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Encyclopedia > Antibes

Commune of Antibes

Antibes Juan-les-Pins
Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ...

Location
Coordinates 43° 34' 51" N 07° 07' 26" E
Administration
Country France
Region Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Department Alpes-Maritimes
Arrondissement Grasse
Canton Chief town of 2 cantons
Intercommunality Communauté d'agglomération de Sophia Antipolis
Mayor Jean Leonetti (UMP)
(2001-2008)
Statistics
Altitude 0 m–163 m
(avg. 9 m)
Land area¹ 26.48 km²
Population²
(1999)
72,412
 - Density 2,734.6/km² (1999)
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 06004/ 06600
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France

Antibes (Provençal Occitan: Antíbol in classical norm or Antibo in Mistralian norm) is a resort town of southeastern France, on the Mediterranean Sea in the Côte d'Azur, located between Cannes and Nice. It is c. 20 km by rail southwest of Nice, and is situated on the east side of the Garoupe peninsula. Its inhabitants are called Antibois or Antipolitains. Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (Région flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Alpes-de-Haute-Provence Alpes-Maritimes Bouches-du-Rhône Hautes-Alpes Var Vaucluse Arrondissements 18 Cantons 237 Communes 963 Statistics Land area1 31,400 km² Population (Ranked 3rd)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Alpes_Maritimes is a département in the extreme southeast corner of France. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The arrondissement of Grasse is an arrondissement of France, located in the Alpes-Maritimes département, of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire, UMP), is the main French centre-right political party. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Rio de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Provençal (Provençau) is one of several dialects of Occitan spoken by a minority of people in southern France and other areas of France and Italy. ... Occitan, or langue doc is a Romance language characterized by its richness, variability, and by the intelligibility of its dialects. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... Cannes - receding storm Cannes, as seen from a ferry speeding towards lÃŽle Saint-Honorat Cannes (pronounced ) (Provençal Occitan: Canas in classical norm or Cano in Mistralian norm) is a city and commune in southern France, located on the Riviera, in the Alpes-Maritimes département and the r... Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Alpes-Maritimes (06) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration Nice Côte dAzur Mayor Jacques Peyrat  (UMP) (since 1995) Statistics Land area¹ 71. ... Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Alpes-Maritimes (06) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration Nice Côte dAzur Mayor Jacques Peyrat  (UMP) (since 1995) Statistics Land area¹ 71. ...


It was formerly fortified, but all the ramparts (save the Fort Carré, built by Vauban, and the ramparts along the sea coast) were demolished in the 1860s. A new town then rose outside the former defenses. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Separation barrier. ... See Stade du Fort Carré for the sports stadium. ... Sébastien Le Prestre, Seigneur de Vauban and later Marquis de Vauban (May 15, 1633 - March 30, 1707), commonly referred to as Vauban, was a Marshal of France and the foremost military engineer of his age, famed for his skill in both designing fortifications and in breaking through them. ...


Antibes has the largest yacht marina (by total tonnage) on the Côte d'Azur, built in the 1960s on the site of a Roman harbor. There is still a local fishing industry, much diminished from its size a century ago. It was formerly a site of perfume distilling; the surrounding country once produced an abundance of flowers. Perfume distillation is still carried out on a commercial scale in nearby Grasse. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... Grasse (Provençal Occitan: Grassa in classical norm or Grasso in Mistralian norm) is a town and episcopal see in southeast France, it is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département (of which it is a sous-préfecture), on the French Riviera. ...

Contents

History

Greek Antipolis in prehistory, the area around Antibes was inhabited by the Deciates (Δεκιῆται), a tribe of the Ligurians (Smith, entry on Deciátes; Cosson, pp.20-23). The border with the Ligurian Oxybii (Ὀξύβιοι) being to the west of Antibes and east of Frejus (Smith, entry on Oxybii). The Deciates had a town in the area, oppidum Deciatum but this was not Antibes itself (Pomponius Mela, Chorographia, 2.69) The Deciates (Δεκιῆται) were a Ligurian tribe living in the Antibes area, west of the river Var (Smith, entry on Deciátes; Cosson, pp. ... The Ligures (Ligurians) were an ancient people who gave their name to Liguria, which once stretched from Northern Italy into southern Gaul. ... The Oxybii (Ὀξύβιοι) were a Ligurian tribe living on the Mediterranean coast of France near Massallia. ... Roman ruins, aquaduct Fréjus is a French city, in the Var département. ...


In litoribus aliquot sunt cum aliquis nominibus loca: ceterum rarae urbes quia rari portus, et omnis plaga austro atque africo exposita est. Nicaea tangit Alpes, tangit oppidum Deciatum, tangit Antipolis.


Antibes was the ancient Antipolis (Stabo, Geography 4.1.9). It was founded as a colony of Massallia (Marseilles), in the 6th century BCE, across the bay from Nikea (Nice); the name in Greek means literally "city across" or "city opposite," Anti polis, and is mentioned in the Geography of Strabo. Although no traces of the Greek port remain, wrecks of sunken ships (such as a 6th century BCE Etruscan ship) attest to the importance of this early port. Marseilles redirects here. ... (7th century BC - 6th century BCE - 5th century BCE - other centuries) (600s BCE - 590s BCE - 580s BCE - 570s BCE - 560s BCE - 550s BCE - 540s BCE - 530s BCE - 520s BCE - 510s BCE - 500s BCE - other decades) (2nd millennium BCE - 1st millennium BCE - 1st millennium) The 5th and 6th centuries BCE were... Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Alpes-Maritimes (06) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration Nice Côte dAzur Mayor Jacques Peyrat  (UMP) (since 1995) Statistics Land area¹ 71. ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ...


Polybius (Histories, 33.7) relates that in 155 BCE the Ligurians attacked Massallia, Antipolis and Nikea and in consequence, Massallia appealed to the Romans for help because of a treaty between Massallia and Rome. The resulting defeat of the Deciates and Oxybii also led to greater Roman involvement in the region, culminating in the battle of Aquae Sextiae in 102 BCE and the creation of the Roman province of Narbonensis along the coast from the Alps to the Pyrenees. Polybius (c. ... (Redirected from 155 BCE) Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC - 150s BC - 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC Years: 160 BC 159 BC 158 BC 157 BC 156 BC - 155 BC... Ligurian may mean one of several things: Pertaining to the ancient Ligures Pertaining to modern Liguria Ligurian language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Deciates (Δεκιῆται) were a Ligurian tribe living in the Antibes area, west of the river Var (Smith, entry on Deciátes; Cosson, pp. ... The Oxybii (Ὀξύβιοι) were a Ligurian tribe living on the Mediterranean coast of France near Massallia. ... Combatants Teutones Roman Republic Commanders King Teutobod Gaius Marius Strength over 110,000 about 40,000 (6 legions with cavalry and auxillaries) Casualties 90,000 killed 20,000 captured Insignificant, probably under 1,000 The Battle of Aquae Sextiae (Aix-en-Provence) took place in 102 BC. After a string... (Redirected from 102 BCE) Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 107 BC 106 BC 105 BC 104 BC 103 BC - 102 BC... Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Provence in southern France. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pic de Bugatetin the Néouvielle Natural Reserve Central Pyrenees For the mountains in Victoria, Australia, see Pyrenees (Victoria). ...



Roman Civitas Antipolitana in 43 BCE, Antipolis lost its status as a free Masaliote city and was annexed by the Romans, becoming Civitas Antipolitana. This was later referred to by Strabo (Geography, 4.1.9) Roman or Romans may refer to: A thing or person of or from the city of Rome. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC 40 BC... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ...


although Antipolis is situated in the Narbonnaise, and Nicæa in Italy, this latter is dependent on Marseilles, and forms part of that province; while Antipolis is ranked amongst the Italian cities, and freed from the government of the Marseillese by a judgment given against them.


Administration

Cap d'Antibes
Cap d'Antibes

Antibes is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département (formerly in that of the Var, but transferred after the Alpes-Maritimes department was formed in 1860 out of the county of Nice). It covers a number of distinct areas, including: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ... Alpes_Maritimes is a département in the extreme southeast corner of France. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ...

  • Antibes proper (which includes Vieil Antibes, or Old Town, the medieval village of stone masonry)
  • Port Vauban and the Yacht Club d'Antibes, a huge marina with a separate section devoted to sumptuous mega-yachts
  • Cap d'Antibes (an exclusive residential area containing several magnificent chateaux)
  • Juan-les-Pins (Unlike the Spanish name, the J in Juan is pronounced like the S in treasure)
  • the southern parts of Sophia Antipolis (the northern parts belonging to Biot and Valbonne)

Port Vauban is a French yachting harbor located in Antibes on the French Riviera. ... Juan-les-Pins is a district of Antibes, in southeastern France, on the Côte dAzur. ... Sophia Antipolis is a technology park north-west of Nice, France. ... </gallery> Biot is a French commune in the département of Alpes-Maritimes and the région of Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur. ... Valbonne is a village and commune near Nice, in the Alpes-Maritimes département, in the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of southeastern France. ...

Economic history

Cap d'Antibes
Cap d'Antibes

Malta-brun paid, in 1882, whereas the city was populated only of 6.752 inhabitants, that is to say the tenth of its current population, a mainly agricultural economy: gardens, vines, orchards, initially turned towards the culture of the tobacco, but also of the olive-tree, the mulberry tree (for silk), of the orange tree and the flowers and plants odoriferous. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1224 pixel, file size: 282 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1224 pixel, file size: 282 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


It brought back moreover commercial activities of wood, salted draperies, fish, wines, perfumery, olive oils, oranges, fishings, citrons, figs, nectarines and grains. Look up Commercial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


It quoted some rare industrial activities: mills with oil, gasoline distillings of flowers, factories of vermiculation and pastes of Italy, potteries, saltings, articles of navy. “Petrol” redirects here. ...


Concerning the harbour, Malta-Brun activity said that the port received 50 to 60 ships annually, and that its coastal traffic was 150 to 200 ships measuring 7.000 to 8.500 barrels. For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For online phenomenon of shipping, see Shipping (fandom). ...


Tourism

The major attractions of Antibes are its history, climate, art, beaches and yachting. The sand beaches of Antibes are all manmade; the natural beaches are gravel (shingle in British English); in summer, these beaches are maintained using large tractors towing a device which scoops-up, sieves, spreads, and rakes the sand. Antibes' beaches east of Fort Carré (that is, going toward Nice) are still the original rough materials. For other uses, see Beach (disambiguation). ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


Cap d'Antibes

Cap d'Antibes
Cap d'Antibes

The southern peninsula of Antibes is known as Cap d'Antibes. A bastion of wealth and exclusivity, it was the setting for F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night. The Hotel du Cap, called Hôtel des Étrangers in the novel, is still one of the most expensive and exclusive hotels in the world. Until 2006, the Hotel du Cap and its Eden Roc restaurant and "beach" club did not even accept credit cards—out of sheer snootiness! Although on a seaside site, the Eden Roc does not have an actual beach; there is a salt water swimming pool with a paved concrete patio for tanning and facilities (a pier, two floats, and a diving board) at the base of their stone ledge cliff for swimming in the sea, but nothing remotely resembling an actual beach. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x671, 120 KB) Summary Photograph of the marina at Antibes, France at dusk, showing a wide variety of different craft - from a tiny water taxi to small sailing craft to a massive, private luxury yacht. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x671, 120 KB) Summary Photograph of the marina at Antibes, France at dusk, showing a wide variety of different craft - from a tiny water taxi to small sailing craft to a massive, private luxury yacht. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Tender Is the Night, first published by Charles Scribners Sons in 1934, is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... Built originally as a private mansion Ville Soleil (Villa of the Sun) in 1863, the Hotel du Cap, in Antibes, first opened its doors to guests in 1870. ...


The highest point on the Cap d'Antibes is occupied by Phare (lighthouse) de la Garoupe, constructed after retreating Nazis blew up the earlier one, and a small Roman Catholic chapel, Chapelle de la Garoupe, containing a locally famous gilded wooden statue of Notre Dame de Bonne Port (loosely, Our Lady of Safe Homecoming), and noted for the variety of ex voto offerings (see also votive deposit) left by sailors and their families... or sometimes their widows. An ex-voto is a votive offering to a saint or divinity. ... An icon of Aghia Paraskevi with votive offerings hung beside it. ...


While most of the residents of "Le Cap" guard their privacy fiercely, they are known to include:

  • Russian oil billionaire Roman Abramovich, owner of the 115-meter (377 foot) mega-yacht Pelorus, the 85-meter (279 foot) mega-yacht Ecstasea, and the 50-meter (164 foot) mega-yacht Sussurro. He is currently having the 160-meter (525 foot) mega-yacht Eclipse built; when completed, it will be the world's largest yacht.
  • Evgeny "Eugene" Shvidler, friend and business partner of Abramovich to whom he gave the 113-meter (371 foot) mega-yacht Le Grand Bleu

Famous past residents include: Roman Arkadyevich Abramovich (IPA: ) (Russian: ) (born 24 October 1966 in Saratov, Russia) is a Russian oil billionaire and the main owner of private investment company Millhouse Capital, referred to as one of the Russian oligarchs. ... Evgeny Eugene Markovich Shvidler (Russian: Евгений Маркович Швидлер) (born 1964 in Moscow, Russia) is a Russian oil billionaire. ...

  • The Duke and Duchess of Windsor after he abdicated as King Edward VIII of England to marry a twice-divorced American
  • Aristotle Onassis, Greek shipping billionaire and future husband of President Kennedy's widow
  • Stavros Niarcos, also a Greek shipping billionaire as well as being Onassis's brother-in-law and chief competitor

(All of them occupied Château de la Cröe on the ultra-exclusive southern end of "Le Cap," as does Roman Abramovich currently) The peerage title Duke of Windsor was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1937 for The Prince Edward, formerly King of the United Kingdom. ... Wallis, The Duchess of Windsor (previously Wallis Simpson; previously Wallis Spencer; born Bessie Wallis Warfield; 19 June 1895 or 1896 – 24 April 1986) was the American wife of Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor. ... Aristotelis Sokratis (also Ari) Onassis (in Greek, Αριστοτέλης Ωνάσης) (January 20, 1900 – March 15, 1975) was the most famous shipping magnate of the 20th century. ...

  • Jacob "Jack L." Warner, longtime head of Warner Brothers, who bought Chateau Aujourd'hui on the west edge of Cap d'Antibes

The Cap d'Antibes was also the birthplace, in 1922, of Nicholas Romanov, Prince of Russia. This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... Nicholas Romanovich Romanov or Nikolai Romanovich Romanov (Николай Романович Романов), (born September 13, 1922) is the President of the Romanov Family Association. ...


The web site of the [Hôtel du Cap — Eden-Roc] contains an extensive list of their past celebrity guests.


Antibes culture

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Genera See article below. ... Marineland is an animal exhibition park in Antibes, France. ...

Literature

Antibes was the birthplace of Jacques Audiberti (1899-1965), author. Jacques Audiberti (March 25, 1899 - July 9, 1965) was a French author. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ...


The author Graham Greene spent the last quarter century of his life living in Vieux Antibes (Old Town), from 1966 to 1991. Anthony Burgess wrote a series of essays, A Homage to QWERTY, about his travels from Monaco to Antibes to interview Greene. This article is about the writer. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ...


The novelist Nikos Kazantzakis (1883 - 1957) wrote Alexas Zorbas, on which the 1964 movie Zorba the Greek was based, while living in Antibes' old town. Nikos Kazantzakis (Greek: Νίκος Καζαντζάκης) (February 18, 1883, Heraklion, Crete, Greece - October 26, 1957, Freiburg, Germany), author of poems, novels, essays, plays, and travel books, was arguably the most important and most translated Greek writer and philosopher of the 20th century. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Zorba the Greek is a 1964 movie by Michael Cacoyannis, originally titled Alexis Zorbas, based on the novel by Nikos Kazantzakis. ...


Music

Interestingly, Antibes was the site of two well-regarded live jazz performances - the Charles Mingus album Mingus at Antibes and a live performance of John Coltrane's A Love Supreme, which was later released with the original in a deluxe package. Charles Mingus (April 22, 1922 – January 5, 1979) was an American jazz bassist, composer, bandleader, and occasional pianist. ... Mingus at Antibes was originally a double album (now a single CD) recorded at a live 1960 performance at Juan-les-Pins by jazz bassist and composer Charles Mingus; it was released in 1976. ... “Coltrane” redirects here. ... A Love Supreme is a jazz album recorded by John Coltranes quartet on December 9, 1964 at the Van Gelder studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. ...


There is a major jazz festival, Jazz à Juan, held every summer in Juan-les-Pins that often attracts very famous jazz musicians from the United States, France, and around the world. Juan-les-Pins is a district of Antibes, in southeastern France, on the Côte dAzur. ...


The electronic music group M83 is from Antibes. M83 is an electronic music group consisting of Nicolas Fromageau and Anthony Gonzalez, and was formed in Antibes, France in 2001. ...


Art

The Musée Picasso, located in the mediaeval Château Grimaldi, contains Pablo Picasso's works from the year-long period he spent in Antibes. “Picasso” redirects here. ...


The Musée Peynet et du Dessin Humoristique has a permanent exhibition of the works of Peynet and has temporary exhibitions of graphic arts, humor, and satire. The museum is built on the site of the Roman temple to Saturn (Cosson p.131). Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ...


The French-Russian abstract painter, Nicolas de Staël committed suicide in Antibes, 1955 Nicolas de Staël (January 5, 1914, Saint Petersburg - March 16, 1955, Antibes) (French nationality, of Russian origin) was a painter known for his use of a thick impasto and his highly abstract landscape painting. ...


Nikos Kazantzakis wrote the novel on which the 1964 motion picture Zorba the Greek was based while living in Antibes' old town. Nikos Kazantzakis (Greek: Νίκος Καζαντζάκης) (February 18, 1883, Heraklion, Crete, Greece - October 26, 1957, Freiburg, Germany), author of poems, novels, essays, plays, and travel books, was arguably the most important and most translated Greek writer and philosopher of the 20th century. ... Zorba the Greek is a 1964 movie by Michael Cacoyannis, originally titled Alexis Zorbas, based on the novel by Nikos Kazantzakis. ...


The prolific English writer Graham Greene (he famously wrote the screenplay for the 1949 film The Third Man) lived the last almost quarter-century of his life in Antibes' old town, from 1966 until he moved to Vevey, Switzerland where he died in 1991. This article is about the writer. ... The Third Man (1949) is a British film noir directed by Carol Reed. ...


Miscellaneous

Next to Fort Carré, facing the N 98 Bord de Mer highway is a marble statue of a World War I soldier, said to be the tallest war memorial in France. Unfortunately, he is holding his rifle at Order Arms (rifle held vertically, butt on the ground, barrel held near muzzle end) next to his LEFT leg, which is a gross mistake since Order Arms is only alongside the RIGHT leg; French veterans reportedly went berserk over this egregious error. View of Aalborg railroad station from J.F. Kennedys Square, 2004 Aalborg (help· info) is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in North Jutland County on the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Market Street in Kinsale, one of the towns oldest thoroughfares Kinsale (Cionn tSáile in Irish) is a town in County Cork, Ireland. ... Schwäbisch Gmünd is a town in the eastern part of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. ... Location of Newport Beach within Orange County, California. ...


See also

The diocese of Nice is a Roman Catholic territory in Franche, comprising the French Départment of Alpes-Maritimes. ...

Sources and references

  • Cosson, Pierre (1995) Civitas Antipolitana: Histoire du Municipe Romain d'Antipolis. Nice, Serre Editeur. ISBN 2-86410-219-6
  • Pliny the Elder, Chorographia, II.69
  • Polybius, Histories 33.7. Available online
  • Smith, William (1854) Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.
  • Strabo, Geographia, 4.1.9. Available online
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913. Nice

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge&#8212;writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others&#8212;in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge&#8212;writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others&#8212;in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Antibes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Antibes Juan-les-Pins Town Village visit - by Provence Beyond (1333 words)
Antibes was a Greek fortified town named Antipolis in the 5th century BC, and later a Roman town, and always an active port for trading along the Mediterranean.
Medieval: Antibes was ruled by the Lords of Grasse, and later by the Bishops of Antibes.
At the end of the 14th century, Antibes was on the Franco-Savoyard frontier, and in 1383, the Pope of Avignon "gave" Antibes to the Grimaldi family of Cagnes.
Antibes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (870 words)
Antibes is a commune of the Alpes-Maritimes département (formerly in that of the Var, but transferred after the Alpes-Maritimes department was formed in 1860 out of the county of Nice).
The border with the Ligurian Oxybii (Ὀξύβιοι) being to the west of Antibes and east of Frejus (Smith, entry on Oxybii).
Antibes was the seat of a bishopric from the 5th century to 1244, when the see was transferred to Grasse.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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