FACTOID # 15: A mere 0.8% of West Virginians were born in a foreign country.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury

Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury ( July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. Events 1499 - Battle of Dornach - The Swiss decisively defeat the Imperial army of Emperor Maximilian I. 1587 - Colony of Roanoke: A second group of English settlers arrive on Roanoke... July 22, Events February 9 - Gregory XV is elected pope. February 17 - Miles Standish is appointed as first commander of Plymouth Colony March 22 - The Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony sign a peace treaty with Massasoit of the Wampanoags. March 16 - Samoset, a Mohegan, visits the settlers of Plymouth Colony and greets them... 1621 January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 344 days remaining (345 in leap years). Events 1189 - Philip II of France and Richard I of England begin to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade. 1276 - Innocent V becomes Pope. 1525 - The Swiss... January 21, Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. June 12 - The Rye House Plot to assassinate Charles II of England is discovered September 7 - Polish-German troops arrive in Vienna to help the besieged November 1 - The British crown colony of New York is... 1683) was a prominent English politician of the The Commonwealth was the republican government which ruled first England and then the whole of Britain, Ireland, the colonies and other Crown possessions during the periods from 1649 (the monarch Charles I being beheaded on January 30 and An Act declaring England to be a Commonwealth being passed by the... Interregnum and during the reign of King Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. Charles IIs father, Charles I, had been executed in... Charles II.


Cooper, born in Dorset (pronounced Dorsit, sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the southwest of England, on the English Channel coast. The county town is Dorchester, centred in the south of the county at 50° 43′ 00″ N 02° 26′... Dorset County, suffered the death of both his parents at a young age and was raised by relatives and family friends, while being subjected to financial mulcting through the neo-feudal Court of Wards. He inherited A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt) is the holder of a species of knighthood known as a baronetcy. The title was introduced by James I of England in 1611 to raise funds. It is an hereditary honour, but it does not amount to a peerage. Baronets use the... baronetcies from both his father and his maternal grandfather, Anthony Ashley. Educated largely by Puritan tutors, he attended Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. History The college was founded in 1314. It is still located at its original site. Exeter College was founded by Walter de Stapeldon from Devon. He was the bishop of Exeter and later... Exeter College at The University of Oxford, situated in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. Oxford University and Cambridge University are sometimes referred to collectively as Oxbridge. The two universities have a long history of competition with each other, as they are the two... Oxford. While there he fomented a minor riot and left without taking a degree; nevertheless, he was admitted into Lincolns Inn is one of four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. The others are Middle Temple, Inner Temple and Grays Inn. It is situated in Holborn, in the London Borough of Camden... Lincoln's Inn.


Sir Anthony was elected to the The Short Parliament (April-May, 1640) of King Charles I is so called because it lasted only three weeks. Charles recalled Parliament in 1640, after eleven years of attempting to rule without one. He was forced to call the Short Parliament primarily to obtain money to finance his military struggle... Short Parliament for the borough of Tewkesbury is a historic town in Gloucestershire, England. It stands at the confluence of the River Severn and the River Avon, and also the minor tributary the Swilgate. It gives its name to the district of Tewkesbury. The town features many notable Tudor buildings, and was the site of the... Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire (pronounced glostersher or sometimes glostersheer) is a ceremonial and administrative county in southwest England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire of the Forest of Dean. The county town is Gloucester, and other principle towns... Gloucestershire, where his family owned land. He was elected to the The Long Parliament is the name of the English Parliament called by Charles I, in 1640, following the Bishops Wars. It receives its name from the fact that it sat almost continuously during the English Civil War until 1660. The sole reason Charles reassembled Parliament was to ask it to... Long Parliament for Poole is a coastal town, port and tourist destination in the traditional county of Dorset in southern England. The town has a population of 138,299 (2001). The town is situated beside a large natural harbour, on the shores of the English Channel. The town is part of a conurbation... Poole in his native Dorset. But Denzil Holles, 1st Baron Holles (October 31, 1599 - February 17, 1680) was an English statesman and writer, best known as one of the five members of parliament whom King Charles I of England attempted to arrest in 1642. Early life Holles was the second son of John Holles, 1st Earl... Denzil Holles, soon to rise to prominence as a leader of the opposition to the king and a personal rival of Sir Anthony's, blocked his admission to the parliament. It was probably feared that Sir Anthony, as a result of his recent marriage to the daughter of Charles I ( 19 November 1600– 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 27 March 1625, until his death. He famously engaged in a struggle for power with Parliament; he was an advocate of the divine right of kings, however some in Parliament feared that he... Charles I's The Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and later of Great Britain was formerly an officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of the Great Seal of England. This evolved into one of the Great Offices of State. The seal, adopted by Edward the Confessor was... Lord Keeper Thomas Coventry, 1st Baron Coventry (1578 - January 14, 1640), was a prominent English lawyer, politician, judge during the early 17th century. Education & Early Legal Career He entered Balliol College, Oxford, in 1592, and the Inner Temple in 1594, becoming bencher of the society in 1614, reader in 1616, and... Coventry, would be too sympathetic to the king.


When the The English Civil War (or Wars) refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651, specifically to the first (1642–1645) and second (1648–1649) civil wars between the supporters of Charles I of England and... Civil War began, Sir Anthony supported the king (somewhat echoing Holles's concerns), but changed sides soon afterward, citing the king's policies as being "destructive to religion and State." He eventually joined Oliver Cromwell Oliver Cromwell ( April 25, 1599 – September 3, 1658) was an English military leader and politician. After leading the overthrow of the British monarchy, he ruled England, Scotland, and Ireland as Lord Protector from December 16, 1653 until his death, which is believed to have been due either... Cromwell's The Council of State is the name of an organ of government in many states, and especially in republics. The name Council of State is applied to different types of bodies in different states, from the formal name for the cabinet to a non-executive advisory body surrounding a head... Council of State, but resigned in Events New Sweden (Delaware) attacked and captured by Dutch forces. March 25 - Saturns largest moon, Titan, is discovered by Christian Huygens. April 7 - Fabio Chigi becomes Pope Alexander VII April - Admiral Robert Blake severely damages the arsenal of the Bey of Tunis. Emperor Go-Sai ascends to the throne... 1655, protesting against Cromwell's dictatorial politics. Four years later, George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle by Sir Peter Lely, painted 1665–1666. George Monk or Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle (6 December 1608 – 3 January 1670), second son of Sir Thomas Monk, a gentleman of good family but in embarrassed circumstances, was born at Potheridge, near Torrington... George Monck, a prominent royalist military officer, recruited Cooper in the The English Restoration or simply Restoration was an episode in the history of Great Britain beginning in 1660 when the monarchy was restored under King Charles II after the English Civil War. Theatres reopened after having been closed during the protectorship of Oliver Cromwell, Puritanism lost its momentum, and the... Restoration of Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. Charles IIs father, Charles I, had been executed in... Charles II.


In October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. October begins (astrologically) with the sun in the sign of Libra and ends in the sign of Scorpio. Astronomically speaking, the sun begins in the constellation... October Events January 1 - colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration February 2 – George Monck and his regiment arrive in London February 23 - Charles XI becomes king of Sweden. February 27... 1660, shortly after the Restoration's success, Sir Anthony was on the commission that controversially tried the The broad definition of Regicide is the deliberate killing of a king. But it is usualy used to refer to the judicial execution of a king after due process of law. The word can be used as both a verb and a noun. The Regicide of Mary Queen of Scots... Regicides (those who had participated in the trial and execution of Charles I). The commission eventually found ten surviving members guilty, and another four were posthumously convicted (their bodies were exhumed and hung publicly). One year later, he was created Baron Ashley and appointed The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. The third oldest major... Chancellor of the Exchequer.


In that position, Lord Ashley served on the The Clarendon Ministry was forged out of the royalist camp of Charles II, who was returned to the throne (the English Restoration) in 1660. Two years previously, Lord Clarendon had been appointed Lord Chancellor, and now he was accompanied by several powerful statesmen, including the heir presumptive of the English... Clarendon Ministry as one of its less prominent members; he frequently quarreled with the head of government, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (February 18, 1609 - December 9, 1674), English historian and statesman. Hyde was the third son of Henry Hyde of Dinton, Wiltshire, a member of a family for some time established at Norbury, Cheshire. He entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford, in 1622 (having been rejected by... Lord Clarendon, especially upon matters of religious toleration (which Ashley supported but Clarendon opposed). In 1663, Ashley was one of eight Lords Proprietors given title to a huge tract of land in World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is the third largest continent in area and in population after Eurasia and Africa. It is bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the... North America, which eventually became the The Carolina Colony grants of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina was a North American English colony that existed from 1663 to 1729, when it was divided into the Provinces of North and South Carolina. See British colonization of the Americas. On March 24, 1663, Charles II of England... Province of Carolina.


After the fall of Lord Clarendon in Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. April 27 - The blind, impoverished John Milton sells the copyright of Paradise Lost for £10... 1667, Lord Ashley became a prominent member of the Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. Start the CABAL article If you have created this page in the past few minutes and it has not yet appeared, it may not be visible due to a delay in updating the database. Please wait and check again... Cabal, in which he formed the second "A". Ashley became The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. He is a Great Officer of State, and is appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of... Lord Chancellor in Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. March 15 - Charles II of England issues the Royal Declaration of Indulgence. June 28 - William III of Orange appointed Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland and Utrecht. Births... 1672, and was created Earl of Shaftesbury and Baron Cooper of Pawlett. He was also appointed The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. It is the secondary title of the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry. The idea of a Board of Trade was first translated into action by Oliver Cromwell in 1655 when... First Lord of Trade. He would serve as Chancellor for one year, but would remain First Lord of Trade until Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Year in topic 1676 in literature 1676 in music 1676 in science Births May 8 - Frederick I of Sweden August 26 - Robert Walpole, first Prime Minister of... 1676.


Due to his intriguing with the James Crofts, later Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, 1st Duke of Buccleuch (April 9, 1649–July 15, 1685) recognised by some as James II of England and James VII of Scotland, was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the son of Charles II and his mistress, Lucy Walter, who... Duke of Monmouth against the succession of the Catholic James VII and II King of England, Scotland and Ireland James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 6 February 1685. He would prove to be the last Catholic monarch to reign over England, Scotland... Duke of York, Shaftesbury fell from favor, and became a leader of the radical This article is about the British Whig party. For other uses of the word Whig, see the disambiguation page. For a long time in British politics, the two main parties were the Tories (the Conservative Party) and the Whigs. The term Whig originates from the Exclusion Bill crisis of 1678... Whigs. In Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. October 12 - A London woman is publicly flogged for the crime of involving herself in politics. August 31 - Titus Oates is told to leave his state apartments in... 1681, Shaftesbury was charged with high treason, but the charges were later dismissed. Nonetheless, he fled to This article is about the region in the Netherlands. For other uses, see Holland (disambiguation). Holland is the name of a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands. Holland is a former county of the Holy Roman Empire and later the leading member of the Republic of the... Holland, where he died two years later.


References


Preceded by:
Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (February 18, 1609 - December 9, 1674), English historian and statesman. Hyde was the third son of Henry Hyde of Dinton, Wiltshire, a member of a family for some time established at Norbury, Cheshire. He entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford, in 1622 (having been rejected by... Edward Hyde
The Right Honourable Gordon Brown, PC, MP, current Chancellor of the Exchequer The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the ancient title held by the British cabinet minister whose responsibilities are akin to the posts of Minister for Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other jurisdictions. The third oldest major... Chancellor of the Exchequer
1661–1672
Succeeded by:
Sir John Duncombe
Preceded by:
Sir Orlando Bridgeman
(Lord Keeper)
The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. He is a Great Officer of State, and is appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of... Lord Chancellor
1672–1673
Succeeded by:
Heneage Finch, 1st Earl of Nottingham (23 December 1621 - 1682), lord chancellor of England, was descended from an old family, many of whose members had attained to high legal eminence, and was the eldest son of Sir Heneage Finch, recorder of London, by his first wife Frances, daughter of Sir... Sir Heneage Finch
(Lord Keeper)
Preceded by:
The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. It is the secondary title of the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry. The idea of a Board of Trade was first translated into action by Oliver Cromwell in 1655 when... First Lord of Trade
1672–1676
Succeeded by:
Unknown
Preceded by:
The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as Presiding officer of the Privy Council. The Lord Presidents principal responsibility is to preside at meetings of the Privy Council, at which the British monarch formally assents to Orders-in... Lord President of the Council
1679
Succeeded by:
John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor (1606-1685) succeeded his father, Richard Robartes, as Baron Robartes of Truro in May 1634. The barony was purchased under compulsion for £10,000 in 1625. The family had amassed great wealth by trading in tin and wool, and in 1620 began building the... The Earl of Radnor


Preceded by:
New Creation
The title of Earl of Shaftesbury was created in 1672 for Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Baron Ashley, a prominent politician in the Cabal then dominating the policies of King Charles II. Earls of Shaftesbury (1672) Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury (1621-1683) Anthony Ashley Cooper, 2nd Earl of... Earl of Shaftesbury Succeeded by:
Anthony Ashley Cooper

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m