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Encyclopedia > Anthony Hecht
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Anthony Ivan Hecht, (January 16, 1923-October 20, 2004), was an American poet. His work combined a deep interest in form with a passionate desire to confront the horrors of 20th century history, with the Second World War, in which he fought, and the Holocaust being recurrent themes in his work. January 16 is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Poets are authors of poems, or of other forms of poetry such as dramatic verse. ... Jump to: navigation, search World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ...

Contents


Life

Hecht was born in New York City to German-Jewish parents. He was educated at various schools in the city - he was a classmate of Jack Kerouac at one point - but showed no great academic ability, something he would later refer to as "conspicuous". However, as a freshman English student at Bard College in New York he discovered the works of Stevens, Auden, Eliot, and Dylan Thomas, it was at this point that he decided he would become a poet. Hecht's parents were not happy at his plans and tried to discourage them; even getting family friend Ted Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, to attempt to dissuade him. New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... Jump to: navigation, search The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of... Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, artist, and one of the most prominent members of the Beat Generation. ... Bard College Bard College, founded in 1860, is a small, four-year liberal arts college located in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, on a 600 acre (2. ... Jump to: navigation, search Wallace Stevens Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 - August 2, 1955) was an American Modernist poet. ... Jump to: navigation, search Christopher Isherwood and W.H. Auden, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Wystan Hugh Auden (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973) was an English poet and critic, widely regarded as among the most influential and important writers of the 20th century. ... Jump to: navigation, search T.S. Eliot (by E.O. Hoppe, 1919) Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965) was an American-born poet, dramatist, and literary critic, whose works like The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, The Waste Land and Four Quartets, are considered major... Dylan Marlais Thomas, (Swansea, October 27, 1914 – November 9, 1953 in New York City) was a Welsh poet and writer. ... Dr. Seuss is the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991). ...


In 1944, upon completing his final year at Bard, Hecht was drafted into the US 97th Infantry Division and was sent to the battlefields in Europe. He saw a great deal of combat in Germany, France, and Czechoslovakia. However, his most significant experience occurred on April 23, 1945. On this day Hecht's division helped liberate Flossenb├╝rg concentration camp, Hecht was ordered to interview French prisoners in the hope of gathering evidence on the camp's commanders. Years later, Hecht said of this experience, "The place, the suffering, the prisoners' accounts were beyond comprehension. For years after I would wake shrieking." Hecht died October 20, 2004. Jump to: navigation, search 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The 97th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. World War I The division was activated 5 September 1918 and inactivated 20 November 1918 ; one infantry regiment (303d) served with the 76th Division. ... Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini // Preceding events Main articles: Events preceding World War II in Europe, Causes of World War II After Germany lost World War I, the Treaty of Versailes placed extremely harsh conditions on Germany, including huge unrealistic reparations and war guilt clauses. ... Jump to: navigation, search April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Flossenbürg concentration camp was a German prison built in 1938 at Flossenbürg, in the Oberpfalz region of Bavaria. ... Jump to: navigation, search October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Career

After the war ended, Hecht took advantage of the G.I. bill to study under the poet-critic John Crowe Ransom at Kenyon College, Ohio. Here he came into contact with fellow poets such as Robert Lowell, Randall Jarrell, Elizabeth Bishop, and Allen Tate. He later received his master's degree from Columbia University. The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. ... John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888 - July 3, 1974) was an United States poet, essayist, and social commentator. ... Kenyon College is a private liberal arts college founded in Gambier, Ohio in 1824, by Episcopal Bishop Philander Chase. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George Voinovich (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... Robert Lowell Robert Lowell (March 1, 1917–September 12, 1977), born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, Jr. ... Randall Jarrell (1914 - 1965) was a United States author, writer and poet. ... Jump to: navigation, search Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979), was an American poet and writer, increasingly regarded as one of the finest 20th century poets writing in English. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... Jump to: navigation, search A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate or graduate course of one to three years in duration. ... Jump to: navigation, search Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ...


Hecht released his first collection, A Summoning of Stones, in 1954. In this work his mastery of a wide range of poetic forms were clear as was his awareness of the forces of history, which he had seen first hand. Even at this stage Hecht's poetry was often compared with that of Auden, with whom Hecht had become friends in 1951 during a holiday on the Italian island of Ischia, where Auden spent each summer. In 1993 Hecht published, The Hidden Law, a critical reading of Auden's body of work. During his career Hecht won many fans, and prizes, including the Prix de Rome in 1951 and the 1968 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for his second work The Hard Hours. It was within this volume that Hecht first addressed his own experiences of World War II - memories that had caused him to have a nervous breakdown in 1959. Hecht spent three months in hospital following his breakdown though was spared electric shock therapy, unlike Sylvia Plath, whom he had encountered whilst teaching at Smith College. Jump to: navigation, search 1954 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1951 was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The island of Ischia near Naples, Italy. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Prix de Rome is a scholarship for students of the arts. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Pulitzer Prize for Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ... Jump to: navigation, search Nervous Breakdown was the first Black Flag 7 EP. It was released in 1978 on SST Records. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Electroconvulsive therapy, also known as electroshock or ECT, is a type of psychiatric shock therapy involving the induction of an artificial seizure in a patient by passing electricity through the brain. ... A self-portrait circa 1951. ... Smith College campus center Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States. ...


Hecht's main source of income was as a teacher of poetry, most notably at the University of Rochester where he taught from 1967 to 1985. He also spent varying lengths of time teaching at other notable institutions such as Smith, Bard, Harvard, Georgetown, and Yale. Between 1982 and 1984 he held the esteemed position of Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. Hecht won a number of notable literary awards including: the Bollingen Prize, and the Tanning Prize. Jump to: navigation, search Located in Rochester, New York, USA and founded in 1850, the University of Rochester is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian research institution. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard, see Harvard (disambiguation) Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Jump to: navigation, search Note: This institution should not be confused with Georgetown College Georgetown University is a major research university in the United States. ... Yale can refer to: Yale University, one of the United States oldest and most famous universities. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... The Bollingen Prize, awarded every two years by the Bollingen Foundation, is a prestigious literary honor bestowed on a poet in recognition of the best book of new verse within the last two years, or for lifetime achievement. ...


Hecht is also notably one of the inventors of the double dactyl, a form of light verse. A dactyl is a poetic foot of the form >-- (ON-off-off). ...


Bibliography

Poetry

  • A Summoning of Stones (1954)
  • The Hard Hours (1968)
  • The Venetian Vespers (1979)
  • Flight Among the Tombs (1998)
  • The Darkness and the Light (2001)

Other Works Jump to: navigation, search 1954 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search This page refers to the year 1979. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...

  • Obbligati: Essays in Criticism (1986)
  • The Hidden Law: The Poetry of W. H. Auden (1994)
  • Melodies Unheard: Essays on the Mysteries of Poetry (2003)

Jump to: navigation, search 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Anthony Hecht - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (633 words)
Hecht's parents were not happy at his plans and tried to discourage them; even getting family friend Ted Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, to attempt to dissuade him.
Hecht's main source of income was as a teacher of poetry, most notably at the University of Rochester where he taught from 1967 to 1985.
Hecht is also notably one of the inventors of the double dactyl, a form of light verse.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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