flemish painter of animals and still life, was born and died at Antwerp. ... A still life is a work of art which represents a subject composed of inanimate objects. ... Frans Hals (c. ... Gaspar de Crayer (1582 Antwerp - 1669 Ghent) sometimes called Gaspard or Caspar de Crayer was a Flemish painter. ... Village Feast by David Teniers the Elder Panel Accademia Carrara, Bergamo David Teniers the Elder (1582-1649), Flemish painter was born at Antwerp. ... Jacob Jordaens, Self-Portrait with Parents, Brothers, and Sisters (c. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Anton) van Dyck (22 March 1599 – 9 December 1641) was a Flemish artist who became the leading court painter in England. ... David Teniers the Younger (December 15, 1610 - April 25, 1690), Flemish artist was the more celebrated son of David Teniers the Elder, almost ranking in celebrity with Rubens and Van Dyck, was born in Antwerp. ... Jan (or Johannes) Fyt (or Fijt) (August, 1609 - 1661), Belgian animal painter, was born at Antwerp and christened on the 19th of August 1609. ... Old Woman Dozing by Nicolaes Maes (1656) Oil on canvas, 135 x 105 cm. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... Gerard Edelinck (1649 - 1707), Flemish copper-plate engraver, was born at Antwerp. ... Johannes Michel or John Michael Rysbrack (born June 27, 1694 in Antwerp; died January 8, 1770 in London) was an 18th century Flemish sculptor. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Hendrik Conscience (born December 3, 1812 in Antwerp – died September 10, 1883 in Antwerp) was a Flemish writer. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Georges Eekhoud (born May 27, 1854, Antwerp; died May 29, 1927, Schaerbeek) was a Belgian novelist. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Hippolyte Delehaye (Antwerp July 19, 1859 – Brussels April 1, 1941) was a Belgian Jesuit who was ahagiographic scholar and an outstanding member of the Bollandists, who established critical editions of texts relating to the Christian saints and martyrs that were based on applying the critical method of sound archaological and... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Hagiography is the study of saints. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... Belgian stamp honoring the writer Willem Elsschot (7 May 1882 - 31 May 1960), was a Flemish writer and poet (pseudonym of Alfons-Jozef De Ridder). ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Constant Permeke (1886 — 1952) is a Belgian painter who is considered the leading figure of Flemish expressionism. ... On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... Paul van Ostaijen (Antwerp, February 22, 1896 - Miavoye-Anthée, March 18, 1928) was a Flemish poet and writer. ... Albert Lilar (Antwerp, 21 December 1900 - 16 March 1976 ) was a Belgian politician of the Liberal Party and a Minister of Justice. ... Baron Maurice Gilliams (Antwerp, 20 July 1900- Antwerp, 18 October 1982) was a Flemish writer and poet. ... Evi Goffin (born on February 27, 1981) is the vocalist of the Belgian musical group Lasgo. ... Jessica Van Der Steen in 2005 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition Jessica Van Der Steen (born on July 9th, 1984) is a model born in Antwerp, Belgium. ... Categories: American professional wrestlers | Professional wrestling stubs ... This article is about the goddess Athena. ...

Lived in Antwerp

Joachim Patinir.
Joachim Patinir.
Wenceslas Hollar.
Wenceslas Hollar.

Image File history File links Patenier. ... Image File history File links Patenier. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (531x739, 146 KB) Wenzel Hollar - zeitgenössischer Stich von Jan Meyssens eingestellt in de unter ((Bild-PD-alt)) : 15:18, 7. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (531x739, 146 KB) Wenzel Hollar - zeitgenössischer Stich von Jan Meyssens eingestellt in de unter ((Bild-PD-alt)) : 15:18, 7. ... The Ugly Duchess by Quentin Matsys (1525-30) Oil on wood, 64 x 45,5 cm National Gallery, London Quentin Matsys, also known as Quentin Massys, Quentin Metsys or Kwinten Metsys (1466 - 1530), was a painter in the Flemish tradition, founder of the Antwerp school. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... St Luke Painting the Madonna by Jan Mabuse (1520-25) Wood, 109,5 x 82 cm Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna Jan Mabuse (d. ... Joachim Patinir, also called de Patinier and de Patiner (b. ... John Rogers (c. ... For other types of minister, see Minister In Christian churches, a minister is a man or woman who serves a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such persons can minister as a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain, Deacon or Elder. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... Portrait of Eleonore of Austria, Queen of France, circa 1530, by Joos van Cleve Joos van Cleve (born at Cleves, active ca 1515-1530 mainly in Antwerp ) was a Netherlandish painter. ... Damiao de Gois (February 2nd, 1502-January 30th, 1574) born in Alenquer, Portugal, was an important Portuguese humanist philosopher. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Portrait by Anthonis Mor, c. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... Financier (IPA: /ËŒfi nãn ˈsjei/) is an elegant term for a person who handles large sums of money, usually involving money lending, financing projects, large-scale investing, or large-scale money management. ... Categories: Stub | Dutch painters ... For other uses, see Portrait (disambiguation). ... Christophe Plantin by Peter Paul Rubens Christoffel Plantijn (in French Christophe Plantin) (ca. ... The word printer is used to describe a company that provides commercial printing services, involving typesetting, printing and book-binding. ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... Bruegels The Painter and The Connoisseur drawn c. ... Printmaking is a process for producing a work of art in ink; the work (called a print) is created indirectly, through the transfer of ink from the surface upon which the work was originally drawn or otherwise composed. ... Portret by Jacques de Gheyn II Philips van Marnix, heer van St Aldegonde (1538 - December 15, 1598), was a Dutch writer and statesman, and the probable author of the text of the Dutch national anthem, the Wilhelmus. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... Simon Stevin Simon Stevin (1548/49 – 1620) was a Flemish mathematician and engineer. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... John Bull (1562 or 1563–March 15, 1628) was an Welsh composer, musician, and organ builder. ... This article is about the country. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... Jan Brueghel the Elder (1568-1625) was a Flemish painter, son of Pieter Brueghel the Elder and father of Jan Brueghel the Younger. ... Pieter Pauwel (Peter Paul) Rubens (June 28, 1577 - May 30, 1640) was a Flemish baroque painter. ... William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle (1592 - December 25, 1676) was an English soldier, politician and writer. ... This article is about a military rank. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Peasants Brawling over Cards by Adriaen Brouwer Adriaen Brouwer (1605 - 1638) was a Flemish painter. ... Still Life with Fruit, Flowers, Glasses and Lobster by Jan Davidszoon de Heem (1660s) Oil on canvas, 87,5 x 72,5 cm. ... Wenzel (or Wenceslaus) Hollar (Vaclav Holar) (July 13, 1607 - March 28, 1677), Bohemian etcher, was born at Prague, and died in London, being buried at St Margarets church, Westminster. ... Bohemians are inhabitants of Bohemia, in the Czech Republic. ... Magdelana by Jan Lievens Jan Lievens (1607–1674) was a painter and an excellent visual artist from Leiden. ... Jan Frans Willems (March 11, 1793 - June 24, 1846), Flemish writer. ... Henri Alexis Brialmont (May 25, 1821 - June 21, 1903) was a Belgian military engineer. ... Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, OM, RA (January 8, 1836, Dronrijp, the Netherlands. ... van Gogh redirects here. ... See also Impressionist (entertainment): A girl with a watering can by Renoir, 1876 Impressionism was a 19th century art movement, which began as a private association of Paris-based artists who exhibited publicly in 1874. ... Camille Huysmans (May 26, 1871 - February 23, 1968, born as Camiel Hansen) was a Flemish-Belgium politician. ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Belgium, known regionally as: Premier Ministre in French, Eerste Minister in Dutch, and Premierminister in German. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Gerard Walschap (Londerzeel-St. ... Albert Lilar (Antwerp, 21 December 1900 - 16 March 1976 ) was a Belgian politician of the Liberal Party and a Minister of Justice. ... Suzanne Lilar in the 1980 Suzanne Lilar (born Suzanne Verbist) (b. ... Jean Genet (French IPA: ) (December 19, 1910) – April 15, 1986), was a prominent, controversial French writer and later political activist. ... Self portrait of George du Maurier George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier (6 March 1834 – 8 October 1896) was a British author who was born in Paris, France. ... Dame Daphne du Maurier DBE (13 May 1907–19 April 1989) was a famous British novelist best known for her short story The Birds and her classic novel Rebecca, published in 1938. ... Rav Kreiswirths sermon at the laying of the foundation stone of the old-age home in 1955 Rav Kreiswirth in later life A fraction of the mourners at the Ravs funeral in Israel HaGaon Harav Chaim Kreiswirth (1918-2001) served as the longtime Chief Rabbi of Antwerp and... William Tyndale (sometimes spelled Tyndale,Tindall or Tyndall) (ca. ...

Specific areas in Antwerp

  • Zurenborg
  • Van Wesenbekestraat – the Chinatown of Antwerp
  • Meir – Antwerp's largest shopping street
  • Den Dam – an area in northern Antwerp
  • Zuid -the south of Antwerp- cultural centre of the city

Zurenborg is a district in the Berchem region of Antwerp, Belgium. ... Van Wesenbekestraat is the street in Antwerp (Belgium) where the little Chinatown of the city is settled. ... Meir is the main shopping street in Antwerp, Belgium. ... Den Dam is an area in northern Antwerp. ... The Zuid (South) in Antwerp, is currently the most fashionable area of Antwerp. ...

See also

The Archief en Museum voor het Vlaams Cultuurleven or AMVC (E: Archive and Museum for the Flemish Culture) is a Belgian non-profit organization located in Antwerp. ... The Antwerp Book Fair (Dutch: (Antwerpse) Boekenbeurs) is a large trade fair for books, held annually between 1 November and 11 November in Antwerp Expo, Antwerp, Belgium. ... AWW Logo The Antwerp Water Works (Dutch: Antwerpse Water Werken) or AWW produces water for the city of Antwerp (Belgium) and its surroundings. ... Ekeren in Antwerp Ekeren is a northern district of the municipality of Antwerp in the Flemish Region of Belgium. ... Mayors of Antwerp, Belgium: 1800s 1811-1814: Jan Baptist de Cornelissen de Weynsbroeck 1914-1817: Filip Jozef Vermoelen 1817-1828: Florent Van Ertborn 1828-1830: Willem Andries De Caters 1830: Frans A. Verdussen 1830: Antoon Dhanis van Cannart 1830-1831: Alexis Gleizes 1831-1848: Graaf Gerard Legrelle 1848-1863: Jan... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Tram on Line 15 to Mortsel at Meir pre-metro station Ticket vending machine The Antwerp Premetro is a network, consisting of lines 2, 3, 5 and 15 of the Antwerp tram system. ... Hollandse Synagogue in Antwerp The Jewish community of Antwerp consists of around 18,000 Orthodox Jews, concentrated in the area next to the diamond district. ... University of Antwerp (Dutch: Universiteit Antwerpen) is a university located in Antwerp, Belgium. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Brabo ANTWERPEN 1 (centrum) / ANTWERPEN (Dutch)
  2. ^ a b Room, Adrian (1997-08-01). Placenames of the World. McFarland & Company, 32. ISBN 0786401729. 
  3. ^ Antwerp Tourist Information - Meredith Booney, "The name 'Antwerp' has been linked to the word “aanwerp” (alluvial mound), which was the geographical feature in the early settlement period in this place".
  4. ^ Brittanica: Antwerp
  5. ^ Antwerp timeline 1300-1399
  6. ^ Antwerp timeline 1400-1499
  7. ^ Braudel, Fernand The Perspective of the World, 1985
  8. ^ a b Antwerp timeline 1500-1599
  9. ^ Description of circumstances around the French Fury, see chapter 'Declaration of independence' in article 'William the Silent'
  10. ^ Antwerp timeline 1600-1699
  11. ^ Antwerp timeline 1700-1799
  12. ^ Antwerp timeline 1800-1899
  13. ^ Antwerp timeline 1900-1999
  14. ^ Emporis Last accessed October 23, 2006

Fernand Braudel (August 24, 1902–November 27, 1985) was a French historian. ... William I (William the Silent). ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Carolus Scribani, Origines Antwerpiensium, 1610
  • Gens, Histoire de la ville d'Anvers
  • F.H. Mertens, K.L. Torfs, Geschiedenis van Antwerpen sedert de stichting der. stad tot onze tyden, vol. 7, Antwerp 1853
  • J. L. Motley, Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1856
  • P. Génard, Anvers à travers les ages
  • Annuaire statistique de la Belgique
  • Richard Stillwell, ed. Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, 1976: "Antwerp Belgium"
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

John Lothrop Motley (April 15, 1814 - May 29, 1877), was an American historian. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Antwerp
  • Official Website
  • Antwerp Airport
  • Antwerp Port
  • Capsule History
  • Forum about the History of Antwerp
  • (French) (Dutch) Antwerp Zoo's Official Website
  • Tourism Antwerp
  • Concise Tourist Guide to Antwerp
  • Antwerp Cathedral Website
  • Echt Antwaarps Teater Website
  • Use-It, City Info for Young Travellers
  • Yahoo Travel
  • Flanders Fashion Institute
  • Google Maps (Satellite View)
  • ErasmusPC - Antwerp: Books, Poets and Podcasts
  • Educational institutions
    • Universiteit Antwerpen – University of Antwerp (UA)
    • Hogeschool Antwerpen – College of Antwerp (HA)
    • Lessius Hogeschool – Lessius College
    • Plantijn Hogeschool – Plantijn College
    • Karel de Grote Hogeschool – Karel de Grote College
    • Hogere zeevaartschool Antwerpen – Antwerp Maritime Academy
    • Antwerp International School
    • HISK – Hoger Instituut voor Schone Kunsten (Higher Institute for Fine Arts)

Image File history File links Poster of the 1920 olympic games. ...


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CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Antwerp (2559 words)
Antwerp from 1604 to 1611, and was succeeded in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by a series of fifteen bishops, the last of whom was Cornelius Nelis, librarian of Louvain University and Bishop of
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In the ninth century, when Antwerp became part of Lorraine, that ‘castellum’ was destroyed by the Norman's.
Antwerp became the most important trading and financial centre in Western Europe; its reputation was based largely on its seaport and wool market.
Whilst it is true that Antwerp owes the beginnings of a modern port to that French period (1792-1815), at the same time the city’s cultural heritage fell prey to art plundering and destruction on a scale rarely seen before.
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