FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Anthony Gale

Anthony Gale (born September 17, 1782 in Dublin, Ireland) was the fourth Commandant of the United States Marine Corps and the only one ever fired. Fewer records survive concerning him than any other Commandant but it is known that he was commissioned a second lieutenant on September 2, 1798. Thereafter he fought, in fairly quick succession, the French, the Barbary pirates, the British, and one of his Navy mess-mates. The last encounter, involving an affront to the Corps, brought about the naval officer's sudden demise and Commandant William W. Burrows's approval for Gale's defense of his Corps' honor. September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the city in Ireland. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps, who is a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and reports to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years). ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Though at least a proportion of them are better described as privateers, the Barbary pirates operated out of Tunis, Tripoli, Algiers, Salè and ports in Morocco, preying on shipping in the western Mediterranean Sea from the time of the Crusades as well as on ships on their way to Asia... Lieutenant Colonel William Ward Burrows (16 January 1768 – 6 March 1805) was the second Commandant of the Marine Corps. ...


Unfortunately for him, increasing rank brought other difficulties not resolved so directly. In 1815, while commanding at Philadelphia, he fell out with Commandant Franklin Wharton over construction of barracks. A court of inquiry cleared him, but he was banished to a less desirable post, where he nursed a feeling of persecution and resumed drinking. 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ...


As a consequence of these and other alleged shortcomings, Captain Gale, although next senior at the time of Wharton's death, had to battle for the job. Captain Archibald Henderson, second in line, was characteristically blunt in assessing Capt Gale's qualifications, or lack of them, to the Secretary of the Navy. After a court of inquiry exonerated him, Capt Gale, with 21 years of service, became Lieutenant Colonel Commandant on March 3, 1819. By then, the Corps had been without a leader for six months. Archibald Henderson was the longest serving Commandant of the Marine Corps, serving from 1820 to 1859. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1819 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Soon came troubles with Navy Secretary Smith Thompson, who frequently countermanded Lt Col Gale's orders in a humiliating manner. Finally, Lt Col Gale courageously submitted a letter analyzing the proper division of function between himself and the Secretary, and respectfully pointed out the impossibility of his position. He paralleled this official reaction to infringements of his authority by unofficial retreats to alcohol. Three weeks later on September 18, 1820 he was under arrest, charged with offenses of alcoholic and related nature. By October 8, 1820, the court had found him guilty, President Monroe approved the verdict, and Lt Col Gale was removed from office and the Marine Corps. Smith Thompson (January 17, 1768 - December 18, 1843) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice from 1823 until his death in 1843. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years). ... Order: 5th President Vice President: Daniel D. Tompkins Term of office: March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1825 Preceded by: James Madison Succeeded by: John Quincy Adams Date of birth: April 28, 1758 Place of birth: Westmoreland County, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1831 Place of death: New York City...


From Washington, Gale went first to Philadelphia where he spent several months in hospitals, then took up residence in Kentucky. Armed with proof that he had been under the strain of temporary mental derangement while Commandant, he spent 15 years attempting to have his court-martial decision reversed. Eventually, in 1835, the government partially cleared him and awarded him a stipend of $15 a month which was later increased to $25 and continued until his death in 1843 in Stanford, Kentucky. Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Stanford is a city located in Lincoln County, Kentucky. ...


This article includes text from the public domain Marine Corps History and Museum web site (http://hqinet001.hqmc.usmc.mil/HD/Home_Page.htm). The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...



Preceded by:
Franklin Wharton
Commandant of the United States Marine Corps
1819—1820
Succeeded by:
Archibald Henderson


The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps, who is a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and reports to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... Archibald Henderson was the longest serving Commandant of the Marine Corps, serving from 1820 to 1859. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m