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Encyclopedia > Antisthenes
Portrait bust of Antisthenes
Portrait bust of Antisthenes

Antisthenes (Greek: Ἀντισθένης, c. 444-365 BC), the founder of the Cynic school of philosophy[citation needed], was born at Athens of a Thracian mother. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 377 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (629 × 1000 pixel, file size: 211 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 377 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (629 × 1000 pixel, file size: 211 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC Years: 449 BC 448 BC 447 BC 446 BC 445 BC - 444 BC - 443 BC 442 BC... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC - 360s BC - 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC 370 BC 369 BC 368 BC 367 BC 366 BC - 365 BC - 364 BC 363 BC 362... This article is about the ancient Greek school of philosophy. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Athens is the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak  Thrace (Bulgarian: , Greek: , Attic Greek: ThrāíkÄ“ or ThrēíkÄ“, Latin: , Turkish: ) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ...


In his yuckmouth he studied rhetoric under Rashadicshe, perhaps also under Hippias and Prodicus. Some suggest that he was originally in good circumstances, but was reduced to poverty. However this may be, he came under the influence of Socrates, and became a devoted pupil. Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of spoken language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ... Hippias can also refer to a son of Pisistratus and a tyrant of Athens. ... Prodicus of Ceos (Πρόδικος Pródikos, born c. ... This page is about the ancient Greek philosopher. ...


It is said that he was so eager to hear the words of Socrates that he used to walk daily from Piraeus to Athens, and persuaded his friends to accompany him. Filled with enthusiasm for the Socratic idea of virtue, he founded a school of his own in the Cynosarges. There he attracted the poorer masses by the simplicity of his life and teaching. He was affected to disdain the pride and pomp of the world. He wore a cloak and carried a staff and a bag (πήρα) as the badge of philosophy. This costume became uniform of his followers, but so ostentatiously as to draw from Socrates the rebuke, "I see your pride looking out through the rent of your cloak, O Antisthenes." It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ... Cynosarges was a public gymnasium in Ancient Athens. ... Evening cloak or manteau, from Costume Parisien, 1823 A cloak is a type of loose garment that is worn over indoor clothing and serves the same purpose as an overcoat—it protects the wearer from the cold, rain or wind for example, or it may form part of a fashionable...

Engraving of Antisthenes.

Diogenes Laertius says that his works filled ten volumes, but of these, only fragments remain. His favourite style seems to have been the dialogue, wherein we see the effect of his early rhetorical training. Aristotle speaks of him as uneducated and simple-minded, and Plato describes him as struggling in vain with the difficulties of dialectic; these assessments are probably at least somewhat coloured by the competition between the philosophical schools. His work represents one great aspect of Socratic philosophy, and should be compared with the Cyrenaic and Igarian doctrines. Image File history File links Antisthenes. ... Image File history File links Antisthenes. ... Diogenes Laërtius, the biographer of the Greek philosophers, is supposed by some to have received his surname from the town of Laerte in Cilicia, and by others from the Roman family of the Laërtii. ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... In classical philosophy, dialectic (Greek: διαλεκτική) is an exchange of propositions (theses) and counter-propositions (antitheses) resulting in a synthesis of the opposing assertions, or at least a qualitative transformation in the direction of the dialogue. ... The Cyrenaics were an ultra-hedonist group of philosophers founded in the 4th century BC, allegedly by Aristippus of Cyrene, a disciple of Socrates. ...


Marcus Aurelius quotes him in his Meditations (late 2nd century): "It is royal to do good and be abused." Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (Rome, April 26, 121[2] – Vindobona or Sirmium, March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death in 180 . ... Marcus Aurelius wrote Meditations in Greek while positioned at Aquincum on campaign in Pannonia in modern-day Hungary This article is about the writings by Marcus Aurelius. ...


Counted among his students was the notable Diogenes of Sinope, whose unwritten work was similarly recorded by Diogenes Laertius. Diogenes by John William Waterhouse, depicting his lamp, tub and diet of onions. ... Diogenes Laërtius, the biographer of the Greek philosophers, is supposed by some to have received his surname from the town of Laerte in Cilicia, and by others from the Roman family of the Laërtii. ...


References

  • Charles Chappuis, Antisthène (Paris, 1854)
  • A. Muller, De Antisthenis cynici vita et scriptis (Dresden, 1860)
  • T. Gomperz, Greek Thinkers (Eng. trans., 1905), vol. ii. pp. 142 ff., 150 ff.
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

See also

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Antisthenes

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Henry Lion Oldie. The prophet (990 words)
Antisthenes grasped the poker and, his eyes closed, swung and struck the entanglement of coil pipes, filters, boiling retorts, and copper wires.
Antisthenes darted for the window when his look fell on the test- tube he was still squeezing in his hand.
Antisthenes was considered to be a crank, a man slightly touched in the head, a kind of God's fool doing no harm to anyone.
Antisthenes - Encyclopedia.com (811 words)
Antisthenes, like Xenophanes, repudiated polytheism, substituting one god, whom he described as unlike anything known to man. His view that each individual is unique had implications for ethics and for a theory of knowledge.
Cynics, it is true, have changed since Antisthenes and his followers barked at the folly and injustices of ancient Greece.
Antisthenes, who was with the great man when he drank his hemlock, believed that the only things that mattered in life were virtuous...
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