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Encyclopedia > Anthony Eden
The Right Honourable
 The Earl of Avon 
KG, MC, PC
Anthony Eden

In office
7 April 1955 – 10 January 1957
Monarch Elizabeth II
Preceded by Sir Winston Churchill
Succeeded by Harold Macmillan

In office
June 1934 – 7 June 1935
Monarch George V
Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald
Preceded by Stanley Baldwin
Succeeded by The Marquess of Londonderry

In office
22 December 1935 – 20 February 1938
Monarch George V
Edward VIII
George VI
Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin
Neville Chamberlain
Preceded by Sir Samuel Hoare, 2nd Baronet
Succeeded by The Viscount Halifax
In office
22 December 1940 – 26 July 1945
Monarch George VI
Prime Minister Winston Churchill
Preceded by The Viscount Halifax
Succeeded by Ernest Bevin
In office
28 October 1951 – 7 April 1955
Monarch George VI
Elizabeth II
Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill
Preceded by Herbert Stanley Morrison
Succeeded by Harold Macmillan

In office
26 October 1951 – 6 April 1955
Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill
Preceded by Vacant
last holder was Herbert Stanley Morrison earlier in 1951
Succeeded by Vacant
next holder was Rab Butler in 1962

Born 12 June 1897(1897-06-12)
West Auckland, County Durham, England
Died 14 January 1977 (aged 79)
Alvediston, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse Beatrice Beckett (1902–1957) (1923 – divorced 1950)
Clarissa Eden, Countess of Avon (born 1920) (1952–1977)
Alma mater Christ Church, Oxford
Religion Anglican

Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC (12 June 189714 January 1977) was a British politician who was Foreign Secretary for three periods between 1935 and 1955, including World War II and Prime Minister from 1955 to 1957. An “Anthony Eden hat (or simply an “Anthony Eden”) was a silk-brimmed, black felt Homburg of the kind favoured in the 1930s by Anthony Eden, later 1st Earl of Avon (1897-1977), a Cabinet Minister in the British National Government, who was Lord Privy Seal 1934-5 and Foreign... The Right Honourable (abbreviated as or ) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... The Military Cross (MC) is the third level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Army and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Most Honourable Charles Stewart Henry Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess of Londonderry (1878-1949) had careers in both Irish and British politics. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Samuel John Gurney Hoare, 1st Viscount Templewood (1880-1959), more commonly known as Sir Samuel Hoare, was a British Conservative politician who served in various capacities in the Conservative and National governments of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, KG, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, PC (16 April 1881–23 December 1959), known as The Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and as The Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944, was a British Conservative politician. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, KG, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, PC (16 April 1881–23 December 1959), known as The Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and as The Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944, was a British Conservative politician. ... Ernest Bevin (9 March 1881 - 14 April 1951) was a British labour leader, politician, and statesman best known for his time as Minister of Labour in the war-time coalition government, and as Foreign Secretary in the post-war Labour government. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Herbert Stanley Morrison, Baron Morrison of Lambeth (January 3, 1888 - March 6, 1965) was a British Labour Party politician and cabinet minister. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Under its uncodified constitution, the United Kingdom possesses no formal permanent office of Deputy Prime Minister. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Churchill redirects here. ... Herbert Stanley Morrison, Baron Morrison of Lambeth (January 3, 1888 - March 6, 1965) was a British Labour Party politician and cabinet minister. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... West Auckland is a village in County Durham, in North East England. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Alvediston is a village and civil parish in the Salisbury district of Wiltshire, England, with a population of 91 (2001 census). ... This article is about the city in the United Kingdom. ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage, which can be contrasted with an annulment which is a declaration that a marriage is void, though the effects of marriage may be recognized in such unions, such as spousal support, child custody and distribution of property. ... Anthony and Clarissa Eden on their wedding day, 15 August 1952 Anne Clarissa Eden, Countess of Avon (née Spencer-Churchill, 28 June 1920) is the widow of Sir Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon (1897-1977), who was British Prime Minister 1955-7. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... The Military Cross (MC) is the third level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Army and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


His world-wide reputation as a "Man of Peace" and skilled diplomat was severely damaged by his conduct of the Suez Crisis in 1956, which was considered disastrous for Britain and a decisive sign of the decline of the British Empire[1]. Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ...


In the post-war years, Eden was a protagonist of the change in British policy[2] about war criminal trials, maybe best symbolised by his signature under the pardon conceded to the German Field Marshal Albert Kesselring on 24 October 1952. ==Biography== Albrecht von Kesselring (August 8, 1881 - July 16, 1960) was a Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. One of the most respected and skillful generals of Nazi Germany, he was nicknamed Smiling Albert or Smiling Kesselring. At least one source claims that Kesselring was born on August 8, 1881 [2... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He is generally ranked among the least successful British Prime Ministers of the 20th century [3][4], although two broadly sympathetic biographies (in 1986 and 2003) have gone some way to redressing the balance of opinion [5]. Many surveys have been conducted in order to construct rankings of the success of individuals who have served as President of the United States, until recently few had been done for Prime Ministers of the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Early career

Eden was born in West Auckland, County Durham, England, into a very conservative landed gentry family, and attended Eton. He was a younger son of Sir William Eden, baronet, from an old titled family. His mother, Sybil Frances Grey, was a member of the famous Grey family of Northumberland (see below). This was perhaps the meaning of Rab Butler's later gibe that Eden - in later life a handsome but ill-tempered man - was "half mad baronet, half beautiful woman". He had an elder brother called Timothy and a younger brother, Nicholas, who was killed when the battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable blew up and sank at the Battle of Jutland in 1916. West Auckland is a village in County Durham, in North East England. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... For the brush-footed butterfly species, see Euthalia nais. ... There has been two baronetcies created for the Eden family. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... [[Image:HMS Hood and HMS Barham. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Indefatigable. ... Belligerents Grand Fleet of the Royal Navy High Seas Fleet of the Kaiserliche Marine Commanders Sir John Jellicoe Sir David Beatty Reinhard Scheer Franz von Hipper Strength 28 battleships 9 battlecruisers 8 armoured cruisers 26 light cruisers 78 destroyers 1 minelayer 1 seaplane carrier 16 battleships 5 battlecruisers 6 pre...


During the First World War, Eden serving with the King's Royal Rifle Corps reached the rank of captain, received a Military Cross, and at the age of twenty-one became the youngest brigade-major in the British Army; at a conference in the early 1930s he and Hitler observed that they had probably fought on opposite sides of the trenches in the Ypres sector. After the war he studied at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated in Oriental Languages. (He was fluent in French, German and Persian and also spoke Russian and Arabic). After fighting a hopeless seat in the November 1922 General Election, Captain Eden, as he was still known, was elected Member of Parliament for Warwick and Leamington in the December 1923 General Election, as a Conservative. In that year also he married Beatrice Beckett. They had two sons (as well as a third who died in infancy), but the marriage was not a success and broke up under the strain of Eden's political career. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Military Cross (MC) is the third level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Army and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries. ... and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford... There are a wide variety of languages spoken thoughout Asia, comprising a number of families and unrelated isolate languages. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Warwick and Leamington is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


During the 1924-1929 Conservative Government, Eden was first Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Home Secretary, Sir William Joynson Hicks, and then in 1926 to the Foreign Secretary Sir Austen Chamberlain. In 1931 he held his first ministerial office as Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs. In 1934 he was appointed Lord Privy Seal and Minister for the League of Nations in Stanley Baldwin's Government. Like many of his generation who had served in the First World War, Eden was strongly anti-war and strove to work through the League of Nations to preserve European peace. He was however among the first to recognise that peace could not be maintained by appeasement of Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. He privately opposed the policy of the Foreign Secretary, Sir Samuel Hoare, of trying to appease Italy during its invasion of Abyssinia (Ethiopia) in 1935. When Hoare resigned after the failure of the Hoare-Laval Pact, Eden succeeded him as Foreign Secretary. A Parliamentary Private Secretary (PPS) is a junior role given to a United Kingdom Member of Parliament (MP). ... A Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, in the United Kingdom government structure, is a minister who is junior to a Minister of State who is then junior to a Secretary of State. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... 1939–1941 semi-official emblem Anachronous world map in 1920–1945, showing the League of Nations and the world Capital Not applicable¹ Language(s) English, French and Spanish Political structure International organization Secretary-general  - 1920–1933 Sir James Eric Drummond  - 1933–1940 Joseph Avenol  - 1940–1946 Seán Lester Historical... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Samuel John Gurney Hoare, 1st Viscount Templewood (1880-1959), more commonly known as Sir Samuel Hoare, was a British Conservative politician who served in various capacities in the Conservative and National governments of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Combatants Kingdom of Italy Ethiopian Empire Commanders Benito Mussolini Emilio De Bono Pietro Badoglio Rodolfo Graziani Haile Selassie Ras Imru Strength 800,000 combatants (only ~330,000 mobilized) ~250,000 combatants Casualties 10,000 killed1 (est. ... The Hoare-Laval Pact was a December 1935 plan concocted by the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, Samuel Hoare and the French Prime Minister, Pierre Laval for the partitioning of Ethiopia, as a means of ending the Italo-Ethiopian War. ...


At this stage in his career Eden was considered as something of a leader of fashion. He regularly wore a Homburg hat (similar to a trilby but more rigid), which became known in Britain as an "Anthony Eden". Hugo Resinger holding a fashionable grey Homburg hat, 1907. ... An “Anthony Eden hat (or simply an “Anthony Eden”) was a silk-brimmed, black felt Homburg of the kind favoured in the 1930s by Anthony Eden, later 1st Earl of Avon (1897-1977), a Cabinet Minister in the British National Government, who was Lord Privy Seal 1934-5 and Foreign...


Foreign Secretary and resignation (1935-38)

Eden became Foreign Secretary at a time when Britain was having to adjust its foreign policy to face the rise of the fascist powers. He supported the policy of non-interference in the Spanish Civil War, and supported Neville Chamberlain in his efforts to preserve peace through reasonable concessions to Germany. He did not protest when Britain and France failed to oppose Hitler's reoccupation of the Rhineland in 1936. His resignation in February 1938 was largely attributed to growing dissatisfaction with Chamberlain`s policy of Appeasement. That is, however, disputed by new research; it was not the question if there should be negotiations with Italy but only when they should start and how far they should be carried.[1] He became a Conservative dissenter leading a group conservative whip David Margesson called the "Glamour Boys," and a leading anti-appeaser like Winston Churchill who led a similar group called "The Old Guard."[6] Although Churchill claimed to have lost sleep the night of Eden's resignation (later recounted in his wartime memoirs (The Gathering Storm, 1948), they were not allies, and did not see eye to eye until Churchill became Prime Minister. There was much speculation that Eden would become a rallying point for all the disparate opponents of Chamberlain, but instead he maintained a low profile, avoiding confrontation though he opposed the Munich Agreement and abstained in the vote on it in the House of Commons. As a result Eden's position declined heavily amongst politicians, though he remained popular in the country at large - in later years he was often wrongly supposed to have resigned in protest at the Munich Agreement. A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Hitler redirects here. ... The Remilitarization of the Rhineland by the German Army took place on 7 March 1936 when German forces entered the Rhineland. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ... Henry David Reginald Margesson, 1st Viscount Margesson, of Rugby (July 26, 1890-December 24, 1965) was a British Conservative politician most popularly remembered for his tenure as Government Chief Whip in the 1930s. ... Churchill redirects here. ... For the annual global security meeting held in Munich, see Munich Conference on Security Policy. ...


Second World War (1939-45)

Eden in 1945
Eden in 1945

In September 1939, on the outbreak of war, Eden, who had briefly rejoined the army with the rank of major, returned to Chamberlain's government as Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs, but was not in the War Cabinet. As a result he was not a candidate for the Premiership when Chamberlain resigned after Germany invaded France in May 1940 and Churchill became Prime Minister. Churchill appointed Eden Secretary of State for War. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The position of Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs was a British cabinet level position created in 1925 to deal with British relations with the Dominions — Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Newfoundland, and the Irish Free State. ... A War Cabinet is committee formed by a government in time of war. ... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ...


At the end of 1940 Eden returned to the Foreign Office, and in this role became a member of the executive committee of the Political Warfare Executive in 1941. Although he was one of Churchill's closest confidants, his role in wartime was restricted because Churchill conducted the most important negotiations, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin, himself, but Eden served loyally as Churchill's lieutenant. Nevertheless he was in charge of handling much of the relations between Britain and de Gaulle during the last years of the war. Eden was often critical of the emphasis Churchill put on the Special Relationship with the US, often disappointed by their treatment of their British allies [1]. During World War II, the Political Warfare Executive (PWE) was a British clandestine body created to produce and disseminate both white and black propaganda, with the aim of damaging enemy morale. ... FDR redirects here. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... This article is about the person. ... Prime Minister Winston Churchill, (left) with President Franklin Roosevelt, at the 1945 Yalta Conference. ...


In 1942 Eden was given the additional job of Leader of the House of Commons. He was considered for various other major jobs during and after the war, including Commander-in-Chief Middle East in 1942 (this would have been a very unusual appointment as Eden was a civilian; General Harold Alexander was in fact appointed), Viceroy of India in 1943 (General Archibald Wavell was appointed to this job) or Secretary-General of the newly-formed United Nations Organisation in 1945. The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... Field Marshal Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis (December 10, 1891 - June 16, 1969) was a British military commander and Field Marshal, notably during World War II as the commander of the 15th Army Group. ... Archibald Percival Wavell, 1st Earl Wavell (May 5, 1883 _ May 24, 1950) was a British General and the commander of British Army forces in the Middle East during World War II. He led British forces to victory over the Italians, only to be defeated by the German army. ...


Eden's eldest son, Simon Eden, went missing in action, later declared deceased, while serving as a pilot with the RAF in Burma in the latter days of the Second World War. There was a close bond between Anthony and Simon, and Simon's death was a great personal shock to his father. De Gaulle wrote him a personal letter of condolence in French. This article is about the person. ...

Eden meeting Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Quebec Conference in 1943
Eden meeting Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Quebec Conference in 1943

Image File history File links FDR_and_Anthony_Eden_at_the_Quebec_Conference. ... Image File history File links FDR_and_Anthony_Eden_at_the_Quebec_Conference. ... FDR redirects here. ... Quebec Conference refers to one of several different meetings by the same name that were held in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. ...

Post-war

Opposition (1945-51)

After the Labour Party won the 1945 elections, Eden went into opposition as Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party. Many felt that Churchill should have retired and allowed Eden to become party leader, but Churchill refused to consider this and Eden was too loyal to press him. He was in any case depressed during this period by the break-up of his first marriage and the death of his eldest son. Churchill was in many ways only "part-time Leader of the Opposition"[1], given his many journeys abroad and his literary work, and left the day-to-day-work largely to Eden. Eden was largely regarded as lacking sense of party politics and contact with the common man [7]. In these opposition years, however, he developed some knowledge about domestic affairs and created the idea of a "property-owning-democracy", which was only realized by the Thatcher government decades later. His domestic agenda is overall considered centre-left [1]. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Deputy Leader in the Westminster system is the second-in-command of a political party, behind the party leader. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ...


Return to government (1951-55)

In 1951, the Conservatives returned to office and Eden became Foreign Secretary for a third time. Churchill was largely a figurehead in this government and Eden had effective control of British foreign policy for the first time, as the Cold War grew more intense. He dealt effectively with the various crises of the period, although Britain was no longer the world power it had been before the war, the success of the 1954 Geneva Conference on Indo-China ranks as his outstanding achievement of his third term in the Foreign Office. In 1950 he and Beatrice Eden were finally divorced and in 1952 he married Churchill's niece, Lady Clarissa Spencer-Churchill (b. 1920)—a nominal Roman Catholic who was fiercely criticised by Catholic writer Evelyn Waugh for marrying a divorced man—a marriage much more successful than his first had been. In 1954 he was made a Knight of the Garter. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Several international or multinational conferences have been called the Geneva Conference, because they were held in the city of Geneva, Switzerland. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom abroad. ... Anne Clarissa Eden, Countess of Avon (neé Spencer-Churchill) (born 28 June 1920) is the widow of Anthony Eden, the former British Prime Minister. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... A garter is one of the Orders most recognisable insignia. ...


The release of Nazi war criminals

Upon regaining office, Winston Churchill and Eden moved for the release of the Nazi war criminals still in British custody,[8] following a policy focused on Anti-Communism and the emerging Cold War. This policy had been discreetly pursued at least since 1947, when Churchill and Harold Alexander had pressured Clement Attlee to commute the death sentence on the German Field Marshal Albert Kesselring for atrocities perpetrated in Italy during the Second World War handed down by a British Military Court in Venice on May 6, 1947. Kesselring had been called to account for more than 1,400 innocent civilians massacred in a series of violent reprisals, including the Ardeatine massacre. Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Ideologies Communist internationals Prominent communists Related subjects Anti-communism refers to opposition to communism. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Field Marshal Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis (December 10, 1891 - June 16, 1969) was a British military commander and Field Marshal, notably during World War II as the commander of the 15th Army Group. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... ==Biography== Albrecht von Kesselring (August 8, 1881 - July 16, 1960) was a Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. One of the most respected and skillful generals of Nazi Germany, he was nicknamed Smiling Albert or Smiling Kesselring. At least one source claims that Kesselring was born on August 8, 1881 [2... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The massacre of Fosse Ardeatine took place in Italy during World War II. On 23 March 1944, 33 German soldiers were killed when members of the Italian Resistance set off a bomb close to a column of German soldiers who were marching on via Rasella. ...


In December 1951 Eden introduced to the Cabinet a cleverly drafted policy according to which pre-trial custody should be counted against sentences inflicted upon war criminals, so effectively reducing them. The policy - apparently aimed only to promote an equitable principle - exploited a loophole which - in certain instances - was effectively used to double a prison reduction already in effect, as for example, in the case of the German Field Marshal Erich von Manstein. Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Generalfeldmarschall Erich von Manstein The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...


Von Manstein was mainly accused of orders equating Partisans to Jews, thus aiming at their indiscriminate extermination. Churchill donated money to von Manstein's defence and openly branded the trial against the German Field Marshal as yet another effort by the then ruling Attlee government to appease the Soviets. CCCP redirects here. ...


Anticipating an extensive interpretation of the pre-trial custody reduction, the Tribunal that condemned von Manstein on December 19, 1949 explicitly stated in its ruling that "The period during which the accused has been in custody has been taken into account". Nevertheless, Eden pushed ahead with the idea that it was legitimate to subtract the pre-trial custody time from the period decreed by judicial decision even in cases such as von Manstein's. is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The pressure on Eden and the government to resolve the war criminals issue as quickly as possible increased during the summer of 1952, coinciding with the looming question of the ratification of the European Defence Community Treaty by West Germany. A lobby that included Harold Alexander - then Minister of Defence - and Basil Liddell Hart strove to this end, echoing the calls in the same direction coming from the German Chancellor, Konrad Adenauer and the press campaign orchestrated in West Germany for the pardoning of most war criminals. Alexander in particular had gone to considerable lengths to justify their release in a way or another, tactically and falsely emphasising health issues and, almost incredibly, the "melancholy" experienced by jailed war criminals.[9] Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Field Marshal Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander, 1st Earl Alexander of Tunis (December 10, 1891 - June 16, 1969) was a British military commander and Field Marshal, notably during World War II as the commander of the 15th Army Group. ... The post of Minister of Defence was responsible for co-ordination of defence and security from its creation in 1940 until its abolition in 1964. ... The military historian Basil Liddell Hart. ... The head of government of Germany is called Chancellor (German: Kanzler). ... For other uses, see Konrad Adenauer (disambiguation). ...


Under Eden, who as Foreign Minister had taken over responsibility after the withdrawal of the British High Commission from the International Military Tribunal, with the clear approval of Churchill, and based on the tactics suggested by Alexander - which included adequately priming prison doctors on which medical aspects concentrate on - both Kesselring (July) and Manstein (August) were released from prison under medical pretexts during the summer of 1952, allegedly because they needed urgent hospitalization for treating, respectively, an "exploratory operation" on a throat cancer, and cataracts. Following their operations, both were conveniently left in liberty for an indefinite convalescence period, and were not to set again foot in jail or, as the German press proclaimed, in a "dungeon".[10][11]. For the 1947 Soviet film about the trials, see Nuremberg Trials (film). ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Jeane Kirkpatrick, promoter of the Kirkpatrick Doctrine advocating Anti-Communism worldwide, swiftly suggested that Adenauer propose the application of the same principal to the US High Commission, which helped West Germany not to misunderstand the real significance of the "medical" release of the Field Marshals, and the policy pursued by both the British and the US governments.[12] Jeane Kirkpatrick Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (November 19, 1926 â€“ December 7, 2006) was an American ambassador and an ardent anticommunist. ... The Kirkpatrick Doctrine was a political doctrine expounded by United States Ambassador to the United Nations Jeane Kirkpatrick in the early 1980s to justify US support for Third World anti-Communist dictatorships in the context of the Cold War. ...


To make the path taken by the British government towards the war criminals clear to German public opinion however, a more explicit gesture was deemed to be necessary. Therefore, on 24 October 1952 Eden signed an act of clemency in favour of the German war criminal Field Marshal Albert Kesselring. Kesselring - officially pardoned in consideration of his allegedly cancerous throat - addressed a rally of veterans immediately after his release (including the fanatic Green Devils who had fought under his command at Monte Cassino and a number of Nazi former leaders), calling for the wholesale liberation of all war criminals. is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ==Biography== Albrecht von Kesselring (August 8, 1881 - July 16, 1960) was a Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. One of the most respected and skillful generals of Nazi Germany, he was nicknamed Smiling Albert or Smiling Kesselring. At least one source claims that Kesselring was born on August 8, 1881 [2... Combatants United Kingdom United States Poland New Zealand Canada Free France India and others Germany Commanders Harold Alexander Mark Clark Oliver Leese Albert Kesselring Heinrich von Vietinghoff Frido von Senger Strength 105,000 80,000 Casualties 54,000 20,000 The Battle of Monte Cassino (also known as the Battle...


Afterwards he lived an active public life for another eight years - he died in July 1960 - mostly rallying ex-Nazis as leader of the neo-Nazi organisation Stahlhelm, Bund der Frontsoldaten, at the head of which had been elected while still in prison[13]. The Stahlhelm, Bund der Frontsoldaten (English: Steel Helmet, League of Frontline Soldiers) was one of the many paramilitary organizations that arose after the defeat of World War I in the Weimar Republic. ...


Thus Eden - albeit with some reluctance and attention for legal stricture - had put his signature upon a policy commenced by Churchill which, by means of a broad campaign of rehabilitation of Nazi military personalities, was aimed at re-establishing a strong Army in what was then West Germany, as a central part of the NATO front line at the height of Cold War. Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


When Churchill took over the Foreign Office due to Eden's serious health problems in 1953, the plan for liberating the war criminals was brought to it logical conclusion, without any further scruples. Selwyn Lloyd, the Minister of State in the Foreign Office with responsibility for German Affairs, was given carte-blanche to resolve the issue of war criminals, now seen as no more than embarrassing. On May 6, 1953 Manstein was pardoned and in 1956 he returned to service upon Adenauer's call, assuming an important official role in the resurrection of the German Army. Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... A blank check (carte blanche) is a check that has no numerical value written in, but is still signed. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Prime Minister (1955-57)

In April 1955 Churchill finally retired, and Sir Anthony succeeded him as Prime Minister. Eden was a very popular figure, as a result of his long wartime service and his famous good looks and charm. On taking office he immediately called a general election, at which the Conservatives were returned with an increased majority. But Sir Anthony had never held a domestic portfolio and had little experience in economic matters. He left these areas to his lieutenants such as Rab Butler, and concentrated largely on foreign policy, forming a close alliance with U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower. His famous words "Peace comes first, always" added to his already substantial popularity. The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on May 26, 1955, four years after the previous general election. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ...


Suez (1956)

Further information: Suez Crisis

This alliance proved illusory, however, when in 1956 Sir Anthony, in conjunction with France, tried to prevent Gamal Abdel Nasser, President of Egypt, from nationalising the Suez Canal, which had been owned since the 19th century by British and French shareholders in the Suez Canal Company. Eden, drawing on his experience in the 1930s, saw Nasser as another Mussolini, considering the two men aggressive nationalist "socialists" determined to invade other countries. Sir Anthony even responded by plotting to assassinate Nasser by enlisting Miles Copeland's "assistance" since he was-apparently-a close friend of Nasser's. Others believed that Nasser was acting from legitimate patriotic concerns. Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... Nasser redirects here. ... For other uses, see Suez (disambiguation). ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Miles Axe Copeland, Jr. ...


In October 1956, after months of negotiation and attempts at mediation had failed to dissuade Nasser, Britain and France, in conjunction with Israel, invaded Egypt and occupied the Suez Canal Zone. But Eisenhower was an advocate of decolonisation, and he immediately and strongly opposed the invasion. Eden, who faced domestic pressure from his party to take action as well as thought terms of stopping the decline of British influence in the Middle East[1] had ignored Britain's financial dependence on the U.S. in the wake of World War II, overestimated US loyalty towards its closest ally and was finally forced to bow to American pressure to withdraw. The Suez Crisis is widely taken as marking the end of Britain's status as a superpower. Colonialism in 1945 Decolonization refers to the undoing of colonialism, the establishment of governance or authority through the creation of settlements by another country or jurisdiction. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1...


The Suez fiasco ruined, in many eyes, Eden's reputation for statesmanship and led to a breakdown in his health. He went on vacation to Ian Fleming's estate on Jamaica in November 1957, at a time when he was still determined to soldier on as Prime Minister. His health, however, did not improve and during his absence from London, his Chancellor Harold Macmillan and Rab Butler worked to manoeuvre him out of office. Macmillan, despite having been one of the architects of Suez, succeeded him as Prime Minister in January 1957. Eden retained some of his personal popularity and was made Earl of Avon in 1961. The term statesman is a respectful term used to refer to diplomats, politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... This article is about the author. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... The title Earl of Avon was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1961 for the former Prime Minister Anthony Eden, together with the subsidiary title Viscount Eden, of Royal Leamington Spa in the County of Warwick. ...


Suez in retrospect

His official biographer Robert Rhodes James re-evaluated sympathetically Eden's stance over Suez in 1986 [14] and, following the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990, asked, "who can now claim that Eden was wrong?" [15]. Such arguments turned mostly on whether, as a matter of policy, the Suez operation was fundamentally flawed or whether, as such "revisionists" thought, the lack of American support conveyed the impression that the West was divided and weak. Anthony Nutting, who resigned as a Foreign Office Minister over Suez, expressed the former view in 1967, the year of the Arab-Israeli Six-Day War, when he wrote that "we had sown the wind of bitterness and we were to reap the whirlwind of revenge and rebellion" [16]. Conversely, D. R. Thorpe, another of Eden's biographers, suggested that had the Suez venture succeeded, "there would almost certainly have been no Middle East war in 1967, and probably no Yom Kippur War in 1973 also" [17]. Sir Robert Rhodes James (10 April 1933–1999) was a British historian and Conservative member of parliament. ... Combatants Republic of Iraq State of Kuwait Commanders Ali Hassan al-Majid N/A Strength 100,000[1] 16,000[2] Casualties 37+ aircraft (est. ... Sir Harold Anthony Nutting (January 11, 1920 _ February 24, 1999) was a British politician. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... D. R. Thorpe (born 1943) is an historian and biographer who has written biographies of two British Prime Ministers of the mid 20th century, Sir Alec Douglas-Home and Sir Anthony Eden. ... Combatants  Israel  Egypt,  Syria,  Iraq Commanders Moshe Dayan, David Elazar, Ariel Sharon, Shmuel Gonen, Benjamin Peled, Israel Tal, Rehavam Zeevi, Aharon Yariv, Yitzhak Hofi, Rafael Eitan, Abraham Adan, Yanush Ben Gal Saad El Shazly, Ahmad Ismail Ali, Hosni Mubarak, Mohammed Aly Fahmy, Anwar Sadat, Abdel Ghani el-Gammasy, Abdul Munim...


Health Issues

A medical mishap would change the course of Eden’s life forever. During an operation in 1953 to remove Eden’s gallstones, the surgeon damaged his bile duct. This blunder made Eden vulnerable to recurrent infections and attacks of violent pain and fevers. To overcome this weakness Eden was prescribed the wonder drug of the 1950s - Benzedrine. Regarded by doctors in the 1950s as a harmless stimulant, it belongs to the family of drugs called amphetamines – the illegal drug we now call speed. During this time amphetamines were prescribed and used in a very casual way. Among the side effects of Benzedrine are Insomnia, restlessness and mood swings, all of which Eden actually suffered during the Suez Crisis. His health condition is now commonly agreed to have been a part of the reason for the Prime Minister's ill judgment[1]. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sustained-Release 15mg Dexedrine Spansules. ... Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... A side-effect is any effect other than an intended primary effect. ... This article is about the sleeping disorder. ...


Rejected plan for union between Britain and France

British Government cabinet papers from September 1956, during Eden's term as Prime Minister, have shown that French Prime Minister Guy Mollet approached the British Government suggesting the idea of an economic and political union between France and Great Britain.[18] This was a similar offer, in reverse, to that made by Churchill (drawing on a plan devised by Leo Amery [19]) in June 1940 [20]. The offer by Guy Mollet was referred to by Sir John Colville, Churchill's former private secretary, in his collected diaries, The Fringes of Power (1985), his having gleaned the information in 1957 from Air Chief Marshal Sir William Dickson during an air flight (and, according to Colville, after several whiskies and soda) [21]. Mollet's request for Union with Britain was rejected by Eden, but the additional possibility of France joining the British Commonwealth was considered, although similarly rejected. Colville noted, in respect of Suez, that Eden and his Foreign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd "felt still more beholden to the French on account of this offer" [21]. A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Guy Mollet (31 December 1905 - 3 October 1975) was a French Socialist politician. ... Leopold Charles Maurice (or Moritz) Stennett Amery (22 November 1873 - 16 September 1955), was a British statesman and Conservative politician. ... Guy Mollet (31 December 1905 - 3 October 1975) was a French Socialist politician. ... Sir John Colville, CB, CVO, was born 28 January 1915. ... Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir William Forster Dickson, GCB, KBE, DSO, AFC (24 September 1898–12 September 1987) was a senior officer in the Royal Air Force. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ...


Retirement (1957-77)

Eden soon retired and lived quietly with his second wife Clarissa, formerly Clarissa Spencer-Churchill, niece of Sir Winston, in 'Rose Bower' by the banks of the River Ebble in Broad Chalke, Wiltshire and published a highly acclaimed personal memoir, Another World (1976), as well as several volumes of political memoirs, in which he, however, denied that there had been any collusion with France and Israel. In his view, American Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, whom he particularly disliked, was responsible for the ill fate of the Suez adventure. This and other proved untruths did further diminish his stand. His main concern in his later years was trying to rebuild his reputation that was destroyed by the Suez fiasco, often taking legal actions against authors who didn´t share his point of view [1]. He sat for extensive interviews for the famed multi-part Thames Television production, The World at War, which was broadcast in 1974. He also featured frequently in Marcel Ophüls' 1969 documentary Le chagrin et la pitié, discussing the occupation of France in a wider geopolitical context. He spoke impeccable, if accented, French.[22] From 1945–1973, Eden was Chancellor of the University of Birmingham, England. Anthony and Clarissa Eden on their wedding day, 15 August 1952 Anne Clarissa Eden, Countess of Avon (née Spencer-Churchill, 28 June 1920) is the widow of Sir Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon (1897-1977), who was British Prime Minister 1955-7. ... The River Ebble is one the five rivers of the English city of Salisbury. ... Broad Chalke is a village and civil parish in the Salisbury district of Wiltshire, England, about 8 miles west of the city of Salisbury. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... John Foster Dulles (February 25, 1888 – May 24, 1959) served as U.S. Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. ... The World at War was a 26-episode television documentary series on World War II, as well as the the events leading up to it and following in its wake. ... Marcel Ophüls (born November 1, 1927) is a documentary film maker. ... The Sorrow and the Pity is a two part documentary by Marcel Ophüls that concerns the French resistance and collaboration with the Vichy government and the Nazis during World War II. This 1969 film used interviews of a German officer, collaborators, and resistance fighters from Clermont-Ferrand. ... The German occupation of France in World War II occurred during the period between May of 1940 to December of 1944. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Website http://www. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


On a trip to the United States in 1976-1977 to spend Christmas and New Year with Averell and Pamela Harriman, his health rapidly deteriorated. At his family's request, James Callaghan arranged for an RAF plane that was already in America to divert to Miami to fly him home. The Earl of Avon died from liver cancer in Salisbury in 1977 at the age of 79; born in the year of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, he thus died in the year of Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee. Eden's papers are housed at the University of Birmingham Special Collections [1] William Averell Harriman William Averell Harriman (November 15, 1891 – July 26, 1986) was a Governor of New York. ... Pamela Churchill Harriman (20 March 1920 – 5 February 1997) was an English-born socialite who was married and linked to important and powerful men. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... RAF redirects here. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, also called hepatoma or hepatocarcinogenesis) is a primary malignancy (cancer) of the liver. ... Salisbury Cathedral by Constable. ... Website http://www. ...


Eden's surviving son, Nicholas Eden (1930–1985), known as Viscount Eden until 1977, was also a politician and was a minister in the Thatcher government until his premature death from AIDS at the age of 54. Nicholas Eden, 2nd Earl of Avon (1930-1985), British politician and son of Prime Minister Anthony Eden. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


Anthony Eden is buried in the country churchyard at Alvediston, just 3 miles upstream from 'Rose Bower' at the source of the River Ebble.


Character and speaking style

Anthony Eden was always a particularly cultured appearance, well-mannered and good-looking. This gave him huge popular support throughout his political life, but some contemporaries felt that he was merely a superficial person lacking any deeper convictions. That view was enforced by his very pragmatic appproach to politics. Sir Oswald Mosley, for example, said that he never understood why Eden was so strongly pushed by the Tory party, while he felt that Eden´s abilities were very much inferior to those of Harold Macmillan and Oliver Stanley.[23] Also, Secretary of State Dean Acheson regarded him as a quite old-fashioned amateur in politics typical of the British Establishment.[1] Recent biographies however put more emphasis on Eden´s outstanding achievements in foreign policy and perceive him to have held deep convictions regarding world peace and security as well as a strong social conscience.[5] Pragmatism is a philosophic school that originated in the late nineteenth century with Charles Sanders Peirce, who first stated the pragmatic maxim. ... Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896 - December 3, 1980) was a British politician principally known as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Oliver Frederick George Stanley (4 May 1896 – 10 December 1950) was a prominent British Conservative politician who held many ministerial posts before his early death when it was assumed he would soon assume higher office. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Dean Acheson Dean Gooderham Acheson (April 11, 1893 – October 12, 1971) was an American statesman and lawyer; as United States Secretary of State in the late 1940s he played the central role in defining American foreign policy for the Cold War. ...


Eden was, for all his abilities not a very effective public speaker. Too often in his career, for instance in the late thirthies, following his resignation from Chamberlain´s government, his parliamentary performances disappointed many of his followers. Churchill once even commented on an Eden speech that the latter had used every cliché except "God is love" [7]. His inability to express himself clearly is often attributed to shyness and lack of self-confidence. Eden is known to have been much more direct in meeting with his secretaries and advisors than in Cabinet meetings and public speeches, sometimes tending to become enraged and behaving "like a child" [24] only to regain his temper within a few minutes [1]. It has been suggested that After dinner speaker be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... This article is becoming very long. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the governmental body. ...


Eden in popular culture

As Secretary of State for War in 1940, Eden authorised the setting-up of the Local Defence Volunteers (soon renamed the Home Guard). In the film of the TV sitcom Dad's Army, the (fictional) Walmington-on-Sea platoon is formed in response to Eden's radio broadcast. The debonair Sergeant Wilson is often said to resemble Eden, something he takes enormous pride in. A Home Guard is a part-time civilian reserve military force similar to a militia. ... Dad’s Army was a British sitcom about the Home Guard in the Second World War. ... Sergeant The Honourable Arthur Wilson is a fictional Home Guard platoon sergeant and bank clerk portrayed by John Le Mesurier on the BBC television situation comedy Dads Army. ...


Eden appears as a character in James P. Hogan's science-fiction novel The Proteus Operation. At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 James Patrick Hogan (born June 27, 1941, London) is a science fiction author. ... The Proteus Operation is a science fiction novel which was written by James P. Hogan and published in 1985. ...


Eden appears as a character in the 2008 play Never So Good – portrayed as a hysterical, pill-addicted wreck. He is shown being overwhelmed by the chaos of the Suez Crisis and eventually forced out of office by his Conservative Party colleagues, at the urging of the American government. Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Eden is mentioned in the 1993 film The Remains of the Day when Anthony Hopkins´s character mentions that Eden has also been a guest at Darlington Hall. This article is about the novel. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ...


Eden is also mentioned in a song by The Kinks, "She's Bought a Hat Like Princess Marina" from the 1969 album Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire). The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... </gallery> </gallery> </gallery> </gallery> </gallery> </gallery> </gallery> </gallery>neygoround, Part One]] (1970) Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire) is a concept album by English rock band The Kinks, released in late 1969. ...


The Eden Government

Changes
The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... David Patrick Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of Kilmuir (1900-1967) was an important British politician and jurist. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The Right Honourable Robert Arthur James Gascoyne-Cecil, 5th Marquess of Salisbury, KG (August 27, 1893–February 23, 1972) was a grandson of the great 3rd Marquess. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... Henry Frederick Comfort Crookshank, 1st Viscount Crookshank (1893-1961), known as Harry Crookshank was a British Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Gwilym Lloyd George, 1st Viscount Tenby, (4 December 1894 - 1967) was a British politician and cabinet minister. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Alan Tindal Lennox-Boyd, 1st Viscount Boyd of Merton CH PC (November 18, 1904–March 8, 1983), was a Conservative Party British politician. ... The Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations was a British Cabinet office existing between 1947 and 1966, responsible for dealing with British relationship with members of the Commonwealth of Nations (its former colonies). ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home, Baron Home of the Hirsel,[1] KT, PC (2 July 1903 - 9 October 1995) 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... George Edward Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft (1909-1994) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Frederick James Marquis, 1st Earl of Woolton (1883-1964) was a British businessman and politician. ... David McAdam Eccles, 1st Viscount Eccles PC KCVO (September 18, 1904–February 24, 1999) was a British peer. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... James Gray Stuart, 1st Viscount Stuart of Findhorn CH MVO MC PC (9 February 1897 - 20 February 1971) was a Scottish Tory politician. ... The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was a UK cabinet position, responsible for the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. ... The Right Honourable Derick Heathcoat Amory, 1st Viscount Amory (26 December 1899–20 January 1981) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for Employment was a UK cabinet position. ... Walter Turner Monckton, 1st Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, GCVO, KCMG, MC, PC (1891-1965) was a British politician. ... A defence minister (Commonwealth English) or defense minister (American English) is a cabinet portfolio (position) which regulates the armed forces in a sovereign nation. ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... Duncan Edwin Sandys, Baron Duncan-Sandys, CH PC [1] (24 January 1908 – 26 November 1987) was a British politician and a minister in successive Conservative governments. ... The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions is a position in the UK cabinet, responsible for the Department for Work and Pensions. ... Osbert Peake, 1st Viscount Ingleby PC (30 December 1897 – 11 October 1966) was a British Conservative politician. ...

  • December 1955 - Rab Butler succeeds Harry Crookshank as Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Commons. Harold Macmillan succeeds Butler as Chancellor of the Exchequer. Selwyn Lloyd succeeds Macmillan as Foreign Secretary. Sir Walter Monckton succeeds Lloyd as Minister of Defence. Iain Macleod succeeds Monckton as Minister of Labour and National Service. Lord Selkirk succeeds Lord Woolton as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. The Minister of Public Works, Patrick Buchan-Hepburn, enters the Cabinet. The Minister of Pensions and National Insurance leaves the Cabinet upon Peake's retirement.
  • October 1956: Sir Walter Monckton becomes Paymaster-General. Antony Henry Head succeeds Monckton as Minister of Defence.

Eden's initial cabinet is remarkable for the fact that 10 out of the original 18 members were Old Etonians: Eden, Salisbury, Crookshank, Macmillan, Home, Stuart, Thorneycroft, Heathcoat Amory, Sandys and Peake were all educated at Eton. Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... Iain Norman Macleod, PC (11 November 1913 – 20 July 1970) was a British Conservative Party politician and government minister. ... George Nigel Douglas-Hamilton, 10th Earl of Selkirk, (4 January 1906 - 24 November 1994) KT GCMG GBE AFC AE PC QC (Scot. ... Patrick George Thomas Buchan-Hepburn, Baron Hailes (April 2, 1901-November 5, 1974) was the first and only Governor-General of the short-lived West Indies Federation, from January 3, 1958, to May 31, 1962, when the country was disbanded. ... Paymaster-General is a ministerial position in UK. Former holders of this post include: Lord John Russell 1830-1834 Sir Edmund Knatchbull 1834-1835 Sir Henry Brook Parnell 1835-1841 Edward John Stanley 1841 Sir Edmund Knatchbull 1841-1845 William Bingham Baring 1845-1846 Thomas Babington Macaulay 1846-1848 The... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Grey-Eden connection

 Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey = Elizabeth Grey | ------------------------------------------ | | Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey William Grey Prime Minister = Maria Shireff | Georgina Plowden = Sir William Grey | Sir William Eden = Sybil Grey | Anthony Eden Prime Minister 

Sir Charles Grey, 1st Earl Grey, K.B. (23 October 1729–14 November 1807) was one of the most important British generals of the 18th century. ... The Right Honourable Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764–17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j David Dutton: Anthony Eden. A Life and Reputation London, Arnold, 1997
  2. ^ Churchill had been a major founder of the War Criminal Trials policy, by drafting the Statement on Atrocities of the Moscow Declaration, signed on October 30, 1943 which, under the emergence of the Cold War, he most notably started to undermine since 1947, when he successfully urged the Attlee government to obtain the commuting in a life sentence the death penalty inflicted upon Albert Kesselring by a British Military Court.
  3. ^ Rating British Prime Ministers 29 November 2004
  4. ^ Churchill 'greatest PM of 20th Century' 4 January 2000
  5. ^ a b Robert Rhodes James (1986) Anthony Eden; D.R. Thorpe (2003) Eden
  6. ^ Oxford DNB theme: Glamour boys
  7. ^ a b http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,891429,00.html
  8. ^ Birmingham University Archives, hereafter, 'BUA',FO 800/846, fo. 2, Churchill to Eden, 29 Nov. 1951; fo. 12, Churchill to Eden 8 June 1952, cited in Donald Bloxham, Genocide on Trial - War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory, Oxford University Press, 2003, p. 168 ISBN 0-19-925904-6.
  9. ^ Donald Bloxham, Genocide on Trial - War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory, Oxford University Press, 2003, p. 169 ISBN 0-19-925904-6, based on LHCMA, Liddell Hart 11/1952/8, Liddell Hart's notes on London visit 1-3 July 1952.
  10. ^ PRO, FO, 371/104159, CW 1663/17, Roberts to Strang, 30 Apr. 1953, as cited in Donald Bloxham, Genocide on Trial - War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory, Oxford University Press, 2003, p. 169 ISBN 0-19-925904-6.
  11. ^ (German) Kerstin von Lingen, Kesselrings letzte Schlacht. Kriegsverbrecherprozesse, Vergangenheitspolitik und Wiederbewaffnung: der Fall Kesselring, Ferdinand Schöningh Verlag, Paderborn 2004, ISBN 3-506-71749-9.
  12. ^ Adenauer, Memoirs, p. 447.
  13. ^ Donald Bloxham, Genocide on Trial - War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory, Oxford University Press, 2003, p. 170 ISBN 0-19-925904-6.
  14. ^ Robert Rhodes James (1986) Anthony Eden
  15. ^ Letter, Daily Telegraph, 7 August 1990
  16. ^ Anthony Nutting (1967) No End of a Lesson
  17. ^ D. R. Thorpe (2003) Eden
  18. ^ When Britain and France nearly married 15 January 2007
  19. ^ See David Faber (2005) Speaking for England
  20. ^ See, for example, Julian Jackson (2003) The Fall of France
  21. ^ a b "Postscript to Suez", recording conversation of 9 April 1957: John Colville (1985) The Fringes of Power, Volume Two
  22. ^ We would have done the same under Nazi occupation Tuesday April 25, 2006
  23. ^ Sir Oswald Mosley. My Life London, 1968
  24. ^ Evelyn Shuckburgh: Descent to Suez. Diaries 1951-1956. London, 1986
Books
  • Eden, Anthony. The Memoirs of the Rt. Hon. Sir Anthony Eden KG, PC, MC: Full Circle. (3 volumes) London: Cassell, 1960, 1962, 1965.
Biographies
  • Film: Marcel Ophüls. Le chagrin et la pitié, 1971.
  • Thorpe, D.R. Eden: The Life and Times of Anthony Eden, First Earl of Avon, 1897–1977. London: Chatto and Windus, 2003 (hardcover, ISBN 0-7011-6744-0); London: Pimlico, 2004 (paperback, ISBN 0-7126-6505-6).
    • Reviewed by Peter Jay in The Guardian, March 22, 2003.

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The Moscow Declaration declared that the annexation (Anschluss) of Austria by Germany was illegal. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ==Biography== Albrecht von Kesselring (August 8, 1881 - July 16, 1960) was a Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. One of the most respected and skillful generals of Nazi Germany, he was nicknamed Smiling Albert or Smiling Kesselring. At least one source claims that Kesselring was born on August 8, 1881 [2... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sorrow and the Pity is a two part documentary by Marcel Ophüls that concerns the French resistance and collaboration with the Vichy government and the Nazis during World War II. This 1969 film used interviews of a German officer, collaborators, and resistance fighters from Clermont-Ferrand. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Anthony Eden
  • More about Anthony Eden on the Downing Street website.
  • University of Birmingham Special Collections The Avon Papers including papers on the Suez Crisis
  • http://www.discoverychannel.com.au/altered_statesmen/anthony_eden/index.shtml
  • http://discoverychannelasia.com/altered_statesmen/eden/index.shtml
  • "Prime Ministers in the Post-War world: Anthony Eden", lecture by Dr David Carlton, given at Gresham College, 10 May 2007 (available for download as video or audio files)
Political offices
Preceded by
Hugh Dalton
Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
1931 – 1934
Succeeded by
The Earl Stanhope
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Lord Privy Seal
1934 – 1935
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for League of Nations Affairs

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Foreign Secretary
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1940
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Vacant
Title next held by
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Foreign Secretary
1951 – 1955
Succeeded by
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Preceded by
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Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
7 April 1955 – 9 January 1957
Parliament of the United Kingdom
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Member of Parliament for Warwick and Leamington
1923 – 1957
Succeeded by
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Party political offices
Preceded by
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Leader of the British Conservative Party
1955 – 1957
Succeeded by
Harold Macmillan
Academic offices
Preceded by
The Viscount Cecil of Chelwood
Chancellor of the University of Birmingham
1945 – 1973
Succeeded by
Peter Scott
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Earl of Avon
1961 – 1977
Succeeded by
Nicholas Eden
Persondata
NAME Eden, Anthony
ALTERNATIVE NAMES 1st Earl of Avon
SHORT DESCRIPTION British politician & Conservative prime minister
DATE OF BIRTH June 12, 1897(1897-06-12)
PLACE OF BIRTH West Auckland, County Durham, England
DATE OF DEATH January 14, 1977
PLACE OF DEATH Alvediston, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Leaders of the UK Conservative Party since 1834. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Italic text His Grace Field Marshal the Most Noble Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Arms of Edward Smith-Stanley Statue in Parliament Square, London Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, KG, PC (29 March 1799–23 October 1869) was a British statesman, three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and is to date the longest serving leader of the Conservative... The Rt Hon. ... Hugh McCalmont Cairns, 1st Earl Cairns (27 December 1810 - 2 April 1885) was a British statesman (of Irish birth) who served as Lord Chancellor of Great Britain during the first two ministries of Benjamin Disraeli. ... His Grace The Duke of Richmond and Lennox Charles Henry Gordon_Lennox, 6th Duke of Richmond, 6th Duke of Lennox and 1st Duke of Gordon (February 27, 1818 - September 27, 1903) was a British politician. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... Sir Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC (3 February 1830 – 22 August 1903), known as Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and as Viscount Cranborne from 1865 until 1868, was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister, serving for a total of over 13 years. ... Spencer Compton Cavendish, 8th Duke of Devonshire (23 July 1833 - 24 March 1908) was a British Liberal statesman, previously known (1858-1891) as Marquess of Hartington (a courtesy title). ... The Most Honourable Henry Charles Keith Petty-FitzMaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne, KG, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE (14 January 1845 – 3 June 1927) was a British politician and Irish peer who served successively as Governor General of Canada, Viceroy of India, Secretary of State for War, and Secretary of State for... The Marquess Curzon of Kedleston George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, KG, GCSI, GCIE, PC (11 January 1859 – 20 March 1925) was a British Conservative statesman who served as Viceroy of India and Foreign Secretary. ... The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... For other people named Robert Peel, see Robert Peel (disambiguation). ... Lord William George Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck (27 February 1802–21 September 1848), better known as simply Lord George Bentinck, was an English Conservative politician and racehorse owner, best known (with Benjamin Disraeli) for his role in unseating Sir Robert Peel over the Corn Laws. ... The Most Noble Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland (1815–1888), known before 1857 as the Marquess of Granby, was an English Conservative politician. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... The Most Noble Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland (1815–1888), known before 1857 as the Marquess of Granby, was an English Conservative politician. ... John Charles Herries (1778 - 1855) was an English politician and financier and a frequent member of Tory and Conservative cabinets in the early to mid 19th century. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Rt Hon. ... Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (13 February 1849 – 24 January 1895) was a British statesman. ... The Rt Hon. ... For the steel manufacturer, see Arthur Balfour, 1st Baron Riverdale. ... Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923) was a British Conservative Party statesman and Prime Minister. ... Sir Joseph Austen Chamberlain, KG (October 16, 1863 – March 17, 1937) was a British statesman, politician, and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. ... Leaders of the UK Conservative Party since 1834. ... Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923) was a British Conservative Party statesman and Prime Minister. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British Prime Minister. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home, Baron Home of the Hirsel,[1] KT, PC (2 July 1903 - 9 October 1995) 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Hague (born 26 March 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and current Conservative Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... Rt. ... The Rt Hon. ... For the Canadian ice hockey player, see Dave Cameron. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... West Auckland is a village in County Durham, in North East England. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Alvediston is a village and civil parish in the Salisbury district of Wiltshire, England, with a population of 91 (2001 census). ... For other uses, see Salisbury (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Wilshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Discovery Channel - Altered Statesmen (704 words)
But Eden’s use of amphetamines was potentially more worrying as he was a man whose childhood, as the son of a volatile, temperamental father, had left him psychologically fragile and short-tempered.
But what Eden didn’t know was that, over time, amphetamine users acquire tolerance and tend to up their doses, thereby exposing them to irritability, mood swings, perceptual changes and paranoia.
Eden wanted to reverse the nationalisation, but he also displayed a paranoid personal animosity to Colonel Nasser that showed all the hallmarks of man in the grip of amphetamines.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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