FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Anton Webern
Anton Webern

Anton Webern in Stettin, October 1912
Background information
Birth name Anton Webern
Born December 3, 1883
Origin Vienna, Austria Flag of Austria
Died September 15, 1945 (aged 61)
Occupation(s) Composer

Anton Webern (December 3, 1883September 15, 1945) was an Austrian composer and conductor. He was a member of the so called Second Viennese School. As a student and significant follower of Arnold Schoenberg, he became one of the best-known proponents of the twelve-tone technique; in addition, his innovations regarding schematic organization of pitch, rhythm and dynamics were formative in the musical style later known as serialism. Image File history File links Anton_Webern_in_Stettin,_October_1912. ... Motto: none Voivodship West Pomeranian Municipal government Rada miasta Szczecina Mayor Marian Jurczyk Area 301,3 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 413 600 1372/km² Founded City rights 8th century 1243 Latitude Longitude 14°34E 53°26N Area code +48 91 Car plates ZS Twin towns Berlin-Kreuzberg... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... “Wien” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... The Second Viennese School was a group of composers made up of Arnold Schoenberg and those who studied under him in early 20th century Vienna. ... Schoenberg redirects here. ... Twelve-tone technique (also dodecaphony) is a method of musical composition devised by Arnold Schoenberg. ... Serialism is a technique for composing music that uses sets to describe musical elements, and allows the composer manipulations of those sets to create music. ...

Contents

Biography

Webern was born in Vienna, Austria, as Anton Friedrich Wilhelm von Webern. He never used his middle names and dropped the von in 1918 as directed by the Austrian government's reforms after World War I. After spending much of his youth in Graz and Klagenfurt, Webern attended Vienna University from 1902. There he studied musicology with Guido Adler, writing his thesis on the Choralis Constantinus of Heinrich Isaac. This interest in early music would greatly influence his compositional technique in later years by employing palindromic form on both the micro- and macro-scale and the economic use of musical materials. “Wien” redirects here. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Grazer Schloßberg Clock Tower Graz [graːts] (Slovenian: Gradec IPA: /gra. ... Klagenfurt (Slovenian: Celovec), since July 3, 2007 Klagenfurt am Wörthersee (Slovenian: Celovec ob vrbskem jezeru) is the capital of the federal state of Carinthia (German Kärnten), in Austria. ... The University of Vienna (German: Universität Wien) was founded in 1365 by Rudolph IV and hence named Alma mater Rudolphina. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Musicology is reasoned discourse concerning music (Greek: μουσικη = music and λογος = word or reason). In other words: the whole body of systematized knowledge about music which results from the application of a scientific method of investigation or research, or of philosophical speculation and rational systematization to the facts, the processes and the... Guido Adler (November 1, 1855, Eibenschütz(Ivančice), Moravia - February 15, 1941, Vienna) was the Austrian musicologist, writer on music. ... Heinrich Isaac (also Henricus, Arrigo dUgo, and Arrigo il Tedesco) (around 1450 – March 26, 1517) was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. ... A palindrome is a word, phrase, number or any other sequence of units (like a strand of DNA) which has the property of reading the same in either direction (the adjustment of spaces between letters is generally permitted). ...


He studied composition under Arnold Schoenberg, writing his Passacaglia, Op. 1 as his graduation piece in 1908. He met Alban Berg, who was also a pupil of Schoenberg's, and these two relationships would be the most important in his life in shaping his own musical direction. After graduating, he took a series of conducting posts at theatres in Ischl, Teplitz, Danzig, Stettin, and Prague before moving back to Vienna. There he helped run Schoenberg's Society for Private Musical Performances from 1918 through 1922 and conducted the "Vienna Workers Symphony Orchestra" from 1922 to 1934. Schoenberg redirects here. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Portrait of Alban Berg by Arnold Schoenberg, c. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Kaiservilla Bad Ischl Bad Ischl is a town in Austria. ... Teplice (German: Teplitz) is a city of the Czech Republic, in the Usti nad Labem Region of Bohemia. ... For alternative meanings of Gdańsk and Danzig, see Gdansk (disambiguation) and Danzig (disambiguation) Motto: Nec temere, nec timide (Neither rashly nor timidly) Voivodship Pomeranian Municipal government Rada miasta Gdańska Mayor Paweł Adamowicz Area 262 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 461 400 (2003) Ranked 6th 1... Motto: none Voivodship West Pomeranian Municipal government Rada miasta Szczecina Mayor Marian Jurczyk Area 301,3 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 413 600 1372/km² Founded City rights 8th century 1243 Latitude Longitude 14°34E 53°26N Area code +48 91 Car plates ZS Twin towns Berlin-Kreuzberg... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... The Society for Private Musical Performances (in German, the Verein für musikalische Privataufführungen) was an organisation founded in Vienna in the Autumn of 1918 by Arnold Schoenberg with the intention of making carefully rehearsed and comprehensible performances of modern music available to genuinely interested members of the musical... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Webern's music was denounced as "cultural Bolshevism" and "degenerate art" by the Nazi Party in Germany, even before they seized power in Austria in 1938 (Moldenhauer and Moldenhauer 1978, 473–75, 478, 491, 498–99). Although Webern had sharply attacked Nazi cultural policies in private lectures given in 1933, their intended publication did not take place at that time, which proved fortunate since this later "would have exposed Webern to serious consequences" (Webern 1963, 7, 19–20). During the war, however, his patriotic fervor led him to endorse the regime in a series of letters to Joseph Hueber, where he described Hitler on 2 May 1940 as "this unique man" who created "the new state" of Germany (Moldenhauer and Moldenhauer 1978, 527). As a result of official disapproval, he found it harder (though at no stage impossible) to earn a living, and had to take on work as an editor and proofreader for his publishers, Universal Edition. He left Vienna near the end of the war, and moved to Mittersill in Salzburg, believing he would be safer there. On September 15, during the Allied occupation of Austria, he was accidentally shot dead by an American Army soldier following the arrest of his son-in-law for black market activities, when, despite the curfew in effect, he stepped outside the house to enjoy a cigar without disturbing his sleeping grandchildren. The Nazi Party (German: , or NSDAP, English: National Socialist German Workers Party), was a far-right, racist political party in Germany between 1920 and 1945. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Universal Edition (UE) are a classical music publishing firm. ... Mittersill is a market town in the federal state of Salzburg, Austria, in the Pinzgau region. ... Salzburg is a state or Land of Austria with an area of 7,154 km², located adjacent to the German border. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into underground economy. ...


Webern's music

Music sample:
  • "Sehr langsam" ( file info) — play in browser (beta)
    • Sample of "Sehr langsam" from String Trio Op. 20, an example of the subclass of Serialism which is twelve tone technique.
    • Problems listening to the file? See media help.
Doomed to total failure in a deaf world of ignorance and indifference, he inexorably kept on cutting out his diamonds, his dazzling diamonds, of whose mines he had a perfect knowledge.Igor Stravinsky

Webern was not a prolific composer; just thirty-one of his compositions were published in his lifetime, and when Pierre Boulez oversaw a project to record all of his compositions, including those without opus numbers, the results fit on just six CDs.[1] However, his influence on later composers, and particularly on the post-war avant garde, was immense. His mature works, using Arnold Schoenberg's twelve tone technique, have a textural clarity and emotional coolness which greatly influenced composers such as Pierre Boulez, Luigi Nono and Karlheinz Stockhausen. Image File history File links Webern_-_Sehr_langsam. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ... Serialism is a technique for composing music that uses sets to describe musical elements, and allows the composer manipulations of those sets to create music. ... Twelve-tone technique is a system of musical composition devised by Arnold Schoenberg. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... Pierre Boulez Pierre Boulez (IPA: /pjɛʁ.buˈlɛz/) (born March 26, 1925) is a conductor and composer of classical music. ... Schoenberg redirects here. ... Twelve-tone technique is a system of musical composition devised by Arnold Schoenberg. ... Pierre Boulez Pierre Boulez (IPA: /pjɛʁ.buˈlɛz/) (born March 26, 1925) is a conductor and composer of classical music. ... Grave of Nono in the San Michele Cemetery, Venice Luigi Nono (born January 29, 1924 in Venice; died May 8, 1990 in Venice) was an Italian composer of classical music and intellectual, one of the most important composers of the 20th century. ... Karlheinz Stockhausen (born August 22, 1928) is a German composer, and one of the most important and controversial composers of the 20th century. ...


Like almost every composer who had a career of any length, Webern's music changed over time. However, it is typified by very spartan textures, in which every note can be clearly heard; carefully chosen timbres, often resulting in very detailed instructions to the performers and use of extended instrumental techniques (flutter tonguing, col legno, and so on); wide-ranging melodic lines, often with leaps greater than an octave; and brevity: the Six Bagatelles for string quartet (1913), for instance, last about three minutes in total. In music, timbre, also timber (from Fr. ... Flutter tonguing is a wind instrument tonguing technique in which performers flutter their tongue to make a characteristic FrrrrFrrrrr sound. ... Col legno (Italian for with the wood) is a method of playing bowed string instruments (particularly the violin, viola, cello, and double bass) whereby the strings are struck with the wood of the bow rather having the hair pulled across them. ...


Webern's earliest works are in a late Romantic style. They were neither published nor performed in his lifetime, though they are sometimes performed today. They include the orchestral tone poem Im Sommerwind (1904) and the Langsamer Satz (1905) for string quartet. The era of Romantic music is defined as the period of European classical music that runs roughly from the early 1800s to the first decade of the 20th century, as well as music written according to the norms and styles of that period. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A symphonic poem or tone poem is a piece of orchestral music in one movement in which some extra-musical programme provides a narrative or illustrative element. ... The resident string quartet of the Library of Congress in 1963 A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string instruments—usually two violins, a viola and cello—or a piece written to be performed by such a group. ...

Anton Webern in his studio, Mödling, Summer 1930

Webern's first piece after completing his studies with Schoenberg was the Passacaglia for orchestra (1908). Harmonically speaking, it is a step forward into a more advanced language, and the orchestration is somewhat more distinctive than his earlier orchestral work. However, it bears little relation to the fully mature works he is best known for today. One element that is typical is the form itself: the passacaglia is a form which dates back to the 17th century, and a distinguishing feature of Webern's later work was to be the use of traditional compositional techniques (especially canons) and forms (the Symphony, the Concerto, the String Trio and String Quartet, and the piano and orchestral Variations) in a modern harmonic and melodic language. Image File history File links Anton_Webern_Modling_Summer_1930. ... Image File history File links Anton_Webern_Modling_Summer_1930. ... Mödling is a municipality in and the capital of the eponymous Austrian district (Bezirk) and located at , , approximately 15 km south of the centre of Vienna. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Orchestration is the study or practice of writing music for orchestra (or, more loosely, for any musical ensemble) or of adapting for orchestra music composed for another medium. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... In music, a canon is a contrapuntal composition that employs a melody with one or more imitations of the melody played after a given duration (e. ...


For a number of years, Webern wrote pieces which were freely atonal, much in the style of Schoenberg's early atonal works. With the Drei Geistliche Volkslieder (1925) he used Schoenberg's twelve tone technique for the first time, and all his subsequent works used this technique. The String Trio (1927) was both the first purely instrumental work using the twelve tone technique (the other pieces were songs) and the first cast in a traditional musical form. Atonality describes music not conforming to the system of tonal hierarchies, which characterizes the sound of classical European music between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. ... Twelve-tone technique is a system of musical composition devised by Arnold Schoenberg. ... A song is a relatively short musical composition. ...


Webern's tone rows are often arranged to take advantage of internal symmetries; for example, a twelve-tone row may be divisible into four groups of three pitches which are variations, such as inversions and retrogrades, of each other, thus creating invariance. This gives Webern's work considerable motivic unity, although this is often obscured by the fragmentation of the melodic lines. This fragmentation occurs through octave displacement (using intervals greater than an octave) and by moving the line rapidly from instrument to instrument (sometimes, and somewhat erroneously, called Klangfarbenmelodie). In music, a tone row or note row is a permutation, an arrangement or ordering, of the twelve notes of the chromatic scale. ... In music using the twelve tone technique invariance describes the portions of rows which have been so designed that they remain invariant under the allowable transformations (inversion, retrograde, retrograde-inversion, multiplication). ... Klangfarbenmelodie (German for sound-color-melody) is a musical technique that involves breaking up a musical line or melody out from one instrument to between several instruments. ...


Webern's last pieces seem to indicate another development in style. The two late Cantatas, for example, use larger ensembles than earlier pieces, last longer (No. 1 around nine minutes; No. 2 around sixteen), and are texturally somewhat denser. A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who gather to perform music. ...


List of works

Works with opus numbers

The works with opus numbers are the ones that Webern saw fit to have published in his own lifetime, plus a few late works published after his death. They constitute the main body of his work, although several pieces of juvenalia and a few mature pieces that do not have opus numbers are occasionally performed today.

  • Passacaglia, for orchestra, opus 1 (1908)
  • Entflieht auf Leichten Kähnen, for a cappella choir on a text by Stefan George, opus 2 (1908)
  • Five Lieder on Der Siebente Ring, for voice and piano, opus 3 (1907-08)
  • Five Lieder after Stefan George, for voice and piano, opus 4 (1908-09)
  • Five Movements for string quartet, opus 5 (1909)
  • Six Pieces for large orchestra, opus 6 (1909-10, revised 1928)
  • Four Pieces for violin and piano, opus 7 (1910)
  • Two Lieder, on texts by Rainer Maria Rilke, for voice and piano, opus 8 (1910)
  • Six Bagatelles for string quartet, opus 9 (1913)
  • Five Pieces for orchestra, opus 10 (1911-13)
  • Three Little Pieces for cello and piano, opus 11, (1914)
  • Four Lieder, for voice and piano, opus 12 (1915-17)
  • Four Lieder, for voice and orchestra, opus 13 (1914-18)
  • Six Lieder for voice, clarinet, bass clarinet, violin and cello, opus 14 (1917-21)
  • Five Sacred Songs, for voice and small ensemble, opus 15 (1917-22)
  • Five Canons on Latin texts, for high soprano, clarinet and bass clarinet, opus 16 (1923-24)
  • Three Traditional Rhymes, for voice, violin (doubling viola), clarinet and bass clarinet, opus 17 (1924)
  • Three Lieder, for voice, E flat clarinet and guitar, opus 18 (1925)
  • Two Lieder, for mixed choir, celesta, guitar, violin, clarinet and bass clarinet, opus 19 (1926)
  • String Trio, opus 20 (1927)
  • Symphony, opus 21 (1928)
  • Quartet for violin, clarinet, tenor saxophone and piano, opus 22 (1930)
  • Three Songs on Hildegard Jone's Viae inviae, for voice and piano, opus 23 (1934)
  • Concerto for flute, oboe, clarinet, horn, trumpet, violin, viola and piano, opus 24 (1934)
  • Three Lieder on texts by Hildegard Jone, for voice and piano, opus 25 (1934-35)
  • Das Augenlicht, for mixed choir and orchestra, on a text by Hildegard Jone, opus 26 (1935)
  • Variations, for solo piano, opus 27 (1936) - sound sample of the opening bars (ogg format, 19 seconds, 85 KB)
  • String Quartet, opus 28 (1937-38) - the tone row of this piece is based around the BACH motif
  • Cantata No. 1, for soprano, mixed choir and orchestra, opus 29 (1938-39)
  • Variations, for orchestra, opus 30 (1940)
  • Cantata No. 2, for soprano, bass, choir and orchestra, opus 31 (1941-43)

In music a passacaglia (French: passacaille, Spanish: pasacalle, German: passacalia; Italian: passacaglio, passagallo, passacagli, passacaglie) is a musical form and the corresponding court dance. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A cappella music is vocal music or singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stefan George (1910) Stefan George (Bingen, Hesse, July 12, 1868 – Locarno, December 4, 1933) was a German poet and translator. ... Lied (plural Lieder) is a German word, literally meaning song; among English speakers, however, it is used primarily as a term for European classical music songs, also known as art songs. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... The resident string quartet of the Library of Congress in 1963 A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string instruments—usually two violins, a viola and cello—or a piece written to be performed by such a group. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... Rainer Maria Rilke (4 December 1875 – 29 December 1926) is considered one of the German languages greatest 20th century poets. ... A bagatelle is a short piece of music, typically for the piano, and usually of a light, mellow character. ... The violoncello, usually abbreviated to cello, or cello (the c is pronounced as in the ch of check), is a bowed stringed instrument, the lowest-sounding member of the violin family. ... Two soprano clarinets: a B♭ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... The bass clarinet is a musical instrument of the clarinet family. ... In music, a canon is a contrapuntal composition that employs a melody with one or more imitations of the melody played after a given duration (e. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Look up soprano in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The viola (French, alto; German Bratsche) is a bowed string instrument. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... French type, four-octave Celesta The Celesta (IPA ) is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard. ... A string trio is a group of three string instruments or a piece written for such a group. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A quartet is a group of four identical or similar objects, or a grouping of four persons for a common purpose. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family, usually made of brass and played with a single-reed mouthpiece like the clarinet. ... The term concerto (plural is concerti or concertos) usually refers to a musical work in which one solo instrument is accompanied by an orchestra. ... The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The horn (popularly known also as the French horn) is a brass instrument decended from the natural horn that consists of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the French horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium, and tuba. ... Ogg is an open standard for a free container format for digital multimedia, unrestricted by software patents and designed for efficient streaming and manipulation. ... The String Quartet by Anton Webern is written for the standard string quartet group of two violins, viola and cello. ... In music, a tone row or note row is a permutation, an arrangement or ordering, of the twelve notes of the chromatic scale. ... The BACH motif. ... A cantata (Italian, sung) is a vocal composition with an instrumental accompaniment and generally containing more than one movement. ... Look up soprano in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up soprano in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A basso (or bass) is a male singer who sings in the lowest vocal range of the human voice. ...

Works without opus numbers

  • Two Pieces for cello and piano (1899)
  • Three Poems, for voice and piano (1899-1902)
  • Eight Early Songs, for voice and piano (1901-1903)
  • Three Songs, after Ferdinand Avenarius (1903-1904)
  • Im Sommerwind, idyl for large orchestra after a poem by Bruno Wille (1904)
  • Slow Movement for string quartet (1905)
  • String Quartet (1905)
  • Piece for piano (1906)
  • Rondo for piano (1906)
  • Rondo for string quartet (1906)
  • Five Songs, after Richar Dehmel (1906-1908)
  • Piano Quintet (1907)
  • Four Songs, after Stefan George (1908-1909)
  • Five Pieces for orchestra (1913)
  • Three Songs, for voice and orchestra (1913-1914)
  • Cello Sonata (1914)
  • Piece for children, for piano (1924)
  • Piece for piano, in the tempo of a minuet (1925)
  • Piece for string trio (1925)
  • Deutsche Tänze (German Dances) by Schubert (1824), orchestrated by Webern (1932)

References

  1. ^ Complete Webern Edition, Deutsche Grammophon. 6CD set 457 637-2.

Logo Deutsche Grammophon is a German record label. ...

Bibliography

  • Bailey, Kathryn. 1991. The Twelve-Note Music of Anton Webern: Old Forms in a New Language. Music in the Twentieth Century 2. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521390885 (cloth) ISBN 0521547962 (pbk. ed., 2006)
  • Bailey, Kathryn (ed.). 1996. Webern Studies. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521475260
  • Bailey, Kathryn. 1998. The Life of Webern Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 052157336X (cloth) ISBN 0521575664 (pbk)
  • Ewen, David. 1971. "Anton Webern (1883-1945)," in Composers of Tomorrow's Music, 66-77. New York: Dodd, Mead & Co. ISBN 0-396-06286-5
  • Forte, Allen. 1998. The Atonal Music of Anton Webern New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300073526
  • Hayes, Malcolm. 1995. Anton von Webern. London: Phaidon Press. ISBN 0714831573
  • Mead, Andrew. 1993. "Webern, Tradition, and 'Composing with Twelve Tones'", Music Theory Spectrum 15:173–204.
  • Moldenhauer, Hans. 1961. The Death of Anton Webern: A Drama in Documents New York: Philosophical Library. OCLC 512111
  • Moldenhauer, Hans. 1966. Anton von Webern Perspectives. Edited by Demar Irvine, with an introductory interview with Igor Stravinsky. Seattle: University of Washington Press.
  • Moldenhauer, Hans, and Rosaleen Moldenhauer. 1978. Anton von Webern: A Chronicle of His Life and Work. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. ISBN 0-394-47237-3 London: Gollancz. ISBN 0575024364
  • Noller, Joachim. 1990. "Bedeutungsstrukturen: zu Anton Weberns 'alpinen' Programmen." Neue Zeitschrift für Musik151, no. 9 (September): 12–18.
  • Perle, George. 1991. Serial Composition and Atonality: an Introduction to the Music of Schoenberg, Berg and Webern. Sixth ed. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  • Webern, Anton. 1963. The Path to the New Music. Edited by Willi Reich. [Translated by Leo Black.] Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania: Theodore Presser Co., in Association with Universal Edition. Reprinted London: Universal Edition, 1975. (Translation of Wege zur neuen Musik. Vienna: Universal Edition, 1960.)
  • Wildgans, Friedrich. 1966. Anton Webern. Translated by Edith Temple Roberts and Humphrey Searle. Introduction and notes by Humphrey Searle. New York: October House.

Further reading

  • Tsang, Lee (2002). "The Atonal Music of Anton Webern (1998) by Allen Forte". Music Analysis, 21/iii (October), 417-27.

Software

is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...

See also

This is a list of Austrian composers, singers and conductors: Johann Georg Albrechtsberger, composer and music theorist August Wilhelm Ambros, composer (19th century) Wolfgang Ambros, singer (Austropop) Christian Anders, singer Marianne von Auenbrugger, composer and pianist 1759-1782 Paul Badura-Skoda, pianist (born 1927) Ludwig van Beethoven, composer (born in... The following list is a selection of famous Austrians. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m