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Encyclopedia > Antonio Taguba
Antonio Taguba
31 October 1950

Major General Antonio Taguba
Place of birth Manila, Philippines
Service/branch U.S. Army
Years of service 1972-2007
Rank Major General
Commands 2d Brigade, 2d Armored Division
Awards Legion of Merit

Major General Antonio Mario Taguba[1] (born October 31, 1950), became known worldwide when a classified report he wrote about cases of torture at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq was published in 2004[2]. Taguba is the second and latest Filipino American to attain General Officer rank in the U.S. Army[2][3]. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2136x2670, 688 KB) Source: http://www. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Abu Ghraib cell block The Abu Ghraib prison (Arabic: سجن أبو غريب; also Abu Ghurayb) is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km (20 mi) west of Baghdad. ... In 1998, Benjamin J. Cayetano became the first Filipino American (and second Asian American after Governor George R. Ariyoshi) to be elected state Governor of the United States. ... General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. ...

Contents

Background

He was born in Sampaloc, Manila, the Philippines, a city to which his family had moved from their home province of Cagayan. His father was a soldier in the 45th Infantry Regiment, Philippine Division (Philippine Scouts), who fought in the Battle of Bataan (January-April 1942), and later survived the Bataan Death March during World War II. Taguba was raised by his mother and grandmother. At the age of 11 his family moved to Hawaii, U.S.. Sampaloc district is a lively, middle-class, residential area in Manila City. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Cagayan Region: Cagayan Valley (Region II) Capital: Tuguegarao City Founded: 1581 Population: 2000 census—993,580 (25th largest) Density—110 per km² (16th lowest) Area: 9,002 km² (3rd largest) Divisions: Highly urbanized cities—0 Component cities—1 Municipalities—28 Barangays—820 Congressional districts... The Bataan Death March (aka The Death March of Bataan) was a Japanese war crime involving the forcible transfer of prisoners of war -- with wide-ranging abuse and high fatalities -- by Japanese forces in the Philippines in 1942. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...


Education

Taguba graduated from Leilehua High School in Wahiawa, Hawaii Class of 1968. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Idaho State University in 1972[4], and graduated from the Armor Officer Basic and Advanced Course, the Army Command and General Staff College, the College of Naval Command and Staff, and the Army War College. Leilehua High School Leilehua High School is a public, co-educational, college preparatory high school in central Oahu, Hawaii. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... History studies time in human terms. ... Idaho State University (ISU) is a public university operated by the U.S. state of Idaho. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Command and General Staff College (C&GSC) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas is a United States Army facility that functions as a graduate school for U.S. military leaders. ... The Naval War College. ... The United States Army War College is a U. S. Army school located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, specifically in the historic Carlisle Barracks. ...


He has received three master's degrees; for public administration at Webster University, for international relations from Salve Regina College, and for national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Public administration can be broadly described as the study and implementation of policy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Ochre Court, Salves administrative building Salve Regina University is a university in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Security measures taken to protect the Houses of Parliament in London, England. ... The Naval War College. ...


Military career

Taguba became a 2nd lieutenant in 1972[5].


In South Korea Taguba served in the 1st Battalion, 72d Armor, 2d Infantry Division, Eighth Army. Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... The 2nd Infantry Division (Heavy) is a formation of the United States Army. ... The Eighth US Army—often abbreviated EUSA—(the acronym EUSA was deemed unauthorized by LTG Charles Campbell in 2002) is the commanding formation of all US Army troops in South Korea. ...


At Fort Sill, Oklahoma, USA, he commanded the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, Staff and Faculty Battalion, Field Artillery School/Center. Fort Sill is a base of the United States Army near Lawton, Oklahoma, about 85 miles southwest of Oklahoma City. ... The United States Army Field Artillery School (USAFAS) trains field artillery soldiers and Marines in tactics, techniques, and procedures for the employment of fire support systems in support of the maneuver commander. ...


Taguba worked for three years in Germany, and commanded a tank company of a mechanized infantry division at Mainz, Company B, 4th Battalion, 69th Armor Division. Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Standard NATO code for a friendly infantry company. ...


Back in Korea he commanded the 1st Battalion, 72d Armor, 2d Infantry Division at Camp Casey; and was the executive officer of the Republic of Korea-U.S. Combined Forces Command in Yongsan. Camp Casey, Korea Located in Dongducheon (also Tongduchon), Republic of Korea, Camp Casey (named in 1952 after Major Hugh B. Casey) is one of several US Army bases in South Korea near the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). ... While Executive officer literally refers to a person responsible for the performance of duties involved in running an organization, the exact meaning of the role is highly variable, depending on the organization. ... Yongsan is a district of Seoul, South Korea. ...


At the Pentagon he served as a Material System Analyst, Office of the Chief of Staff, Army. This article is about the United States military building. ... Look up material in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


At Fort Hood, Texas, USA, he commanded the "St. Lo", 2d Brigade, 2d Armored Division. When the division was reflagged to the 4th Infantry Division, Colonel Taguba then became the commander of the "Warhorse", 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division from June 1995 until he relinguished command in June 1997.[6] Fort Hood, named after Confederate General John Bell Hood, is a U.S. Army post located halfway between Austin and Waco within the U.S. state of Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the United States Army 2nd Armored Division, Hell on Wheels. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... It has been suggested that U.S. 1st Brigade 4th Infantry Division be merged into this article or section. ...


At Fort McPherson, Georgia, USA, he was the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army reserve Command. Fort McPherson is a U.S. Army base located in southwest Atlanta, Georgia. ...


At Fort Jackson, South Carolina, USA, he was the Assistant Division Commander-Forward, 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized) and Deputy Commanding General (South), First U.S. Army. Fort Jackson is a United States Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) base located in South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... The 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized)—also known as the Victory Division—was an infantry division of the United States Army with base of operations at Fort Riley, Kansas originally organized out of the old Hawaiian Division. ... Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the U.S. First Army. ...


In Alexandria, Virginia, USA, he was promoted to brigadier general, and commanded the United States Army Community and Family Support Center. Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Founded 1718 Government  - Mayor William D. Euille Area  - City  15. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ...


Major General Taguba served for ten months as the Deputy Commanding General for Support, Third U.S. Army, U.S. Army Forces Central Command, Coalition Forces Land Component Command (CFLCC), based in Kuwait. Prior to this assignment, he served as the Acting Director of the Army Staff, Headquarters, Department of the Army, The Pentagon under Gen. Eric K. Shinseki.[7]. Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the U.S. Third Army. ... Coalition Forces Land Component Command As of July 2005, Headquarters, Third U.S. Army, is acting as the Coalition Forces Land Component Command under the U.S. CENTCOM. ... Eric K. Shinseki General Eric Ken Shinseki (エリック・シンセキ) was the 34th Chief of Staff of the United States Army, and retired from the post in 2003. ...


In 2004 Taguba was assigned to report on prisoner abuse in the Abu Ghraib military prison in Iraq. In May of that year he published an extremely critical report that was leaked to the public. [8] See Abu Ghraib prison and Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse. ...


Later that May Major General Taguba was reassigned to the Pentagon to serve as deputy assistant secretary of defense for readiness, training and mobilization in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs[7]. Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Look up pentagon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In January of 2006, Taguba was instructed by General Richard A. Cody, the Army’s Vice-Chief of Staff, to retire by January of 2007. No explanation was given[8]. Taguba's retirement, effective January 1, 2007 ended a 34 year career of military service[5]. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... GEN Richard A. Cody General Richard A. Cody became the 31st Vice Chief of Staff, United States Army, on June 24, 2004. ...


Decorations

This article concerns Distinguished Service Medals which are issued by the United States of America. ... The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. ... Bronze and Silver oak leaf clusters An Oak leaf cluster is a common device which is placed on military awards and decorations to denote those who have received more than one bestowal of a particular decoration. ... The Meritorious Service Medal is a military award presented to members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguished themselves by outstanding non-combat meritorious achievement or service to the United States subsequent to January 16, 1969. ... The Commendation Medal is a mid-level United States military award which is presented for sustained acts of heroism or meritorious service. ... The Achievement Medal is the lowest of the United States military’s non-combat meritorious service medals. ... The Army Staff Identification Badge is a decoration of the United States Army and is awarded to those personnel who serve for one year as a member of the Army General Staff. ...

References

  1. ^ General officer biographies index. United States Army center of military history. United States Army (2006-11-06). Retrieved on 2007-09-23.
  2. ^ a b Sullivan, Laura; David Greene (2004-05-08). Fil-Am general praised for report. The Baltimore Sun. ABS-CBN news. Archived from the original on 2004-11-24. Retrieved on 2006-09-10.
  3. ^ Eljera, Bert (1997-08-01). Army appoints its second Fil-Am general. AsianWeek. Pan Asia Venture Capital Corporation. Retrieved on 2006-09-10.
  4. ^ Major General Antonio M. Taguba. United States Army (2003-12-10). Archived from the original on 2004-06-11. Retrieved on 2006-09-10.
  5. ^ a b General who authored Abu Ghraib report retires. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  6. ^ Commanders past and present. United States Army. Retrieved on 2006-09-10.
  7. ^ a b Douglas Jehl. "Head of Inquiry On Iraq Abuses Now in Spotlight", New York Times, 2004-05-11. 
  8. ^ a b Hersh, Seymour (June 25, 2007). The General’s Report. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
US Army 15-6 Report of Abuse of Prisoners in Iraq
  • Taguba is called a straight arrow - Baltimore Sun
  • U.S. Army report on Iraqi prisoner abuse - Executive summary of Article 15-6 investigation of the 800th Military Police Brigade by Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba
  • Taguba Report on Wikisource
  • The General’s Report: How Antonio Taguba, who investigated the Abu Ghraib scandal, became one of its casualties - by Seymour Hersh published in The New Yorker.
  • General Says Prison Inquiry Led to His Forced Retirement
  • Taguba's Revenge
  • Taguba calls troops "sorry soldiers"

  Results from FactBites:
 
Muslim American Society (1147 words)
Antonio Taguba testify on abuses of Iraq prisoners with other Defense personnel present, including civilian administration official Under Secretary of Defense Stephen Cambone.
Antonio Taguba testified at a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee, reports Agence France-Presse (AFP).
Taguba had submitted his findings to the Pentagon in January, reporting that soldiers photographed naked male and female prisoners, jumped on naked inmates' feet and forced prisoners into sexually explicit positions.
Antonio Taguba - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (544 words)
Major General Antonio M. Taguba (born October 31, 1950), became known worldwide when a classified report he wrote about cases of torture at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq was published in 2004.
Taguba is only the second Filipino American to attain the rank of U.S. Army General.
Colonel Taguba was the commander of the "Warhorse", the 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division from June 1995 until he relinguished command in June 1997.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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